Dr Alix Hall

Post Doctoral Researcher

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Master of Medical Statistics with Distinction, University of Newcastle

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (90 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Bovill M, Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Reath J, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, et al., 'Ngaa-bi-nya-nhumi-nya (to Test First): Piloting the Feasibility of Using the Growth and Empowerment Measure with Aboriginal Pregnant Women Who Smoke', Journal of Smoking Cessation, 2021 1-8 (2021)
DOI 10.1155/2021/6610500
Co-authors Michelle Bovill, Billie Bonevski, Gillian Gould, Christopher Oldmeadow
2021 Nathan N, McCarthy N, Hope K, Sutherland R, Lecathelinais C, Hall A, et al., 'The impact of school uniforms on primary school student's physical activity at school: outcomes of a cluster randomized controlled trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 18 17 (2021)
DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01084-0
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland
2021 Hullick CJ, Hall AE, Conway JF, Hewitt JM, Darcy LF, Barker RT, et al., 'Reducing Hospital Transfers from Aged Care Facilities: A Large-Scale Stepped Wedge Evaluation.', J Am Geriatr Soc, 69 201-209 (2021)
DOI 10.1111/jgs.16890
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2021 Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.', J Med Internet Res, 23 e23180 (2021)
DOI 10.2196/23180
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Kathryn L Reilly, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, John Wiggers
2021 McGarvey AC, Osmotherly PG, Hoffman GR, Hall A, 'Improving screening for physical impairments and access to early physiotherapy after neck dissection surgery: a translational controlled trial.', European archives of oto-rhino-laryngology : official journal of the European Federation of Oto-Rhino-Laryngological Societies (EUFOS) : affiliated with the German Society for Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 278 509-516 (2021)
DOI 10.1007/s00405-020-06142-0
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2020 Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Lum M, Leonard A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Early childhood education and care-based healthy eating interventions for improving child diet: a systematic review protocol.', Syst Rev, 9 181 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-020-01440-4
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Alice Grady, Jacklyn Jackson Uon, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Lum M, Grady A, Falkiner M, Jones J, Finch M, Green S, et al., 'Assessing the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in the family day care setting: A cross-sectional study.', Health Promot J Austr, (2020)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.420
Co-authors Alice Grady, Serene Yoong
2020 Nathan NK, Sutherland RL, Hope K, McCarthy NJ, Pettett M, Elton B, et al., 'Implementation of a school physical activity policy improves student physical activity levels: Outcomes of a cluster-randomized controlled trial', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 17 1009-1018 (2020)

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers' implementation of a school... [more]

© 2020 Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.. All rights reserved. Aim: To assess the impact of a multistrategy intervention designed to improve teachers' implementation of a school physical activity (PA) policy on student PA levels. Methods: A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 12 elementary schools. Policy implementation required schools to deliver 150 minutes of organized PA for students each week via physical education, sport, or class-based activities such as energizers. Schools received implementation support designed using the theoretical domains framework to help them implement the current policy. Results: A total of 1,502 children in kindergarten to grade 6 participated. At follow-up compared with control, students attending intervention schools had, measured via accelerometer, significantly greater increases in school day counts per minute (97.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 64.5 to 130.4; P <.001) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (3.0; 95% CI, 2.2-3.8, P <.001) and a greater decrease in sedentary time (-2.1; 95% CI, -3.9 to -0.4, P =.02) per school day. Teachers in intervention schools delivered significantly more minutes (36.6 min) of PA to their students at follow-up (95% CI, 2.7-70.5, P =.04). Conclusions: Supporting teachers to implement a PA policy improves student PA. Additional strategies may be needed to support teachers to implement activities that result in larger gains in student MVPA.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0595
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2020 Herrmann A, Mansfield E, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Hall A, 'Use of the supportive care framework to explore haematological cancer survivors unmet needs: a qualitative study', BMC Health Services Research, 20 (2020)

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Some sub-types of haematological cancers are acute and require intensive treatment soon after diagnosis. Other sub-types are chronic, relapse ov... [more]

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Some sub-types of haematological cancers are acute and require intensive treatment soon after diagnosis. Other sub-types are chronic, relapse over many years and require life-long cycles of monitoring interspersed with bouts of treatment. This often results in significant uncertainty about the future, high levels of depression and anxiety, and reduced quality of life. Little is known about how to improve care for haematological cancer survivors. This study explored qualitatively, in a sample of haematological cancer survivors, (i) their unmet needs experienced as a result of their disease and treatment; and (ii) strategies that may help address these needs. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 adult haematological cancer survivors. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The Supportive Care Framework guided data collection and analysis. Results: Participants had a mean age of 57 years (SD 13). Most were male (n = 10, 59%). Five themes emerged from the data: (i) changes in unmet needs across the care trajectory (with greatest unmet needs experienced soon after diagnosis, at discharge from hospital and with cancer recurrence); (ii) informational unmet needs requiring improved patient-centred communication; (iii) uncertainty about treatment and the future; (iv) coordinated, tailored and documented post-treatment care planning as a strategy for optimal care delivery; and (v) ongoing support services to meet psychosocial and practical unmet needs by involving peer support, less bureaucratic transport services and flexible work arrangements. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first qualitative investigation using the Supportive Care Framework to explore unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors. Our findings offer fresh insights into this important area of study. Written, take-home care plans which provide simple but tailored guidance on where to seek additional support may help decrease uncertainty and feelings of vulnerability post-treatment for adult haematological cancer survivors. Future research should further develop and test strategies aimed at addressing unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors identified in this study.

