Dr Christopher Williams

Dr Christopher Williams

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health (Public Health)

Backs to the future

Dr Chris Williams is an HMRI Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Hunter New England Population Health and the University of Newcastle's School of Medicine and Public Health in the field of musculoskeletal pain.

Very easily, though, the former Singleton High School student could have been Chris Williams, builder. In one of life's "sliding doors" moments he relinquished a carpentry apprenticeship, enrolled at Newcastle TAFE and gained entry to University.

Playing rugby union for the Newcastle Wildfires led serendipitously to a sports scholarship at Sydney University. There, he initially completed a Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science.

With a keen interest in sports injury Chris progressed to a Master of Physiotherapy and also undertook postgraduate training in biostatistics. He finally gained his PhD in 2013 at The George Institute for Global Health and returned to the Hunter that year with his wife and two young children.

Construction's loss is definitely medicine's gain, for the 33-year-old has instead built a pre-eminent research reputation in health promotion and the prevention of musculoskeletal conditions.

His curiosity for research was piqued by his clinical expertise in physiotherapy: "I moved into the public health sphere after realising the enormity of musculoskeletal problems – around 90 per cent of the population will experience back pain during their life.

"Through my physiotherapy practice I knew that we really don't have the answers, so researching this area was greatly needed."

For his doctoral thesis Chris began a major randomised trial investigating the effects of paracetamol on alleviating acute low back pain. His results, published in The Lancet this year, surprised not only Chris but the medical world as a whole.

"Current guidelines for treating acute low back pain recommend paracetamol as the first line medication but there was very little evidence for this," Chris said. "Our research showed that patient recovery time and pain sensation were no different between those who took paracetamol and those who took a placebo.

"It suggested that we perhaps rely on pharmaceutical therapies more than we need to. General lifestyle factors and a positive attitude seem to be the key, including being active, having a good diet and making sure you don't gain weight.

"The sad thing is that most people don't get good advice. If there's one message I could impart, it's that it is critical to remain active and not let pain get on top of you."

In collaboration with Hunter New England Population Health, Chris is primarily focused on improving service delivery of preventative health practices in clinical and community settings. His work relates to the interaction between musculoskeletal management and health risk behaviours like obesity, inactivity, poor diet, alcohol misuse and smoking.

Where chronic diseases are often treated in isolation, Chris believes they could be tackled in unison with back pain and osteoarthritis for example.

"We have ever-increasing waiting lists for hip and knee replacements and we have to look at ways to overcome these problems," he said.

His current involvement in an Osteoarthritis Optimisation initiative at the John Hunter Hospital is contributing to an evidence-based screening service, ensuring patients are referred to the right care at the right time.

In collaboration with NPS MedicineWise, Chris also led the development of an electronic decision-support tool to aid patients and clinicians in managing low back pain. It was rolled-out nationally, attracting over 6000 users in the first six months.

It's a significantly different 'tool' to the ones he could have been wielding. "Research wasn't something I'd have ever considered when I was at school," he said, "but when you find something you really enjoy doing it certainly makes it a lot easier."

Backs to the future

Dr Chris Williams is an HMRI Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Hunter New England Population Health and the University of Newcastle’s School of Medicine

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Williams is a research fellow (NHMRC) and population health physiotherapist with qualifications in exercise science, physiotherapy and postgraduate training in biostatistics. In addition to his current NHMRC award, he is appointed to the Hunter New England Local Health District as a Clinical Research Fellow. He completed his PhD in 2013 at The Sydney Medical School and The George Institute for Global Health. Dr Williams established and leads the Hunter New England Musculoskeletal Health Program, a research-practice program with Hunter New England Population Health and various clinical units which focuses on improving the coordination of population health and clinical services to optimise management of health risk factors associated with musculoskeletal conditions in adults and adolescents. He is also the co-lead for the Centre for Pain, Health and Lifestyle, a multi-institutional collaboration which aims to improve musculoskeletal health and other co-morbid health problems across the lifespan.
  

Dr Williams’s research interests have focused on the use of novel methods to conduct efficient research trials in real world contexts. This has involved assessing the effectiveness of i) clinical and public health interventions to improve outcomes for people with musculoskeletal pain, and ii) implementation strategies aimed to improve the adoption and sustained use of recommended practice in community and clinical settings. To date he has conducted or is conducting 6 RCTs and 2 observational studies. These include a cohort multiple RCT and the world’s largest placebo controlled trial in back pain (n=1650). 

Research Expertise
Musculoskeletal conditions Implementation Health risk behaviours Clinical research Public Health, Population Health 

Collaborations
Dr Williams's work involves numerous collaborations with researchers from Australia and internationally including: Hunter New England Population Health; The George Institute for Global Health, Australia; School of Public Health, University of Sydney; Neuroscience Research Australia, University of New South Wales, Australia; UniSA, Australia; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, The Netherlands; Universidade de São, São Paulo, Brazil; Keele University, UK; Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada; University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Master of Physiotherapy, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Back pain
  • Clinical decision support
  • Diagnostic accuracy
  • Health risk behaviours
  • Implementation
  • Musculoskeletal conditions
  • Predicition models/validation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post-Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2016 -  Research Fellow Universityof Newcastle Faulty of Health and Medicine
Australia
1/03/2013 -  Honorary Fellow The George Institute for Global Health
Australia
1/03/2009 - 1/03/2013 PhD Candidate University of Sydney

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2014 HMRI Award for Early Career Research
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (71 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kamper SJ, Williams CM, Hestbaek L, 'Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood? A Cohort Study.', The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy, 47 763-768 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2017.7484
2017 Wolfenden L, Yoong SL, Williams CM, Grimshaw J, Durrheim DN, Gillham K, Wiggers J, 'Embedding researchers in health service organizations improves research translation and health service performance: the Australian Hunter New England Population Health example.', J Clin Epidemiol, 85 3-11 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.03.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors D Durrheim, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2017 Machado GC, Pinheiro MB, Lee H, Ahmed OH, Hendrick P, Williams C, Kamper SJ, 'Smartphone apps for the self-management of low back pain: A systematic review', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Guidelines for low back pain (LBP) often recommend the use of self-management such as unsupervised exercise, booklets, and online education. Another potentia... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Guidelines for low back pain (LBP) often recommend the use of self-management such as unsupervised exercise, booklets, and online education. Another potentially useful way for patients to self-manage LBP is by using smartphone applications (apps). However, to date, there has been no rigorous evaluation of LBP apps and no guidance for consumers on how to select high-quality, evidence-based apps. This chapter reviews smartphone apps for the self-management of LBP and evaluates their content quality and whether they recommend evidence-based interventions.This chapter shows that generally app developers are selecting interventions that are endorsed by guidelines, although their quality is low. There are many apps available for the self-management of LBP, but their effectiveness in improving patient outcomes has not been rigorously assessed. App developers need to work closely with healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients to ensure app content is accurate, evidence based, and engaging.

DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.04.002
2017 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Williams CM, Gilligan C, Regan T, Daly J, et al., 'Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectiv... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectives of this review are to assess the following, across community, healthcare or other settings. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling delivered individually or to a group for increasing smoking cessation. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling on increasing the number of quit attempts. The effect of real-time video counselling on intervention adherence and duration of consultations. The effect of real-time video counselling on satisfaction, including ease of use. The effect of real-time video counselling on therapeutic alliance. To provide a brief economic commentary of real-time video counselling.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012659
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Conor Gilligan, Timothy Regan, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder
2017 da Silva T, Macaskill P, Mills K, Maher C, Williams C, Lin C, Hancock MJ, 'Predicting recovery in patients with acute low back pain: A Clinical Prediction Model.', Eur J Pain, 21 716-726 (2017)
DOI 10.1002/ejp.976
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Kamper SJ, Williams CM, 'Evidence and methods in back pain research', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.07.003
2017 Lee H, Wiggers J, Kamper SJ, Williams A, O'Brien KM, Hodder RK, et al., 'Mechanism evaluation of a lifestyle intervention for patients with musculoskeletal pain who are overweight or obese: protocol for a causal mediation analysis.', BMJ Open, 7 e014652 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014652
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial.', Implement Sci, 12 6 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Kamper SJ, Yamato TP, Williams CM, 'The prevalence, risk factors, prognosis and treatment for back pain in children and adolescents: An overview of systematic reviews', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Emerging data suggest that back pain in adolescents is responsible for a substantial disability burden and consumes considerable healthcare services. Of furt... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Emerging data suggest that back pain in adolescents is responsible for a substantial disability burden and consumes considerable healthcare services. Of further concern is the fact that back pain during this period of life may have health implications in adulthood. Given this, understanding the epidemiology and clinical evidence base relevant to clinicians and researchers in the field of musculoskeletal health is crucial. This chapter provides an overview and synthesis of systematic reviews that address important questions related to back pain in children and adolescents:. ¿What is the prevalence of back pain in children and adolescents?¿What are the risk factors?¿What is the clinical course and what are the prognostic factors?¿Which are the most effective preventative interventions and clinical treatments?

DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.04.003
2017 Lee H, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, Kamper SJ, Traeger AC, Skinner IW, et al., 'An embedded randomised controlled trial of a Teaser Campaign to optimise recruitment in primary care', Clinical Trials, 14 162-169 (2017) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2017. Background: Marketing communication and brand identity is a fundamental principle of advertising and end-user engagement. Health researchers have begun to a... [more]

© The Author(s) 2017. Background: Marketing communication and brand identity is a fundamental principle of advertising and end-user engagement. Health researchers have begun to apply this principle to trial recruitment in primary care. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a Teaser Campaign using a series of postcards in advance of a conventional mail-out increases the number of primary care clinics that engage with a clinical trial. Methods: Embedded randomised recruitment trial across primary care clinics (general practitioners and physiotherapists) in the Sydney metropolitan area. Clinics in the Teaser Campaign group received a series of branded promotional postcards in advance of a standard letter inviting them to participate in a clinical trial. Clinics in the Standard Mail group did not receive the postcards. Results: From a total of 744 clinics that were sent an invitation letter, 46 clinics in the Teaser Campaign group and 40 clinics in the Standard Mail group responded (11.6% total response rate). There was no between-group difference in the odds of responding to the invitation letter (odds ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.85, p = 0.49). For physiotherapy clinics and general practice clinics, the odds ratios were 1.43 (confidence interval = 0.82-2.48, p = 0.21) and 0.77 (confidence interval = 0.34-1.75, p = 0.54), respectively. Conclusion: A Teaser Campaign using a series of branded promotional postcards did not improve clinic engagement for a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

DOI 10.1177/1740774516683921
2017 Michaleff ZA, Kamper SJ, Stinson JN, Hestbaek L, Williams CM, Campbell P, Dunn KM, 'Measuring Musculoskeletal Pain in Infants, Children, and Adolescents.', J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 47 712-730 (2017)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2017.7469
2017 Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, Kamper SJ, Lee H, Williams A, O'Brien KM, Williams CM, 'Developing implementation science to improve the translation of research to address low back pain: A critical review', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)

© 2017. The evidence base regarding treatment for back pain does not align with clinical practice. Currently there is relatively little evidence to guide health decision-makers o... [more]

© 2017. The evidence base regarding treatment for back pain does not align with clinical practice. Currently there is relatively little evidence to guide health decision-makers on how to improve the use, uptake or adoption of evidence-based recommended practice for low back pain. Improving the design, conduct and reporting of strategies to improve the implementation of back pain care will help address this important evidence-practice gap. In this paper, we. 1)Describe implementation science models and approaches.2)Outline important features of implementation research.3)Critically appraise the quality and findings of implementation trials in the low back pain field.4)Provide recommendations for the design and conduct of future implementation studies in the field.

DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.05.002
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Bier JD, Kamper SJ, Verhagen AP, Maher CG, Williams CM, 'Patient Nonadherence to Guideline-Recommended Care in Acute Low Back Pain.', Arch Phys Med Rehabil, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.05.029
2017 Lee H, Mansell G, McAuley JH, Kamper SJ, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, et al., 'Causal mechanisms in the clinical course and treatment of back pain', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying causal mechanisms in the development and treatment of back pain. The aim of this article is t... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying causal mechanisms in the development and treatment of back pain. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of our current understanding of causal mechanisms in the field. In the first section, we introduce key concepts and terminology. In the second section, we provide a brief synopsis of systematic reviews of mechanism studies relevant to the clinical course and treatment of back pain. In the third section, we reflect on the findings of our review to explain how understanding causal mechanisms can inform clinical practice and the implementation of best practice. In the final sections, we introduce contemporary methodological advances, highlight the key assumptions of these methods, and discuss future directions to advance the quality of mechanism-related studies in the back pain field.

DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.04.001
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Dissing KB, Hestbæk L, Hartvigsen J, Williams C, Kamper S, Boyle E, Wedderkopp N, 'Spinal pain in Danish school children - how often and how long? The CHAMPS Study-DK.', BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 18 67 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1424-5
2017 Nathan N, Wiggers J, Wyse R, Williams CM, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, et al., 'Factors associated with the implementation of a vegetable and fruit program in a population of Australian elementary schools.', Health Educ Res, 32 197-205 (2017)
DOI 10.1093/her/cyx038
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2017 Butler P, Kamper SJ, Williams CM, 'Exercise-based programmes reduce sports injury in adolescents (PEDro synthesis)', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51 690-691 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096732
2016 Kamper SJ, Henschke N, Hestbaek L, Dunn KM, Williams CM, 'Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 20 275-284 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia. All rights reserved. Introduction: Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impa... [more]

© 2016, Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia. All rights reserved. Introduction: Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have little empirical evidence to underpin their clinical practice. In this article we summarise the state of the evidence concerning MSK pain in children and adolescents, and offer suggestions for future research. Results: Rates of self-reported MSK pain in adolescents are similar to those in adult populations and they are typically higher in teenage girls than boys. Epidemiological research has identified conditions such as back and neck pain as major causes of disability in adolescents, and in up to a quarter of cases there are impacts on school or physical activities. A range of physical, psychological and social factors have been shown to be associated with MSK pain report, but the strength and direction of these relationships are unclear. There are few validated instruments available to quantify the nature and severity of MSK pain in children, but some show promise. Several national surveys have shown that adolescents with MSK pain commonly seek care and use medications for their condition. Some studies have revealed a link between MSK pain in adolescents and chronic pain in adults. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal pain conditions are often recurrent in nature, occurring throughout the life-course. Attempts to understand these conditions at a time close to their initial onset may offer a better chance of developing effective prevention and treatment strategies.

DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0149
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
2016 Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'CAFE: a multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: a randomised controlled trial', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0453-z
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
2016 O'Brien KM, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, et al., 'Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol', BMJ OPEN, 6 (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010203
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, 'Educational interventions are effective in treating childhood obesity: (PEDro synthesis)', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 50 130-+ (2016)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094667
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Williams A, Wiggers J, O'Brien KM, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle behavioural intervention for patients with low back pain, who are overweight or obese: study protocol', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-0922-1
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Wolfenden L, Milat AJ, Lecathelinais C, Skelton E, Clinton-McHarg T, Williams C, et al., 'A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates', Preventive Medicine Reports, 4 441-443 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research accor... [more]

© 2016 The Authors The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database ¿Scopus¿ was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2016.08.006
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Li K Chai, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2016 Wolfenden L, Grimshaw J, Williams CM, Yoong SL, 'Time to consider sharing data extracted from trials included in systematic reviews', Systematic Reviews, 5 (2016)

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: While the debate regarding shared clinical trial data has shifted from whether such data should be shared to how this is best achieved, the shar... [more]

© 2016 The Author(s). Background: While the debate regarding shared clinical trial data has shifted from whether such data should be shared to how this is best achieved, the sharing of data collected as part of systematic reviews has received little attention. In this commentary, we discuss the potential benefits of coordinated efforts to share data collected as part of systematic reviews. Main body: There are a number of potential benefits of systematic review data sharing. Shared information and data obtained as part of the systematic review process may reduce unnecessary duplication, reduce demand on trialist to service repeated requests from reviewers for data, and improve the quality and efficiency of future reviews. Sharing also facilitates research to improve clinical trial and systematic review methods and supports additional analyses to address secondary research questions. While concerns regarding appropriate use of data, costs, or the academic return for original review authors may impede more open access to information extracted as part of systematic reviews, many of these issues are being addressed, and infrastructure to enable greater access to such information is being developed. Conclusion: Embracing systems to enable more open access to systematic review data has considerable potential to maximise the benefits of research investment in undertaking systematic reviews.

DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0361-y
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Nathan N, Yoong SL, 'Improving the translation of health promotion interventions using effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs in program evaluations', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 204-207 (2016) [C1]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Bridging the gap between research-based evidence and public health policy and practice is a considerable challenge to public healt... [more]

© Australian Health Promotion Association 2016. Bridging the gap between research-based evidence and public health policy and practice is a considerable challenge to public health improvement this century, requiring a rethinking of conventional approaches to health research production and use. Traditionally the process of research translation has been viewed as linear and unidirectional, from epidemiological research to identify health problems and determinants, to efficacy and effectiveness trials and studies of strategies to maximise the implementation and dissemination of evidence-based interventions in practice. A criticism of this approach is the considerable time it takes to achieve translation of health research into practice. Hybrid evaluation designs provide one means of accelerating the research translation process by simultaneously collecting information regarding intervention impacts and implementation and dissemination strategy. However, few health promotion research trials employ such designs and often fail to report information to enable assessment of the feasibility and potential impact of implementation and dissemination strategies. In addition to intervention effects, policy makers and practitioners also want to know the impact of implementation strategies. This commentary will define the three categories of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs, describe their application in health promotion evaluation, and discuss the potential implications of more systematic use of such designs for the translation of health promotion and evaluation.So what?Greater use of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs may accelerate research translation by providing more practice- and policy-relevant information to end-users, more quickly.

