Dr Christopher Oldmeadow

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Oldmeadow is a Senior Statistician at  the Clinical Research Design, Information Technology and Statistical Support (CReDITSS) unit,  located at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI).  Dr Oldmeadow  completed his PhD in late 2009 at the Queensland University of Technology, his thesis was in the application and development of statistical methods in bioinformatics and genetic epidemiology; a particular highlight was the development of Bayesian methods for segmenting and classifying  multiple alignments of DNA sequences. In 2010 Dr Oldmeadow joined the CReDITSS unit  as an HMRI post-doctoral research fellow.  His research interests are in statistical methodologies for Biostatistics, Genetic Epidemiology, and Bioinformatics, with a particular interest in Bayesian statistics, model selection,  missing data and causal modelling. 

Dr Oldmeadow has contributed to the design, analysis and data management of a number of large studies and has provided consultative and collaborative input to clinicians and public health specialists on a wide range of methodological problems.  He has a strong track-record in study design and coordinating the analytic plans of research projects.

Research Expertise
Dr Oldmeadow's specific research interests are in Bayesian statistics, model selection, genomic segmentation, and causal modelling. He has published first author articles in high impact journals such as Molecular Biology and Evolution, Bioinformatics, and Genetic Epidemiology, and has co-authored articles appearing in Science and Nature Genetics.

Teaching Expertise
He has experience coordinating large post-graduate Biostatistics subjects both face-to-face and distance learning (BIOSTATISTICS B and INTERMEDIATE BIOSTATISTICS). 

Qualifications

  • PhD, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Mathematics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Bioinformatics
  • Biostatistics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
060102 Bioinformatics 15
010402 Biostatistics 85
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Woods C, James E, Baxter SM, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, 'Celebrity? Doctor? Celebrity Doctor? Which Spokesperson is Most Effective for Cancer Prevention?', Teaching Medicine and Medical Ethics Using Popular Culture, Palgrave Macmillan, Cham 71-98 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-65451-5_5
Co-authors Erica James, Stacey Baxter
2017 Maguire JM, Holliday EG, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Henderson MPA, Pare G, 'Genetic Association Studies and Next Generation Sequencing in Stroke: Methods', Stroke Genetics, Springer International Publishing, London (2017)
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia
2015 Riveros C, Vimieiro R, Holliday EG, Oldmeadow C, Wang JJ, Mitchell P, et al., 'Identification of genome-wide SNP-SNP and SNP-clinical Boolean interactions in Age-related Macular Degeneration', Epistasis: Methods and Protocols, Springer, New York 217-255 (2015) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4939-2155-3_12
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Carlos Riveros, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato, Liz Holliday, John Attia
2013 Holliday EG, Oldmeadow CJ, Maguire JM, Attia JR, 'Candidate gene association studies in stroke', Stroke Genetics, Springer Verlag, London 9-23 (2013) [B1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (188 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Gould GS, Bovill M, Pollock L, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Atkins L, et al., 'Feasibility and acceptability of Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy multicomponent implementation intervention and study design for Australian Indigenous pregnant women: A pilot cluster randomised step-wedge trial.', Addictive behaviors, 90 176-190 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.036
Co-authors Gillian Gould, Maree Gruppetta, Billie Bonevski, Michelle Bovill
2018 Evangelou E, Warren HR, Mosen-Ansorena D, Mifsud B, Pazoki R, Gao H, et al., 'Publisher Correction: Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.', Nat Genet, 50 1755 (2018)
DOI 10.1038/s41588-018-0297-3
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, John Attia
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Bourne J, Callister R, Dunn A, et al., 'Frequent, short bouts of light-intensity exercises while standing decreases systolic blood pressure: Breaking Up Sitting Time after Stroke (BUST-Stroke) trial.', Int J Stroke, 13 932-940 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1747493018798535
Co-authors Linkooi Ong, Coralie English, Robin Callister, Neil Spratt, Rohan Walker, Amanda Patterson
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Callister R, Dunn A, Mackie P, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke (BUST-stroke).', Int J Stroke, 13 921-931 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1747493018801222
Co-authors Coralie English, Rohan Walker, Neil Spratt, Robin Callister, Linkooi Ong, Amanda Patterson
2018 McCarter KL, Baker A, Britton B, Beck A, Carter G, Bauer J, et al., 'Effectiveness of clinical practice change strategies in improving dietitian care for head and neck cancer patients according to evidence based clinical guidelines: A stepped wedge randomised controlled trial.', Translational Behavioral Medicine, 8 166-174 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibx016
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Kristen Mccarter, Liz Holliday, Sean Halpin
2018 Barnett AG, Oldmeadow C, Attia JR, 'Survival studies: Competing risks, immortality and censoring', Medical Journal of Australia, 208 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja17.00171
Co-authors John Attia
2018 Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Twyman L, Atkins L, Palazzi K, et al., 'Clinician factors associated with prescribing nicotine replacement therapy in pregnancy: A cross-sectional survey of Australian obstetricians and general practitioners', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 58 366-370 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists The use of nicotine replacement therapy in pregnancy has been debated but evidence suggests... [more]

© 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists The use of nicotine replacement therapy in pregnancy has been debated but evidence suggests that it is safer than smoking. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with: (i) general practitioners and obstetricians from a college database; and (ii) general practitioners with a special interest in Indigenous health. General practitioners had higher odds of prescribing compared to obstetricians. Reading guidelines, confidence, viewing nicotine replacement therapy as safe, effective and with good adherence, also significantly increased the odds of prescription. Clear guidance regarding safety and efficacy, with practical clinical protocols, are required in order to reduce variation in prescribing rates across these clinicians.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12751
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Maree Gruppetta, Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2018 Thibault P, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, 'A prolonged antibiotic protocol to treat persistent Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection improves the extracranial venous circulation in multiple sclerosis', Phlebology, 33 397-406 (2018) [C1]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Objective: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a condition associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). One mechanism that has been pro... [more]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Objective: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a condition associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). One mechanism that has been proposed is that the venous obstructions found in MS are due to a chronic persistent venulitis caused by the intra-cellular bacterial parasite, Chlamydophila pneumoniae (Cpn). The objective of the current study is to determine the effect of a combined antibiotic protocol (CAP) on the venous flow in MS patients as measured by a quantitative duplex ultrasound examination (QDUS). Method: A non-randomised before-after cohort study was conducted to investigate differences in blood flow volumes pre and 6-months post antibiotic treatment for Cpn infection. Flow volume data were measured by QDUS across affected and unaffected sides from multiple veins segments, including internal jugular vein (IJV) segments J2 and J3, and vertebral vein (VV), as well as global arterial blood flow (GABF). Results: 91 patients were included in the study. 64 (70%) were found to have positive Cpn serology. There was a statistically significant post-treatment difference seen for the affected side of Cpn infected patients (mean difference = 56 mL/min, p = 0.02). There was a non-significant increase seen for the affected side of uninfected patients (mean difference = 23 mL/min, p = 0.2). The difference in these effects (34 mL/min) was not statistically significant (p = 0.3). The mean flow rate decreased in the unaffected side for both infected (-27 mL/min, p = 0.5) and uninfected patients (-69 mL/min, p = 0.01). There was a statistically significant post-treatment increase in GABF for the infected patients (mean difference = 90 mL/min, p = 0.02) and a difference of 76 mL/min for non-infected patients (p = 0.01). Conclusion: A CAP appears to improve the extra-cranial circulation in patients diagnosed with MS. This effect is statistically significant in patients with positive Cpn serology, although patients with negative Cpn serology also show some benefit, betraying a lack of specificity of this effect.

DOI 10.1177/0268355517712884
Co-authors John Attia
2018 Lee JJ, Wedow R, Okbay A, Kong E, Maghzian O, Zacher M, et al., 'Gene discovery and polygenic prediction from a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in 1.1 million individuals', Nature Genetics, 50 1112-1121 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, The Author(s). Here we conducted a large-scale genetic association analysis of educational attainment in a sample of approximately 1.1 million individuals and identify 1,2... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s). Here we conducted a large-scale genetic association analysis of educational attainment in a sample of approximately 1.1 million individuals and identify 1,271 independent genome-wide-significant SNPs. For the SNPs taken together, we found evidence of heterogeneous effects across environments. The SNPs implicate genes involved in brain-development processes and neuron-to-neuron communication. In a separate analysis of the X chromosome, we identify 10 independent genome-wide-significant SNPs and estimate a SNP heritability of around 0.3% in both men and women, consistent with partial dosage compensation. A joint (multi-phenotype) analysis of educational attainment and three related cognitive phenotypes generates polygenic scores that explain 11¿13% of the variance in educational attainment and 7¿10% of the variance in cognitive performance. This prediction accuracy substantially increases the utility of polygenic scores as tools in research.

DOI 10.1038/s41588-018-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors Rodney Scott, John Attia, Liz Holliday
2018 Morten M, Collison A, Murphy VE, Barker D, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, et al., 'Managing Asthma in Pregnancy (MAP) trial: FENO levels and childhood asthma.', J Allergy Clin Immunol, (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2018.02.039
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, John Attia, Daniel Barker, Vanessa Murphy, Adam Collison, Peter Gibson
2018 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'What factors are associated with abstinence amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers? A cross-sectional survey of use of cessation aids and quitting approach', Drug and Alcohol Review, 37 170-179 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to compare current and ex-smokers' sociodemographic and psychosoci... [more]

© 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: This study aimed to compare current and ex-smokers' sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics, use of cessation aids and abrupt versus gradual quitting approaches. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of financially disadvantaged adults attending a community service organisation was conducted in New South Wales, Australia, between February 2012 and December 2013. Sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, use of cessation aids and gradual versus abrupt quit approach were assessed. ¿2 tests and logistic regression compared characteristics of current and ex-smokers. Results: Of 905 individuals who completed the survey, 639 (71%) were current smokers and 107 (12%) were ex-smokers. Ex-smokers were older [odds ratio (OR)¿=¿1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)¿=¿1.01, 1.05], had higher odds of being female (OR¿=¿1.67, 95% CI¿=¿1.06, 2.65), lower odds of being financially stressed (OR¿=¿0.87, 95% CI¿=¿0.76, 0.99), lower odds of anxiety and depression symptoms (OR¿=¿0.91, 95% CI¿=¿0.84, 0.98) and lower odds of having friends and family who were smokers (ORs ranged from 0.30¿0.43). Ex-smokers had lower odds of using cessation aids and higher odds of reporting abrupt quitting during their last quit attempt (OR¿=¿4.48, 95% CI¿=¿2.66, 7.54). Conclusions: Lower levels of disadvantage, less smoking in social networks, less use of cessation aids and abrupt (vs. gradual) quitting approaches were associated with being an ex-smoker. Lower use of evidence based methods to quit by disadvantaged ex-smokers requires further exploration. [Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, D'este C, Oldmeadow C, Palazzi K. What factors are associated with abstinence amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers? A cross-sectional survey of use of cessation aids and quitting approach. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12561
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste
2018 Yoong SL, Stockings E, Chai LK, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use among youth globally: A systematic review and meta-analysis of country level data', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 303-308 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking s... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking status. Methods: Databases and the grey literature were systematically searched to December 2015. Studies describing the prevalence of ENDS use in the general population aged =20 years in a defined geographical region were included. Where multiple estimates were available within countries, prevalence estimates of ENDS use were pooled for each country separately. Results: Data from 27 publications (36 surveys) from 13 countries were included. The prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 among youth were highest in Poland (62.1%; 95%CI: 59.9-64.2%), and lowest in Italy (5.9%; 95%CI: 3.3-9.2%). Among non-smoking youth, the prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 varied, ranging from 4.2% (95%CI: 3.8-4.6%) in the US to 14.0% in New Zealand (95%CI: 12.7-15.4%). The prevalence of ENDS ever use among current tobacco smoking youth was the highest in Canada (71.9%, 95%CI: 70.9-72.8%) and lowest in Italy (29.9%, 95%CI: 18.5-42.5%). Between 2008 and 2015, ENDS ever use among youth increased in Poland, Korea, New Zealand and the US; decreased in Italy and Canada; and remained stable in the UK. Conclusions: There is considerable heterogeneity in ENDS use among youth globally across countries and also between current smokers and non-smokers. Implications for public health: Population-level survey data on ENDS use is needed to inform public health policy and messaging globally.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12777
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Serene Yoong, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Li K Chai, Chris Paul
2018 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'Prevalence of appropriate colorectal cancer screening and preferences for receiving screening advice among people attending outpatient clinics', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 334-339 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors Objective: To examine among people attending outpatient clinics aged 50¿74 at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC): 1) The proportion who report: a) faecal o... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Objective: To examine among people attending outpatient clinics aged 50¿74 at average risk of colorectal cancer (CRC): 1) The proportion who report: a) faecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past two years; and b) colonoscopy within the past five years, including the reasons for undergoing colonoscopy; 2) characteristics associated with under-screening; 3) For those who are under-screened, the proportion who are: a) willing to receive help and the acceptability of different methods of receiving help, and; b) unwilling to receive help and reasons for this. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 197 participants attending a major regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine correlates of under-screening. Results: A total of 59% reported either FOBT in the past two years or colonoscopy in the past five years. Of those reporting colonoscopy in the past five years, 21% were potentially over-screened. Males were more likely than females to be under-screened. Of those under-screened (41%), fewer than half were willing to receive screening advice. Conclusions and implications for public health: A significant proportion of people attending outpatient clinics are under-screened for CRC, with some people also over-screened. There is a need to explore strategies to overcome both under- and over-screening.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12776
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey, Natalie Dodd
2018 Ho E, Doherty M, Thomas R, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Clapham M, 'Prescription of opioids to post-operative orthopaedic patients at time of discharge from hospital: A prospective observational study', Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 18 253-259 (2018)

© 2018 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. All rights reserved. Excessive opioid prescribing can lead to adverse co... [more]

© 2018 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston. All rights reserved. Excessive opioid prescribing can lead to adverse consequences including stockpiling, misuse, dependency, diversion and mortality. Increased prescriptions to post-operative inpatients as part of their discharge planning may be a significant contributor. Primary aims included comparing the amount of opioids prescribed, consumed, left unused and their relationship with pain and functionality. A total of 132 consecutive patients who underwent elective orthopaedic surgery were prospectively audited. Daily oral morphine equivalent (DME) of opioids prescribed was compared with opioids consumed and amount left unused 7-10 days after discharge. For analysis, patients were split into three groups: total knee replacement (TKR), hand surgery (Hands), and miscellaneous (Misc). The mean dose of opioid prescribed per patient was 108.5 mg DME. TKR consumed 33-35% more opioids than Misc (p=0.0283) and Hands (p=0.0975). Age was a significant independent factor for opioid consumption in the 50th and 75th percentiles of Hands (p=0.05). An average of 36 mg DME per patient was left unused with Hands having the highest median DME (37 mg) unused. In the total cohort, 26% of patients were discharged with more DME than their last 24 h as an inpatient and had at least 50% of their tablets left unused at follow-up. Over-prescription of opioids occurs at discharge which can increase the risk of harm. New intervention is needed to optimise prescribing practises. Changes to prescribing habits and workplace culture are required to minimise unnecessary opioid prescribing but will be challenging to implement. A multi-layered approach of electronic prescribing, opioid stewardship and targeted educational awareness programmes is recommended.

DOI 10.1515/sjpain-2017-0149
Co-authors John Attia
2018 Smith R, Mohapatra L, Hunter M, Evans T-J, Oldmeadow C, Holliday E, et al., 'A case for not adjusting birth weight customized standards for ethnicity: Observations from a unique Australian cohort.', Am J Obstet Gynecol, (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2018.10.094
Co-authors John Attia, Roger Smith, Alexis Hure
2018 Clover K, Lambert SD, Oldmeadow C, Britton B, King MT, Mitchell AJ, Carter G, 'PROMIS depression measures perform similarly to legacy measures relative to a structured diagnostic interview for depression in cancer patients.', Quality of life research : an international journal of quality of life aspects of treatment, care and rehabilitation, 27 1357-1367 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11136-018-1803-x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2018 Jayakody A, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, Bryant J, Evans T, Ella S, et al., 'Unplanned readmission or death after discharge for¿Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with chronic disease in NSW Australia: a retrospective cohort study', BMC health services research, 18 893 (2018)

BACKGROUND: Admitted patients with chronic disease are at high risk of an unplanned hospital readmission, however, little research has examined unplanned readmission among Aborigi... [more]

BACKGROUND: Admitted patients with chronic disease are at high risk of an unplanned hospital readmission, however, little research has examined unplanned readmission among Aboriginal people in Australia. This study aimed to examine whether rates of unplanned 28¿day hospital readmission, or death, significantly differ between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients in New South Wales, Australia, over a nine-year period. METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis of a sample of de-identified linked hospital administrative data was conducted. Eligible patients were: 1) aged =18¿years old, 2) admitted to an acute facility in a NSW public hospital between 30th June 2005 and 1st July 2014, and 3) admitted with either cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes or renal disease. The primary composite outcome was unplanned readmission or death within 28¿days of discharge. Generalized linear models and a test for trend were used to assess rates of unplanned readmission or death over time in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with chronic disease, accounting for sociodemographic variables. RESULTS: The final study cohort included 122,145 separations corresponding to 48,252 patients (Aboriginal¿=¿57.2%, n¿=¿27,601; non-Aboriginal¿=¿42.8%, n¿=¿20,651). 13.9% (n¿=¿16,999) of all separations experienced an unplanned readmission or death within 28¿days of discharge. Death within 28¿days of discharge alone accounted for only a small number of separations (1.4%; n¿=¿1767). Over the nine-year period, Aboriginal separations had a significantly higher relative risk of an unplanned readmission or death (Relative risk¿=¿1.34 (1.29, 1.40); p-value <¿0.0001) compared with non-Aboriginal separations once adjusted for sociodemographic, disease variables and restricted to <¿75¿years of age. A test for trend, including an interaction between year and Aboriginal status, showed there was no statistically significant change in proportions over the nine-year period for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal separations (p-value for trend¿=¿0.176). CONCLUSION: Aboriginal people with chronic disease had a significantly higher risk of unplanned readmission or death 28¿days post discharge from hospital compared with non-Aboriginal people, and there has been no significant change over the nine year period. It is critical that effective interventions to reduce unplanned readmissions for Aboriginal people are identified.

DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3723-4
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, John Attia
2018 Ligthart S, Vaez A, Võsa U, Stathopoulou MG, de Vries PS, Prins BP, et al., 'Genome Analyses of >200,000 Individuals Identify 58 Loci for Chronic Inflammation and Highlight Pathways that Link Inflammation and Complex Disorders', American Journal of Human Genetics, 103 691-706 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 American Society of Human Genetics C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive biomarker of chronic low-grade inflammation and is associated with multiple complex diseases. The... [more]

© 2018 American Society of Human Genetics C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive biomarker of chronic low-grade inflammation and is associated with multiple complex diseases. The genetic determinants of chronic inflammation remain largely unknown, and the causal role of CRP in several clinical outcomes is debated. We performed two genome-wide association studies (GWASs), on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputed data, of circulating amounts of CRP by using data from 88 studies comprising 204,402 European individuals. Additionally, we performed in silico functional analyses and Mendelian randomization analyses with several clinical outcomes. The GWAS meta-analyses of CRP revealed 58 distinct genetic loci (p < 5 × 10-8). After adjustment for body mass index in the regression analysis, the associations at all except three loci remained. The lead variants at the distinct loci explained up to 7.0% of the variance in circulating amounts of CRP. We identified 66 gene sets that were organized in two substantially correlated clusters, one mainly composed of immune pathways and the other characterized by metabolic pathways in the liver. Mendelian randomization analyses revealed a causal protective effect of CRP on schizophrenia and a risk-increasing effect on bipolar disorder. Our findings provide further insights into the biology of inflammation and could lead to interventions for treating inflammation and its clinical consequences.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.09.009
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2018 Sharma BB, Loxton DJ, Murray H, Angeli GL, Oldmeadow C, Chiu S, Smith R, 'A first step to improving maternal mortality in a low-literacy setting; the successful use of singing to improve knowledge regarding antenatal care.', Am J Obstet Gynecol, 219 615.e1-615.e11 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2018.09.038
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Giavanna Angeli, Roger Smith
2018 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Zucca A, Oldmeadow C, 'System-wide and group-specific health service improvements: Cross-sectional survey of outpatient improvement preferences and associations with demographic characteristics', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15020179
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Elizabeth Fradgley, Alison Zucca, Chris Paul
2018 Jackson JK, Patterson AJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Oldmeadow C, McEvoy MA, 'The role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease risk factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis of human evidence.', Nutrition reviews, 76 348-371 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nuy005
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Lesley Wicks, Mark Mcevoy, Jacklyn Jackson Uon
2018 Jamaluddin MFB, Nagendra PB, Nahar P, Oldmeadow C, Tanwar PS, 'Proteomic Analysis Identifies Tenascin-C Expression Is Upregulated in Uterine Fibroids.', Reprod Sci, 1933719118773420 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1933719118773420
Co-authors Pradeep Tanwar, Muhammad Jamaluddin
2018 Hutchesson M, Callister R, Morgan P, Pranata I, Clarke E, Skinner G, et al., 'A Targeted and Tailored eHealth Weight Loss Program for Young Women: The Be Positive Be Healthe Randomized Controlled Trial', Healthcare, 6 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare6020039
Co-authors Erin Clarke Uon, Robin Callister, Lee Ashton, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Megan Whatnall Uon, Melinda Hutchesson, Geoff Skinner, Ilung Pranata
2018 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Have we increased our efforts to identify strategies which encourage colorectal cancer screening in primary care patients? A review of research outputs over time', Preventive Medicine Reports, 11 100-104 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain suboptimal. Primary care practitioners are supported by clinical practice guidelines which recommend they provide r... [more]