DOI 10.1186/s12913-020-05927-7
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Marita Lynagh, Flora Tzelepis
2020 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Hall A, Paul C, 'Barriers to self-care and their association with poor adherence to self-care behaviours in people with type 2 diabetes in Ghana: A cross sectional study', Obesity Medicine, 18 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.obmed.2020.100222
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Natalie Johnson
2020 Mclaughlin M, Atkin AJ, Starr L, Hall A, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, et al., 'Worldwide surveillance of self-reported sitting time: a scoping review.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01008-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc
2020 Yoong SL, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, Wyse R, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, et al., 'Adaptation of public health initiatives: expert views on current guidance and opportunities to advance their application and benefit', Health education research, 35 243-257 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyaa014
Co-authors Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, John Attia, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2020 Bovill M, Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, et al., 'Aboriginal Wingadhan Birrang (woman's journey) of smoking cessation during pregnancy as they participate in the ICAN QUIT in pregnancy pilot step-wedge trial', Women and Birth, 33 300-308 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Addressing smoking cessation during pregnancy among Aboriginal women is a national priority under the Closing the Gap campaign. There is a need to m... [more]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Addressing smoking cessation during pregnancy among Aboriginal women is a national priority under the Closing the Gap campaign. There is a need to measure and report interventions to support Aboriginal women during pregnancy. Aim: To quantitatively assess women's smoking experiences over a 12 week ICAN QUIT in Pregnancy program. Methods: Aboriginal women and/or women expecting an Aboriginal baby reported their smoking experiences through repeated cross-sectional survey at baseline, four weeks, and 12 weeks. Self-reported nicotine dependence measures (heaviness of smoking index, strength of urges and frequency of urges to smoke), intentions to quit smoking, quit attempts, use of nicotine replacement therapy were gathered as well as a carbon-monoxide measure at each time point. Results: Expectant mothers (n = 22) of Aboriginal babies participated from six Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services between November 2016 and July 2017. At 12 weeks women reported (n = 17) low heaviness of smoking index 1.21 with high strength of urges 2.64 and frequency of urges 3.00; 12/13 (92%) reported likely/very likely to quit smoking, made a mean 1.67 number of quit attempts, three women (13.6%) quit smoking (validated); 5/16 (31%) reported using nicotine replacement therapy. Discussion: Participating women made multiple quit attempts demonstrating motivation to quit smoking. Smoking cessation interventions should be tailored to address high strength and frequency of nicotine dependence despite low consumption. Conclusion: Prolonged smoking cessation support is recommended to address physical, behavioural and psychological aspect of smoking. Cessation support should address previous quitting experiences to assess smoking dependence and tailoring of support. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinicial Trials Registry (Ref #ACTRN12616001603404).

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.05.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Michelle Bovill, Gillian Gould, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski
2020 Luu Q, Day J, Hall A, Limaye V, Major G, 'External validation of EULAR/ACR classification criteria for idiopathic inflammatory myopathies', Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, (2020)
DOI 10.1136/annrheumdis-2020-217568
Citations Scopus - 1
2020 Hasnain MG, Attia JR, Akter S, Rahman T, Hall A, Hubbard IJ, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions to improve rates of intravenous thrombolysis using behaviour change wheel functions: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Implementation Science, 15 (2020)

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Despite being one of the few evidence-based treatments for acute ischemic stroke, intravenous thrombolysis has low implementation rates¿mainly d... [more]