DOI 10.1071/HE16056
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Kamper SJ, Henschke N, Hestbaek L, Dunn KM, Williams CM, 'Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents.', Braz J Phys Ther, 20 275-284 (2016)
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0149
2016 Wolfenden L, Regan T, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Kingsland M, Milat A, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of workplace-based policies or practices targeting tobacco, alcohol, diet, physical activity and obesity', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary ... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The primary aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of implementation strategies for policies, practices or programmes that aim to improve health behaviours or reduce unhealthy behaviours commonly associated with risk factors for chronic disease in the workplace. Specifically, this review will target interventions that address diet, physical inactivity, obesity, risky alcohol use and tobacco use. In addition, this review will determine: the effectiveness of implement ation strategies on health behaviour outcomes (nutrition, physical activity, obesity, alcohol use and smoking); the cost-effectiveness of these strategies; the existence of adverse outcomes resulting from the implementation of these strategies.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012439
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Timothy Regan, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 O'Brien KM, Williams A, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Campbell E, et al., 'Effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for low back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee: protocol and statistical analysis plan for two randomised controlled trials', BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, 20 477-489 (2016)
DOI 10.1590/bjpt-rbf.2014.0189
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Traeger AC, Henschke N, Hübscher M, Williams CM, Kamper SJ, Maher CG, et al., 'Estimating the Risk of Chronic Pain: Development and Validation of a Prognostic Model (PICKUP) for Patients with Acute Low Back Pain', PLoS Medicine, 13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002019
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2016 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub2
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Flora Tzelepis, John Wiggers
2016 Lin CWC, Li Q, Williams CM, Maher CG, Day RO, Hancock MJ, et al., 'The economic burden of guideline-recommended first line care for acute low back pain', European Spine Journal, 1-8 (2016)

© 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Purpose: To report health care costs and the factors associated with such costs in people with acute low back pain receiving guideline-re... [more]

© 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg Purpose: To report health care costs and the factors associated with such costs in people with acute low back pain receiving guideline-recommended first line care. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a trial which found no difference in clinical outcomes. Participants with acute low back pain received reassurance and advice, and either paracetamol (taken regularly or as needed) or placebo for up to 4 weeks and followed up for 12 weeks. Data on health service utilisation were collected by self-report. A health sector perspective was adopted to report all direct costs incurred (in 2015 AUD, 1 AUD = 0.53 Euro). Costs were reported for the entire study cohort and for each group. Various baseline clinical, demographic, work-related and socioeconomic factors were investigated for their association with increased costs using generalised linear models. Results: The mean cost per participant was AUD167.74 (SD = 427.24) for the entire cohort (n = 1365). Most of these costs were incurred in primary care through visits to a general practitioner or physiotherapist. Compared to the placebo group, there was an increase in cost when paracetamol was taken. Multivariate analysis showed that disability, symptom duration and compensation were associated with costs. Receiving compensation was associated with a twofold increase compared to not receiving compensation. Conclusions: Taking paracetamol as part of first line care for acute low back pain increased the economic burden. Higher disability, longer symptom duration and receiving compensation were independently associated with increased health care costs.

DOI 10.1007/s00586-016-4781-0
Citations Scopus - 3
2016 Yoong SL, Chai LK, Williams CM, Wiggers J, Finch M, Wolfenden L, 'Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions targeting sleep and their impact on child body mass index, diet, and physical activity', Obesity, 24 1140-1147 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and phy... [more]

© 2016 The Obesity Society. Objective This review aimed to examine the impact of interventions involving an explicit sleep component on child body mass index (BMI), diet, and physical activity. Methods A systematic search was undertaken in six databases to identify randomized controlled trials examining the impact of interventions with a sleep component on child BMI, dietary intake, and/or physical activity. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted assessing the impact of included interventions on child BMI. Results Of the eight included trials, three enforced a sleep protocol and five targeted sleep as part of multicomponent behavioral interventions either exclusively or together with nutrition and physical activity. Meta-analysis of three studies found that multicomponent behavioral interventions involving a sleep component were not significantly effective in changing child BMI (n = 360,-0.04 kg/m 2 [-0.18, 0.11], I 2 = 0%); however, only one study included in the meta-analysis successfully changed sleep duration in children. There were some reported improvements to adolescent diet, and only one trial examined the impact on child physical activity, where a significant effect was observed. Conclusions Findings from the included studies suggest that where improvements in child sleep duration were achieved, a positive impact on child BMI, nutrition, and physical activity was also observed.

DOI 10.1002/oby.21459
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Li K Chai
2016 Traeger AC, Hübscher M, Henschke N, Williams CM, Maher CG, Moseley GL, et al., 'Emotional distress drives health services overuse in patients with acute low back pain: a longitudinal observational study', European Spine Journal, 25 2767-2773 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To determine whether emotional distress reported at the initial consultation affects subsequent healthcare use either directly... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To determine whether emotional distress reported at the initial consultation affects subsequent healthcare use either directly or indirectly via moderating the influence of symptoms. Methods: Longitudinal observational study of 2891 participants consulting primary care for low back pain. Negative binomial regression models were constructed to estimate independent effects of emotional distress on healthcare use.¿Potential confounders were identified using directed acyclic graphs. Results: After the initial consultation, participants had a mean (SD) of one (1.2) visit for back pain over 3¿months, and nine (14) visits for back pain over 12¿months. Higher reports of anxiety during the initial consultation led to increased short-term healthcare use (IRR 1.06, 95¿% CI 1.01¿1.11) and higher reports of depression led to increased long-term healthcare use (IRR 1.04, 95¿% CI 1.02¿1.07). The effect sizes suggest that a patient with a high anxiety score (8/10) would consult 50¿% more frequently over 3¿months, and a person with a high depression score (8/10) would consult 30¿% more frequently over 12¿months, compared to a patient with equivalent pain and disability and no reported anxiety or depression. Conclusions: Emotional distress in the acute stage of low back pain increased subsequent consultation rates. Interventions that target emotional distress during the initial consultation are likely to reduce costly and potentially inappropriate future healthcare use for patients with non-specific low back pain.

DOI 10.1007/s00586-016-4461-0
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare Service Centers' Preferences and Intentions to Use a Web-Based Program to Implement Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Steffens D, Maher CG, Ferreira ML, Hancock MJ, Pereira LSM, Williams CM, Latimer J, 'Influence of clinician characteristics and operational factors on recruitment of participants with low back pain: An observational study', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 38 151-158 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence recruitment of patients to an observational study of low... [more]

© 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence recruitment of patients to an observational study of low back pain (LBP). Methods From 1147 primary care (first health contact) clinicians initially contacted, 138 (physiotherapists and chiropractors) agreed to participate in a large observational study of LBP and were the focus of the current study. Data were collected pertaining to clinicians' characteristics, operational factors, and the number of patients recruited. The association of a variety of clinician characteristics and operational factors with recruitment rate was determined using a multivariate negative binomial regression analysis. Results From October 2011 to November 2012, 1585 patients were screened by 138 study clinicians with 951 eligible patients entering the observational study. Clinicians who were members of their professional association had a recruitment rate less than half that of those who were nonmembers (P < .0001). Clinicians who were trained by telephone had a recruitment rate 4.01 times higher than those trained face to face (P < .0001). Similarly, clinicians who referred a larger number of ineligible participants had a slightly higher recruitment rate with an incident rate ratio of 1.04 per ineligible patient (P < .0001). Other clinicians' characteristics and operational factors were not associated with recruitment. Conclusion This study provides evidence that it is feasible to recruit participants from primary care practices to a simple observational study of LBP. Factors identified as influencing rec ruitment were professional association (negative association), training by telephone, and referring a higher number of ineligible participants.

DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.10.016
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2015 Williams C, Nathan N, Wyse R, yoong S, delaney T, Wiggers JH, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease (protocol)', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Traeger A, Henschke N, Hübscher M, Williams CM, Kamper SJ, Maher CG, et al., 'Development and validation of a screening tool to predict the risk of chronic low back pain in patients presenting with acute low back pain: A study protocol', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C3]

Introduction: Around 40% of people presenting to primary care with an episode of acute low back pain develop chronic low back pain. In order to reduce the risk of developing chron... [more]

Introduction: Around 40% of people presenting to primary care with an episode of acute low back pain develop chronic low back pain. In order to reduce the risk of developing chronic low back pain, effective secondary prevention strategies are needed. Early identification of at-risk patients allows clinicians to make informed decisions based on prognostic profile, and researchers to select appropriate participants for secondary prevention trials. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a prognostic screening tool that identifies patients with acute low back pain in primary care who are at risk of developing chronic low back pain. This paper describes the methods and analysis plan for the development and validation of the tool. Methods/analysis: The prognostic screening tool will be developed using methods recommended by the Prognosis Research Strategy (PROGRESS) Group and reported using the Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) statement. In the development stage, we will use data from 1248 patients recruited for a prospective cohort study of acute low back pain in primary care. We will construct 3 logistic regression models to predict chronic low back pain according to 3 definitions: any pain, high pain and disability at 3 months. In the validation stage, we will use data from a separate sample of 1643 patients with acute low back pain to assess the performance of each prognostic model. We will produce validation plots showing Nagelkerke R < sup > 2 < /sup > and Brier score (overall performance), area under the curve statistic (discrimination) and the calibration slope and intercept (calibration). Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval from the University of Sydney Ethics Committee was obtained for both of the original studies that we plan to analyse using the methods outlined in this protocol (Henschke et al, ref 11-2002/3/3144; Williams et al, ref 11638).

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007916
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2015 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SL, Lecathelinais C, Bell AC, et al., 'Adoption of obesity prevention policies and practices by Australian primary schools: 2006 to 2013', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 30 262-271 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyu068
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2015 Yoong SL, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Preece SJ, Williams CM, Sutherland RL, et al., 'Assessment of the School Nutrition Environment: A Study in Australian Primary School Canteens', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 49 215-222 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children&apos;s diets, as they offer structured opp... [more]

© 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Introduction Schools represent a valuable setting for interventions to improve children's diets, as they offer structured opportunities for ongoing intervention. Modifications to the school food environment can increase purchasing of healthier foods and improve children's diets. This study examines the availability of healthy food and drinks, implementation of pricing and promotion strategies in Australian primary school canteens, and whether these varied by school characteristics. Methods In 2012 and 2013, canteen managers of primary schools in the Hunter New England region of New South Wales reported via telephone interview the pricing and promotion strategies implemented in their canteens to encourage healthier food and drink purchases. A standardized audit of canteen menus was performed to assess the availability of healthy options. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results Overall, 203 (79%) canteen managers completed the telephone interview and 170 provided menus. Twenty-nine percent of schools had menus that primarily consisted of healthier food and drinks, and 11% did not sell unhealthy foods. Less than half reported including only healthy foods in meal deals (25%), labeling menus (43%), and having a comprehensive canteen policy (22%). A significantly larger proportion of schools in high socioeconomic areas (OR=3.0) and large schools (OR=4.4) had primarily healthy options on their menus. School size and being a Government school were significantly associated with implementation of some pricing and promotion strategies. Conclusions There is a need to monitor canteen environments to inform policy development and research. Future implementation research to improve the food environments of disadvantaged schools in particular is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.02.002
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2015 Williams CM, Nathan N, Delaney T, Yoong SL, Wiggers J, Preece S, et al., 'CAFÉ: A multicomponent audit and feedback intervention to improve implementation of healthy food policy in primary school canteens: Protocol of a randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 5 (2015) [C1]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. On... [more]

Introduction: A number of jurisdictions internationally have policies requiring schools to implement healthy canteens. However, many schools have not implemented such policies. One reason for this isthat current support interventions cannot feasibly be delivered to large numbers of schools. A promising solution to support population-wide implementation of healthy canteen practices is audit and feedback. The effectiveness of this strategy has, however, not previously been assessed in school canteens. This study aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an audit and feedback intervention, delivered by telephone and email, in increasing the number of school canteens that have menus complying with a government healthy-canteen policy. Methods and analysis: Seventy-two schools, across the Hunter New England Local Health District in New South Wales Australia, will be randomised to receive the multicomponent audit and feedback implementation intervention or usual support. The intervention will consist of between two and four canteen menu audits over 12 months. Each menu audit will be followed by two modes of feedback: a written feedback report and a verbal feedback/support via telephone. Primary outcomes, assessed by dieticians blind to group status and as recommended by the Fresh Tastes @ School policy, are: (1) the proportion of schools with a canteen menu containing foods or beverages restricted for sale, and; (2) the proportion of schools that have a menu which contains more than 50% of foods classified as healthy canteen items. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of menu items in each category ('red', 'amber' and 'green'), canteen profitability and cost-effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained by from the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee. The findings will be disseminated in usual forums, including peer-reviewed publication and conference presentations.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006969
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2015 Downie AS, Hancock MJ, Rzewuska M, Williams CM, Lin CWC, Maher CG, 'Trajectories of acute low back pain: A latent class growth analysis', Pain, 157 225-234 (2015)