© 2018 Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain suboptimal. Primary care practitioners are supported by clinical practice guidelines which recommend they provide routine CRC screening advice. Published research can provide evidence to improve CRC screening in primary care, however this is dependent on the type and quality of evidence being produced. This review aimed to provide a snapshot of trends in the type and design quality of research reporting CRC screening among primary care patients across three time points: 1993¿1995, 2003¿2005 and 2013¿2015. Four databases were searched using MeSH headings and keywords. Publications in peer-reviewed journals which reported primary data on CRC screening uptake among primary care patients were eligible for inclusion. Studies meeting eligibility criteria were coded as observational or intervention. Intervention studies were further coded to indicate whether or not they met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) study design criteria. A total of 102 publications were included. Of these, 65 reported intervention studies and 37 reported observational studies. The proportion of each study type did not change significantly over time. The majority of intervention studies met EPOC design criteria at each time point. The majority of research in this field has focused on testing strategies to increase CRC screening in primary care patients, as compared to research describing rates of CRC screening in this population. Further research is needed to determine which effective interventions are most likely to be adopted into primary care.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.05.015
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Natalie Dodd, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2018 Bonevski B, Twyman L, Paul C, D'Este C, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Smoking cessation intervention delivered by social service organisations for a diverse population of Australian disadvantaged smokers: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 112 38-44 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Objectives: There remains a need to identify effective smoking cessation interventions in severely disadvantaged populations. This trial aimed to examine the effectiveness ... [more]

© 2018 Objectives: There remains a need to identify effective smoking cessation interventions in severely disadvantaged populations. This trial aimed to examine the effectiveness of an intervention (Call it Quits) developed to promote smoking cessation and delivered by community social service case-workers. Methods: Call it Quits was a pragmatic, parallel randomised trial of a case-worker delivered smoking cessation intervention conducted in a non-government community social service organisation in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Adult smokers requiring financial assistance were randomly assigned to the five-session Call it Quits intervention or usual care control group. Of the 618 eligible individuals, 300 were randomised to the intervention group, of whom 187 (62%) consented and 318 were randomised to the control group, of whom 244 (77%) consented, resulting in 431 participants. The primary outcome measure was self-reported continuous abstinence up to 6-month follow-up with biochemical verification. Primary analysis was performed using all the available data from participants under the assumption the data is missing completely at random, followed by sensitivity analyses. Results: No statistically significant differences in the primary outcome were found (1.4% in the control group versus 1.0% in the intervention group, OR = 0.77, p = 0.828). Conclusions: A multi-component smoking cessation intervention delivering motivational interviewing-based counselling and free NRT by a trained case-worker within a community social service setting was not effective at achieving abstinence in a highly disadvantaged sample of smokers but increased attempts to stop and led to a reduction in number of cigarettes smoked daily.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.04.005
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2018 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Clinton-McHarg T, Boyes A, Olver I, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Examining variation across treatment clinics in cancer patients¿ psychological outcomes: results of a cross sectional survey', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 3201-3208 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: The majority of research on psychological outcomes for cancer patients has focussed on the role of individual characteristics, and disease and trea... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: The majority of research on psychological outcomes for cancer patients has focussed on the role of individual characteristics, and disease and treatment factors. There has been very little exploration of the potential contribution of the treatment clinic to these outcomes. This study explored whether there is variation among clinics in cancer patients¿ psychological outcomes. Methods: Cancer outpatients were recruited from 22 medical oncology and haematology clinics in Australia. Participants completed a pen and paper survey including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), as well as sociodemographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results: Of those eligible to participate, 4233 (82%) consented and 2811 (81% of consenters) returned the completed survey. There was no statistically significant variation in HADS depression scores across clinics. Some difference in anxiety scores derived from the HADS questionnaire between clinics (p = 0.03) was found with the percentage of between-clinic variation estimated to be 1.11%. However, once all demographic, disease and treatment predictors were adjusted for there was no statistical differences between clinics (percent of between-clinic variation = 0.53%; p = 0.1415). Conclusions: Psychological outcomes were not found to vary between clinics. Other sources of variation including patient characteristics may over-ride between-clinic variability, if it exists.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4188-z
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Frans Henskens, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2018 Revelas M, Thalamuthu A, Oldmeadow C, Evans TJ, Armstrong NJ, Kwok JB, et al., 'Review and meta-analysis of genetic polymorphisms associated with exceptional human longevity', Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, 175 24-34 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Many factors contribute to exceptional longevity, with genetics playing a significant role. However, to date, genetic studies examining exceptiona... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Many factors contribute to exceptional longevity, with genetics playing a significant role. However, to date, genetic studies examining exceptional longevity have been inconclusive. This comprehensive review seeks to determine the genetic variants associated with exceptional longevity by undertaking meta-analyses. Methods: Meta-analyses of genetic polymorphisms previously associated with exceptional longevity (85+) were undertaken. For each variant, meta-analyses were performed if there were data from at least three independent studies available, including two unpublished additional cohorts. Results: Five polymorphisms, ACE rs4340, APOE e2/3/4, FOXO3A rs2802292, KLOTHO KL-VS and IL6 rs1800795 were significantly associated with exceptional longevity, with the pooled effect sizes (odds ratios) ranging from 0.42 (APOE e4) to 1.45 (FOXO3A males). Conclusion: In general, the observed modest effect sizes of the significant variants suggest many genes of small influence play a role in exceptional longevity, which is consistent with results for other polygenic traits. Our results also suggest that genes related to cardiovascular health may be implicated in exceptional longevity. Future studies should examine the roles of gender and ethnicity and carefully consider study design, including the selection of appropriate controls.

DOI 10.1016/j.mad.2018.06.002
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Schofield, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2018 Zdenkowski N, Butow P, Spillane A, Douglas C, Snook K, Jones M, et al., 'Single-arm longitudinal study to evaluate a decision aid for women offered Neoadjuvant systemic therapy for operable breast cancer', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 16 378-385 (2018) [C1]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) is an increasingly used treatment option for women with large operable... [more]

© JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Background: Neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST) is an increasingly used treatment option for women with large operable or highly proliferative breast cancer. With equivalent survival outcomes between NAST and up-front surgery, the situation-specific preference-sensitive nature of the decision makes it suitable for a decision aid (DA). This study aimed to develop and evaluate a DA for this population. Methods: A DA booklet was developed according to international standards, including information about adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment, outcome probabilities, and a values clarification exercise. Eligible women, considered by investigators as candidates for NAST, were enrolled in a multi-institutional, single-arm, longitudinal study. Patient-reported outcome measure questionnaires were completed pre- and post-DA, between chemotherapy and surgery, and at 12 months. Outcomes were feasibility (percentage of eligible patients accessing the DA); acceptability to patients (percentage who would recommend it to others) and clinicians (percentage who would use the DA in routine practice); and decision-related outcomes. Results: From 77 eligible women, 59 were enrolled, of whom 47 (79.7%; 95% CI, 69.4-89.9) reported having read the DA; 51 completed the first post-DA questionnaire. Of these 51, 41 participants (80.4%; 95% CI, 69.5-91.3) found the DA useful for their decision about NAST. Of 18 responding investigators, 16 (88.9%; 95% CI, 74.4-103.4) indicated they would continue to use the DA in routine practice. Post-DA, decisional conflict decreased significantly (P<.01); anxiety and distress decreased significantly; and 86.3% (95% CI, 73.7-94.3) achieved at least as much decisional control as they desired. Conclusions: This DA was feasible and acceptable to patients and clinicians, and improvement in decision-related outcomes was demonstrated when used in combination with clinical consultations. This DA could safely be implemented into routine practice for women considering NAST for operable breast cancer.

DOI 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7063
Co-authors Charles Douglas, Nick Zdenkowski
2018 Davies G, Lam M, Harris SE, Trampush JW, Luciano M, Hill WD, et al., 'Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-04362-x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2018 Faulkner S, Jobling P, Rowe CW, Rodrigues Oliveira SM, Roselli S, Thorne RF, et al., 'Neurotrophin Receptors TrkA, p75

© 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology Neurotrophin receptors are emerging targets in oncology, but their clinicopathologic significance in thyroid cancer is unclear.... [more]

© 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology Neurotrophin receptors are emerging targets in oncology, but their clinicopathologic significance in thyroid cancer is unclear. In this study, the neurotrophin tyrosine receptor kinase TrkA (also called NTRK1), the common neurotrophin receptor p75NTR, and the proneurotrophin receptor sortilin were analyzed with immunohistochemistry in a cohort of thyroid cancers (n = 128) and compared with adenomas and normal thyroid tissues (n = 62). TrkA was detected in 20% of thyroid cancers, compared with none of the benign samples (P = 0.0007). TrkA expression was independent of histologic subtypes but associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0148), suggesting the involvement of TrkA in tumor invasiveness. Nerves in the tumor microenvironment were positive for TrkA. p75NTR was overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancers compared with papillary and follicular subtypes (P < 0.0001). Sortilin was overexpressed in thyroid cancers compared with benign thyroid tissues (P < 0.0001). Neurotrophin receptor expression was confirmed in a panel of thyroid cancer cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. Functional investigations using the anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line CAL-62 found that siRNA against TrkA, p75NTR, and sortilin decreased cell survival and cell migration through decreased SRC and ERK activation. Together, these data reveal TrkA, p75NTR, and sortilin as potential therapeutic targets in thyroid cancer.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajpath.2017.09.008
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Xu Zhang, Hubert Hondermarck, Rick Thorne, Phillip Jobling, Christopher W Rowe, John Attia, Marjorie Walker, Chenchen Jiang, Sam Faulkner
2018 Evangelou E, Warren HR, Mosen-Ansorena D, Mifsud B, Pazoki R, Gao H, et al., 'Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits', Nature Genetics, 50 1412-1425 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature America, Inc. High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature America, Inc. High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.

DOI 10.1038/s41588-018-0205-x
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday
2018 Vandelanotte C, Duncan MJ, Kolt GS, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Van Itallie A, et al., 'More real-world trials are needed to establish if web-based physical activity interventions are effective.', Br J Sports Med, (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099437
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2018 Sanson-Fisher RW, Noble NE, Searles AM, Deeming S, Smits RE, Oldmeadow CJ, Bryant J, 'A simple filter model to guide the allocation of healthcare resources for improving the treatment of depression among cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-018-4009-2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Andrew Searles, Natasha Noble
2018 McCarter K, Baker A, Britton B, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, bauer J, et al., 'Smoking, drinking, and depression: comorbidity in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy', Cancer Medicine, 7 2382-2390 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cam4.1497
Co-authors Sean Halpin, Kristen Mccarter, Gregory Carter, Amanda Baker, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'Differential intervention effectiveness of a universal school-based resilience intervention in reducing adolescent substance use within student subgroups: Exploratory assessment within a cluster-randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 8 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021047
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Attia
2018 Jayakody A, Passmore E, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Carey M, Simons E, et al., 'The impact of telephone follow up on adverse events for Aboriginal people with chronic disease in new South Wales, Australia: A retrospective cohort study', International Journal for Equity in Health, 17 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12939-018-0776-2
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Al-Omary MS, Khan AA, Davies AJ, Fletcher PJ, Mcivor D, Bastian B, et al., 'Outcomes following heart failure hospitalization in a regional Australian setting between 2005 and 2014.', ESC heart failure, 5 271-278 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ehf2.12239
Co-authors John Attia, Andrew Boyle, Aaron Sverdlov
2018 Morten BC, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Lubinski J, Scott RJ, Avery-Kiejda KA, 'The intron 3 16¿bp duplication polymorphism of p53 (rs17878362) is not associated with increased risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, (2018)

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Purpose: Very little is known about the genetic risk factors associated with triple-negative breast cancer (... [more]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Purpose: Very little is known about the genetic risk factors associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive clinical subtype characterised by the absence of ER, PR and HER2. p53, the tumour suppressor gene, is essential for maintaining genomic stability in response to cellular stress. In breast cancer, the mutation rates of TP53 vary depending on the subtype, such that ER-negative tumours have a high rate, and in ER-positive tumours they are less common. Previous studies have implicated the intronic polymorphism in TP53 (rs17878362; or PIN3) with an increased risk of developing breast cancer, although little has been discerned on its prevalence in different subtypes. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of the PIN3 genotype in the blood of cohorts with ER-positive and the ER-negative subtype TNBC, and assessed its association with outcome. Methods: We genotyped 656 TNBC and 648 ER-positive breast cancer patients, along with 436 controls, and compared the prevalence of polymorphism rs17878362 in these cohorts. Results: We found there to be no differences in the prevalence of the PIN3 genotype between the ER-positive and TNBC cohorts. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was observed in the outcome of patients in either cohort with respect to their PIN3 genotype. Conclusions: Taken together, our results do not support an association of the PIN3 genotype with increased breast cancer risk, either in ER-positive or ER-negative patients.

DOI 10.1007/s10549-018-5039-9
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Kelly Kiejda
2018 Bryant J, Hobden B, Forshaw K, Oldmeadow C, Walsh J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'How accurately do general practitioners detect concurrent tobacco use and risky alcohol consumption? A cross-sectional study in Australian general practice.', Aust J Prim Health, (2018)
DOI 10.1071/PY17122
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kristy Fakes
2018 Holmes M, Connor T, Oldmeadow C, Pockney PG, Scott RJ, Talseth-Palmer BA, 'CD36-a plausible modifier of disease phenotype in familial adenomatous polyposis', HEREDITARY CANCER IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, 16 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13053-018-0096-y
Co-authors Bente Talseth-Palmer, Rodney Scott, Peter Pockney
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Baker AL, Farrell M, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Finding the optimal treatment model: A systematic review of treatment for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 52 737-750 (2018) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examin... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2018. Objectives: Alcohol misuse and depression are commonly co-occurring conditions. To date, no review has examined the most efficacious treatment model for psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. This systematic review determined the: (i) methodological quality of publications examining psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression using a sequential, parallel or integrated treatment model; and (ii) effectiveness of each dual treatment model compared to single treatment for those with co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. Methods: PubMed, Medline and PsycInfo databases were searched for studies which were included if they involved treatment for alcohol misuse and depression and could be classified into one of the three treatment models. Included studies were assessed using the Cochrane¿s Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias criteria. Relevant study characteristics and outcomes were extracted and are presented in a narrative review format. Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria. None were categorised as low risk on the risk of bias criteria. No studies examined a sequential model of treatment, three examined a parallel model and four examined an integrated model of dual-focussed treatment. The studies examining the parallel model and two out of four studies examining the effectiveness of an integrated model demonstrated greater improvement for alcohol or depression outcomes compared to control conditions. Conclusion: Evidence for the psychosocial treatment of co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression is limited to a handful of studies. The evidence has several methodological limitations, which impact the interpretation of the findings. Therefore, while international guidelines recommend integrated dual-focussed treatment for co-occurring conditions, there is little evidence supporting the superiority of this treatment format for co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression. High-quality research demonstrating improvements in patient outcomes is required to ensure recommendations for clinical practice are based on strong empirical evidence.

DOI 10.1177/0004867418758922
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Amanda Baker, Bree Hobden
2018 Ren S, Holliday E, Hure A, Peel R, Hancock S, Leigh L, et al., 'Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine associated with reduced lengths of stay for cardiovascular events hospital admissions: Experience from the Hunter Community Study', Vaccine, 36 7520-7524 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular events in human observational studies. Animal... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular events in human observational studies. Animal studies suggest that the phosphorylcholine epitope in the Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall is structurally similar to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), hence PPV induces the production of antibodies that cross-react with anti-oxLDL and may cause regression of atherosclerotic plaque. We set out to determine the strength of association between PPV administration and reduction in cardiovascular events. Methods: A longitudinal, population-based cohort study of older Australians, from the Hunter Community Study, with up to 11 years of follow-up. We included participants aged = 65 years at baseline (2004¿2008), without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD). History of PPV administration at baseline was the main exposure of interest. ¿Total number of hospital bed-days with CVD primary diagnosis¿ was one of the main outcomes measured. Models were adjusted for age, diabetes, alcohol intake, and smoking status. Influenza vaccine was the control exposure used and fracture bed-days was the control outcome used, to investigate the potential for residual confounding. Results: 91 of the total 1074 participants (mean age = 72, male = 45%) experienced a CVD event during follow-up. PPV (regardless of influenza vaccine) was associated with a significant reduction in CVD bed-day, (n = 863, incident rate ratio, IRR = 0.65, 95%CI: 0.45¿0.94, p = 0.02), but influenza vaccine (regardless of PPV) was not (n = 864, IRR = 0.86, 95%CI: 0.54¿1.35, p = 0.51). Furthermore, PPV adjusted for influenza vaccine remained associated with CVD bed-days (IRR = 0.64, 95%CI: 0.43¿0.96, p = 0.03) but was not associated with fracture bed-days (IRR = 0.75, 95%CI: 0.28¿2.00, p = 0.56). Conclusion: PPV demonstrated a 35% reduction in CVD bed-days. This finding was robust to residual confounding, using a control exposure and a control outcome, eliminating the concern for healthy-user bias. A large double-blinded placebo-controlled RCT is underway to confirm our finding and to explore the proposed mechanism of action (ACTRN12615000536561).

DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.10.064
Co-authors Shuchuen Li, David Newby, Alexis Hure, Liz Holliday, Roseanne Peel, John Attia
2018 Joshi T, Pullen S-J, Gebuehr A, Oldmeadow C, Attia JR, Acharya SH, 'Glycaemic optimization for patients with cardiac disease-A before-and-after study.', International journal of clinical practice, 72 e13086-e13086 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijcp.13086
Co-authors John Attia
2018 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Co-occurring depression and alcohol misuse is under-identified in general practice: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Health Psychology, 23 1085-1095 (2018) [C1]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depre... [more]

© 2016, The Author(s). Depression and alcohol misuse are common co-occurring conditions. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of general practitioner identification of depression and alcohol misuse. Participants from 12 Australian general practices reported demographic and health risk behaviour data. General practitioners were asked to indicate the presence or absence of six health risk factors for individual patients. Accuracy of general practitioner identification was low at 21 per cent. Those with severe alcohol misuse, no chronic diseases and lower education levels were more likely to be identified. Routine screening prior to patient appointments may be a simple and efficient way to increase identification rates.

DOI 10.1177/1359105316643855
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2018 Wyss AB, Sofer T, Lee MK, Terzikhan N, Nguyen JN, Lahousse L, et al., 'Multiethnic meta-analysis identifies ancestry-specific and cross-ancestry loci for pulmonary function', Nature Communications, 9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-05369-0
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday, Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott
2017 Seward K, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wyse R, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Measuring implementation behaviour of menu guidelines in the childcare setting: confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical domains framework questionnaire (TDFQ)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0499-6
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2017 Joshi T, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Wynne K, 'The duration of intrapartum maternal hyperglycaemia predicts neonatal hypoglycaemia in women with pre-existing diabetes', Diabetic Medicine, 34 725-731 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: There is a high incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia in neonates born to mothers with pre-existing diabetes. This often necessitates admission to the neonat... [more]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: There is a high incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia in neonates born to mothers with pre-existing diabetes. This often necessitates admission to the neonatal intensive care. Guidelines suggest maintaining intrapartum blood glucose levels (BGLs) of 4¿7 mmol/l in women with diabetes to reduce the risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia. This study assessed whether intrapartum BGLs in women with pre-gestational Type 1 and 2 diabetes were predictive of neonatal hypoglycaemia. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 261 births delivered at a tertiary hospital in Australia from 2009 to 2014. Results: There were 122 cases of neonatal hypoglycaemia (glucose = 2.6 mmol/l) in 261 births (47%). The mothers in the neonatal hypoglycaemia group spent less time with BGL in the range 4¿7 mmol/l [55 ± 37% vs. 65 ± 35%, P = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 0.992, P = 0.03] and more time with BGL in the 7¿10 mmol/l range (31 ± 34% vs. 18 ± 27%, P = 0.003; OR 1.013, P = 0.003) compared with those without neonatal hypoglycaemia. Although statistically significant, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that time spent with maternal BGLs in the range 4¿7 mmol/l [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.58] or 7¿10 mmol (AUC = 0.60) was not strong enough to be a useful clinical predictor of neonatal hypoglycaemia. HbA1c in the second trimester of pregnancy (P = 0.02, OR 1.42) and percentage time spent in BGL range of 7¿10 mmol/l (P = 0.001, OR 1.02) were both associated with a risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia in a logistic regression model. HbA1c in the third trimester (P = 0.07, OR 1.28) approached, but did not reach, significance. Conclusions: These data support a BGL range of 4¿7 mmol/l as an intrapartum target. Glycaemic control in the second trimester is associated with neonatal hypoglycaemia. Improvement in ante- and intrapartum glycaemic control may reduce neonatal hypoglycaemia in women with pre-existing diabetes.

DOI 10.1111/dme.13337
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors John Attia
2017 Kepreotes E, Whitehead B, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Collison A, Searles A, et al., 'High-flow warm humidified oxygen versus standard low-flow nasal cannula oxygen for moderate bronchiolitis (HFWHO RCT): an open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial', The Lancet, 389 930-939 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm h... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm humidified oxygen (HFWHO) is increasingly used, but has not been rigorously studied in randomised trials. We aimed to examine whether HFWHO provided enhanced respiratory support, thereby shortening time to weaning off oxygen. Methods In this open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial, we recruited children aged less than 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis attending the emergency department of the John Hunter Hospital or the medical unit of the John Hunter Children's Hospital in New South Wales, Australia. Patients were randomly allocated (1:1) via opaque sealed envelopes to HFWHO (maximum flow of 1 L/kg per min to a limit of 20 L/min using 1:1 air¿oxygen ratio, resulting in a maximum FiO2 of 0·6) or standard therapy (cold wall oxygen 100% via infant nasal cannulae at low flow to a maximum of 2 L/min) using a block size of four and stratifying for gestational age at birth. The primary outcome was time from randomisation to last use of oxygen therapy. All randomised children were included in the primary and secondary safety analyses. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12612000685819. Findings From July 16, 2012, to May 1, 2015, we randomly assigned 202 children to either HFWHO (101 children) or standard therapy (101 children). Median time to weaning was 24 h (95% CI 18¿28) for standard therapy and 20 h (95% CI 17¿34) for HFWHO (hazard ratio [HR] for difference in survival distributions 0·9 [95% CI 0·7¿1·2]; log rank p=0·61). Fewer children experienced treatment failure on HFWHO (14 [14%]) compared with standard therapy (33 [33%]; p=0·0016); of these children, those on HFWHO were supported for longer than were those on standard therapy before treatment failure (HR 0·3; 95% CI 0·2¿0·6; p<0·0001). 20 (61%) of 33 children who experienced treatment failure on standard therapy were rescued with HFWHO. 12 (12%) of children on standard therapy required transfer to the intensive care unit compared with 14 (14%) of those on HFWHO (difference -1%; 95% CI -7 to 16; p=0·41). Four adverse events occurred (oxygen desaturation and condensation inhalation in the HFWHO group, and two incidences of oxygen tubing disconnection in the standard therapy group); none resulted in withdrawal from the trial. No oxygen-related serious adverse events occurred. Secondary effectiveness outcomes are reported in the Results section. Interpretation HFWHO did not significantly reduce time on oxygen compared with standard therapy, suggesting that early use of HFWHO does not modify the underlying disease process in moderately severe bronchiolitis. HFWHO might have a role as a rescue therapy to reduce the proportion of children requiring high-cost intensive care. Funding Hunter Children's Research Foundation, John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust, and the University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre GrowUpWell.