© 2020, The Author(s). Background: Despite being one of the few evidence-based treatments for acute ischemic stroke, intravenous thrombolysis has low implementation rates¿mainly due to a narrow therapeutic window and the health system changes required to deliver it within the recommended time. This systematic review and meta-analyses explores the differential effectiveness of intervention strategies aimed at improving the rates of intravenous thrombolysis based on the number and type of behaviour change wheel functions employed. Method: The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and SCOPUS. Multiple authors independently completed study selection and extraction of data. The review included studies that investigated the effects of intervention strategies aimed at improving the rates of intravenous thrombolysis and/or onset-to-needle, onset-to-door and door-to-needle time for thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Interventions were coded according to the behaviour change wheel nomenclature. Study quality was assessed using the QualSyst scoring system for quantitative research methodologies. Random effects meta-analyses were used to examine effectiveness of interventions based on the behaviour change wheel model in improving rates of thrombolysis, while meta-regression was used to examine the association between the number of behaviour change wheel intervention strategies and intervention effectiveness. Results: Results from 77 studies were included. Five behaviour change wheel interventions, ¿Education¿, ¿Persuasion¿, ¿Training¿, ¿Environmental restructuring¿ and ¿Enablement¿, were found to be employed among the included studies. Effects were similar across all intervention approaches regardless of type or number of behaviour change wheel-based strategies employed. High heterogeneity (I2 > 75%) was observed for all the pooled analyses. Publication bias was also identified. Conclusion: There was no evidence for preferring one type of behaviour change intervention strategy, nor for including multiple strategies in improving thrombolysis rates. However, the study results should be interpreted with caution, as they display high heterogeneity and publication bias.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-020-01054-3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Christopher Levi, John Attia, Isobel Hubbard
2020 Yoong SL, Hall A, Stacey F, Grady A, Sutherland R, Wyse R, et al., 'Nudge strategies to improve healthcare providers' implementation of evidence-based guidelines, policies and practices: a systematic review of trials included within Cochrane systematic reviews', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-020-01011-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Amy Anderson
2020 Shoesmith A, Hall A, Hope K, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, Trost SG, et al., 'Associations between in-school-hours physical activity and child health-related quality of life: A cross-sectional study in a sample of Australian primary school children', Preventive Medicine Reports, 20 (2020)

© 2020 The Author(s) The aim of the current study was to examine the association between Australian primary school children&apos;s objectively measured in-school-hours weekly phys... [more]

© 2020 The Author(s) The aim of the current study was to examine the association between Australian primary school children's objectively measured in-school-hours weekly physical activity (PA) and their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A cross-sectional study of 1128 Grade 2 and 3 children, aged 7¿9 years, from 62 primary schools was conducted in New South Wales, Australia between October 2017 and April 2018. Children's PA was assessed via an accelerometer worn for five days during school hours. Their parents completed a telephone interview, answering demographic, child HRQoL and out-of-school-hours PA questions. Children's in-school-hours PA was classified as total PA and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). HRQoL scores were aggregated and reported at the high construct level domains (Total Quality of Life (Total HRQoL), Physical and Psychosocial Health Summary Scores). Multiple linear mixed regression analyses accounting for clustering were conducted to evaluate the association between children's in-school-hours weekly PA and their HRQoL. After adjusting for potential confounders, significant positive associations were found between children's in-school-hours weekly total PA and Total HRQoL (0.62 units, 95% CI: 0.29; 0.94, p < 0.001), Physical (0.71 units, 95% CI: 0.38; 1.04, p = 0.001) and Psychosocial (0.58 units, 95% CI: 0.19; 0.97, p = 0.004) scores, with a stronger association observed between average weekly MVPA than average weekly total PA. There were also positive associations between PA and HRQoL for each sex when analysed separately. Our findings demonstrate a positive association between children's objectively-measured in-school-hours PA and parent-reported child HRQoL, strengthening evidence supporting the continued implementation of school-based PA programs for broader health outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2020.101179
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder, Rachel Sutherland
2020 Stuart AM, Baker AL, Denham AMJ, Lee NK, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Psychological treatment for methamphetamine use and associated psychiatric symptom outcomes: A systematic review', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 109 61-79 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Regular methamphetamine use is associated with increased rates of psychiatric symptoms. Although there has been a substantial body of research repor... [more]

© 2019 The Authors Background: Regular methamphetamine use is associated with increased rates of psychiatric symptoms. Although there has been a substantial body of research reporting on the effectiveness of psychological treatments for reducing methamphetamine use, there is a paucity of research examining the effects of these treatments on co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. We addressed this gap by undertaking a systematic review of the evidence of the effectiveness of psychological treatments for methamphetamine use on psychiatric symptom outcomes in randomized controlled trials. Methods: A narrative synthesis of studies was conducted following the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement to inform methodology. Eight electronic peer-reviewed databases were searched. Ten eligible studies were assessed. Results: Most studies found an overall reduction in levels of methamphetamine use and psychiatric symptoms among samples as a whole. Although brief interventions were effective, there is evidence that more intensive interventions have greater impact on methamphetamine use and/or psychiatric symptomatology. Intervention attendance was variable. Conclusions: The evidence suggests that a variety of psychological treatments are effective in reducing levels of methamphetamine use and improving psychiatric symptoms. Future research should consider how psychological treatments could maximize outcomes in the co-occurring domains of methamphetamine use and psychiatric symptoms, with increasing treatment attendance as a focus. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42016043657.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2019.09.005
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Alexandra Denham, Amanda Baker, A Dunlop, Kristen Mccarter, Christopher Oldmeadow
2020 Gonzalez S, Kingsland M, Hall A, Clinton-McHarg T, Lecathelinais C, Zukowski N, et al., 'Alcohol and fast food sponsorship in sporting clubs with junior teams participating in the Good Sports program: a cross-sectional study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 44 145-151 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 The Authors Objective: To examine: alcohol and fast food sponsorship of junior community sporting clubs; the association between sponsorship and club characteristics; and p... [more]