© 2015 International Association for the Study of Pain. Characterising the clinical course of back pain by mean pain scores over time may not adequately reflect the complexity of... [more]

© 2015 International Association for the Study of Pain. Characterising the clinical course of back pain by mean pain scores over time may not adequately reflect the complexity of the clinical course of acute low back pain. We analysed pain scores over 12 weeks for 1585 patients with acute low back pain presenting to primary care to identify distinct pain trajectory groups and baseline patient characteristics associated with membership of each cluster. This was a secondary analysis of the PACE trial that evaluated paracetamol for acute low back pain. Latent class growth analysis determined a 5 cluster model, which comprised 567 (35.8%) patients who recovered by week 2 (cluster 1, rapid pain recovery); 543 (34.3%) patients who recovered by week 12 (cluster 2, pain recovery by week 12); 222 (14.0%) patients whose pain reduced but did not recover (cluster 3, incomplete pain recovery); 167 (10.5%) patients whose pain initially decreased but then increased by week 12 (cluster 4, fluctuating pain); and 86 (5.4%) patients who experienced high-level pain for the whole 12 weeks (cluster 5, persistent high pain). Patients with longer pain duration were more likely to experience delayed recovery or nonrecovery. Belief in greater risk of persistence was associated with nonrecovery, but not delayed recovery. Higher pain intensity, longer duration, and workers' compensation were associated with persistent high pain, whereas older age and increased number of episodes were associa ted with fluctuating pain. Identification of discrete pain trajectory groups offers the potential to better manage acute low back pain.

DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000351
Citations Scopus - 11
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices:a cross-sectional study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating ... [more]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. Objective: This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods: A computer-Assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-Assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Results: Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (P < .001, OR 28,95% CI 8.0-95.2). Features reported by service managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to support staff with menu planning (117/129, 90.7%), links to relevant resources (212/212, 100%), updated information on guidelines (208/212, 98.1%), and feedback regarding childcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Conclusions: Childcare service managers reported high intention to use a Web-based program and identified several useful features to support staff to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Further descriptive and intervention research examining the development and use of such a program to support childcare centers with the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is warranted.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2015 Haanstra TM, Kamper SJ, Williams CM, Spriensma AS, Lin C-WC, Maher CG, et al., 'Does adherence to treatment mediate the relationship between patients' treatment outcome expectancies and the outcomes of pain intensity and recovery from acute low back pain?', Pain, 156 1530-1536 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000198
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, 'Computer-tailored interventions to facilitate health behavioural change.', Br J Sports Med, 49 1478-1479 (2015) [C2]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-093508
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Peiris D, Williams C, Holbrook R, Lindner R, Reeve J, Das A, Maher C, 'A web-based clinical decision support tool for primary health care management of back pain: development and mixed methods evaluation.', JMIR Res Protoc, 3 e17 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.3071
2014 Delaney T, Williams C, Wyse R, Yoong SL, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Identifying social influences on the implementation of canteen practices in primary schools', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 8 24-24 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.10.042
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2014 Williams CM, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, 'Physical activity promotion in primary care has a sustained influence on activity levels of sedentary adults', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 1069-1070 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2013-093187
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Williams CM, Maher CG, Hancock MJ, McAuley JH, Lin CWC, Latimer J, 'Recruitment rate for a clinical trial was associated with particular operational procedures and clinician characteristics', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 67 169-175 (2014) [C1]

Objectives Expenditure on research has grown substantially; however, a major challenge for conducting successful clinical research is the efficient recruitment of participants. We... [more]

Objectives Expenditure on research has grown substantially; however, a major challenge for conducting successful clinical research is the efficient recruitment of participants. We investigated factors influencing the rate at which general practitioners (GPs) recruit participants to a randomized controlled trial. Study Design and Setting We used data on 363 GPs recruiting participants for a randomized controlled trial of low back pain. Multivariate negative binomial regression was used to determine associations of characteristics of the GP and study operational aspects with the recruitment rate. Results GPs recruited 1,195 participants at a rate of 0.013 participants/day. GPs located in a high socioeconomic area recruited at half the rate as those located in a low socioeconomic area [incident rate ratio (IRR), 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.37, 0.74]. A follow-up within 2 weeks of training the GP and a higher number of face-to-face visits were operational procedures associated with a higher rate of recruitment (IRR, 2.15; 95% CI: 1.58, 2.94 and IRR, 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.24, respectively). Other contacts made with a GP were not associated with recruitment. Conclusion The results suggested that the type of operational procedures used in clinical trial recruitment strategies are important aspects to consider. The ability to predict which GPs will recruit based on GP characteristics seems limited. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.08.007
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2014 Di Pietro F, Catley MJ, McAuley JH, Parkitny L, Maher CG, Menezes Costa LDC, et al., 'Rasch Analysis Supports the Use of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire', PHYSICAL THERAPY, 94 91-100 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20130217
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2014 Downie A, Williams CM, Henschke N, Hancock MJ, Ostelo RWJG, de Vet HCW, et al., 'Red flags to screen for malignancy and fracture in patients with low back pain', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 48 1518-1518 (2014) [O1]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-f7095rep
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 Williams CM, Hancock MJ, Maher CG, McAuley JH, Lin CWC, Latimer J, 'Predicting rapid recovery from acute low back pain based on the intensity, duration and history of pain: A validation study', European Journal of Pain (United Kingdom), 18 1182-1189 (2014) [C1]

Background Clinical prediction rules can assist clinicians to identify patients with low back pain (LBP) who are likely to recover quickly with minimal treatment; however, there i... [more]

Background Clinical prediction rules can assist clinicians to identify patients with low back pain (LBP) who are likely to recover quickly with minimal treatment; however, there is a paucity of validated instruments to assist with this task. Method We performed a pre-planned external validation study to assess the generalizability of a simple 3-item clinical prediction rule developed to estimate the probability of recovery from acute LBP at certain time points. The accuracy of the rule (calibration and discrimination) was determined in a sample of 956 participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Results The calibration of the rule was reasonable in the new sample with predictions of recovery typically within 5-10% of observed recovery. Discriminative performance of the rule was poor to moderate and similar to that found in the development sample. Conclusions The results suggest that the rule can be used to provide accurate information about expected recovery from acute LBP, within the first few weeks of patients presenting to primary care. Impact analysis to determine if the rule influences clinical behaviours and patient outcomes is required. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