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30061-2
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, Andrew Searles, Adam Collison, John Attia
2017 Hoffman GR, Palazzi K, Oteng Boateng BK, Oldmeadow C, 'Liquor legislation, last drinks, and lockouts: the Newcastle (Australia) solution', International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 46 740-745 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons The aim of this study was to determine whether the regional implementation of prohibitive liquor legislation, i... [more]

© 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons The aim of this study was to determine whether the regional implementation of prohibitive liquor legislation, introduced in order to limit the sale of and access to alcohol, can lead to a sustained reduction in the incidence of assault occasioning facial injury, as seen in patients presenting to a level 1 trauma hospital. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted to document patients who were identified as an acute hospital presentation of assault occasioning facial injury. The period of study was 2003¿2015; this ensured a similar period of time before and after the implementation of the legislation in 2008. A statistical analysis was undertaken to assess the rates of change in oral and maxillofacial (OMF) assault admissions pre and post legislation. The study found that pre-legislation numbers of OMF assaults increased at a rate of 14% per annum and then decreased at a rate of 21% per annum post legislation (31% relative rate ratio reduction). Similar trends were seen for all males, males aged 18¿35 years, and males where alcohol was recorded at clinical presentation. The introduction of ¿last drinks¿ and ¿lock out¿ legislation has led to a significant and sustained reduction in assaultive alcohol-related facial injury in Newcastle.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijom.2017.01.019
2017 Willems SM, Wright DJ, Day FR, Trajanoska K, Joshi PK, Morris JA, et al., 'Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 8 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ncomms16015
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Attia
2017 Chen C, Parsons MW, Clapham M, Oldmeadow C, Levi CR, Lin L, et al., 'Influence of penumbral reperfusion on clinical outcome depends on baseline ischemic core volume', Stroke, 48 2739-2745 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose: In alteplase-treated patients with acute ischemic stroke, we investigated the relationship between penumbral reperf... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Background and Purpose: In alteplase-treated patients with acute ischemic stroke, we investigated the relationship between penumbral reperfusion at 24 hours and clinical outcomes, with and without adjustment for baseline ischemic core volume. Methods: Data were collected from consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients with baseline and follow-up perfusion imaging presenting to hospital within 4.5 hours of symptom onset at 7 hospitals. Logistic regression models were used for predicting the effect of the reperfused penumbral volume on the dichotomized modified Rankin Scale (MRS) at 90 days and improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at 24 hours, both adjusted for baseline ischemic core volume. Results: This study included 1507 patients. Reperfused penumbral volume had moderate ability to predict 90-day MRS 0 to 1 (area under the curve, 0.77; R2, 0.28; P<0.0001). However, after adjusting for baseline ischemic core volume, the reperfused penumbral volume was a strong predictor of good functional outcome (area under the curve, 0.946; R2, 0.55; P<0.0001). For every 1% increase in penumbral reperfusion, the odds of achieving MRS 0 to 1 at day 90 increased by 7.4%. Improvement in acute 24-hour National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was also significantly related to the degree of reperfused penumbra (R2, 0.31; P<0.0001). This association was again stronger after adjustment for baseline ischemic core volume (R2, 0.41; P<0.0001). For each 1% of penumbra that was reperfused, the 24-hour National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale decreased by 0.069 compared with baseline. Conclusions: In patients treated with alteplase, the extent of the penumbra that is reperfused is a powerful predictor of early and late clinical outcomes, particularly when baseline ischemic core is taken into account.

DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.018587
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi, Andrew Bivard
2017 Lai JS, Hure AJ, Oldmeadow C, McEvoy M, Byles J, Attia J, 'Prospective study on the association between diet quality and depression in mid-aged women over 9¿years', European Journal of Nutrition, 56 273-281 (2017) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To examine the longitudinal association between diet quality and depression using prospective data from the Australian Longitud... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To examine the longitudinal association between diet quality and depression using prospective data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. Methods: Women born in 1946¿1951 (n¿=¿7877) were followed over 9¿years starting from 2001. Dietary intake was assessed using the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies (version 2) in 2001 and a shortened form in 2007 and 2010. Diet quality was summarised using the Australian Recommended Food Score. Depression was measured using the 10-item Centre for Epidemiologic Depression Scale and self-reported physician diagnosis. Pooled logistic regression models including time-varying covariates were used to examine associations between diet quality tertiles and depression. Women were also categorised based on changes in diet quality during 2001¿2007. Analyses were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: The highest tertile of diet quality was associated marginally with lower odds of depression (OR 0.94; 95¿% CI 0.83, 1.00; P¿=¿0.049) although no significant linear trend was observed across tertiles (OR 1.00; 95¿% CI 0.94, 1.10; P¿=¿0.48). Women who maintained a moderate or high score over 6¿years had a 6¿14¿% reduced odds of depression compared with women who maintained a low score (moderate vs low score¿OR 0.94; 95¿% CI 0.80, 0.99; P¿=¿0.045; high vs low score¿OR 0.86; 95¿% CI 0.77, 0.96; P¿=¿0.01). Similar results were observed in analyses excluding women with prior history of depression. Conclusion: Long-term maintenance of good diet quality may be associated with reduced odds of depression. Randomised controlled trials are needed to eliminate the possibility of residual confounding.

DOI 10.1007/s00394-015-1078-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2017 Dunlop AJ, Brown AL, Oldmeadow C, Harris A, Gill A, Sadler C, et al., 'Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of unsupervised buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of heroin dependence in a randomized waitlist controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 174 181-191 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Background Access to opioid agonist treatment can be associated with extensive waiting periods with significant health and financial burdens. This study aimed to determine ... [more]

© 2017 Background Access to opioid agonist treatment can be associated with extensive waiting periods with significant health and financial burdens. This study aimed to determine whether patients with heroin dependence dispensed buprenorphine-naloxone weekly have greater reductions in heroin use and related adverse health effects 12-weeks after commencing treatment, compared to waitlist controls and to examine the cost-effectiveness of this strategy. Methods An open-label waitlist RCT was conducted in an opioid treatment clinic in Newcastle, Australia. Fifty patients with DSM-IV-TR heroin dependence (and no other substance dependence) were recruited. The intervention group (n = 25) received take-home self-administered sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone weekly (mean dose, 22.7 ± 5.7 mg) and weekly clinical review. Waitlist controls (n = 25) received no clinical intervention. The primary outcome was heroin use (self-report, urine toxicology verified) at weeks four, eight and 12. The primary cost-effectiveness outcome was incremental cost per additional heroin-free-day. Results Outcome data were available for 80% of all randomized participants. Across the 12-weeks, treatment group heroin use was on average 19.02 days less/month (95% CI -22.98, -15.06, p < 0.0001). A total 12-week reduction in adjusted costs including crime of $A5,722 (95% CI 3299, 8154) in favor of treatment was observed. Excluding crime, incremental cost per heroin-free-day gained from treatment was $A18.24 (95% CI 4.50, 28.49). Conclusion When compared to remaining on a waitlist, take-home self-administered buprenorphine-naloxone treatment is associated with significant reductions in heroin use for people with DSM-IV-TR heroin dependence. This cost-effective approach may be an efficient strategy to enhance treatment capacity.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.01.016
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Daniel Barker, A Dunlop, John Attia
2017 Wye PM, Stockings EA, Bowman JA, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers JH, 'Effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing the provision of nicotine dependence treatment in inpatient psychiatric facilities: an implementation trial', BMC PSYCHIATRY, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1220-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2017 Gould GS, Zeev YB, Tywman L, Oldmeadow C, Chiu S, Clarke M, Bonevski B, 'Do Clinicians Ask Pregnant Women about Exposures to Tobacco and Cannabis Smoking, Second-Hand-Smoke and E-Cigarettes? An Australian National Cross-Sectional Survey.', International journal of environmental research and public health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14121585
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2017 Bailey KA, Baker AL, McElduff P, Jones MA, Oldmeadow C, Kavanagh DJ, 'Effects of Assault Type on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Coexisting Depression and Alcohol Misuse', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 6 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/jcm6070072
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Amanda Baker, Kylie Bailey
2017 Vandelanotte C, Kolt GS, Caperchione CM, Savage TN, Rosenkranz RR, Maeder AJ, et al., 'Effectiveness of a Web 2.0 Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Real-World Settings: Randomized Ecological Trial.', Journal of medical Internet research, 19 e390 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.8484
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2017 Attia JR, Oldmeadow C, Holliday EG, Jones MP, 'Deconfounding confounding part 2: using directed acyclic graphs (DAGs)', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 206 480-+ (2017)
DOI 10.5694/mja16.01167
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday
2017 Zdenkowski N, Radvan G, Pugliese L, Charlton J, Oldmeadow C, Fraser A, Bonaventura A, 'Treatment of pancreatic insufficiency using pancreatic extract in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: a pilot study (PICNIC)', Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 1963-1971 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3602-2
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2017 Gleeson M, Pyne DB, Elkington LJ, Hall ST, Attia JR, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Developing a multi-component immune model for evalusating the risk of respiratory illness in athletes', EXERCISE IMMUNOLOGY REVIEW, 23 52-64 (2017) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Attia, Robin Callister, Lisa Wood, Maree Gleeson, Sharron Hall
2017 Hobden B, Schwandt ML, Carey M, Lee MR, Farokhnia M, Bouhlal S, et al., 'The Validity of the Montgomery¿Asberg Depression Rating Scale in an Inpatient Sample with Alcohol Dependence', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 41 1220-1227 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/acer.13400
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Bree Hobden
2017 Kolt GS, Rosenkranz RR, Vandelanotte C, Caperchione CM, Maeder AJ, Tague R, et al., 'Using web 2.0 applications to promote health-related physical activity: Findings from the WALK 2.0 randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51 1433-1440 (2017) [C1]

Background/Aim Web 2.0 internet technology has great potential in promoting physical activity. This trial investigated the effectiveness of a Web 2.0-based intervention on physica... [more]

Background/Aim Web 2.0 internet technology has great potential in promoting physical activity. This trial investigated the effectiveness of a Web 2.0-based intervention on physical activity behaviour, and the impact on website usage and engagement. Methods 504 (328 women, 126 men) insufficiently active adult participants were randomly allocated to one f two web-based interventions or a paper-based Logbook group. The Web 1.0 group participated in the existing 10 000 Steps programme, while the Web 2.0 group participated in a Web 2.0-enabled physical activity intervention including user-to-user interaction through social networking capabilities. ActiGraph GT3X activity monitors were used to assess physical activity at four points across the intervention (0, 3, 12 and 18 months), and usage and engagement were assessed continuously through website usage statistics. Results Treatment groups differed significantly in trajectories of minutes/day of physical activity (p=0.0198), through a greater change at 3 months fo Web 2.0 than Web 1.0 (7.3 min/day, 95% CI 2.4 to 12.3). In the Web 2.0 group, physical activity increased at 3 (mean change 6.8 min/day, 95% CI 3.9 to 9.6) and 12 months (3.8 min/day, 95% CI 0.5 to 7.0), but not 18 months. The Logbook group also increased physical activity at 3 (4.8 min/day, 95% CI 1.8 to 7.7) and 12 months (4.9 min/day, 95% CI 0.7 to 9.1), but not 18 months. The Web 1.0 group increased physical activity at 12 months only (4.9 min/day, 95% CI 0.5 to 9.3). The Web 2.0 group demonstrated higher levels of website engagement (p=0.3964).Conclusions In comparison to a Web 1.0 intervention, a more interactive Web 2.0 intervention, as well as the paper-based Logbook intervention, improved physicalactivity in the short term, but that effect reduced over time, despite higher levels of engagement of the Web 2.0 group. Trial registration number ACTRN12611000157976.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096890
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mitch Duncan
2017 Holliday SM, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, Dunlop AJ, van Driel ML, et al., 'The pattern of anxiolytic and hypnotic management by Australian general practice trainees', Drug and Alcohol Review, 36 261-269 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: Guidelines recommend anxiolytics and hypnotics (A/H) as second-line, short-term medicati... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: Guidelines recommend anxiolytics and hypnotics (A/H) as second-line, short-term medications. We aimed to establish prevalence and associations of A/H prescribing by Australian general practice (GP) trainees. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional analysis from a cohort study of vocational trainees from four GP Regional Training Providers during 2010¿2013. General practice trainees act as independent practitioners (including for prescribing purposes) while having recourse to advice from a GP supervisor. Practice and trainee demographic data were collected as well as patient, clinical and educational data from 60 consecutive consultations of each trainee each training term. Analysis was at the level of individual problem managed, with the outcome factor being prescription of any anxiolytic or hypnotic. Results: Overall, 645 registrars (response rate 94.0%) prescribed 68 582 medications in 69 621 consultations (with 112 890 problems managed). A/Hs were prescribed for 1.3% of problems managed and comprised 2.2% of all prescriptions. They were prescribed particularly for insomnia (28.2%) or anxiety (21.8%), but also for many ¿off-label¿ indications. Significant associations of A/H prescriptions were: patient-level (greater age, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, English-speaking background, being new to the trainee but not to the practice); trainee-level (male) and consultation-level (longer duration, pre-existing problem, specialist referral not being made). Prescribing was significantly lower in one of the four Regional Training Providers. Discussion and Conclusions: GP trainees, inconsistent with most guideline recommendations, prescribe A/Hs mainly as maintenance therapy to unfamiliar and older patients. Our results suggest that changes in management approaches are needed which may be facilitated by support for psychotherapeutic training. [Holliday SM, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, Dunlop AJ, van Driel ML, Spike NA, McArthur LA, Ball J, Oldmeadow CJ, Magin PJ. The pattern of anxiolytic and hypnotic management by Australian general practice trainees. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:261-269].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12404
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Parker Magin, A Dunlop
2017 Gould GS, Bovill M, Chiu S, Bonevski B, Oldmeadow C, 'Exploring an adapted Risk Behaviour Diagnosis Scale among Indigenous Australian women who had experiences of smoking during pregnancy: a cross-sectional survey in regional New South Wales, Australia', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015054
Co-authors Michelle Bovill, Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2017 Zhang X, Khan AA, Haq EU, Rahim A, Hu D, Attia J, et al., 'Increasing mortality from ischaemic heart disease in China from 2004 to 2010: disproportionate rise in rural areas and elderly subjects. 438 million person-years follow-up.', European heart journal. Quality of care & clinical outcomes, 3 47-52 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ehjqcco/qcw041
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Andrew Boyle
2017 Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Bovill M, Gruppetta M, Oldmeadow C, Palazzi K, et al., 'The Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy Pilot Study protocol: a feasibility step-wedge cluster randomised trial to improve health providers' management of smoking during pregnancy', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016095
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Maree Gruppetta, Gillian Gould
2017 Lim MS, Ariyarajah A, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, Enjeti AK, 'A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing Anticoagulation versus No Anticoagulation and Shorter versus Longer duration of Anticoagulation for Treatment of Isolated Distal Deep Vein Thrombosis', Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, 43 836-848 (2017) [C1]

Isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) represents an important clinical problem but there is no consensus regarding its management. The aim of this review was to evaluate the ... [more]

Isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) represents an important clinical problem but there is no consensus regarding its management. The aim of this review was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and shorter versus longer duration of anticoagulation in patients with isolated distal DVT. A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews. Studies reporting rates of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE), recurrent DVT, proximal extension, and/or major bleeding were included. Fourteen studies (six randomized controlled trials, eight cohorts) involving 2,918 patients met the eligibility criteria (with a total of 13 meeting criteria for the meta-analysis). Compared with no anticoagulation, anticoagulation was associated with a significant reduction in proximal extension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13-0.67; p < 0.004), recurrent DVT (OR: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.04-0.65; p = 0.01), and the composite end-point of proximal extension/PE (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.16-0.72; p = 0.005); however, no significant differences in PE (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.17-1.34; p = 0.16) or major bleeding (OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 0.33-6.86; p = 0.60) were observed. Anticoagulation for a longer duration (=8 vs. =6 weeks) was associated with a significant reduction in proximal extension (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.11-0.48; p < 0.001) but not for other outcomes.

DOI 10.1055/s-0037-1604085
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Anoop Enjeti
2017 Clover KA, Rogers KM, Britton B, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Carter GL, 'Reduced prevalence of pain and distress during 4 years of screening with QUICATOUCH in Australian oncology patients', European Journal of Cancer Care, 26 1-10 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12636
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gregory Carter, John Attia
2017 Dallas A, van Driel M, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Antibiotic prescribing for acute otitis media and acute sinusitis: A cross-sectional analysis of the ReCEnT study exploring the habits of early career doctors in family practice', Family Practice, 34 180-187 (2017) [C1]

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern, and is linked to over-prescribing. In s... [more]

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern, and is linked to over-prescribing. In self-limiting infections such as acute otitis media (AOM) and acute sinusitis, prescribing remains high despite strong guideline recommendations against the routine use of antibiotics. Early career General Practitioners may find evidence-based prescribing challenging. Aim. To establish the prevalence and associations of antibiotic prescribing for AOM and acute sinusitis by Australian vocational trainees in General Practice. Method. A cross-sectional analysis of data from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study. This ongoing, multicentre prospective cohort study documents trainees' consultation-based clinical experiences. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted on data recorded in consultations for AOM or acute sinusitis in nine collection periods during 2010-2014. Results. Data from 856 individual trainees (response rate 95.2%) were analysed. AOM was managed in 0.9% of encounters. Antibiotics were prescribed in 78.8% of cases. Prescribing was significantly associated with longer consultation time and first presentation for this problem. There was no significant association with patient age group. Acute sinusitis was managed in 0.9% of encounters. Antibiotics were prescribed in 71.2% of cases. Later-stage trainees and trainees who did not receive their primary medical qualification in Australia were more likely to prescribe an antibiotic for acute sinusitis. Conclusion. Early career GPs are not prescribing in an evidence-based manner. The complexity of guidelines for AOM and acute sinusitis may be confusing for prescribers, especially early career doctors struggling with inexperience and diagnostic uncertainty. Educational interventions are necessary to bring prescribing rates closer to quality benchmarks.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw144
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Parker Magin
2017 Iseme RA, McEvoy M, Kelly B, Agnew L, Walker FR, Handley T, et al., 'A role for autoantibodies in atherogenesis', CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH, 113 1102-1112 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/cvr/cvx112
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Brian Kelly, John Attia, Rohan Walker
2017 Schumacher TL, Oldmeadow C, Clausen D, Weatherall L, Keogh L, Pringle KG, Rae KM, 'Reference Intervals for Non-Fasting CVD Lipids and Inflammation Markers in Pregnant Indigenous Australian Women.', Healthcare, 5 1-11 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare5040072
Co-authors Kym Rae, Tracy Schumacher, Kirsty Pringle
2017 Harris ML, Oldmeadow C, Hure A, Luu J, Loxton D, Attia J, 'Stress increases the risk of type 2 diabetes onset in women: A 12-year longitudinal study using causal modelling.', PLoS One, 12 e0172126 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0172126
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, John Attia, Alexis Hure
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal intervention targeting student resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents', Journal of Adolescence, 57 74-89 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach for reducing mental health problems in adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal, school-based intervention targeting resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 20 intervention and 12 control secondary schools located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas of NSW, Australia. Data were collected from 3115 students at baseline (Grade 7, 2011), of whom 2149 provided data at follow up (Grade 10, 2014; enrolments in Grades 7 to 10 typically aged 12¿16 years; 50% male; 69.0% retention). There were no significant differences between groups at follow-up for three mental health outcomes: total SDQ, internalising problems, and prosocial behaviour. A small statistically significant difference in favour of the control group was found for externalising problems. Findings highlight the continued difficulties in developing effective, school-based prevention programs for mental health problems in adolescents. Trial registration ANZCTR (Ref no: ACTRN12611000606987).

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.03.009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2017 Ewald BD, Oldmeadow C, Attia JR, 'Daily step count and the need for hospital care in subsequent years in a community-based sample of older australians', Medical Journal of Australia, 206 126-130 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Objectives: To determine the extent to which physical activity reduces the number of hospital bed-days for A... [more]

© 2017 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Objectives: To determine the extent to which physical activity reduces the number of hospital bed-days for Australians over 55, using an objective measure of activity. Design, setting and participants: 9784 Newcastle residents aged 55 years or more were invited to participate. 3253 responders were eligible and wore pedometers for one week during 2005e2007; their hospital data from recruitment to 31 March 2015 were analysed (mean follow-up time: 8.2 years). Complete data for 2110 people were available for analysis. Main outcome measures: Mean annual hospital bed-days, according to individual step count. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction in the number of hospital bed-days associated with higher step counts; the incidence rate ratio per extra 1000 steps per day at baseline was 0.91 (95% CI, 0.90e0.94). The disease-specific reductions were significant for admissions for cancer and diabetes, but not for cardiovascular disease. The difference between 4500 and 8800 steps per day (the upper and lower quartile boundaries for step count) was 0.36 bed-days per person per year, after adjusting for age, sex, number of medications, number of comorbidities, smoking and alcohol status, and education. When analysis was restricted to hospital admissions after the first 2 years of follow-up, the difference was 0.29 bed-days per person per year. Conclusions: More active people require less hospital care, and an achievable extra 4300 steps per day would result in an average of one less day in hospital for each 3 years of life.