© 2020 The Authors Objective: To examine: alcohol and fast food sponsorship of junior community sporting clubs; the association between sponsorship and club characteristics; and parent and club representative attitudes toward sponsorship. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone survey of representatives from junior community football clubs across New South Wales and Victoria, Australia, and parents/carers of junior club members. Participants were from junior teams with Level 3 accreditation in the ¿Good Sports¿ program. Results: A total of 79 club representatives and 297 parents completed the survey. Half of participating clubs (49%) were sponsored by the alcohol industry and one-quarter (27%) were sponsored by the fast food industry. In multivariate analyses, the odds of alcohol sponsorship among rugby league clubs was 7.4 (95%CI: 1.8¿31.0, p=<0.006) that of AFL clubs, and clubs located in regional areas were more likely than those in major cities to receive fast food industry sponsorship (OR= 9.1; 95%CI: 1.0¿84.0, p=0.05). The majority (78¿81%) of club representatives and parents were supportive of restrictions to prohibit certain alcohol sponsorship practices, but a minority (42%) were supportive of restrictions to prohibit certain fast food sponsorship practices. Conclusions: Large proportions of community sports clubs with junior members are sponsored by the alcohol industry and the fast food industry. There is greater acceptability for prohibiting sponsorship from the alcohol industry than the fast food industry. Implications for public health: Health promotion efforts should focus on reducing alcohol industry and fast food industry sponsorship of junior sports clubs.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12954
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2019 Han Y, Zhou Y, Wang J, Hall A, Zhao Q, Qin H, et al., 'Chinese version of the Cancer Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey-Sort Form: A psychometric study', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CANCER CARE, 28 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12963
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, 'Not having adequate time to make a treatment decision can impact on cancer patients care experience: Results of a cross-sectional study', Patient Education and Counseling, 102 1957-1960 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Objective: We examined whether patients reporting not having adequate time to make a treatment decision is associated with discordance between their preferred... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Objective: We examined whether patients reporting not having adequate time to make a treatment decision is associated with discordance between their preferred and perceived involvement in decision making. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study involving Australian outpatients attending five medical or radiation oncology units. Logistic regression modelling was conducted. Results: Four hundred twenty-three patients participated. Patients who reported not having adequate time to make their last important treatment decision had significantly higher odds of experiencing discordance between their preferred and perceived involvement in this decision, compared to those patients who reported having adequate time (OR: 2.76; 95% CI: 1.01¿7.55; p = 0.048). Conclusion: Patients should receive adequate time when making cancer treatment decisions. This may help patients ¿digest¿ and use the information they received, and become involved in decision making, to the extent they desire. Future research should further investigate what patients consider adequate time for decision making. Practice implications: Doctors should assess patients¿ preferences for the amount of time they prefer when making a treatment decision and tailor care accordingly. Offering patients two consultations with some time to think about their options in-between these consultations may be one method in achieving this.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2019.06.011
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Clinton-McHarg T, Gonzalez S, Milner S, Sherker S, Kingsland M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Implementing health policies in Australian junior sports clubs: an RCT', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6873-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2019 Gould GS, Bovill M, Pollock L, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Atkins L, et al., 'Feasibility and acceptability of Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy multicomponent implementation intervention and study design for Australian Indigenous pregnant women: A pilot cluster randomised step-wedge trial.', Addictive behaviors, 90 176-190 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.036
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Roger Smith, Billie Bonevski, Michelle Bovill, Christopher Oldmeadow, Gillian Gould
2019 Hall A, Nguyen SM, Mackenzie L, Sanson-Fisher R, Olver I, Thuan TV, Huong TT, 'What Caused My Cancer? Cancer Patients Perceptions on What May Have Contributed to the Development of Their Cancer: A Cross-Sectional, Cross-Country Comparison Study', Cancer Control, 26 1-10 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1073274819863786
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 McCrabb S, Lane C, Hall A, Milat A, Bauman A, Sutherland R, et al., 'Scaling-up evidence-based obesity interventions: A systematic review assessing intervention adaptations and effectiveness and quantifying the scale-up penalty', OBESITY REVIEWS, 20 964-982 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12845
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Sam Mccrabb
2019 Robson EK, Kamper SJ, Davidson S, da Silva PV, Williams A, Hodder RK, et al., 'Healthy Lifestyle Program (HeLP) for low back pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-029290
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Rebecca Hodder
2019 Sutherland R, Nathan N, Brown A, Yoong S, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'A randomized controlled trial to assess the potential efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of an m-health intervention targeting parents of school aged children to improve the nutritional quality of foods packed in the lunchbox 'SWAP IT'', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 16 1-13 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-019-0812-7
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Gonzalez S, Clinton-McHarg T, Kingsland M, Hall A, Lecathelinais C, Milner S, et al., 'Promotion of healthy eating in clubs with junior teams in Australia: A cross-sectional study of club representatives and parents', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30 15-19 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issues addressed: To: (i) describe the prevalence of policies and practices promoting healthy eating implemented by sports clubs wit... [more]