DOI 10.1002/j.1532-2149.2014.00467.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2014 Williams CM, Williams A, O¿Brien K, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Preventative care strategies for common risk factors of chronic disease and musculoskeletal pain in patients waiting for specialist consultation', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 8 115-115 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2014.10.207
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2014 Williams CM, Maher CG, Latimer J, McLachlan AJ, Hancock MJ, Day RO, Lin CWC, 'Efficacy of paracetamol for acute low-back pain: A double-blind, randomised controlled trial', The Lancet, 384 1586-1596 (2014) [C1]

Background: Regular paracetamol is the recommended first-line analgesic for acute low-back pain; however, no high-quality evidence supports this recommendation. We aimed to assess... [more]

Background: Regular paracetamol is the recommended first-line analgesic for acute low-back pain; however, no high-quality evidence supports this recommendation. We aimed to assess the efficacy of paracetamol taken regularly or as-needed to improve time to recovery from pain, compared with placebo, in patients with low-back pain. Methods: We did a multicentre, double-dummy, randomised, placebo controlled trial across 235 primary care centres in Sydney, Australia, from Nov 11, 2009, to March 5, 2013. We randomly allocated patients with acute low-back pain in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive up to 4 weeks of regular doses of paracetamol (three times per day; equivalent to 3990 mg paracetamol per day), as-needed doses of paracetamol (taken when needed for pain relief; maximum 4000 mg paracetamol per day), or placebo. Randomisation was done according to a centralised randomisation schedule prepared by a researcher who was not involved in patient recruitment or data collection. Patients and staffat all sites were masked to treatment allocation. All participants received best-evidence advice and were followed up for 3 months. The primary outcome was time until recovery from low-back pain, with recovery defined as a pain score of 0 or 1 (on a 0-10 pain scale) sustained for 7 consecutive days. All data were analysed by intention to treat. This study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry, number ACTN 12609000966291. Findings:550 participants were assigned to the regular group (550 analysed), 549 were assigned to the as-needed group (546 analysed), and 553 were assigned to the placebo group (547 analysed). Median time to recovery was 17 days (95% CI 14-19) in the regular group, 17 days (15-20) in the as-needed group, and 16 days (14-20) in the placebo group (regular vs placebo hazard ratio 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.14; as-needed vs placebo 1.05, 0.92-1.19; regular vs as-needed 1.05, 0.92-1.20). We recorded no difference between treatment groups for time to recovery (adjusted p=0.79). Adherence to regular tablets (median tablets consumed per participant per day of maximum 6; 4.0 [IQR 1.6-5.7] in the regular group, 3.9 [1.5-5.6] in the as-needed group, and 4.0 [1.5-5.7] in the placebo group), and number of participants reporting adverse events (99 [18.5%] in the regular group, 99 [18.7%] in the asneeded group, and 98 [18.5%] in the placebo group) were similar between groups. Interpretation: Our findings suggest that regular or as-needed dosing with paracetamol does not affect recovery time compared with placebo in low-back pain, and question the universal endorsement of paracetamol in this patient group. Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and GlaxoSmithKline Australia.

DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60805-9
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 74
2014 Alsaadi SM, McAuley JH, Hush JM, Lo S, Lin CWC, Williams CM, Maher CG, 'Poor sleep quality is strongly associated with subsequent pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain', Arthritis and Rheumatology, 66 1388-1394 (2014) [C1]

Objective Recent research suggests that sleep quality and pain intensity are intimately linked. Although sleep problems are common in patients with low back pain, the effect of sl... [more]

Objective Recent research suggests that sleep quality and pain intensity are intimately linked. Although sleep problems are common in patients with low back pain, the effect of sleep quality on the levels of pain intensity is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sleep quality on subsequent pain intensity in patients with recent-onset low back pain. Methods Data on 1,246 patients with acute low back pain were included in the analysis. Sleep quality was assessed using the sleep quality item of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, scored on a 0-3-point scale, where 0 = very good sleep quality and 3 = very bad sleep quality. Pain intensity was assessed on a numerical rating scale (range 0-10). A generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis modeled with an exchangeable correlation structure was used to examine the relationship between sleep quality and pain intensity. The model further controlled for symptoms of depression and prognostic factors for low back pain. Results The GEE analysis demonstrated a large effect of poor sleep on subsequent pain intensity, such that for every 1-point decrease in sleep quality (based on a 0-3-point scale), pain intensity (based on a 0-10-point scale) increased by 2.08 points (95% confidence interval 1.99-2.16). This effect was independent of depression and common prognostic factors for low back pain. Conclusion Sleep quality is strongly related to subsequent pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain. Future research is needed to determine whether targeting sleep improvement contributes to pain reduction. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