DOI 10.5694/mja16.00640
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ben Ewald, John Attia
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Computer tablet or telephone? A randomised controlled trial exploring two methods of collecting data from drug and alcohol outpatients', Addictive Behaviors, 71 111-117 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) ac... [more]

© 2017 Objective Both computerised and telephone surveys have potential advantages for research data collection. The current study aimed to determine the: (i) feasibility, (ii) acceptability, and (iii) cost per completed survey of computer tablet versus telephone data collection for clients attending an outpatient drug and alcohol treatment clinic. Design Two-arm randomised controlled trial. Method Clients attending a drug and alcohol outpatient clinic in New South Wales, Australia, were randomised to complete a baseline survey via computer tablet in the clinic or via telephone interview within two weeks of their appointment. All participants completed a three-month follow-up survey via telephone. Results Consent and completion rates for the baseline survey were significantly higher in the computer tablet condition. The time taken to complete the computer tablet survey was lower (11¿min) than the telephone condition (17¿min). There were no differences in the proportion of consenters or completed follow-up surveys between the two conditions at the 3-month follow-up. Acceptability was high across both modes of data collection. The cost of the computer tablet condition was $67.52 greater per completed survey than the telephone condition. Conclusion There is a trade-off between computer tablet and telephone data collection. While both data collection methods were acceptable to participants, the computer tablet condition resulted in higher consent and completion rates at baseline, therefore yielding greater external validity, and was quicker for participants to complete. Telephone data collection was however, more cost-effective. Researchers should carefully consider the mode of data collection that suits individual study needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.03.009
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Bree Hobden, Mariko Carey
2017 Davies AJ, Naudin C, Al-Omary M, Khan A, Oldmeadow C, Jones M, et al., 'Disparities in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction: long-term trends from the Hunter region', Internal Medicine Journal, 47 557-562 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: Trends in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) provide important information for healthcare providers and... [more]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: Trends in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) provide important information for healthcare providers and can allow for accurate planning of future health needs and targeted interventions in areas with an excess burden of cardiovascular disease. Aim: To investigate the regional variations in AMI incidence in the Hunter region. Methods: Incident cases of AMI identified between 1996 and 2013 from the Hunter New England Health Cardiac and Stroke Outcomes Unit were prospectively collected for this study. We calculated crude and age-adjusted incidence of AMI over an 18-year period and explored differences in remoteness, age, sex and indigenous status. Results: During 1996¿2013, a total of 15 480 cases of AMI were identified. There was a significantly higher incidence of AMI in patients from regional areas compared to patients from metropolitan areas. More importantly, while rates of AMI declined by 28% in metropolitan patients, they increased by 8% in regional patients. Males had higher rates of AMI throughout the study period than females, however there was trend over time towards a reduction in AMI incidence in males that was not seen in females. The age-adjusted incidence of AMI for indigenous patients increased by 48% from 2007 to 2013, compared to a 23% decrease in non-indigenous patients. Conclusion: Between 1996 and 2013 in the Hunter region, the adjusted incidence of AMI increased for regional patients compared to metropolitan patients with a trend towards a higher adjusted incidence of AMI in the indigenous population.

DOI 10.1111/imj.13399
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Andrew Boyle
2017 de Vries PS, Sabater-Lleal M, Chasman DI, Trompet S, Ahluwalia TS, Teumer A, et al., 'Comparison of HapMap and 1000 Genomes Reference Panels in a Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study', PLOS ONE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0167742
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott
2017 Jones MP, Beath A, Oldmeadow C, Attia JR, 'Understanding statistical hypothesis tests and power.', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 207 148-150 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja16.01022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia
2017 Paul C, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, Lynagh M, Campbell S, Bradstock K, et al., 'Dyadic interdependence of psychosocial outcomes among haematological cancer survivors and their support persons', Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 3339-3346 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the dyadic relationships between unmet need, depression, and anxiety in people diagnosed with haema... [more]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the dyadic relationships between unmet need, depression, and anxiety in people diagnosed with haematological cancer and their support persons. Methods: Adult survivors (18¿years+) who had been diagnosed with a haematological cancer were recruited to a cross-sectional mailed survey via five state cancer registries in Australia. Participating survivors invited a support person to also complete a survey. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the relationships among survivor and support person self-reported depression, anxiety, and unmet needs. Results: Of the 4299 eligible haematological cancer survivors contacted by the registries, 1511 (35%) returned a completed survey as did 1004 support persons. There were 787 dyads with complete data. After adjusting for age, gender, rurality, cancer type, and whether the support person was a relative, positive correlations were found between survivor and support person scores for depression (p¿=¿0.0029) and unmet needs (p¿<¿0.001), but not anxiety scores (p¿=¿0.075). Survivor unmet needs were significantly related to support person depression (p¿=¿0.0036). Support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher depression score for survivors (p¿=¿0.0067). Greater support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher anxiety score for survivors (p¿=¿0.0083). Survivor unmet needs did not have a significant relationship to support person anxiety (p¿=¿0.78). Conclusion: Unmet needs may mediate the interdependence of psychosocial experiences for survivors and support persons, although a longitudinal study is required to confirm causality. Addressing unmet needs may be a potential target for improving outcomes for both groups.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3751-3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh
2017 Hobden B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Carey M, 'Do rates of depression vary by level of alcohol misuse in Australian general practice?', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 263-267 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depressi... [more]

© 2017 La Trobe University. Limited data exist regarding co-occurring alcohol misuse and depression among general practice patients. This study examined the prevalence of depression by level of alcohol misuse, and the sociodemographic factors associated with depression and increased alcohol misuse severity. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 3559 Australian general practice patients. Patients completed their demographic details, the Patient Health Questionnaire (9-item) and the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (Consumption items). The prevalence of alcohol misuse and depression was 6.7%, and depression prevalence varied significantly according to level of alcohol misuse (P<0.001). Age, gender, Aboriginality and number of chronic diseases were associated with depression and higher levels of alcohol misuse. These findings may assist General Practitioners in identifying those at risk of experiencing co-morbid depression and alcohol use, and aid in effective treatment and referral.

DOI 10.1071/PY16076
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Bree Hobden
2017 Whiting G, Magin P, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'General practice trainees¿ clinical experience of dermatology indicates a need for improved education: A cross-sectional analysis from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training Study', Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 58 e199-e206 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists Background/Objectives: Skin conditions are commonly encountered in general practice but dermatology is underrepresented in underg... [more]

© 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists Background/Objectives: Skin conditions are commonly encountered in general practice but dermatology is underrepresented in undergraduate medical courses. Australian and international studies have shown that the dermatological diagnostic ability of general practitioners (GPs) is suboptimal, contributing to increased dermatology outpatient referrals. Dermatological experience in GP vocational training is thus of particular importance. We aimed to document the prevalence of skin disease presentations and the range of skin diseases encountered by GP trainees. We also sought to establish associations of GP trainee's skin disease experience, including their personal characteristics, consultation factors, and the actions arising from the consultation. Methods: This study took place in the Registrars Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study. ReCEnT is an ongoing, prospective, multi-site cohort study of Australian GP trainees' consultations. A descriptive cross-sectional analysis was performed on trainees' consultation data. Results: In total, 645 individual trainees contributed data from 84¿615 consultations. Altogether, 11% of all problems managed were skin problems. Infections, dermatitis, injury and wounds were the most common presentations. Associations of consultations for skin problems (compared with all other problems) included seeking in-consultation advice, planning patient follow up and generating learning goals. Conclusions: These findings suggest GP trainees find skin problems challenging and may indicate a need for more and better targeted undergraduate and GP trainee education.

DOI 10.1111/ajd.12493
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Parker Magin
2017 Kable A, Pond D, Hullick C, Chenoweth L, Duggan A, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, 'An evaluation of discharge documentation for people with dementia discharged home from hospital - A cross-sectional pilot study.', Dementia (London, England), 1471301217728845 (2017)
DOI 10.1177/1471301217728845
Co-authors Ashley Kable, John Attia, Dimity Pond
2017 Laver DR, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Quail AW, 'Cardiac Calcium Release Channel (Ryanodine Receptor 2) Regulation by Halogenated Anesthetics', Anesthesiology, 126 495-506 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Background: Halogenated anesthetics activate cardiac ryanodine receptor 2-... [more]

© 2017, the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Background: Halogenated anesthetics activate cardiac ryanodine receptor 2-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ release, leading to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ depletion, reduced cardiac function, and providing cell protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Anesthetic activation of ryanodine receptor 2 is poorly defined, leaving aspects of the protective mechanism uncertain. Methods: Ryanodine receptor 2 from the sheep heart was incorporated into artificial lipid bilayers, and their gating properties were measured in response to five halogenated anesthetics. Results: Each anesthetic rapidly and reversibly activated ryanodine receptor 2, but only from the cytoplasmic side. Relative activation levels were as follows: halothane (approximately 4-fold; n = 8), desflurane and enflurane (approximately 3-fold,n = 9), and isoflurane and sevoflurane (approximately 1.5-fold, n = 7, 10). Half-activating concentrations (K a) were in the range 1.3 to 2.1 mM (1.4 to 2.6 minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) with the exception of isoflurane (5.3 mM, 6.6 minimum alveolar concentration). Dantrolene (10 µM with 100 nM calmodulin) inhibited ryanodine receptor 2 by 40% but did not alter the K a for halothane activation. Halothane potentiated luminal and cytoplasmic Ca 2+ activation of ryanodine receptor 2 but had no effect on Mg 2+ inhibition. Halothane activated ryanodine receptor 2 in the absence and presence (2 mM) of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Adenosine, a competitive antagonist to ATP activation of ryanodine receptor 2, did not antagonize halothane activation in the absence of ATP. Conclusions: At clinical concentrations (1 MAC), halothane desflurane and enflurane activated ryanodine receptor 2, whereas isoflurane and sevoflurane were ineffective. Dantrolene inhibition of ryanodine receptor 2 substantially negated the activating effects of anesthetics. Halothane acted independently of the adenine nucleotide-binding site on ryanodine receptor 2. The previously observed adenosine antagonism of halothane activation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ release was due to competition between adenosine and ATP, rather than between halothane and ATP.

DOI 10.1097/ALN.0000000000001519
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Derek Laver, John Attia, Tony Quail
2017 Wain LV, Vaez A, Jansen R, Joehanes R, Van Der Most PJ, Erzurumluoglu AM, et al., 'Novel Blood Pressure Locus and Gene Discovery Using Genome-Wide Association Study and Expression Data Sets from Blood and the Kidney', Hypertension, 70 e4-e19 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a substantial genetic contribution. Genetic variation inf... [more]

© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc. Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has a substantial genetic contribution. Genetic variation influencing blood pressure has the potential to identify new pharmacological targets for the treatment of hypertension. To discover additional novel blood pressure loci, we used 1000 Genomes Project-based imputation in 150 134 European ancestry individuals and sought significant evidence for independent replication in a further 228 245 individuals. We report 6 new signals of association in or near HSPB7, TNXB, LRP12, LOC283335, SEPT9, and AKT2, and provide new replication evidence for a further 2 signals in EBF2 and NFKBIA. Combining large whole-blood gene expression resources totaling 12 607 individuals, we investigated all novel and previously reported signals and identified 48 genes with evidence for involvement in blood pressure regulation that are significant in multiple resources. Three novel kidney-specific signals were also detected. These robustly implicated genes may provide new leads for therapeutic innovation.

DOI 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09438
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday
2017 Warren HR, Evangelou E, Cabrera CP, Gao H, Ren M, Mifsud B, et al., 'Genome-wide association analysis identifies novel blood pressure loci and offers biological insights into cardiovascular risk', Nature Genetics, 49 403-415 (2017) [C1]

Elevated blood pressure is the leading heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease worldwide. We report genetic association of blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, pulse pres... [more]

Elevated blood pressure is the leading heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease worldwide. We report genetic association of blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, pulse pressure) among UK Biobank participants of European ancestry with independent replication in other cohorts, and robust validation of 107 independent loci. We also identify new independent variants at 11 previously reported blood pressure loci. In combination with results from a range of in silico functional analyses and wet bench experiments, our findings highlight new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation enriched for genes expressed in vascular tissues and identify potential therapeutic targets for hypertension. Results from genetic risk score models raise the possibility of a precision medicine approach through early lifestyle intervention to offset the impact of blood pressure-raising genetic variants on future cardiovascular disease risk.

DOI 10.1038/ng.3768
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 77
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, John Attia
2017 Hobden B, Carey M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, 'Clinician identification of elevated symptoms of depression among individuals seeking treatment for substance misuse.', Drug and alcohol dependence, 181 71-76 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.09.013
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2017 Regan T, Paul C, Ishiguchi P, D Este C, Koller C, Forshaw K, et al., 'Comparison of two sources of clinical audit data to assess the delivery of diabetes care in aboriginal communities', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14101236
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Natasha Noble, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal resilience intervention in reducing tobacco, alcohol and illicit substance use in a population of adolescents: cluster-randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016060
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Attia, Megan Freund
2017 Fletcher R, Kay-Lambkin F, May C, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Leigh L, 'Supporting men through their transition to fatherhood with messages delivered to their smartphones: a feasibility study of SMS4dads', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4978-0
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, John Attia, Frances Kaylambkin
2017 Abdullah N, Abdul Murad NA, Mohd Haniff EA, Syafruddin SE, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Predicting type 2 diabetes using genetic and environmental risk factors in a multi-ethnic Malaysian cohort', Public Health, 149 31-38 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health Objective Malaysia has a high and rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). While environmental (non-genetic) risk factors for the dis... [more]

© 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health Objective Malaysia has a high and rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). While environmental (non-genetic) risk factors for the disease are well established, the role of genetic variations and gene¿environment interactions remain understudied in this population. This study aimed to estimate the relative contributions of environmental and genetic risk factors to T2D in Malaysia and also to assess evidence for gene¿environment interactions that may explain additional risk variation. Study design This was a case¿control study including 1604 Malays, 1654 Chinese and 1728 Indians from the Malaysian Cohort Project. Methods The proportion of T2D risk variance explained by known genetic and environmental factors was assessed by fitting multivariable logistic regression models and evaluating McFadden's pseudo R2and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Models with and without the genetic risk score (GRS) were compared using the log likelihood ratio Chi-squared test and AUCs. Multiplicative interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors was assessed via logistic regression within and across ancestral groups. Interactions were assessed for the GRS and its 62 constituent variants. Results The models including environmental risk factors only had pseudo R2values of 16.5¿28.3% and AUC of 0.75¿0.83. Incorporating a genetic score aggregating 62 T2D-associated risk variants significantly increased the model fit (likelihood ratio P-value of 2.50 × 10-4¿4.83 × 10-12) and increased the pseudo R2by about 1¿2% and AUC by 1¿3%. None of the gene¿environment interactions reached significance after multiple testing adjustment, either for the GRS or individual variants. For individual variants, 33 out of 310 tested associations showed nominal statistical significance with 0.001 < P < 0.05. Conclusion This study suggests that known genetic risk variants contribute a significant but small amount to overall T2D risk variation in Malaysian population groups. If gene¿environment interactions involving common genetic variants exist, they are likely of small effect, requiring substantially larger samples for detection.

DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2017.04.003
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2017 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'Are Australian general practice patients appropriately screened for colorectal cancer? A cross-sectional study', Australasian Medical Journal, 10 610-619 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Background Australia has one of the highest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the world. Data from the Nationa... [more]

© 2017, Australasian Medical Journal Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Background Australia has one of the highest rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the world. Data from the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) suggests that only one third of Australians eligible for CRC screening are up-to-date with CRC screening; however screening occurring outside the program is not captured. Aims This study examines the self-reported CRC screening practices of general practice patients, and the factors associated with being under-screened for CRC. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted in five general practice clinics in NSW from 2015-2017. Participants were aged 50-75 and at average risk of CRC. Participants reported whether they had a faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the past two years, including the source of FOBT; and whether they had a colonoscopy in the past five years and the reason for colonoscopy. Results Forty-nine per cent of participants completed a FOBT in the past two years. Of these, 62 per cent sourced their FOBT from the NBCSP and 25 per cent from their general practitioner. Thirty-seven per cent of participants reported colonoscopy in the past five years. Of these, 29 per cent received potentially inappropriate colonoscopy. Thirty-two per cent of the samples were classified as under-screened. Older adults were less likely to be under-screened. Conclusion CRC screening rates were higher than those reported by the NBCSP, however a significant proportion of participants remain under-screened. Over one-quarter of participants reporting colonoscopy in the past five years may have undergone unnecessary colonoscopy. These findings indicate that more needs to be done at a general practice level to facilitate risk-appropriate CRC screening.

DOI 10.21767/AMJ.2017.3041
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Natalie Dodd, Elise Mansfield
2017 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Oldmeadow C, Barker D, Callister R, 'Efficacy of Web-Based Weight Loss Maintenance Programs: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Standard Features Versus the Addition of Enhanced Personalized Feedback over 12 Months.', Behavioral sciences (Basel, Switzerland), 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/bs7040076
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Daniel Barker, Robin Callister
2017 Dodd N, Carey ML, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'Testing the Effectiveness of a Primary Care Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 6 (2017)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.7432
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey, Natalie Dodd
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, et al., 'Systematic Review of Universal Resilience-Focused Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 56 813-824 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems i... [more]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems in children and adolescents. Method Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of universal, school-based interventions that included strategies to strengthen a minimum of 3 internal resilience protective factors, and included an outcome measure of mental health problems in children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years. Six databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Results were pooled in meta-analyses by mental health outcome (anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, hyperactivity, conduct problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress), for all trials (5-18 years). Subgroup analyses were conducted by age (child: 5-10 years; adolescent: 11-18 years), length of follow-up (short: post-=12 months; long: >12 months), and gender (narrative). Results A total of 57 included trials were identified from 5,984 records, with 49 contributing to meta-analyses. For all trials, resilience-focused interventions were effective relative to a control in reducing 4 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. For child trials (meta-analyses for 6 outcomes), interventions were effective for anxiety symptoms and general psychological distress. For adolescent trials (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. For short-term follow-up, interventions were effective for 2 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. For long-term follow-up (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. Conclusion The findings may suggest most promise for using universal resilience-focused interventions at least for short-term reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms for children and adolescents, particularly if a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based approach is used. The limited number of trials providing data amenable for meta-analysis for some outcomes and subgroups, the variability of interventions, study quality, and bias mean that it is not possible to draw more specific conclusions. Identifying what intervention qualities (such as number and type of protective factor) achieve the greatest positive effect per mental health problem outcome remains an important area for future research. Systematic review protocol and registration Systematic Review of Universal Resilience Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting; http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6; PROSPERO CRD42015025908.

DOI 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.780
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Megan Freund, Kate Bartlem, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2017 Zeev YB, Bonevski B, Twyman L, Watt K, Atkins L, Palazzi K, et al., 'Opportunities missed: A cross-sectional survey of the provision of smoking cessation care to pregnant women by Australian General Practitioners and Obstetricians', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 19 636-641 (2017) [C1]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Similar to other high-income countries, smoking rates in pregnancy can be high in specific vulnerable groups in Australia. Several clinical guidel... [more]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Similar to other high-income countries, smoking rates in pregnancy can be high in specific vulnerable groups in Australia. Several clinical guidelines exist, including the 5A's (Ask, Advice, Assess, Assist, and Arrange), ABCD (Ask, Brief advice, Cessation, and Discuss), and AAR (Ask, Advice, and Refer). There is lack of data on provision of smoking cessation care (SCC) of Australian General Practitioners (GPs) and Obstetricians. Methods: A cross-sectional survey explored the provision of SCC, barriers and enablers using the Theoretical Domains Framework, and the associations between them. Two samples were invited: (1) GPs and Obstetricians from a college database (n = 5571) (2) GPs from a special interest group for Indigenous health (n = 500). Dimension reduction for the Theoretical Domains Framework was achieved with factor analysis. Logistic regression was carried out for performing all the 5A's and the AAR. Results: Performing all of the 5A's, ABCD, and AAR "often and always" was reported by 19.9%, 15.6%, and 49.2% respectively. "Internal influences" (such as confidence in counselling) were associated with higher performance of the 5A's (Adjusted OR 2.69 (95% CI 1.5, 4.8), p <.001), whereas "External influences" (such as workplace routine) were associated with higher performance of AAR (Adjusted OR 1.7 (95% CI 1, 2.8), p =.035). Conclusions: Performance in providing SCC to pregnant women is low among Australian GPs and Obstetricians. Training clinicians should focus on improving internal influences such as confidence and optimism. The AAR may be easier to implement, and interventions at the service level should focus on ensuring easy, effective, and acceptable referral mechanisms are in place. Implications: Improving provision of the 5A's approach should focus on the individual level, including better training for GPs and Obstetricians, designed to improve specific "internal" barriers such as confidence in counselling and optimism. The AAR may be easier to implement in view of the higher overall performance of this approach. Interventions on a more systemic level need to ensure easy, effective, and acceptable referral mechanisms are in place. More research is needed specifically on the acceptability of the Quitline for pregnant women, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntw331
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megan Freund, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers
2016 Pezdirc K, Hutchesson MJ, Williams RL, Rollo ME, Burrows TL, Wood LG, et al., 'Consuming High-Carotenoid Fruit and Vegetables Influences Skin Yellowness and Plasma Carotenoids in Young Women: A Single-Blind Randomized Crossover Trial', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 116 1257-1265 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Background Consumption of dietary carotenoids from fruits and vegetables (F/V) leads to accumulations in human skin, altering skin yellow... [more]

© 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Background Consumption of dietary carotenoids from fruits and vegetables (F/V) leads to accumulations in human skin, altering skin yellowness. The influence of the quantity of F/V consumed on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations has not been examined previously. Objective To compare the influence of consuming high-carotenoid-containing F/V (HCFV) (176,425 µg beta carotene/wk) vs low-carotenoid F/V (LCFV) (2,073 µg beta carotene/wk) on skin yellowness and plasma carotenoid concentrations, over 4 weeks. Design and intervention A single-blind randomized controlled crossover trial from October 2013 to March 2014. Thirty women were randomized to receive 7 daily servings of HCFV or LCFV for 4 weeks. Following a 2-week washout period they followed the alternate intervention. Main outcome measures Skin color (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* color space, where L* represents skin lightness and positive values of a* and b* represent degrees of redness and yellowness, respectively) was assessed by reflectance spectroscopy in both sun-exposed and nonexposed skin areas. Fasting plasma carotenoids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, before and after each intervention period. Statistical analyses performed Linear mixed models were used to determine the HCFV and LCFV response on skin color and plasma carotenoids, adjusting for intervention order, time, and interaction between baseline differences and time. Results There were no significant differences in mean daily fruit (P=0.42) and vegetable (P=0.17) intakes between HCFV and LCFV groups. Dietary alpha carotene, beta carotene, lutein, and beta cryptoxanthin intakes were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01). Following HCFV there was a significantly greater increase in skin yellowness (b*) in both sun-exposed (P<0.001) and unexposed areas, (P<0.001), with no change in skin lightness (L*) or redness (a*). Significantly higher plasma alpha carotene (P=0.004), beta carotene (P=0.001), and lutein (P=0.028) concentrations were found following the HCFV intervention. Skin yellowness correlated with alpha carotene and beta carotene. Conclusions Skin yellowness (b*) and fasting plasma carotenoid concentrations were significantly higher following HCFV than LCFV over 4 weeks.

DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2016.03.012
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Lisa Wood, Megan Rollo, Kristine Pezdirc, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2016 Sutherland RL, Campbell EM, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The Physical Activity 4 Everyone Cluster Randomized Trial: 2-Year Outcomes of a School Physical Activity Intervention Among Adolescents.', Am J Prev Med, 51 195-205 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.020
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Nicole Nathan, David Lubans, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2016 Turnock A, Morgan S, Henderson K, Tapley A, Van Driel M, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' involvement in consultations of general practitioner registrars: A cross-sectional analysis', Australian Health Review, 40 92-99 (2016) [C1]

© AHHA 2016. Objective To establish prevalence and associations of general practice nurses&apos; (GPNs) involvement in general practitioner (GP) registrars&apos; consultations. Me... [more]

© AHHA 2016. Objective To establish prevalence and associations of general practice nurses' (GPNs) involvement in general practitioner (GP) registrars' consultations. Methods A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of registrars' clinical consultations in five Australian states. Registrars recorded detailed data from 60 consecutive consultations per 6-month training term. Problems and diagnoses encountered, including chronic disease classification, were coded using the International Classification of Primary Care, second edition duplication system (ICPC-2plus) classification system. The outcome factor in our analysis was GPN involvement in management of individual problems and diagnoses. Independent variables were a range of patient, registrar, practice, consultation and educational factors. Results We analysed 108759 consultations of 856 registrars including 169307 problems or diagnoses. Of the problems/diagnoses, 5.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.0-5.2) involved a GPN. Follow-up with a GPN was organised for 1.5% (95% CI 1.4-1.5) of all problems/diagnoses. Significant associations of GPN involvement included patient age, male sex, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status, non-English-speaking background (NESB) and the patient being new to the practice. Larger practice size, the particular training organisation, and the problem/diagnosis being new and not a chronic disease were other associations. Conclusions Associations with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status and NESB status suggest GPNs are addressing healthcare needs of these under-serviced groups. But GPNs may be underutilised in chronic disease care. What is known about this topic? GPNs are increasingly involved in team-based care in Australian general practice. The potential positive contribution of GPNs to general practice teams is acknowledged, but the role of the GPN is still being refined. What does this paper add? GPNs contribute to the care of a modest proportion of patients seen by GP registrars. Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander status and NESB of patients are positively associated with being seen by a GPN; chronic disease is negatively associated with being seen by a GPN. There is geographic variability in prevalence of GPN consultations, not explained by other factors. What are the implications for practitioners? Given the match of GPN skills and attributes to the needs of patients with chronic diseases, GPNs currently may be underutilised in chronic disease care in Australian general practice. The marked geographic variation in uptake of GPNs also suggests scope for greater utilisation of GPNs Australia-wide.

DOI 10.1071/AH15010
Co-authors Parker Magin
2016 Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Oldmeadow C, Mansfield E, Walsh J, 'Improving self-management of cancer risk factors, underscreening for cancer and depression among general practice patients: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014782
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield
2016 Okbay A, Baselmans BML, De Neve JE, Turley P, Nivard MG, Fontana MA, et al., 'Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses', Nature Genetics, 48 624-633 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Nature America, Inc. Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subje... [more]

© 2016 Nature America, Inc. Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (P = 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association.

DOI 10.1038/ng.3552
Citations Scopus - 158Web of Science - 143
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday
2016 Gunathilake R, Oldmeadow C, McEvoy M, Inder KJ, Schofield PW, Nair BR, Attia J, 'The Association Between Obesity and Cognitive Function in Older Persons: How Much Is Mediated by Inflammation, Fasting Plasma Glucose, and Hypertriglyceridemia?', J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci, 71 1603-1608 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glw070
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Peter Schofield, Mark Mcevoy, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2016 De Vries PS, Chasman DI, Sabater-Lleal M, Chen MH, Huffman JE, Steri M, et al., 'A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration', Human Molecular Genetics, 25 358-370 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentr... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels.We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ~120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indelswere examined.We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18were newly identified. Therewere no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration.

DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddv454
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday, Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse
2016 Dallas A, van Driel M, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Ball J, et al., 'Antibiotic prescribing for sore throat: A cross-sectional analysis of the ReCEnT study exploring the habits of early-career doctors in family practice', Family Practice, 33 302-308 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background: Acute sore throat is a common condition presenting to family practitioners. It is usually... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background: Acute sore throat is a common condition presenting to family practitioners. It is usually self-limiting, with antibiotic treatment recommended only for high-risk presentations. Overprescribing of antibiotics contributes to individual and community resistance. Learning to prescribe in the context of diagnostic uncertainty and patient pressures is a challenge for early-career doctors. Prescribing habits develop early and tend not to change with time. Objective: To establish the prevalence and associations of antibiotic prescribing for acute sore throat by Australian vocational trainees in family practice. Method: A cross-sectional analysis of data from the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study. This ongoing, multicentre prospective cohort study documents the nature of trainees' consultation-based clinical experiences. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted on data recorded in consultations for sore throat in nine collection periods during 2010-14. Results: Data from 856 individual trainees (response rate 95.2%) were analysed. Sore throat was managed in 2.3% encounters. Antibiotics were prescribed for 71.5% of sore throat diagnoses. The variables associated with prescribing were inner-regional location and higher socio-economic area. There was no significant association with younger age of patient or greater trainee experience. If an antibiotic was prescribed, the trainee was more likely to seek information from guidelines or a supervisor. Conclusions: The high frequency of antibiotic prescribing and the lack of attenuation in prescribing with increased experience suggest current educational interventions and the apprenticeship model of training is not fostering appropriate practice in this important clinical area. Targeted educational interventions, for supervisors as well as trainees, are indicated.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw014
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Parker Magin
2016 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Thornton L, Lappin JM, Hanstock T, Sylvia L, Jacka F, et al., 'Study protocol for a systematic review of evidence for lifestyle interventions targeting smoking, sleep, alcohol/other drug use, physical activity, and healthy diet in people with bipolar disorder', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as car... [more]

© 2016 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: People with bipolar disorder (BD) have a mortality gap of up to 20 years compared to the general population. Physical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, cause the majority of excess deaths in psychiatric populations and are the leading causes of mortality in people with BD. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to reducing the risk of physical conditions in psychiatric populations. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are among the potentially modifiable risk factors for a range of commonly comorbid chronic medical conditions, including CVD, diabetes, and obesity. This systematic review will identify and evaluate the available evidence for effective interventions to reduce risk and promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in BD. Methods/design: We will search MEDLINE, Embase, PsychINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and CINAHL for published research studies (with at least an abstract published in English) that evaluate behavioral or psychosocial interventions to address the following lifestyle factors in people with BD: tobacco use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, overweight or obesity, sleep-wake disturbance, and alcohol/other drug use. Primary outcomes for the review will be changes in tobacco use, level of physical activity, diet quality, sleep quality, alcohol use, and illicit drug use. Data on each primary outcome will be synthesized across available studies in that lifestyle area (e.g., tobacco abstinence, cigarettes smoked per day), and panel of research and clinical experts in each of the target lifestyle behaviors and those experienced with clinical and research with individuals with BD will determine how best to represent data related to that primary outcome. Seven members of the systematic review team will extract data, synthesize the evidence, and rate it for quality. Evidence will be synthesized via a narrative description of the behavioral interventions and their effectiveness in improving the healthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. Discussion: The planned review will synthesize and evaluate the available evidence regarding the behavioral or psychosocial treatment of lifestyle-related behaviors in people with BD. From this review, we will identify gaps in our existing knowledge and research evidence about the management of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors in people with BD. We will also identify potential opportunities to address lifestyle behaviors in BD, with a view to reducing the burden of physical ill-health in this population. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015019993

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0282-9
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Tanya Hanstock, Sally Hunt, Frances Kaylambkin, Simon Dennis, Robin Callister, Amanda Baker
2016 Faulkner S, Roselli S, Demont Y, Pundavela J, Choquet G, Leissner P, et al., 'ProNGF is a potential diagnostic biomarker for thyroid cancer', Oncotarget, 7 28488-28497 (2016) [C1]

The precursor for nerve growth factor (proNGF) is expressed in some cancers but its clinicopathological significance is unclear. The present study aimed to define the clinicopatho... [more]

The precursor for nerve growth factor (proNGF) is expressed in some cancers but its clinicopathological significance is unclear. The present study aimed to define the clinicopathological significance of proNGF in thyroid cancer. ProNGF expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry in two cohorts of cancer versus benign tumors (adenoma) and normal thyroid tissues. In the first cohort (40 thyroid cancers, 40 thyroid adenomas and 80 normal thyroid tissues), proNGF was found overexpressed in cancers compared to adenomas and normal samples (p<0.0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.93, p<0.0001) for cancers versus adenomas, and 0.99 (95% CI 0.98-1.00, p<0.0001) for cancers versus normal tissues. ProNGF overexpression was confirmed in a second cohort (127 cancers of various histological types and 55 normal thyroid tissues) and using a different antibody (p<0.0001). ProNGF staining intensity was highest in papillary carcinomas compared to other histological types (p<0.0001) and there was no significant association with age, gender, tumor size, stage and lymph node status. In conclusion, proNGF is increased in thyroid cancer and should be considered as a new potential diagnostic biomarker.

DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.8652
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Sam Faulkner, Hubert Hondermarck, John Attia, Marjorie Walker
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC Medical Research Methodology, 16 1-10 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low c... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results: A total of 1947 patients (80.6 %) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 %) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %). Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. Conclusions: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0238-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden, Andrew Searles, Elizabeth Fradgley, Frans Henskens, Alison Zucca
2016 Mandaliya H, Ansari Z, Evans T, Oldmeadow C, George M, 'Psychosocial analysis of cancer survivors in rural Australia: Focus on demographics, quality of life and financial domains', Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 17 2459-2464 (2016) [C1]

Background: Cancer treatments can have long-term physical, psychological, financial, sexual and cognitive effects that may influence the quality of life. These can vary from urban... [more]

Background: Cancer treatments can have long-term physical, psychological, financial, sexual and cognitive effects that may influence the quality of life. These can vary from urban to rural areas, survival period and according to the type of cancer. We here aimed to describe demographics and psychosocial analysis of cancer survivors three to five years post-treatment in rural Australia and also assess relationships with financial stress and quality of life domains. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 65 participants visiting the outpatient oncology clinic were given a self-administered questionnaire. The inclusion criteria included three to five years post-treatment. Three domains were investigated using standardised and validated tools such as the Standard Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors Scale (QLACS) and the Personal and Household Finances (HILDA) survey. Included were demographic parameters, quality of life, treatment information and well-being. Results: There was no evidence of associations between any demographic variable and either financial stress or cancer-specific quality of life domains. Financial stress was however significantly associated with the cancerspecific quality of life domains of appearance-related concerns, family related distress, and distress related to recurrence. Conclusions: This unique study effectively points to psychosocial aspects of cancer survivors in rural regions of Australia. Although the majority of demographic characteristics were not been found to be associated with financial stress, this latter itself is significantly associated with distress related to family and cancer recurrence. This finding may be of assistance in future studies and also considering plans to fulfil unmet needs.

DOI 10.7314/APJCP.2016.17.5.2459
Citations Scopus - 1
2016 Clover KA, Oldmeadow C, Nelson L, Rogers K, Mitchell AJ, Carter G, 'Which items on the distress thermometer problem list are the most distressing?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 4549-4557 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: The importance of distress identification and management in oncology has been established. We examined the relationship between... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: The importance of distress identification and management in oncology has been established. We examined the relationship between distress and unmet bio-psychosocial needs, applying advanced statistical techniques, to identify which needs have the closest relationship to distress. Methods: Oncology outpatients (n¿=¿1066) undergoing QUICATOUCH screening in an Australian cancer centre completed the distress thermometer (DT) and problem list (PL). Principal component analysis (PCA), logistic regression and classification and regression tree (CART) analyses tested the relationship between DT score (at a cut-off point of 4) and PL items. Results: Sixteen items were reported by <5¿% of participants. PCA analysis identified four major components. Logistic regression analysis indicated three of these component scores, and four individual items (20 items in total) demonstrated a significant independent relationship with distress. The best CART model contained only two PL items: ¿worry¿ and ¿depression¿. Conclusions: The DT and PL function as intended, quantifying negative emotional experience (distress) and identifying bio-psychosocial sources of distress. We offer two suggestions to minimise PL response time whilst targeting PL items most related to distress, thereby increasing clinical utility. To identify patients who might require specialised psychological services, we suggest the DT followed by a short, case-finding instrument for patients over threshold on the DT. To identify other important sources of distress, we suggest using a modified PL of 14 key items, with the 15th item ¿any other problem¿ as a simple safety net question. Shorter times for patient completion and clinician response to endorsed PL items will maximise acceptance and clinical utility.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3294-z
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2016 Lai JS, Oldmeadow C, Hure AJ, McEvoy M, Byles J, Attia J, 'Longitudinal diet quality is not associated with depressive symptoms in a cohort of middle-aged Australian women', British Journal of Nutrition, 115 842-850 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © The Authors 2016. There is increasing evidence for the role of nutrition in the prevention of depression. This study aims to describe changes in diet quality over 12 y... [more]

Copyright © The Authors 2016. There is increasing evidence for the role of nutrition in the prevention of depression. This study aims to describe changes in diet quality over 12 years among participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in relation to changes in depressive symptoms. Women born between 1946 and 1951 were followed-up for 12 years (2001-2013). Dietary intake was assessed using the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies (version 2) in 2001, 2007 and every 2-3 years after that until 2013. Diet quality was summarised using the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS). Depressive symptoms were measured using the ten-item Centre for Epidemiologic Depression Scale at every 2-3-year intervals during 2001-2013. Linear mixed models were used to examine trends in diet quality and its sub-components. The same model including time-varying covariates was used to examine associations between diet quality and depressive symptoms adjusting for confounders. Sensitivity analyses were carried out using the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP) index to assess diet quality. Minimal changes in overall diet quality and its sub-components over 12 years were observed. There was a significant association between baseline diet quality and depression (ß=-0 24, P=0 001), but this was lost when time-varying covariates were added (ß=-0 04, P=0 10). Sensitivity analyses showed similar performance for both ARFS and MDP in predicting depressive symptoms. In conclusion, initial associations seen when using baseline measures of diet quality and depressive symptoms disappear when using methods that handle time-varying covariates, suggesting that previous studies indicating a relationship between diet and depression may have been affected by residual confounding.

DOI 10.1017/S000711451500519X
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Julie Byles, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2016 Fradgley EA, Paul CL, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'Getting right to the point: Identifying Australian outpatients' priorities and preferences for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease care', International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 28 470-477 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify spec... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. Objectives: To identify specific actions for patient-centred quality improvement in chronic disease outpatient settings, this study identified patients' general and specific preferences among a comprehensive suite of initiatives for change.Design and setting: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three hospital-based clinics specializing in oncology, neurology and cardiology care located in New South Wales, Australia.Participants and measures: Adult English-speaking outpatients completed the touch-screen Consumer Preferences Survey in waiting rooms or treatment areas. Participants selected up to 23 general initiatives that would improve their experience. Using adaptive branching, participants could select an additional 110 detailed initiatives and complete a relative prioritization exercise.Results: A total of 541 individuals completed the survey (71.1% consent, 73.1% completion). Commonly selected general initiatives, presented in order of decreasing priority (along with sample proportion), included: improved parking (60.3%), up-to-date information provision (15.0%), ease of clinic contact (12.9%), access to information at home (12.8%), convenient appointment scheduling (14.2%), reduced wait-times (19.8%) and information on medical emergencies (11.1%). To address these general initiatives, 40 detailed initiatives were selected by respondents.Conclusions: Initiatives targeting service accessibility and information provision, such as parking and up-to-date information on patient prognoses and progress, were commonly selected and perceived to be of relatively greater priority. Specific preferences included the need for clinics to provide patient-designated parking in close proximity to the clinic, information on treatment progress and test results (potentially in the form of designated brief appointments or via telehealth) and comprehensive and trustworthy lists of information sources to access at home.

DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzw049
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Hure AJ, Jensen M, Oldmeadow C, 'Maternal diet during early childhood, but not pregnancy, predicts diet quality and fruit and vegetable acceptance in offspring', Maternal and Child Nutrition, 12 579-590 (2016) [C1]

© 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Studies have identified prenatal flavour exposure as a determinant of taste preferences in infants; however, these studies have focused on relat... [more]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Studies have identified prenatal flavour exposure as a determinant of taste preferences in infants; however, these studies have focused on relatively small samples and limited flavours. As many parents struggle with getting children to accept a variety of nutritious foods, a study of the factors influencing food acceptance is warranted. The objective of this study was to determine whether exposure to a wider variety of fruit and vegetables and overall higher diet quality in utero results in acceptance of a greater variety of these foods and better diet quality for offspring during childhood. This study is a secondary data analysis of pregnant women (n = 52) and their resulting offspring recruited for the Women and Their Children's Health study in NSW, Australia. Dietary intake of mothers and children was measured using food frequency questionnaires. Diet quality and vegetable and fruit variety were calculated using the Australian Recommended Food Score and the Australian Child and Adolescent Recommended Food Score. Associations between maternal and child diet quality and variety were assessed using Pearson's correlations and the total effect of in utero maternal pregnancy diet on childhood diet was decomposed into direct and indirect effect using mediation analysis. Maternal pregnancy and post-natal diet were both correlated with child diet for overall diet quality and fruit and vegetable variety (P < 0.001). Mediation analyses showed that the indirect effect of maternal pregnancy diet on child diet was mediated through maternal post-natal diet, particularly for fruit (P = 0.045) and vegetables (P = 0.055). Nutrition intervention should therefore be aimed at improving diet quality and variety in mothers with young children, in order to subsequently improve eating habits of offspring.

DOI 10.1111/mcn.12151
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Megan Jensen, Alexis Hure
2016 Okbay A, Beauchamp JP, Fontana MA, Lee JJ, Pers TH, Rietveld CA, et al., 'Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment.', Nature, 533 539-542 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/nature17671
Citations Scopus - 226Web of Science - 215
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2016 Anderson D, Phelan H, Jones K, Smart C, Oldmeadow C, King B, Crock P, 'Evaluation of a novel continuous glucose monitoring guided system for adjustment of insulin dosing¿¿¿PumpTune: a randomized controlled trial', Pediatric Diabetes, 17 478-482 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley &amp; Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Objective: Retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can guide insulin pump adjustments, howev... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Objective: Retrospective continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can guide insulin pump adjustments, however, interpretation of data and recommending new pump settings is complex and subjective. We aimed to compare the safety and glycaemic profiles of children after their diabetologist or a novel algorithm (PumpTune) adjusted their insulin pump settings. Research design and methods: In a randomized cross-over trial of 22 patients aged 6¿14 yr with type 1 diabetes with mean Hba1c 7.4% (57 mmol/mol) using CSII, CGM was used over two periods each of 6.5 d to assess percentage time glucose remained within, above and below 3.9¿10.0 mmol/L. Before the start of one period pump settings were adjusted by the patient's diabetologist, and before the other insulin pump settings were adjusted by PumpTune. Results: A total of 63.4% of the sensor glucose levels were within target range with PumpTune settings and 57.4% were within range with the clinician settings (p = 0.016). The time spent above target range with PumpTune was 26.9% and with clinician settings was 33.5% (p = 0.021). The time spent below target range with PumpTune was 9.7% and with clinician settings was 9.2% (p = 0.77). The mean number of times when a sensor glucose level <2.75 mmol/L was recorded with PumpTune settings was 2.9 compared with 3.7 with clinician settings (p = 0.39). There were no serious adverse outcomes and no difference in parent-assessed satisfaction. Conclusions: Automated insulin pump adjustment with PumpTune is feasible and warrants testing in a larger more varied population over a longer time. In this well-controlled group of children, PumpTune achieved a more favorable glucose profile.

DOI 10.1111/pedi.12332
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Carmel Smart, Bruce King
2016 Hure A, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, 'Invited Commentary: Improving Estimates of Severe Acute Malnutrition Requires More Data', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 184 870-872 (2016)
DOI 10.1093/aje/kww131
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Attia, Alexis Hure
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'The association between cannabis use and motivation and intentions to quit tobacco within a sample of Australian socioeconomically disadvantaged smokers.', Health Educ Res, 31 771-781 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyw049
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Frances Kaylambkin, Jamie Bryant, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Anne S, Tse R, Oldmeadow C, Attia JR, Cala AD, 'Immersion of bovine eyeballs after 1 hour in seawater does not result in elevation of postmortem vitreous humor sodium and chloride levels', American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, 37 108-111 (2016) [C1]

© Copyright 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Elevations in postmortem vitreous sodium chloride (PMVSC) levels may help in differentiating saltwater/seawater drowning (SWD) deaths ... [more]

© Copyright 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Elevations in postmortem vitreous sodium chloride (PMVSC) levels may help in differentiating saltwater/seawater drowning (SWD) deaths from immersion deaths not related to drowning (DNRD). It is unclear whether the elevation is related to blood/plasma electrolyte changes after inhalation of seawater as hypothesized in SWDs or possibly caused by electrolyte diffusion and/or osmosis across the outer coats of the eyeball during immersion. Aim: To investigate the changes in bovine PMVSC levels at different time points while immersed in seawater. Methods: Bovine eyeballs were obtained from an abattoir and randomized into 2 groups: A) submerged in seawater ("wet" group) or b) placed in an impermeable plastic bag that was immersed in seawater ("dry" group). The PMVSC levels from 6 eyeballs were measured from each group (without replacement) at 30 minutes, 1 hour, 6 hours, and 12 hours. Results: There was no significant difference in mean PMVSC levels between the 2 groups at 30-minute and 1-hour intervals. A significant difference was noted from 6 hours onward. Discussion: There is no statistically significant elevation in bovine PMVSC levels when immersed in seawater for up to 1 hour. Assuming similar physical properties in humans, any elevations in PMVSC levels in bodies immersed in seawater for less than 1 hour should not be caused by immersion.