© 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association Issues addressed: To: (i) describe the prevalence of policies and practices promoting healthy eating implemented by sports clubs with junior teams; (ii) examine differences in such practices across geographic and operational characteristics of clubs; and (iii) describe the attitudes of club representatives and parents regarding the acceptability of sports clubs implementing policies and practices to promote healthy eating. Methods: Cross-sectional telephone surveys of junior community football club management representatives and parents/carers of junior players were conducted in the states of New South Wales and Victoria, Australia in 2016. Results: Seventy-nine of the 89 club representatives approached to participate completed the telephone survey. All clubs (100%; 95% CI 96.2-100.0) reported recommending fruit or water be provided to players after games or at half-time, 24% (95% CI 14.4-33.7) reported promoting healthy food options through prominent positioning at point of sale and only 8% (95% CI 1.6-13.6) of clubs had a written healthy eating policy. There were no significant differences between the mean number of healthy eating policies and practices implemented by club socio-economic or geographic characteristics. Club representatives and parents/carers were supportive of clubs promoting healthy eating for junior players. Conclusions: While there is strong support within sporting clubs with junior teams for policies and practices to promote healthy eating, their implementation is highly variable. So what?: A considerable opportunity remains for health promotion policy and practice improvement in clubs with junior teams, particularly regarding policies related to nutrition.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.214
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2019 Hasnain MG, Levi CR, Ryan A, Hubbard IJ, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Can a multicomponent multidisciplinary implementation package change physicians' and nurses' perceptions and practices regarding thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke? An exploratory analysis of a cluster-randomized trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-019-0940-0
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia, Christopher Levi, Alice Grady, Chris Paul, Isobel Hubbard
2019 Luu Q, Day J, Hall A, Limaye V, Major G, 'External Validation and Evaluation of Adding MRI or Extended Myositis Antibody Panel to the 2017 EULAR/ACR Myositis Classification Criteria.', ACR open rheumatology, 1 462-468 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/acr2.11061
2019 Hasnain MG, Paul CL, Attia JR, Ryan A, Kerr E, D'Este C, et al., 'Door-to-needle time for thrombolysis: a secondary analysis of the TIPS cluster randomised controlled trial', BMJ open, 9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032482
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Isobel Hubbard, Christopher Levi, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste
2019 Fakes KL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Boyes AW, Symonds M, Evans TJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Development and Validation of the MiPrep Survey: An Instrument Assessing Patients' Perceived Preparation for Medical Interventions Including Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, and Surgery', Value in Health, 22 704-711 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 ISPOR¿The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research Background: Adequately preparing patients for medical interventions is an important component of q... [more]

© 2019 ISPOR¿The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research Background: Adequately preparing patients for medical interventions is an important component of quality healthcare. Nevertheless, few instruments for assessing patients' preparation exist. Objectives: To develop a psychometrically rigorous instrument to assess patients' perceptions of the quality of preparation. Methods: An instrument to measure patients' preparation for medical interventions (MiPrep) was developed and tested with patients undergoing medical imaging, radiotherapy, or surgery. Patients were recruited and asked to complete 2 surveys. Survey A assessed patient and intervention characteristics. Survey B (postintervention) contained MiPrep to assess validity (face, content, and construct) and reliability (internal consistency and test-retest). Results: A total of 869 (85%) patients consented to participate and 551 (63%) returned the postintervention survey. Face and content validity were demonstrated. Exploratory factor analysis identified 2 survey modules: receipt and adequacy of information (2 domains) and overall appraisal of patient-centered care (1 domain). Reliability was evidenced by adequate internal consistency (Cronbach a 0.81-0.89) and item-total correlations higher than 0.20. Nevertheless, individual item test-retest reliability requires further confirmation. The final instrument contained 27 items. Conclusions: The MiPrep instrument has evidence of being a valid and reliable instrument of preparation for medical interventions. Healthcare providers can use the instrument as a quality assurance tool to identify areas for improvement and areas of excellence in patients' preparation. Future studies should verify these findings in other populations and examine the divergent and predictive validity of the instrument.

DOI 10.1016/j.jval.2019.01.017
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kristy Fakes, Mariko Carey
2019 Delaney T, Jackson JK, Jones J, Hall A, Dives A, Wedesweiler T, et al., 'A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Increase Physical Activity of Preschool-Aged Children Attending Early Childhood Education and Care: Study Protocol for the 'Everybody Energise' Trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019)
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16214275
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong
2019 Carey M, Bryant J, Zucca A, Hall A, Grady A, Dilworth S, Peek K, 'How well do cancer survivor self-classifications of anxiety, depression and stress agree with a standardised tool? Results of a cross-sectional study.', PloS one, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0222107
Co-authors Alice Grady, Mariko Carey, Alison Zucca, Jamie Bryant
2019 Herrmann A, Hall A, Zdenkowski N, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Heading in a new direction? Recommendations for future research on patient decision aids', PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, 102 1029-1034 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2018.12.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Wolfenden L, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, McCrabb S, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, et al., 'Optimisation: Defining and exploring a concept to enhance the impact of public health initiatives', Health Research Policy and Systems, 17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-019-0502-6
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Sam Mccrabb, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, John Attia, Rebecca Hodder, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland
2018 Lee H, Hall A, Nathan N, Reilly KL, Seward K, Williams CM, et al., 'Mechanisms of implementing public health interventions: A pooled causal mediation analysis of randomised trials', Implementation Science, 13 1-11 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-018-0734-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Kathryn L Reilly, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Herrmann A, Hall A, Zdenkowski N, 'Women's Experiences with Deciding on Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Study.', Asia-Pacific journal of oncology nursing, 5 68-76 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.4103/apjon.apjon_60_17
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2018 Carey M, Herrmann A, Hall A, Mansfield E, Fakes K, 'Exploring health literacy and preferences for risk communication among medical oncology patients', PLoS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0203988
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Kristy Fakes, Elise Mansfield
2018 Waller A, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Walsh J, 'Do medical oncology patients and their support persons agree about end-of-life issues?', Internal Medicine Journal, 48 60-66 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: The perceptions of those called on to make decisions on behalf of patients who lack capacity at the end of life must a... [more]