DOI 10.1002/art.38329
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2014 Hancock MJ, Maher CG, Costa LDCM, Williams CM, 'A guide to survival analysis for manual therapy clinicians and researchers', Manual Therapy, 19 511-516 (2014) [C2]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2013.08.007
2013 Williams CM, Henschke N, Maher CG, van Tulder MW, Koes BW, Macaskill P, Irwig L, 'Red flags to screen for vertebral fracture in patients presenting with low-back pain', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008643.pub2
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 9
2013 Kamper SJ, Williams CM, 'The placebo effect: powerful, powerless or redundant?', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 47 6-9 (2013)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091472
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2013 Williams CM, Maher CG, Latimer J, McLachlan AJ, Hancock MJ, Day RO, et al., 'PACE - the first placebo controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain: statistical analysis plan.', Trials, 14 248-248 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-14-248
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2013 Downie A, Williams CM, Henschke N, Hancock MJ, Ostelo RWJG, de Vet HCW, et al., 'Red flags to screen for malignancy and fracture in patients with low back pain: systematic review', BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 347 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmj.f7095
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 40
2012 Williams CM, Lin C-WC, Jan S, 'Economic analysis of physical activity interventions', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 46 422-423 (2012) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091121
2012 Williams CM, Kamper SJ, 'Non-specific effects of acupuncture - does the 'placebo' effect play an important role?', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 46 578-579 (2012) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2012-091229
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2012 Williams CM, Lin C-WC, Jan S, 'Economic analysis of physical activity interventions', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 46 422-423 (2012)
DOI 10.1136/422bjsports-2012-091121
2011 Kamper SJ, Stanton TR, Williams CM, Maher CG, Hush JM, 'How is recovery from low back pain measured? A systematic review of the literature.', European spine journal official publication of the European Spine Society the European Spinal Deformity Society and the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society, 20 9-18 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 32
2011 Maher CG, Williams C, Lin C, Latimer J, 'Managing low back pain in primary care', AUSTRALIAN PRESCRIBER, 34 128-132 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2010 Williams CM, Maher CG, Hancock MJ, McAuley JH, McLachlan AJ, Britt H, et al., 'Low back pain and best practice care: A survey of general practice physicians.', Archives of internal medicine, 170 271-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/archinternmed.2009.507
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 74
2010 Williams CM, Maher CG, Hancock MJ, McLachlan AJ, McAuley JH, Latimer J, 'Appropriate Discard of "Best" Practice Guidelines for Acute Low Back Pain In reply', ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, 170 1088-1088 (2010) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
2010 Williams CM, Maher CG, Hancock MJ, McLachlan AJ, McAuley JH, Latimer J, 'In reply', Archives of Internal Medicine, 170 1088 (2010)
2010 Williams CM, Latimer J, Maher CG, McLachlan AJ, Cooper CW, Hancock MJ, et al., 'PACE - The first placebo controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain: design of a randomised controlled trial.', BMC musculoskeletal disorders, 11 1691-6 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-11-169
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 8
2009 Williams CW, Maher CG, Hancock MJ, McAuley JH, McLachlan AJ, Britt H, et al., 'Usual care of low back pain in primary care and a comparison to evidence-based guideline recommendations.', The e-AJP, 55 32-32 (2009)
Show 68 more journal articles

Conference (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Allori AC, Kelley T, Meara JG, Albert A, Bonanthaya K, Chapman K, et al., 'A standard set of outcome measures for the comprehensive appraisal of cleft care', Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal (2017)

© 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Care of the patient with cleft lip and/or palate remains complex. Prior attempts at aggregating data to study the effective... [more]

© 2017 American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Care of the patient with cleft lip and/or palate remains complex. Prior attempts at aggregating data to study the effectiveness of specific interventions or overall treatment protocols have been hindered by a lack of data standards. There exists a critical need to better define the outcomes - particularly those that matter most to patients and their families - and to standardize the methods by which these outcomes will be measured. This report summarizes the recommendations of an international, multidisciplinary working group with regard to which outcomes a typical cleft team could track, how those outcomes could be measured and recorded, and what strategies may be employed to sustainably implement a system for prospective data collection. It is only by agreeing on a common, standard set of outcome measures for the comprehensive appraisal of cleft care that intercenter comparisons can become possible. This is important for quality-improvement endeavors, comparative effectiveness research, and value-based health-care reform.

DOI 10.1597/15-292
2015 Wolfenden L, Nathan NR, Yoong S, Rose B, Aikman V, Williams C, et al., 'Improving implementation of NSW healthy canteen policy: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2014 Wiggers JH, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Williams CM, Yoong SZ, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN AUST RALIAN PRIMARY SCHOOLS 2006-2013: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $1,472,518

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $140,000

HELP – Healthy Lifestyle for patients with Low Back Pain$70,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Miss Emma Robson, Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme PhD Scholarships Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700885
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

PainSmart Kids Obesity Project$70,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700975
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20165 grants / $1,137,102

HELP - A healthy lifestyle intervention for patients with chronic low back pain$588,313

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams, Dr Steven Kamper
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500157
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Understanding the association between low back pain and risk factors for chronic disease$322,080

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Early Career Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500606
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of strategies to scale the implementation of community chronic disease prevention interventions$118,004

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Doctor Christopher Williams, Doctor Melanie Kingsland, Professor John Wiggers, Mr Andrew Milat, Professor Chris Rissel, Ms Karen Gillham, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Professor Adrian Bauman
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600445
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Reducing the impact of back pain in miners$98,705

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1601325
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

DVCRI Research Support for Early Career Fellow (ECF16)$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme NHMRC ECF Support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600550
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20155 grants / $111,566

Scholarship top-up - Kate O'Brien$39,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401508
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Scholarship top-up - Amanda Williams$36,500

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1500227
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Scholarship Top-up$19,568

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500854
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Assessing the impact of low back pain on health behaviour risks in adolecents$9,600

Funding body: PRC Health Behaviour

Funding body PRC Health Behaviour
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Travel grant$6,898

Funding body: PRC Health Behaviour

Funding body PRC Health Behaviour
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20141 grants / $10,000

HMRI Award for Early Career Research$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Christopher Williams
Scheme PULSE Early Career Researcher of the Year Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401513
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20111 grants / $73,850

NHMRC postgraduate scholarship$73,850

Scholarship to conduct a randomised placebo controlled trial of paracetamol for low back pain.

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Christopher Williams

Scheme people support
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD2.65

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD A Healthy Lifestyle Program for Patients with Low Back Pain (HELP) PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Prognosis and Management of Musculoskeletal Pain and Health Behavioural Risks in Adolescents. PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Telephone-based weight management for patients with osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Characteristics and Management of Co-Existing Low Back Pain and Health Risk Behaviours PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Reducing Risky Drinking and Alcohol-Related Harm in the Sports Setting PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

NHMRC

NHMRC funding success 2016

November 10, 2015

Dr Christopher Williams has been awarded more than $1,000,000 in NHMRC funding commencing in 2016. He has received an Early Career Fellowship and a Project Grant.

Managing back pain in children

Managing back pain in children

February 25, 2015

New research shows that children and teenagers are just as likely as adults to report back pain.

Professor Brian Kelly

Mental health trailblazer

November 5, 2014

On an evening when more than 70 donor-funded grants worth $3.5 million were awarded or acknowledged, mental health trailblazer Professor Brian Kelly has been heralded as the HMRI Researcher of the Year for 2014.

Paracetemol and pain

Paracetamol and pain

September 2, 2014

Paracetamol does not speed recovery or reduce pain for people with acute low back ache, according to the results of a trial by HMRI researcher Dr Chris Williams.

Dr Christopher Williams

Position

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
HMRI Public Health Hunter New England Population Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email christopher.m.williams@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6374

Office

Building Booth Building, Wallsend
Location Wallsend

,
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