DOI 10.1097/PAF.0000000000000229
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Attia
2016 Garland J, Tse R, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Anne S, Cala AD, 'Elevation of post mortem vitreous humour sodium and chloride levels can be used as a reliable test in cases of suspected salt water drowning when the immersion times are less than one hour', Forensic Science International, 266 338-342 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Background Previous studies in salt water drowning deaths (SWD) demonstrated an observable elevation of post mortem vitreous sodium and chloride (PMVSC) levels. It remains ... [more]

© 2016 Background Previous studies in salt water drowning deaths (SWD) demonstrated an observable elevation of post mortem vitreous sodium and chloride (PMVSC) levels. It remains unclear what the underlying mechanism responsible for this change is: whether this is due to rapid electrolyte changes from salt water inhalation/ingestion during drowning or from electrolyte diffusion and/or osmosis across the outer coats of the eyeballs during immersion. A recent animal study using sacrificed bovine eyeballs immersed in salt water demonstrated no significant elevations in PMVSC when immersed for less than one hour. Assuming similar physical properties between human and bovine, we extrapolate that an elevation in PMVSC in SWD with immersion times of less than one hour (SWD-1) would not be from immersion, but from drowning. Aim Investigate whether there is an elevation in PMVSC in SWD-1. Methods Retrospective study comparing PMVSC in SWD-1 with controls from 2012 to 2015 inclusive. Results PMVSC in SWD-1 was significantly elevated compared with controls. A PMVSC of 259¿mmol/L has a sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio of 0.9, 0.9 and 7.6, respectively. Conclusion The elevation in PMVSC in SWD-1 is due to drowning. A PMVSC of 259¿mmol/L and above is a reliable ancillary test in diagnosing drowning in bodies immersed in salt water for less than one hour.

DOI 10.1016/j.forsciint.2016.06.001
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Attia
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Paul C, D¿Este C, Twyman L, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, 'Self-Exempting Beliefs and Intention to Quit Smoking within a Socially Disadvantaged Australian Sample of Smokers', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13 118-118 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph13010118
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Fradgley EA, Bryant J, Paul CL, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Oldmeadow C, 'Cross-sectional data that explore the relationship between outpatients' quality of life and preferences for quality improvement in oncology settings', Journal of Oncology Practice, 12 e746-e754 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients&apos; quality improvement prefe... [more]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients' quality improvement preferences and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Implementation of specific initiatives preferred by patients with lower HRQoL may be a strategic approach to enhancing care for potentially vulnerable patients. Methods English-speaking adults were recruited from five outpatient chemotherapy clinics located in New South Wales, Australia. Using touch screen devices, participants selected up to 25 initiatives that would improve their experiences and completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) survey. The logistic odds of selecting an initiative according to FACT-G scores were calculated to determine whether preferences were associated with HRQoL after controlling for potential confounders. Results Of the 411 eligible outpatients approached to participate, 263 (64%) completed surveys. Commonly selected initiatives were up-to-date information on treatment and condition progress (19.8%), access to or information on financial assistance (18.3%), and reduced clinic wait times (17.5%). For those with relatively lower FACT-G scores, the adjusted odds of selecting five initiatives illustrated an increasing trend: convenient appointment scheduling systems (+23% [P =.002]), reduced wait times (+15% [P =.01]), information on medical emergencies (+14% [P =.04]), access to or information on financial assistance (+15% [P =.009]), help to maintain daily living activities (+18% [P =.007]). Conclusion Two areas of improvement were commonly selected: easily accessible health services and information and support for self-management. Although the results suggest an association between a few quality improvement preferences and HRQoL, a wider spectrum of patient characteristics must be considered when targeting quality improvement to patient subgroups.

DOI 10.1200/JOP.2016.011023
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2016 Hollis JL, Sutherland R, Campbell L, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Nathan N, et al., 'Effects of a 'school-based' physical activity intervention on adiposity in adolescents from economically disadvantaged communities: secondary outcomes of the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' RCT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 40 1486-1493 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2016.107
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Jenna Hollis, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Thomson A, Morgan S, O'Mara P, Tapley A, Henderson K, Van Driel M, et al., 'Clinical encounters of Australian general practice registrars with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 S75-S80 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors. Objective: General practice is central to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, and this area is a core element of Australian general practice (GP... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. Objective: General practice is central to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, and this area is a core element of Australian general practice (GP) training. We aimed to describe the prevalence, nature and associations of GP registrar encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis from a cohort study of GP registrars' clinical consultations 2010-2013. Registrars record demographic, clinical and educational details of consecutive patient encounters. Multivariable associations were tested with logistic regression. Results: A total of 592 registrars contributed data from 69,188 consultations. Encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients comprised 1.0% of consultations. Significant positive associations included younger patient age; new patient to the registrar; lower socioeconomic status of practice location; non-urban practice setting; more problems managed; and follow-up arranged. A greater proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients' problems were psychological/social and a lesser proportion were cardiovascular. Consultation duration did not differ between the two groups Conclusions: GP registrars encounter Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients less than do established GPs. Our results suggest possible variability in registrar experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Implications: Our findings will inform training of a culturally and clinically competent workforce in this area.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12412
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Parker Magin
2016 Lai JS, Oldmeadow C, Hure AJ, McEvoy M, Hiles SA, Boyle M, Attia J, 'Inflammation mediates the association between fatty acid intake and depression in older men and women', Nutrition Research, 36 234-245 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Antioxidants and fatty acids are associated with depression and inflammation, and inflammation appears to predict depression risk; hence, the associations bet... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. Antioxidants and fatty acids are associated with depression and inflammation, and inflammation appears to predict depression risk; hence, the associations between these nutrients and depression may be mediated by inflammation. We hypothesized that inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) mediate the associations between antioxidant and fatty acid intakes, and depression. Participants were from the Hunter Community Study, a longitudinal cohort of adults aged 55-85 years. Dietary intake was assessed using the Older Australian's Food Frequency Questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were drawn for analysis of nutrient and inflammatory biomarkers. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale at baseline and at 5-year follow-up. Linear mixed models were used to investigate longitudinal associations between dietary intakes and depression, and mediation analyses were carried out to determine if IL-6 and/or CRP were the mediators. Analyses were conducted on men and women separately and adjusted for potential confounders. Fruit and monounsaturated fat intakes were negatively associated with depression, whereas total fat and saturated fat intakes were positively associated with depression in both sexes. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fat was inversely associated with depression in men only. IL-6 was a significant mediator of the association between fruits with low carotenoid content and depression in women. CRP significantly mediated the relationship between total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat intakes and depression in women, and saturated fat intake and depression in men. Our findings raise the possibility that the association between fatty acid intake and depression is partially mediated by inflammatory markers.

DOI 10.1016/j.nutres.2015.11.017
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, John Attia, Sarah Hiles, Alexis Hure
2016 Thomson A, Morgan S, O'Mara P, Tapley A, Henderson K, Van Driel M, et al., 'The recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice clinical records: A cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 S70-S74 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors. Objectives: To document the frequency of recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice (GP) clinical records and to establish a... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. Objectives: To document the frequency of recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice (GP) clinical records and to establish associations of this recording. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of recording of patients' Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in GP clinical records from GP training practices in four Australian states. Results: Of the 9,704 clinical records examined, the patients' Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status had been documented in 5,165 (53.2%). Higher rates of recording were associated with older patient age, practices outside a major city, patients who were not new to the practice and the patient being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. In encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, the patient's status had been documented in 82% of records. Those attending larger practices were less likely to have had their status recorded. Conclusions: This is the first report of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status recording in GP clinical records. Almost 20% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients did not have their status recorded in the clinical record, with indications that recording may be unsystematic. Implications: Our findings reinforce the need for a systematic approach to identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice and will inform policy and practice in this important area.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12400
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Parker Magin
2016 Ibrahim-Verbaas CA, Bressler J, Debette S, Schuur M, Smith AV, Bis JC, et al., 'GWAS for executive function and processing speed suggests involvement of the CADM2 gene', Molecular Psychiatry, 21 189-197 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. To identify common variants contributing to normal variation in two specific domains of cognitive functioning, we conducte... [more]

© 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved. To identify common variants contributing to normal variation in two specific domains of cognitive functioning, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of executive functioning and information processing speed in non-demented older adults from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) consortium. Neuropsychological testing was available for 5429-32 070 subjects of European ancestry aged 45 years or older, free of dementia and clinical stroke at the time of cognitive testing from 20 cohorts in the discovery phase. We analyzed performance on the Trail Making Test parts A and B, the Letter Digit Substitution Test (LDST), the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), semantic and phonemic fluency tests, and the Stroop Color and Word Test. Replication was sought in 1311-21860 subjects from 20 independent cohorts. A significant association was observed in the discovery cohorts for the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17518584 (discovery P-value=3.12 × 10 -8) and in the joint discovery and replication meta-analysis (P-value=3.28 × 10 -9 after adjustment for age, gender and education) in an intron of the gene cell adhesion molecule 2 (CADM2) for performance on the LDST/DSST. Rs17518584 is located about 170 kb upstream of the transcription start site of the major transcript for the CADM2 gene, but is within an intron of a variant transcript that includes an alternative first exon. The variant is associated with expression of CADM2 in the cingulate cortex (P-value=4 × 10 -4). The protein encoded by CADM2 is involved in glutamate signaling (P-value=7.22 × 10 -15), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport (P-value=1.36 × 10 -11) and neuron cell-cell adhesion (P-value=1.48 × 10 -13). Our findings suggest that genetic variation in the CADM2 gene is associated with individual differences in information processing speed.

DOI 10.1038/mp.2015.37
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 30
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Peter Schofield, Liz Holliday
2016 O Brien KM, Williams A, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: Protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 20 477-489 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0189
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, John Attia
2016 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Hobden B, Zucca A, Henskens F, et al., 'A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations', BMC medical research methodology, 16 134 (2016)

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participati... [more]

BACKGROUND: Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however,¿they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the 'Consumer Register', that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i) consent rates onto the register; (ii) preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii) the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a) cost per person recruited to the register; (b) the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c) participant completion rates. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 1947 patients (80.6¿%) consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3¿%) completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4¿%, or 1032 participants) were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3¿%). Almost 39¿% of completers¿were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12¿month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the register. Use of volunteer data collectors contributed to an annual saving of $14,183, however paid data collectors achieved significantly higher consent rates. Successful enrolment onto the register was completed for 42 % of the sample. CONCLUSIONS: A Consumer Register is a promising and feasible alternative to population-based registries, with the majority of participants willing to be contacted multiple times via low-resource methods such as email. There is an effectiveness/cost trade off in the use of paid versus volunteer data collectors.

Co-authors Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Andrew Searles, Alison Zucca, Bree Hobden, Elizabeth Fradgley
2016 Khan AA, Williams T, Savage L, Stewart P, Ashraf A, Davies AJ, et al., 'Pre-hospital thrombolysis in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: A regional Australian experience', Medical Journal of Australia, 205 121-125 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Objective: The system of care in the Hunter New England Local Health District for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) foresees p... [more]

© 2016 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Objective: The system of care in the Hunter New England Local Health District for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) foresees pre-hospital thrombolysis (PHT) administered by paramedics to patients more than 60 minutes from the cardiac catheterisation laboratory (CCL), and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at the CCL for others. We assessed the safety and effectiveness of the pre-hospital diagnosis strategy, which allocates patients to PHT or primary PCI according to travel time to the CCL. Design, setting and participants: Prospective, non-randomised, consecutive, single-centre case series of STEMI patients diagnosed on the basis of a pre-hospital electrocardiogram (ECG), from August 2008 to August 2013. All patients were treated at the tertiary referral hospital (John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle). Main outcome measures: The primary efficacy endpoint was all-cause mortality at 12 months; the primary safety endpoint was bleeding. Results: STEMI was diagnosed in 484 patients on the basis of pre-hospital ECG; 150 were administered PHT and 334 underwent primary PCI. The median time from first medical contact (FMC) to PHT was 35 minutes (IQR, 28¿43 min) and to balloon inflation 130 minutes (IQR, 100¿150 min). In the PHT group, 37 patients (27%) needed rescue PCI (median time, 4 h; IQR, 3¿5 h). The 12-month all-cause mortality rate was 7.0% (PHT, 6.7%; PCI, 7.2%). The incidence of major bleeding (TIMI criteria) in the PHT group was 1.3%; no patients in the primary PCI group experienced major bleeding. Conclusion: PHT can be delivered safely by paramedical staff in regional and rural Australia with good clinical outcomes.

DOI 10.5694/mja15.01336
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Andrew Boyle, John Attia
2016 Minelli C, Dean CH, Hind M, Alves AC, Amaral AFS, Siroux V, et al., 'Association of Forced Vital Capacity with the Developmental Gene NCOR2', PLOS ONE, 11 e0147388-e0147388 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147388
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2016 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Factors associated with concurrent tobacco smoking and heavy alcohol consumption within a socioeconomically disadvantaged Australian sample', Substance Use and Misuse, 51 459-470 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Background: Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption occur more frequently in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Little is known ab... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Background: Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption occur more frequently in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Little is known about the sociodemographic and psychosocial factors associated with use of alcohol and tobacco in disadvantaged groups in comparison to low-risk users. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the characteristics of low-risk users with: disadvantaged smokers only; disadvantaged heavy drinkers only; and disadvantaged concurrent smokers and heavy drinkers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of socioeconomically disadvantaged adult clients attending a community welfare agency assessed tobacco use, alcohol use, demographic, and psychosocial variables. Multivariable analysis using multinomial logistic regression was carried out. Results: The sample consisted of 835 participants; 40% (n = 331) were concurrent users, 31% were smokers only (n = 252), 11% were heavy drinkers only (n = 93), and 18% were low-risk users (n = 149). Compared with those who neither smoked nor consumed alcohol heavily, concurrent users were more likely to be younger, have only some contact with family, have more friends and family who were smokers, have no fixed home address, live alone, and have higher levels of financial stress. Most of these factors were shared by individuals who were smokers only. Factors associated with heavy drinkers only were frequent contact with family and having more friends and family who were smokers. Conclusion: Among those Australians who suffer severe economic hardship, being a concurrent smoker and heavy drinker appears to be associated with more isolated living conditions and financial stress but some contact with family.

DOI 10.3109/10826084.2015.1122065
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2016 Mather KA, Thalamuthu A, Oldmeadow C, Song F, Armstrong NJ, Poljak A, et al., 'Genome-wide significant results identified for plasma apolipoprotein H levels in middle-aged and older adults', Scientific Reports, 6 (2016) [C1]

Apolipoprotein H (ApoH) is a multi-functional plasma glycoprotein that has been associated with negative health outcomes. ApoH levels have high heritability. We undertook a genome... [more]

Apolipoprotein H (ApoH) is a multi-functional plasma glycoprotein that has been associated with negative health outcomes. ApoH levels have high heritability. We undertook a genome-wide association study of ApoH levels using the largest sample to date and replicated the results in an independent cohort (total N = 1,255). In the discovery phase, a meta-analysis of two cohorts, the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study (Sydney MAS) and the Older Australian Twins Study (OATS) (n = 942) revealed genome-wide significant results in or near the APOH gene on chromosome 17 (top SNP, rs7211380, p = 1 × 10-11). The results were replicated in an independent cohort, the Hunter Community Study (p < 0.002) (n = 313). Conditional and joint analysis (COJO) confirmed the association of the chromosomal 17 region with ApoH levels. The set of independent SNPs identified by COJO explained 23% of the variance. The relationships between the top SNPs and cardiovascular/lipid/cognition measures and diabetes were assessed in Sydney MAS, with suggestive results observed for diabetes and cognitive performance. However, replication of these results in the smaller OATS cohort was not found. This work provides impetus for future research to better understand the contribution of genetics to ApoH levels and its possible impacts on health.

DOI 10.1038/srep23675
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Peter Schofield, Rodney Scott, Mark Mcevoy
2015 Thomson A, Morgan S, Tapley A, van Driel M, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence and associations of gender concordance in general practice consultations: a cross-sectional analysis', European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare, 3 470-477 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.5750/ejpch.v3i4.1016
Co-authors Parker Magin
2015 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Callister R, Collins CE, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Study protocol: A stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial of a healthy lifestyle intervention for people attending residential substance abuse treatment Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Kelly et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Cardiovascular disease and cancer are leading causes of mortality for people with a history of alcohol or other substance... [more]

© 2015 Kelly et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: Cardiovascular disease and cancer are leading causes of mortality for people with a history of alcohol or other substance use disorders. These chronic diseases share the same four primary behavioural risk factors i.e. excessive alcohol use, smoking, low intake of fruit and vegetables and physical inactivity. In addition to addressing problematic alcohol use, there is the potential for substance abuse treatment services to also address these other behaviours. Healthy Recovery is an 8-session group-based intervention that targets these multiple behavioural health risk factors and was developed specifically for people attending substance abuse treatment. This protocol describes a Cancer Institute NSW funded study that assesses the effectiveness of delivering Healthy Recovery for people who are attending residential alcohol and other substance abuse treatment. Methods/Design: The study uses a stepped wedge randomised controlled design, where randomisation occurs at the service level. Participants will be recruited from residential rehabilitation programs provided by The Australian Salvation Army. All participants who (1) currently smoke tobacco and (2) are expected to be in the residential program for the duration of the 5-week intervention will be asked to participate in the study. Those participants residing at the facilities assigned to the treatment condition will complete Healthy Recovery. The intervention is manual guided and will be delivered over a 5-week period, with participants attending 8 group sessions. All participants will continue to complete The Salvation Army residential program, a predominantly 12-step based, modified therapeutic community. Participants in the control condition will complete treatment as usual. Research staff blind to treatment allocation will complete the primary and secondary outcome assessments at baseline and then at weeks 8, 20 and 32 weeks post intervention. Discussion: This study will provide comprehensive data on the effect of delivering a healthy lifestyle intervention (i.e. Healthy Recovery) within a residential substance abuse setting. If shown to be effective, this intervention can be disseminated within other residential substance abuse programs. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12615000165583. Registered 19th February 2015.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1729-y
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Attia, Amanda Baker, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2015 Morgan S, Wearne S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, Ball J, et al., 'In-consultation information and advice-seeking by Australian GP trainees from GP trainers - a cross-sectional analysis.', Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors, 26 155-165 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14739879.2015.11494335
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Parker Magin
2015 Rifat M, Hall J, Oldmeadow C, Husain A, Milton AH, 'Health system delay in treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients in Bangladesh', BMC Infectious Diseases, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Rifat et al. Background: Bangladesh is one of the 27 high burden countries for multidrug resistant tuberculosis listed by the World Health Organization. Delay in multidrug ... [more]

© 2015 Rifat et al. Background: Bangladesh is one of the 27 high burden countries for multidrug resistant tuberculosis listed by the World Health Organization. Delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment may allow progression of the disease and affect the attempts to curb transmission of drug resistant tuberculosis. The main objective of this study was to investigate the health system delay in multidrug resistant tuberculosis treatment in Bangladesh and to explore the factors related to the delay. Methods: Information related to the delay was collected as part of a previously conducted case-control study. The current study restricts analysis to patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis who were diagnosed using rapid diagnostic methods (Xpert MTB/RIF or the line probe assay). Information was collected by face-to-face interviews and through record reviews from all three Government hospitals providing multidrug resistant tuberculosis services, from September 2012 to April 2013. Multivariable regression analysis was performed using Bootstrap variance estimators. Definitions were as follows: Provider delay: time between visiting a provider for first consultation on MDR-TB related symptom to visiting a designated diagnostic centre for testing; Diagnostic delay: time from date of diagnostic sample provided to date of result; Treatment initiation delay: time between the date of diagnosis and date of treatment initiation; Health system delay: time between visiting a provider to start of treatment. Health system delay was derived by adding provider delay, diagnostic delay and treatment initiation delay. Results: The 207 multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients experienced a health system delay of median 7.1 weeks. The health system delay consists of provider delay (median 4 weeks), diagnostic delay (median 5 days) and treatment initiation delay (median 10 days). Health system delay (Coefficient: 37.7; 95 %; CI 15.0-60.4; p 0.003) was associated with the visit to private practitioners for first consultation. Conclusions: Diagnosis time for multidrug resistant tuberculosis was fast using the rapid tests. However, some degree of delay was present in treatment initiation, after diagnosis. The most effective way to reduce health system delay would be through strategies such as engaging private practitioners in multidrug resistant tuberculosis control.

DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1253-9
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Hall
2015 Grady A, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, Bryant J, Mazza D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'GP detection of health risk factors among general practice patients at risk of primary and secondary stroke', Family Practice, 32 336-342 (2015) [C1]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; ... [more]

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. People with a history of stroke or heart disease are at increased risk of future stroke; therefore, identification of risk factors by GPs is critical. Objectives. To compare the following among general practice patients with and without a history of stroke or heart disease: (i) self-reported prevalence rates of lifestyle risk factors; (ii) accuracy of GP detection of patient-reported risk factors and (iii) average proportion of patient-reported risk factors detected by GPs. Methods. Consecutive patients attending a participating general practice clinic were invited to participate in a cross-sectional touchscreen survey assessing lifestyle risk factors in 2010-11. The GP of each consenting patient completed a corresponding survey assessing the patient's risk factors. Demographic characteristics of patients and GPs were obtained. Results. Data from 51 GPs and 564 patients were analysed. Patients without a history of stroke or heart disease reported significantly higher rates of smoking (12%) and risky alcohol consumption (56%) than patients with a history of stroke or heart disease (6% and 36%, respectively). Low sensitivity of GP detection of risk factors was found for all risk factors for all patients. Patients with a history of stroke or heart disease have a significantly higher mean proportion of risk factors detected by their GP compared to patients without a history of stroke or heart disease (P = 0.00). Conclusion. Given low sensitivity and specificity of GP detection of risk factors among patients, alternate methods of identification are needed. Research is required to determine strategies to facilitate secondary care of patients with a history of stroke or heart disease by GPs.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv024
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Rachakonda K, George M, Shafiei M, Oldmeadow C, 'Unmet Supportive Cancer Care Needs: An Exploratory Quantitative Study in Rural Australia.', World J Oncol, 6 387-393 (2015)
DOI 10.14740/wjon928w
2015 Morgan S, Henderson KM, Tapley A, Scott J, Van Driel ML, Spike NA, et al., 'Pathology test-ordering behaviour of Australian general practice trainees: a cross-sectional analysis.', International journal for quality in health care : journal of the International Society for Quality in Health Care, 27 528-535 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzv086
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Parker Magin
2015 Chan JPL, Thalamuthu A, Oldmeadow C, Armstrong NJ, Holliday EG, McEvoy M, et al., 'Genetics of hand grip strength in mid to late life', Age, 37 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, American Aging Association. Hand grip strength (GS) is a predictor of mortality in older adults and is moderately to highly heritable, but no genetic variants have been co... [more]

© 2015, American Aging Association. Hand grip strength (GS) is a predictor of mortality in older adults and is moderately to highly heritable, but no genetic variants have been consistently identified. We aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with GS in middle-aged to older adults using a genome-wide association study (GWAS). GS was measured using handheld dynamometry in community-dwelling men and women aged 55¿85 from the Hunter Community Study (HCS, N = 2088) and the Sydney Memory and Ageing Study (Sydney MAS, N = 541). Genotyping was undertaken using Affymetrix microarrays with imputation to HapMap2. Analyses were performed using linear regression. No genome-wide significant results were observed in HCS nor were any of the top signals replicated in Sydney MAS. Gene-based analyses in HCS identified two significant genes (ZNF295, C2CD2), but these results were not replicated in Sydney MAS. One out of eight SNPs previously associated with GS, rs550942, located near the CNTF gene, was significantly associated with GS (p = 0.005) in the HCS cohort only. Study differences may explain the lack of consistent results between the studies, including the smaller sample size of the Sydney MAS cohort. Our modest sample size also had limited power to identify variants of small effect. Our results suggest that similar to various other complex traits, many genetic variants of small effect size may influence GS. Future GWAS using larger samples and consistent measures may prove more fruitful at identifying genetic contributors for GS in middle-aged to older adults.

DOI 10.1007/s11357-015-9745-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, Roseanne Peel, John Attia
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Eliza Skelton, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Davies G, Armstrong N, Bis JC, Bressler J, Chouraki V, Giddaluru S, et al., 'Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)', Molecular Psychiatry, 20 183-192 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic co... [more]

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. General cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of 31 cohorts (N=53 949) in which the participants had undertaken multiple, diverse cognitive tests. A general cognitive function phenotype was tested for, and created in each cohort by principal component analysis. We report 13 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations in three genomic regions, 6q16.1, 14q12 and 19q13.32 (best SNP and closest gene, respectively: rs10457441, P=3.93 × 10<sup>-9</sup>, MIR2113; rs17522122, P=2.55 × 10<sup>-8</sup>, AKAP6; rs10119, P=5.67 × 10<sup>-9</sup>, APOE/TOMM40). We report one gene-based significant association with the HMGN1 gene located on chromosome 21 (P=1 × 10<sup>-6</sup>). These genes have previously been associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Meta-analysis results are consistent with a polygenic model of inheritance. To estimate SNP-based heritability, the genome-wide complex trait analysis procedure was applied to two large cohorts, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (N=6617) and the Health and Retirement Study (N=5976). The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for by all genotyped common SNPs was 29% (s.e.=5%) and 28% (s.e.=7%), respectively. Using polygenic prediction analysis, ~1.2% of the variance in general cognitive function was predicted in the Generation Scotland cohort (N=5487; P=1.5 × 10<sup>-17</sup>). In hypothesis-driven tests, there was significant association between general cognitive function and four genes previously associated with Alzheimer's disease: TOMM40, APOE, ABCG1 and MEF2C.

DOI 10.1038/mp.2014.188
Citations Scopus - 127Web of Science - 114
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Peter Schofield, Liz Holliday, John Attia
2015 Magin P, Morgan S, Wearne S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'GP trainees' in-consultation information-seeking: associations with human, paper and electronic sources.', Family Practice, 32 525-532 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmv047
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Parker Magin
2015 Kable A, James C, Snodgrass S, Plotnikoff R, Guest M, Ashby S, et al., 'Nurse provision of healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 451-459 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a regional area in Australia to measure nurses&apos; perceptions, practices, and knowledge in regar... [more]

© 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a regional area in Australia to measure nurses' perceptions, practices, and knowledge in regard to providing healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese. Responses were compared between geographic regions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Of the 79 nurse participants, 68% considered that provision of healthy lifestyle advice was within their scope of practice. Only 28% reported frequently estimating body mass index in the practice setting. Nurses often recommended increasing activity levels (44%), but recommended reducing daily caloric intake less often (25%). Nurses' knowledge about weight management was variable and the proportion of correct answers to knowledge items ranged from 33-99%. Nurses have many opportunities to deliver healthy lifestyle advice in a range of practice settings. The variation in practices and knowledge of nurses indicates a need for improved healthy lifestyle education for undergraduate and practicing nurses.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12214
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Samantha Ashby, Carole James, Suzanne Snodgrass
2015 Denham JW, Steigler A, Joseph D, Lamb DS, Spry NA, Duchesne G, et al., 'Radiation dose escalation or longer androgen suppression for locally advanced prostate cancer? Data from the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial', Radiotherapy and Oncology, 115 301-307 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.radonc.2015.05.016
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
Co-authors John Attia, Allison Steigler, Liz Holliday, Jim Denham
2015 Sales M, Quain D, Lasserson D, Levi C, Oldmeadow C, Jiwa M, et al., 'Quality of referrals and guideline compliance for time to consultation at an acute neurovascular clinic', Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 24 874-880 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by National Stroke Association. Background: The Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration of symptoms, Diabetes (ABCD2) score can be used to predict early recurrent ... [more]

© 2015 by National Stroke Association. Background: The Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration of symptoms, Diabetes (ABCD2) score can be used to predict early recurrent stroke risk following Transient ischemic attack (TIA). Given that recurrent stroke risk can be as high as 20% in the first week, international guidelines recommend ''high-risk'' TIAs (ABCD2 .3) be seen by specialist services such as dedicated acute neurovascular clinics within 24 hours. The goal of this study was to examine the associations of both quality of referrals to a specialist acute clinic and of "guideline congruence" of time-to-clinic consultation after TIA/minor stroke. We hypothesized highquality referrals containing key clinical elements would be associated with greater guideline congruence. Methods: A retrospective analysis of referrals to an acute neurovascular clinic within a tertiary care hospital of consecutive patients with TIA/minor stroke. Quality of general practitioner and emergency department referrals was defined on the basis of information content enabling ABCD2-based risk stratification by the clinic triage service. Time-to-clinic consultation was used to define "guideline congruence." Results: Referrals of 148 consecutive eligible patients were reviewed. Sixty-six percent of cases were subsequently neurologist-diagnosed as TIA or minor stroke. Seventy-nine percent were referred by general practitioners. Fifty-three percent of referrals were of high quality, but quality was not associated with guideline congruence. Of the high-risk patients, only 3.6% were seen at the clinic within 24 hours of index event and 31.3% within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions: Current guidelines are pathophysiologically logical and evidence based, but are difficult to implement. Improving quality of primary-secondary communication by improved referral quality is unlikely to improve guideline compliance. Alternative strategies are needed to reduce recurrent stroke risk after TIA/minor stroke.

DOI 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.12.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Parker Magin, Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi
2015 Bonevski B, Twyman L, Paul C, D'Este C, West R, Siahpush M, et al., 'Comparing socially disadvantaged smokers who agree and decline to participate in a randomised smoking cessation trial', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008419
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Jamie Bryant
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Turon H, Oldmeadow C, 'Which modifiable health risk behaviours are related? A systematic review of the clustering of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol and Physical activity ('SNAP') health risk factors', Preventive Medicine, 81 16-41 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objective: There is a growing body of literature examining the clustering of health risk behaviours, but little consensus about which risk factors can be expe... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objective: There is a growing body of literature examining the clustering of health risk behaviours, but little consensus about which risk factors can be expected to cluster for which sub groups of people. This systematic review aimed to examine the international literature on the clustering of smoking, poor nutrition, excess alcohol and physical inactivity (SNAP) health behaviours among adults, including associated socio-demographic variables. Method: A literature search was conducted in May 2014. Studies examining at least two SNAP risk factors, and using a cluster or factor analysis technique, or comparing observed to expected prevalence of risk factor combinations, were included. Results: Fifty-six relevant studies were identified. A majority of studies (81%) reported a 'healthy' cluster characterised by the absence of any SNAP risk factors. More than half of the studies reported a clustering of alcohol with smoking, and half reported clustering of all four SNAP risk factors. The methodological quality of included studies was generally weak to moderate. Males and those with greater social disadvantage showed riskier patterns of behaviours; younger age was less clearly associated with riskier behaviours. Conclusion: Clustering patterns reported here reinforce the need for health promotion interventions to target multiple behaviours, and for such efforts to be specifically designed and accessible for males and those who are socially disadvantaged.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.07.003
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natasha Noble
2015 Rifat M, Hall J, Oldmeadow C, Husain A, Hinderaker SG, Milton AH, 'Factors related to previous tuberculosis treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Bangladesh', BMJ OPEN, 5 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008273
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Hall
2015 Abdullah N, Abdul Murad NA, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Mohd Haniff EA, Syafruddin SE, et al., 'Characterizing the genetic risk for Type 2 diabetes in a Malaysian multi-ethnic cohort.', Diabet Med, 32 1377-1384 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dme.12735
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, John Attia
2015 Noble NE, Paul CL, Turner N, Blunden SV, Oldmeadow C, Turon HE, 'A cross-sectional survey and latent class analysis of the prevalence and clustering of health risk factors among people attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Noble et al. Background: Indigenous Australians are a socially disadvantaged group who experience significantly poorer health and a higher prevalence of modifiable health b... [more]

© 2015 Noble et al. Background: Indigenous Australians are a socially disadvantaged group who experience significantly poorer health and a higher prevalence of modifiable health behaviours than other Australians. Little is known about the clustering of health risks among Indigenous Australians. The aims of this study were to describe the clustering of key health risk factors, such as smoking, physical inactivity and alcohol consumption, and socio-demographics associated with clusters, among a predominantly Aboriginal sample. Methods: Participants (n = 377) attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) in regional/rural New South Wales, Australia, in 2012-2013 completed a self-report touch screen health risk survey. Clusters were identified using latent class analysis. Results: Cluster 1 ('low fruit/vegetable intake, lower risk'; 51 %) consisted of older men and women; Cluster 2 ('risk taking'; 22 %) included younger unemployed males with a high prevalence of smoking, risky alcohol, and illicit drug use. Cluster 3 ('inactive, overweight, depressed'; 28 %) was characterised by younger to mid aged women likely to have experienced emotional or physical violence. Conclusions: If future research identifies similar stable clusters of health behaviours for this population, intervention approaches targeting these clusters of risk factors should be developed and tested for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2015-8
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Chris Paul
2015 Debette S, Ibrahim Verbaas CA, Bressler J, Schuur M, Smith A, Bis JC, et al., 'Genome-wide studies of verbal declarative memory in nondemented older people: The Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium', Biological Psychiatry, 77 749-763 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. BACKGROUND: Memory performance in older persons can reflect genetic influences on cognitive function and dementing processes. We aimed to ... [more]

© 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. BACKGROUND: Memory performance in older persons can reflect genetic influences on cognitive function and dementing processes. We aimed to identify genetic contributions to verbal declarative memory in a community setting. METHODS: We conducted genome-wide association studies for paragraph or word list delayed recall in 19 cohorts from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium, comprising 29,076 dementia- and stroke-free individuals of European descent, aged =45 years. Replication of suggestive associations (p < 5 × 10-6) was sought in 10,617 participants of European descent, 3811 African-Americans, and 1561 young adults. RESULTS: rs4420638, near APOE, was associated with poorer delayed recall performance in discovery (p = 5.57 × 10-10) and replication cohorts (p = 5.65 × 10-8). This association was stronger for paragraph than word list delayed recall and in the oldest persons. Two associations with specific tests, in subsets of the total sample, reached genome-wide significance in combined analyses of discovery and replication (rs11074779 [HS3ST4], p = 3.11 × 10-8, and rs6813517 [SPOCK3], p = 2.58 × 10-8) near genes involved in immune response. A genetic score combining 58 independent suggestive memory risk variants was associated with increasing Alzheimer disease pathology in 725 autopsy samples. Association of memory risk loci with gene expression in 138 human hippocampus samples showed cis-associations with WDR48 and CLDN5, both related to ubiquitin metabolism. CONCLUSIONS: This largest study to date exploring the genetics of memory function in ~40,000 older individuals revealed genome-wide associations and suggested an involvement of immune and ubiquitin pathways.

DOI 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.08.027
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2015 Holliday S, Morgan S, Tapley A, Dunlop A, Henderson K, van Driel M, et al., 'The Pattern of Opioid Management by Australian General Practice Trainees', Pain Medicine (United States), 16 1720-1731 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understand... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understanding of opioid prescribing is essential. We aimed to establish consultation-level prevalence and associations of opioid prescribing. Design: A cross-sectional secondary analysis from a longitudinal multisite cohort study of general practitioner (GP) vocational trainees: "Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training." Setting: Four of Australia's seventeen GP Regional Training Providers, during 2010-13. Subjects: GP trainees. Methods: Practice and trainee demographic data were collected as well as patient, clinical and educational data of 60 consecutive consultations of each trainee, each training term. Outcome factors were any opioid analgesic prescription and initial opioid analgesic prescription for a specific problem for the first time. Results: Overall, 645 trainees participated. Opioids comprised 4.3% prescriptions provided for 3.8% of patients. Most frequently prescribed were codeine (39.9%) and oxycodone (33.4%). Prescribing was for acute pain (29.3%), palliative care (2.6%) or other indications (68.1%). Most prescribing involved repeat prescriptions for pre-existing problems (62.7% of total). Other associations included older patients; prescriber and patient male gender; Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander status; rural and disadvantaged locations; longer consultations; and generation of referrals, follow-up, and imaging requests. Opioid initiation was more likely for new patients with new problems, but otherwise associations were similar. Trainees rarely reported addiction risk-mitigation strategies. Conclusions: Most opioids were prescribed as maintenance therapy for non-cancer pain. Demographic associations with opioid analgesic prescribing resemble those presenting for opioid dependency treatment. Our findings should inform measures by regulators and medical educators supporting multimodal pain management.

DOI 10.1111/pme.12820
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Parker Magin, A Dunlop
2015 Kay-Lambkin FJ, Baker AL, Geddes J, Hunt SA, Woodcock KL, Teesson M, et al., 'The iTreAD project: A study protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial of online treatment and social networking for binge drinking and depression in young people Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These... [more]

© 2015 Kay-Lambkin et al. Background: Depression and binge drinking behaviours are common clinical problems, which cause substantial functional, economic and health impacts. These conditions peak in young adulthood, and commonly co-occur. Comorbid depression and binge drinking are undertreated in young people, who are reluctant to seek help via traditional pathways to care. The iTreAD project (internet Treatment for Alcohol and Depression) aims to provide and evaluate internet-delivered monitoring and treatment programs for young people with depression and binge drinking concerns. Methods: Three hundred sixty nine participants will be recruited to the trial, and will be aged 18-30 years will be eligible for the study if they report current symptoms of depression (score 5 or more on the depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale) and concurrent binge drinking practices (5 or more standard drinks at least twice in the prior month). Following screening and online baseline assessment, participants are randomised to: (a) online monthly self-assessments, (b) online monthly self-assessments¿+¿12-months of access to a 4 week online automated cognitive behaviour therapy program for binge drinking and depression (DEAL); or (c) online monthly assessment¿+¿DEAL¿+¿12-months of access to a social networking site (Breathing Space). Independent, blind follow-up assessments occur at 26, 39, 52 and 64-weeks post-baseline. Discussion: The iTreAD project is the first randomised controlled trial combining online cognitive behaviour therapy, social networking and online monitoring for young people reporting concerns with depression and binge drinking. These treatments represent low-cost, wide-reach youth-appropriate treatment, which will have significantly public health implications for service design, delivery and health policy for this important age group. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000310662. Date registered 24 March 2014.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2365-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Sally Hunt, Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Baker, Terry Lewin
2015 Holliday EG, Traylor M, Malik R, Bevan S, Falcone G, Hopewell JC, et al., 'Genetic Overlap Between Diagnostic Subtypes of Ischemic Stroke', STROKE, 46 615-+ (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.007930
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, Lisa Lincz, Christopher Levi, John Attia
2015 Iseme RA, McEvoy M, Kelly B, Agnew L, Attia J, Walker FR, et al., 'Autoantibodies are not predictive markers for the development of depressive symptoms in a population-based cohort of older adults', European Psychiatry, 30 694-700 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.06.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Rohan Walker, Brian Kelly, John Attia
2014 Oldmeadow C, Mossman D, Evans T-J, Holliday EG, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, et al., 'Combined analysis of exon splicing and genome wide polymorphism data predict schizophrenia risk loci.', J Psychiatr Res, 52 44-49 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.01.011
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Attia, Murray Cairns, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, Paul Tooney
2014 McCarthy-Jones S, Green MJ, Scott RJ, Tooney PA, Cairns MJ, Wu JQ, et al., 'Preliminary evidence of an interaction between the FOXP2 gene and childhood emotional abuse predicting likelihood of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia', JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, 50 66-72 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2013.11.012
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Murray Cairns, Paul Tooney
2014 Moayyeri A, Hsu Y-H, Karasik D, Estrada K, Xiao S-M, Nielson C, et al., 'Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium', HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS, 23 3054-3068 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/hmg/ddt675
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, Roseanne Peel, John Attia
2014 Loth DW, Artigas MS, Gharib SA, Wain LV, Franceschini N, Koch B, et al., 'Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity', NATURE GENETICS, 46 669-677 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ng.3011
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 58
Co-authors John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday
2014 Holliday EG, Traylor M, Malik R, Bevan S, Maguire J, Koblar SA, et al., 'Polygenic Overlap Between Kidney Function and Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke', STROKE, 45 3508-+ (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.006609
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Christopher Levi, John Attia, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, Mark Mcevoy
2014 Oldmeadow C, Holliday EG, McEvoy M, Scott R, Kwok JBJ, Mather K, et al., 'Concordance between direct and imputed APOE genotypes using 1000 genomes data', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 42 391-393 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. There are a growing number of large cohorts of older persons with genome-wide genotyping data available, but APOE is not i... [more]

© 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. There are a growing number of large cohorts of older persons with genome-wide genotyping data available, but APOE is not included in any of the common microarray platforms. We compared directly measured APOE genotypes with those imputed using microarray data and the '1000 Genomes' dataset in a sample of 320 Caucasians. We find 90% agreement for e2/e3/e4 genotypes and 93% agreement for predicting e4 status, yielding kappa values of 0.81 and 0.84, respectively. More stringent thresholds around allele number estimates can increase this agreement to 90-97% and kappas of 0.90-0.93.