© 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians. Background: The perceptions of those called on to make decisions on behalf of patients who lack capacity at the end of life must accurately reflect patient preferences. Aims: To establish the extent to which the views of medical oncology outpatients are understood by their support persons, specifically with regards to (i) preferred type and location of end-of-life care, (ii) preferred level of involvement in end-of-life decision-making and (iii) whether the patient has completed an advance care plan or appointed an enduring guardian. Methods: Adults with a confirmed cancer diagnosis and their nominated support persons were approached between September 2015 and January 2016 in the waiting room of an Australian tertiary referral clinic. Consenting participants completed a pen-and-paper survey. Nominated support persons answered the same questions from the patient¿s perspective. Results: In total, 208 participants (39% of eligible dyads) participated. Observed agreement across the five outcomes ranged from 54% to 84%. Kappa values for concordance between patient¿support person responses were fair to moderate (0.24¿0.47) for enduring guardian, decision-making, advance care plan and care location outcomes. A slight level of concordance (k = 0.15; 95% confidence interval: -0.02, 0.32) was found for the type of care outcome. Conclusion: Relying on support persons¿ views does not guarantee that patients¿ actual preferences will be followed. Strategies that make patient preferences known to healthcare providers and support persons while they still have the capacity to do so is a critical next step in improving quality cancer care.

DOI 10.1111/imj.13626
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Charles Douglas, Nick Zdenkowski, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Herrmann A, Boyle F, Butow P, Hall AE, Zdenkowski N, 'Exploring women's experiences with a decision aid for neoadjuvant systemic therapy for operable breast cancer', Health Science Reports, 1 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hsr2.13
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski
2018 Hall AE, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW, Fradgley EA, Proietto AM, Roos I, 'Consumer input into health care: Time for a new active and comprehensive model of consumer involvement', Health Expectations, 21 707-713 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers ... [more]

© 2018 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: To ensure the provision of patient-centred health care, it is essential that consumers are actively involved in the process of determining and implementing health-care quality improvements. However, common strategies used to involve consumers in quality improvements, such as consumer membership on committees and collection of patient feedback via surveys, are ineffective and have a number of limitations, including: limited representativeness; tokenism; a lack of reliable and valid patient feedback data; infrequent assessment of patient feedback; delays in acquiring feedback; and how collected feedback is used to drive health-care improvements. Objectives: We propose a new active model of consumer engagement that aims to overcome these limitations. This model involves the following: (i) the development of a new measure of consumer perceptions; (ii) low cost and frequent electronic data collection of patient views of quality improvements; (iii) efficient feedback to the health-care decision makers; and (iv) active involvement of consumers that fosters power to influence health system changes.

DOI 10.1111/hex.12665
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elizabeth Fradgley
2018 Forshaw KL, Boyes AW, Carey ML, Hall AE, Symonds M, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Raised Anxiety Levels Among Outpatients Preparing to Undergo a Medical Imaging Procedure: Prevalence and Correlates', Journal of the American College of Radiology, 15 630-638 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 American College of Radiology Purpose: To examine the percentage of patients with raised state anxiety levels before undergoing a medical imaging procedure; their attributi... [more]

© 2018 American College of Radiology Purpose: To examine the percentage of patients with raised state anxiety levels before undergoing a medical imaging procedure; their attribution of procedural-related anxiety or worry; and sociodemographic, health, and procedural characteristics associated with raised state anxiety levels. Materials and Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken in the outpatient medical imaging department at a major public hospital in Australia, with institutional board approval. Adult outpatients undergoing a medical imaging procedure (CT, x-ray, MRI, ultrasound, angiography, or fluoroscopy) completed a preprocedural survey. Anxiety was measured by the short-form state scale of the six-item State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI: Y-6). The number and percentage of participants who reported raised anxiety levels (defined as a STAI: Y-6 score = 33.16) and their attribution of procedural-related anxiety or worry were calculated. Characteristics associated with raised anxiety were examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: Of the 548 (86%) patients who consented to participate, 488 (77%) completed all STAI: Y-6 items. Half of the participants (n = 240; 49%) experienced raised anxiety, and of these, 48% (n = 114) reported feeling most anxious or worried about the possible results. Female gender, imaging modality, medical condition, first time having the procedure, and lower patient-perceived health status were statistically significantly associated with raised anxiety levels. Conclusion: Raised anxiety is common before medical imaging procedures and is mostly attributed to the possible results. Providing increased psychological preparation, particularly to patients with circulatory conditions or neoplasms or those that do not know their medical condition, may help reduce preprocedural anxiety among these subgroups.

DOI 10.1016/j.jacr.2017.12.030
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2018 Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a cancer treatment decision', BMC Research Notes, 11 1-6 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3552-x
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Laura Wall, Amy Waller
2018 Herrmann A, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Watson R, Turon H, 'Not asking cancer patients about their preferences does make a difference. A cross-sectional study examining cancer patients preferred and perceived role in decision-making regarding their last important cancer treatment', European Journal of Cancer Care, 27 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12871
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nick Zdenkowski, Heidi Turon
2018 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Watson R, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preferences for models of peer support in the digital era: A cross-sectional survey of people with cancer.', Psycho-oncology, 27 2148-2154 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.4781
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Heidi Turon, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Jiao M, Hall AE, Nolte L, Piper A, Lisy K, Jefford M, 'A rapid review of needs assessment tools for post-treatment cancer survivors.', European journal of cancer care, 27 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12764
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2018 Olver I, Carey M, Boyes A, Hall A, Noble N, Bryant J, et al., 'The timeliness of patients reporting the side effects of chemotherapy.', Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 3579-3586 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4225-y
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Natasha Noble
2018 Herrmann A, Hall A, Proietto A, 'Using the Health Belief Model to explore why women decide for or against the removal of their ovaries to reduce their risk of developing cancer', BMC Women's Health, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0673-2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2018 Stockings E, Bartlem K, Hall A, Hodder R, Gilligan C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Whole-of-community interventions to reduce population-level harms arising from alcohol and other drug use: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Addiction, 113 1984-2018 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/add.14277
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Kate Bartlem
2018 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Hall A, Walsh J, 'The right place at the right time: Medical oncology outpatients' perceptions of location of end-of-life care', JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 16 35-41 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Background: Helping people achieve their preferred location of care is an important indicator of quality end-of-... [more]

© 2018 JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Background: Helping people achieve their preferred location of care is an important indicator of quality end-of-life (EOL) care. Using a sample of Australian medical oncology outpatients, this study examined (1) their preferred location of EOL care; (2) their perceived benefits and worries of receiving care in that location; (3) the percentage who had discussed preferences with their doctor and/or support person; and (4) whether they wanted their doctor to ask them where they wanted to die. Methods: Adults with a confirmed diagnosis of cancer were approached between September 2015 and January 2016 in the waiting room of an Australian oncology outpatient clinic. Consenting participants completed a home-based pen-and-paper survey indicating preferred location of care, perceived benefits and worries of that location, whether they had discussed preferences with their doctors, and whether they were willing to be asked about their preferences. Results: A total of 203 patients returned the survey (47% of those eligible). Less than half preferred to be cared for at home (47%), 34% preferred a hospice/palliative care unit, and 19% preferred the hospital. Common benefits and worries associated with locations included perceived burden on others, familiarity of environment, availability of expert medical care, symptom management, and likelihood of having wishes respected. More patients had discussed preferences with their support persons (41%) than doctors (7%). Most wanted a doctor to ask them about preferred location of care (87%) and thought it was important to die in the location of their choice (93%). Conclusions: Patients were willing to have clinicians to ask them where they wanted to die, although few had discussed their preferences with doctors. Although home was the most preferred location for many patients, the overall variation suggests that clinicians should adopt a systematic approach to eliciting patient preferences.

DOI 10.6004/jnccn.2017.7025
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Charles Douglas, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2018 Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'A discrete choice experiment to assess cancer patients preferences for when and how to make treatment decisions', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 1215-1220 (2018) [C1]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Purpose: Cancer patients can be overwhelmed when being confronted with their diagnosis and treatment options. Such information is often provi... [more]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Purpose: Cancer patients can be overwhelmed when being confronted with their diagnosis and treatment options. Such information is often provided during one consultation between the patient and treating clinician. In order to achieve optimal cancer care, there may be justification for alternative consultation styles. We assessed, in a sample of adult medical oncology patients, their preferences for (i) attending one 40-min consultation or two 20-min consultations and (ii) receiving written only or both written and online information, when making a cancer treatment decision. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey using a discrete choice design of 159 adult medical oncology patients presenting for their second or subsequent outpatient consultation. Participants were presented with a set of hypothetical scenarios and asked to indicate their most and least preferred scenario. The scenarios contained a caveat explaining that there would be no difference between the available treatment options in terms of when treatment would be initiated and the impact it would have on patients¿ life expectancy. Results: One hundred forty-seven patients completed the DCE. Of these, 70% (n¿=¿103) preferred being provided with written and online information rather than just written information. This preference was statistically significant (p¿<¿0.01). Fifty-nine percent (n¿=¿86) of patients preferred two 20-min consultations over one 40-min consultation when making a treatment decision. Significantly, more patients preferred two shorter consultations rather than one longer consultation when this was combined with written and online information (p¿<¿0.01). Conclusion: When making a cancer treatment decision, clinicians should consider offering patients written and online information, combined with two shorter consultations.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3944-9
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Laura Wall, Amy Waller, Nick Zdenkowski, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Hall A, Lynagh M, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mansfield E, 'Who are the support persons of haematological cancer survivors and how is their performance perceived?', Psycho-Oncology, 26 2201-2207 (2017) [C1]