DOI 10.3233/JAD-140846
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Attia, Peter Schofield, Liz Holliday, Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott
2014 Gunathilake R, Krishnamurthy V, Oldmeadow C, Kerr E, Padmakumar C, Attia J, et al., 'Relationships between age, other predictive variables, and the 90-day functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, 33 19-19 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi
2014 de Zeeuw EL, van Beijsterveldt CEM, Glasner TJ, Bartels M, Ehli EA, Davies GE, et al., 'Polygenic scores associated with educational attainment in adults predict educational achievement and ADHD symptoms in children', American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 165 510-520 (2014) [C1]

The American Psychiatric Association estimates that 3 to 7 per cent of all school aged children are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Even after corr... [more]

The American Psychiatric Association estimates that 3 to 7 per cent of all school aged children are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Even after correcting for general cognitive ability, numerous studies report a negative association between ADHD and educational achievement. With polygenic scores we examined whether genetic variants that have a positive influence on educational attainment have a protective effect against ADHD. The effect sizes from a large GWA meta-analysis of educational attainment in adults were used to calculate polygenic scores in an independent sample of 12-year-old children from the Netherlands Twin Register. Linear mixed models showed that the polygenic scores significantly predicted educational achievement, school performance, ADHD symptoms and attention problems in children. These results confirm the genetic overlap between ADHD and educational achievement, indicating that one way to gain insight into genetic variants responsible for variation in ADHD is to include data on educational achievement, which are available at a larger scale. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/ajmg.b.32254
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott
2014 Abdullah N, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Scott RJ, Holliday EG, 'The Architecture of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: Understanding Asia in the Context of Global Findings', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2014/593982
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2014 Denham JW, Joseph D, Lamb DS, Spry NA, Duchesne G, Matthews J, et al., 'Short-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy versus intermediate-term androgen suppression and radiotherapy, with or without zoledronic acid, in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (TROG 03.04 RADAR): an open-label, randomised, phase 3 factorial trial', LANCET ONCOLOGY, 15 1076-1089 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(14)70328-6
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 54
Co-authors Allison Steigler, John Attia, Jim Denham
2014 Gunathilake R, Krishnamurthy V, Oldmeadow C, Kerr E, Padmakumar C, Attia J, et al., 'Relationships between age, other predictive variables, and the 90-day functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke', International Journal of Stroke, 9 E36-E37 (2014) [O1]
DOI 10.1111/ijs.12347
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi, John Attia
2014 Algama M, Oldmeadow C, Tasker E, Mengersen K, Keith JM, 'Drosophila 3 ' UTRs Are More Complex than Protein-Coding Sequences', PLOS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0097336
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2014 Rifat M, Milton AH, Hall J, Oldmeadow C, Islam MA, Husain A, et al., 'Development of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis in Bangladesh: A Case-Control Study on Risk Factors', PLOS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0105214
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors John Hall
2014 George M, Abu Asab N, Varughese E, Irwin M, Oldmeadow C, Hollebone K, et al., 'Risk Awareness on Uterine Cancer among Australian Women', ASIAN PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CANCER PREVENTION, 15 10251-10254 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.7314/APJCP.2014.15.23.10251
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Napthali K, Boyle M, Tran H, Schofield PW, Peel R, McEvoy M, et al., 'Thyroid antibodies, autoimmunity and cognitive decline: is there a population-based link?', Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra, 4 140-146 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1159/000362716
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Roseanne Peel, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2013 Gunathilake R, Oldmeadow C, McEvoy M, Kelly B, Inder K, Schofield P, Attia J, 'Mild Hyponatremia Is Associated With Impaired Cognition And Falls In Community-Dwelling Older Persons', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 1838-1839 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jgs.12468
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Mark Mcevoy, Peter Schofield, Kerry Inder, John Attia
2013 Köttgen A, Albrecht E, Teumer A, Vitart V, Krumsiek J, Hundertmark C, et al., 'Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations', Nature Genetics, 45 145-154 (2013) [C1]

Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from &gt;140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the ... [more]

Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with serum urate concentrations (18 new regions in or near TRIM46, INHBB, SFMBT1, TMEM171, VEGFA, BAZ1B, PRKAG2, STC1, HNF4G, A1CF, ATXN2, UBE2Q2, IGF1R, NFAT5, MAF, HLF, ACVR1B-ACVRL1 and B3GNT4). Associations for many of the loci were of similar magnitude in individuals of non-European ancestry. We further characterized these loci for associations with gout, transcript expression and the fractional excretion of urate. Network analyses implicate the inhibins-activins signaling pathways and glucose metabolism in systemic urate control. New candidate genes for serum urate concentration highlight the importance of metabolic control of urate production and excretion, which may have implications for the treatment and prevention of gout. © 2013 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1038/ng.2500
Citations Scopus - 283Web of Science - 282
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2013 Rietveld CA, Medland SE, Derringer J, Yang J, Esko T, Martin NW, et al., 'GWAS of 126,559 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with educational attainment', Science, 340 1467-1471 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 312Web of Science - 290
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott
2013 Ranasinghe WKB, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Lawrentschuk N, Robertson J, Ranasinghe T, et al., 'Bladder carcinoma in situ (CIS) in Australia: a rising incidence for an under-reported malignancy', BJU International, 112 46-52 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/bju.12052
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Attia
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Dunbabin J, Henry J, et al., 'An examination of the influences on New South Wales general practitioners regarding the provision of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review, 32 495-503 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12046
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin, John Attia
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Dunbabin J, Oldmeadow C, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'An Evaluation of the Prescription of Opioids for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain by Australian General Practitioners', PAIN MEDICINE, 14 62-74 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2012.01527.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, A Dunlop
2013 Williams N, Hardy BM, Tarrant S, Enninghorst N, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Balogh ZJ, 'Changes in hip fracture incidence, mortality and length of stay over the last decade in an Australian major trauma centre.', Archives of Osteoporosis, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11657-013-0150-3
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, John Attia
2012 Yoshino O, Quail AW, Oldmeadow CJ, Balogh ZJ, 'The interpretation of intra-abdominal pressures from animal models: The rabbit to human example', Injury: International Journal of the Care of the Injured, 43 169-173 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, Tony Quail
2012 Collins NJ, Hatton R, Ng K, Bhagwandeen R, Attia JR, Oldmeadow CJ, Jayasinghe R, 'Percutaneous device closure of patent foramen ovale using the premere occlusion device: Initial experience, procedural, and intermediate-term results', Journal of Invasive Cardiology, 24 164-168 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia
2012 Holliday EG, Maguire JM, Evans T-J, Koblar SA, Jannes J, Sturm J, et al., 'Common variants at 6p21.1 are associated with large artery atherosclerotic stroke', Nature Genetics, 44 1147-1153 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 103Web of Science - 94
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, Christopher Levi, Rodney Scott, Pablo Moscato, Mark Parsons, Lisa Lincz, John Attia, Wayne Smith, Roseanne Peel
2012 Okada Y, Sim X, Go MJ, Wu J-Y, Gu D, Takeuchi F, et al., 'Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations', Nature Genetics, 44 904-909 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 127Web of Science - 128
Co-authors Liz Holliday, John Attia, Rodney Scott
2012 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, Symonds IM, Scott A, Hall AE, Oldmeadow CJ, 'An RCT protocol of varying financial incentive amounts for smoking cessation among pregnant women', BMC Public Health, 12 1032 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Ian Symonds, Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh
2011 Oldmeadow CJ, Riveros RC, Holliday EG, Scott R, Moscato PA, Wang JJ, et al., 'Sifting the wheat from the chaff: Prioritizing GWAS results by identifying consistency across analytical methods', Genetic Epidemiology, 35 745-754 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/gepi.20622
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Attia, Pablo Moscato, Rodney Scott, Liz Holliday, Carlos Riveros
2011 Oldmeadow CJ, Keith J, 'Model selection in Bayesian segmentation of multiple DNA alignments', Bioinformatics, 27 604-610 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/bioinformatics/btq716
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2010 Oldmeadow CJ, Mengersen K, Mattick JS, Keith JM, 'Multiple evolutionary rate classes in animal genome evolution', Molecular Biology and Evolution, 27 942-953 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/molbev/msp299
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2009 Oldmeadow CJ, Mengersen K, Martin N, Duffy DL, 'Heritability and linkage analysis of appendicitis utilizing age at onset', Twin Research and Human Genetics, 12 150-157 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1375/twin.12.2.150
Citations Scopus - 4
2008 Oldmeadow CJ, Wood I, Mengersen K, Visscher PM, Martin NG, Duffy DL, 'Investigation of the relationship between smoking and appendicitis in Australian twins', Annals of Epidemiology, 18 631-636 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.annepidem.2008.04.004
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Show 185 more journal articles

Conference (50 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Griffiths E, Rayner S, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Risk factors for obstetric anal sphincter injury: The impact of birthing position, Type of Delivery and Other Aspects of Intrapartum Care', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY (2018)
2018 Hammer P, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Holder C, Maiti K, Smith R, Morgan TK, 'Increased Erythropoiesis in Post-Dates Deliveries is Associated with Fetal Sex', REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES, San Diego, CA (2018)
Co-authors Roger Smith, John Attia
2018 Sharma BB, Loxton D, Murray H, Angeli G, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Smith R, 'Use of Songs to Improve Knowledge of Antenatal Care in a Predominantly Illiterate Community.', REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES, San Diego, CA (2018)
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2018 Wang JJ, Jones M, Holliday E, Tan AG, Oldmeadow C, van Darn RM, et al., 'Exploring factors underlying ethnic differences in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) prevalence', INVESTIGATIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISUAL SCIENCE, Honolulu, HI (2018)
Co-authors John Attia, Liz Holliday
2018 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE FOR SMOKING CESSATION IN AUSTRALIAN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CENTRES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2018 White B, Haber PS, Lintzeris N, Roberts J, Cretikos M, Mackson J, et al., 'ASSESSING THE SAFETY AND FEASIBILITY OF LONG-ACTING DEPOT OF BUPRENORPHINE IN ADULTS REQUIRING TREATMENT FOR OPIOID USE DISORDER IN NEW SOUTH WALES CUSTODIAL SETTINGS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors A Dunlop, John Attia
2018 Hyde L, Boyes A, Mackenzie L, Leigh L, Oldmeadow C, Riveros C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Identifying Classes of eHealth Literacy Among Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Outpatients', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Carlos Riveros, Lisa Mackenzie
2018 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Callister R, Dunn A, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'BREAKING UP SITTING TIME AFTER STROKE IMPROVES BLOOD PRESSURE (BUST-STROKE)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2018)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Rohan Walker, Coralie English
2018 Gould G, Bovill M, Pollock L, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Atkins L, et al., 'Feasibility and Acceptability of ICAN QUIT in Pregnancy Multicomponent Implementation Intervention and Research Design for Australian Indigenous Pregnant Women: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Step-Wedge Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Gillian Gould, Maree Gruppetta
2018 Bovill M, Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, et al., 'Wingadhan Birrang (Woman's Journey) of Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women Participating in the Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy Pilot Study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Maree Gruppetta, Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2018 Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Skelton E, Gruppetta M, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, Gould G, 'Systematic Review of Interventions to Improve Health Providers Smoking Cessation Care in Pregnancy', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Maree Gruppetta, Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton
2017 Bar-Zeev Y, Bovill M, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, Gould G, 'The Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) Quit in Pregnancy Intervention - Preliminary Findings of Changes in Health Providers' Knowledge and Practices', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Maree Gruppetta, Gillian Gould, Billie Bonevski
2017 Mandaliya H, Jones M, Oldmeadow C, Nordman I, 'Prognostic importance of neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (LMR) and advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) at diagnosis and post treatment in elderly with stage IV NSCLC', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Singapore, SINGAPORE (2017)
2017 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Walker R, Patterson A, Callister R, et al., 'Does breaking up sitting time after stroke improve glucose control? (bust-stroke)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Robin Callister, Amanda Patterson, Neil Spratt, Coralie English, Rohan Walker, Linkooi Ong
2017 Dodd N, Carey M, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'Testing the Effectiveness of a General Practice Intervention to Improve Uptake of Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Randomized Controlled Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Natalie Dodd, Mariko Carey
2017 Bovill M, Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, Gould G, 'The Growth and Empowerment Measure Among Aboriginal Pregnant Women Recruited for Ican Quit in Pregnancy', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Maree Gruppetta, Billie Bonevski, Gillian Gould, Michelle Bovill
2017 English C, Janssen H, Crowfoot G, Walker R, Patterson A, Callister R, et al., 'Breaking up sitting time after stroke improves blood pressure (bust-stroke)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Rohan Walker, Robin Callister, Neil Spratt, Linkooi Ong, Amanda Patterson, Coralie English
2017 Blyton SJ, Edwards S, Moghaddas D, de Zoete RMJ, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Associations between neck kinematics and pain in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', Sydney, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Rutger Dezoete, Suzanne Snodgrass, Suzi Edwards, Philip Bolton, Darren Rivett
2017 Mandaliya H, Jones M, Oldmeadow C, Nordman I, 'Prognostic significance of advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) In untreated and treated stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): An Australian cancer centre experience', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Geneva, SWITZERLAND (2017)
2017 Paul C, Hall A, Lynagh M, Oldmeadow C, Sanson-Fisher R, Campbell S, et al., 'Could unmet needs mediate poor psychosocial outcomes among patient-support person dyads in haematological cancer?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh
2016 Hasnat MA, Rifat M, Hall J, Oldmeadow C, 'Experience from Research projects on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Bangladesh.', Kathmundu, Nepal (2016)
Co-authors John Hall
2016 Kepreotes E, Whitehead B, Lee M, Collison A, Goddard B, Cheese L, et al., 'HIGH-FLOW OXYGEN COMPARED TO STANDARD NASAL CANNULA OXYGEN DOES NOT REDUCE THE MEDIAN TIME ON OXYGEN FOR INFANTS WITH MODERATE BRONCHIOLITIS', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Adam Collison, John Attia, Joerg Mattes
2016 Anne S, Tse R, Oldmeadow C, Cala A, 'Immersion of bovine eyeballs after one hour in seawater does not result in elevation of post-mortem vitreous humor sodium and chloride levels.', Pathology, England (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.pathol.2015.12.254
2016 Dodd N, Carey M, Mansfield E, Oldmeadow C, 'THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A POINT OF CARE INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE UPTAKE OF COLORECTAL CANCER SCREENING AMONG PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Natalie Dodd
2016 Dodd N, Mansfield E, Carey M, Oldmeadow C, 'PARTICIPATION IN FOBT AND COLONOSCOPY AMONG AUSTRALIAN PRIMARY CARE PATIENTS: RESULTS OF A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Natalie Dodd
2016 Faulkner S, Jobling P, Rowe C, Oldmeadow C, Roselli S, Thorne R, et al., 'CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF PRONGF RECEPTORS IN THYROID CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Marjorie Walker, Rick Thorne, Hubert Hondermarck, John Attia, Phillip Jobling, Christopher W Rowe
2016 Mandaliya HA, Oldmeadow C, Evans T, Troke P, George M, 'Breast cancer demographics, screening and survival outcome at a regional Australian cancer centre: a retrospective study', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY (2016)
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdw387.22
2016 Kelly PJ, Baker AL, Deane FP, Callister R, Collins C, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'ADDRESSING SMOKING, DIET AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WITHIN RESIDENTIAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT: RESULTS FROM A STEPPED WEDGE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Attia, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Amanda Baker
2016 Sutherland R, Hollis J, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, et al., 'EFFECTS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION ON ADIPOSITY IN ADOLESCENTS FROM ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES: 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' RCT.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, David Lubans, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, John Attia, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE WITHIN STUDENT SUBGROUPS: EXPLORATORY ASSESSMENT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, John Attia
2016 Sutherland RR, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 4 EVERYONE' CLUSTER RCT: 24-MONTH PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OUTCOMES OF A SCHOOL-BASED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY INTERVENTION TARGETING ADOLESCENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2016 Kepreotes E, Whitehead B, Attia J, Oldmeadow C, Collison A, Goddard B, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial examining high-flow oxygen in the management of infants with moderate bronchiolitis', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL (2016)
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2016.OA4983
Co-authors Adam Collison, John Attia
2016 Hutchesson M, Callister R, Morgan PJ, Pranata I, Skinner G, Collins CE, 'A targeted and tailored eHealth weight loss program for young women: The Be Positive Be Healthe pilot randomised controlled trial', http://www.alswh.org.au/scientificmeeting2016/program, Newcastle, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Ilung Pranata, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Erin Clarke Uon, Geoff Skinner, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton, Philip Morgan
2016 Britton B, Baker A, Wolfenden L, Wratten C, Bauer J, Beck A, et al., 'Eating As Treatment (EAT): a stepped-wedge, randomised controlled trial of a health behaviour intervention provided by dietitians to improve nutrition in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Kristen Mccarter, Amanda Baker, Gregory Carter, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff
2015 Faulkner S, Roselli S, Demont Y, Choquet G, Leissner P, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'ProNGF AS A NEW BIOMARKER IN THYROID CANCER', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Sam Faulkner, John Attia, Hubert Hondermarck, Marjorie Walker
2015 Fradgley E, Paul C, Bryant J, Oldmeadow C, 'AIMING FOR THE RIGHT QUALITY IMPROVEMENT TARGET: CROSS-SECTIONAL DATA EXPLORING OUTPATIENTS' PRIORITIES AND PREFERENCES FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN TERTIARY CLINICS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley, Jamie Bryant
2015 Makaroff AP, Attia J, Levi C, 'Seasonal variation in cervical arterial dissection in the Hunter New England region, New South Wales: a retrospective cohort study', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference Abstract E-book, Gold Coast, Qld. (2015) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Lucy Thomas, Christopher Levi
2015 Hasnat MA, Rifat M, Hall J, Oldmeadow C, Hasnat MA, 'Treatment delay among the tuberculosis patients of Bangladesh', Program Book, Brisbane, Queensland (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Hall
2015 Tracey E, Gilles D, Oldmeadow C, Lack J, Proietto A, 'THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE PUBLIC DIRECT ACCESS COLONOSCOPY SERVICE IMPLEMENTED AT JOHN HUNTER HOSPITAL', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
2014 Mather KA, Thalamuthu A, Oldmeadow C, Song F, Armstrong NJ, Poljak A, et al., 'Genome-wide significant results identified for plasma apolipoprotein h levels', Alzheimer's & Dementia (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.05.1526
Co-authors Peter Schofield, Mark Mcevoy, Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2014 Chouraki VA, Jakobsdottir J, Mather K, Adams H, Mollon J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'A genome-wide meta-analysis of plasma clusterin levels in the charge consortium', Alzheimer's & Dementia, Washington, DC (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.05.1159
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2014 Raudino A, Carr VJ, Cairns MJ, Oldmeadow C, Tooney PA, Scott RJ, Green MJ, 'INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF FKBP5 AND CHILDHOOD TRAUMA ON COGNITION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA', SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH (2014)
Co-authors Murray Cairns, Paul Tooney, Rodney Scott
2014 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, D'Este CA, West R, et al., 'OUTCOMES OF A SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION DESIGNED FOR SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL (RTC)', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Jamie Bryant
2014 Twyman L, Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, D'Este CA, Oldmeadow C, Palazzi K, 'WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT BARRIERS TO QUITTING SMOKING? A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY OF PERCEPTIONS OF HIGHLY DISADVANTAGED SMOKERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski
2014 Zdenkowski N, Radvan G, Oldmeadow C, Bonaventura A, 'PICNIC: TREATMENT OF PANCREATIC ENZYME INSUFFICIENCY IN PATIENTS WITH PANCREATIC CANCER (TRIAL IN PROGRESS)', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2014 Gunathilake R, Krishnamurthy V, Oldmedow C, Kerr E, Padmakumar C, Attia J, et al., 'Relationships between age, other predictive variables and the 90-day functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Levi, Mark Parsons
2013 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, Symonds I, Scott A, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Should we pay pregnant smokers to quit? Preliminary findings of a feasibility trial.', Journal of Smoking Cessation, Sydney (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.26
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh, Ian Symonds
2012 Holliday S, Magin PJ, Dunbabin JS, Oldmeadow CJ, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'Motivating factors amongst NSW general practitioners regarding the prescription of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review, Melbourne, Australia (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin, John Attia
2012 Ranasinghe WKB, Attia JR, Oldmeadow CJ, Lawrentschuk N, Robertson J, Ranasinghe T, et al., 'Bladder carcinoma in situ in Australia: A rising incidence for an under-reported malignancy', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia
Show 47 more conferences

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, Kheng Chai L, Paul C, et al., 'Systematic Review: Prevalence of smoking-proxy electronic inhaling systems (SEIS) use and its association with tobacco initiation in youth', World Health Organisation, 41 (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Flora Tzelepis, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Chris Paul
2016 Holliday EG, Oldmeadow C, 'Chronic Care Service Enhancements Program Evaluation, Statistical Analysis Report', NSW Department of Health, 63 (2016)
Co-authors Liz Holliday
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $8,014,086

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $542,000

Taking action: Increasing Advance Personal Planning by older adults$542,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Amy Waller, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Nola Ries, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor John Anderson, Professor Kichu Nair, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1701610
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20182 grants / $3,133,040

Addressing health and care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their communities: A cluster RCT$3,046,293

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Gail Garvey, Mr Steve Blunden, Assoicate Professor Alan Clough, Professor Michael Lowe, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Dr Megan Passey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Associate Professor Nola Ries
Scheme Targeted Call for Research - Dementia in Indigenous Australians
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700852
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Pilot randomised controlled trial of a telephone delivered intervention for hazardous alcohol use among young people living with severe mental ill-health $86,747

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Professor Amanda Baker, Associate Professor Peter Kelly, Professor Leanne Hides, Professor Kypros Kypri, Professor Richard Velleman, Conjoint Associate Professor Richard Clancy, Ms Margarett Terry, Professor Billie Bonevski, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Conjoint Professor Adrian Dunlop, Doctor Kristen McCarter, Doctor Emma Griffith, Griffith, Emma
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700922
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20173 grants / $3,368,574

'Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy' - a cluster randomised trial to implement culturally competent evidence-based smoking cessation for pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait$2,225,354

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Gillian Gould, Assoicate Professor Alan Clough, Professor Joerg Mattes, Ms Kristin Carson, Professor Chris Doran, Associate Professor Peter O'Mara, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Prof Katherine Boydell
Scheme Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1501260
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Healthy living after stroke: An online intervention for improving stroke survivor health behaviours and quality of life$599,124

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Neil Spratt, Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Professor Amanda Baker, Conjoint Professor Parker Magin, Dr Alyna Turner, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600296
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Does a targeted intervention improve medication safety after discharge and improve outcomes for people with dementia and their carers?$544,096

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Ashley Kable, Professor Dimity Pond, Professor John Attia, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Doctor Carolyn Hullick, Anne Fullerton
Scheme Dementia and Aged Care Services Research and Innovation Funding Round (DACS)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1601301
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

20164 grants / $593,950

A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of ‘Enable Me’: an e-health innovation for stroke survivors and support persons.$253,264

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Amy Waller, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Associate Professor Michael Pollack, Professor Chris Doran, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Conjoint Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500867
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The susceptibility, prevalence, type and burden of adolescent gambling: an opportunity for an ongoing monitoring tool$174,967

Funding body: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

Funding body Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor David Hill, Dr Vicki White, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601000
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Phase 1 and 2 of the Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy$136,275

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Gillian Gould, Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Peter O'Mara, Dr Marilyn Clarke, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Assoicate Professor Alan Clough, Ms Kristin Carson, Professor Jennifer Reath, Doctor Yael Bar Zeev, Associate Professor Maree Gruppetta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600932
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of ‘Enable Me’: an e-health innovation for stroke survivors and support persons.$29,444

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Amy Waller, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Dr Michael Pollack, Professor Chris Doran, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Conjoint Professor Frans Henskens
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1501095
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20153 grants / $366,522

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $270,908

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Improving uptake of colorectal screening among primary care attendees.$51,000

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Ms Natalie Dodd, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme PhD Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400854
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Delivery of care, are we doing enough? An investigation in to the treatment provided for depression in Australian alcohol treatment centers. $44,614

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Ms Breanne Hobden
Scheme Ian Scott Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1401254
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20141 grants / $10,000

A regional primary care based intervention to encourage colorectal cancer screening in those not responding to current national screening initiatives. $10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Conjoint Professor Frans Henskens, Associate Professor Marita Lynagh
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301403
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Strategies to Improve Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Reducing High Rates of Unplanned Hospital Readmissions Among Aboriginal People with Chronic Disease PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Co-occurring Depression and Alcohol Misuse: An Epidemiological Investigation PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Genetic And Non-Genetic Studies of Type 2 Diabetes in Three Susceptible Asian Populations: Malay, Chinese And Indian PhD (Medical Genetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Multidrug Resistance Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in Community Setting of Bangladesh PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

New study shows genetic role in education

May 31, 2013

A multinational consortium of medical researchers and social scientists has found a link between educational attainment and variations in one’s genetic sequence

Dr Christopher Oldmeadow

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer
CReDITSS - HMRI
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email christopher.oldmeadow@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (+612) 40420499
Fax (+612) 4913848

Office

Building Hunter Medical Research Institute
Location John Hunter Hospital

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