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Objective: To explore: (1) how haematological cancer survivors and their support persons perceive the overall performance of the sup... [more]

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: To explore: (1) how haematological cancer survivors and their support persons perceive the overall performance of the support person; (2) disagreement between survivor and support person ratings; and (3) characteristics associated with support persons rating their performance poorly. Methods: This is a substudy of a larger project of Australian haematological cancer survivors and their support persons. For this substudy, haematological cancer survivors were recruited from 4 Australian population-based cancer registries and asked to pass on a questionnaire package to their support persons. Survivors who passed on a questionnaire package to their support person were asked to answer questions about the support person and how they perceived the support person's performance. Similarly, support persons answered questions on their own performance as a support person. Results: A total of 924 haematological cancer survivors and 821 support persons were eligible for this study. Most survivors rated their support person as performing very well (84%) while less than half (48%) of support persons rated their own performance as very well. There was significant disagreement between survivor and their support person (dyad) ratings of the support person's performance. Support persons with above normal levels of depression (vs those with normal levels) had significantly higher odds of rating their own performance as ¿not well/somewhat well.¿. Conclusions: Health care providers should consider providing additional education and skills-based interventions to support persons who experience increased symptoms of depression.

DOI 10.1002/pon.4449
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Marita Lynagh, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Lim MS, Ariyarajah A, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, Enjeti AK, 'A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing Anticoagulation versus No Anticoagulation and Shorter versus Longer duration of Anticoagulation for Treatment of Isolated Distal Deep Vein Thrombosis', Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis, 43 836-848 (2017) [C1]

Isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) represents an important clinical problem but there is no consensus regarding its management. The aim of this review was to evaluate the ... [more]

Isolated distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) represents an important clinical problem but there is no consensus regarding its management. The aim of this review was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and shorter versus longer duration of anticoagulation in patients with isolated distal DVT. A systematic search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews. Studies reporting rates of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE), recurrent DVT, proximal extension, and/or major bleeding were included. Fourteen studies (six randomized controlled trials, eight cohorts) involving 2,918 patients met the eligibility criteria (with a total of 13 meeting criteria for the meta-analysis). Compared with no anticoagulation, anticoagulation was associated with a significant reduction in proximal extension (odds ratio [OR]: 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.13-0.67; p < 0.004), recurrent DVT (OR: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.04-0.65; p = 0.01), and the composite end-point of proximal extension/PE (OR: 0.34; 95% CI: 0.16-0.72; p = 0.005); however, no significant differences in PE (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.17-1.34; p = 0.16) or major bleeding (OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 0.33-6.86; p = 0.60) were observed. Anticoagulation for a longer duration (=8 vs. =6 weeks) was associated with a significant reduction in proximal extension (OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.11-0.48; p < 0.001) but not for other outcomes.

DOI 10.1055/s-0037-1604085
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Anoop Enjeti, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Paul C, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, Lynagh M, Campbell S, Bradstock K, et al., 'Dyadic interdependence of psychosocial outcomes among haematological cancer survivors and their support persons', Supportive Care in Cancer, 25 3339-3346 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the dyadic relationships between unmet need, depression, and anxiety in people diagnosed with haema... [more]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to explore the dyadic relationships between unmet need, depression, and anxiety in people diagnosed with haematological cancer and their support persons. Methods: Adult survivors (18¿years+) who had been diagnosed with a haematological cancer were recruited to a cross-sectional mailed survey via five state cancer registries in Australia. Participating survivors invited a support person to also complete a survey. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the relationships among survivor and support person self-reported depression, anxiety, and unmet needs. Results: Of the 4299 eligible haematological cancer survivors contacted by the registries, 1511 (35%) returned a completed survey as did 1004 support persons. There were 787 dyads with complete data. After adjusting for age, gender, rurality, cancer type, and whether the support person was a relative, positive correlations were found between survivor and support person scores for depression (p¿=¿0.0029) and unmet needs (p¿<¿0.001), but not anxiety scores (p¿=¿0.075). Survivor unmet needs were significantly related to support person depression (p¿=¿0.0036). Support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher depression score for survivors (p¿=¿0.0067). Greater support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher anxiety score for survivors (p¿=¿0.0083). Survivor unmet needs did not have a significant relationship to support person anxiety (p¿=¿0.78). Conclusion: Unmet needs may mediate the interdependence of psychosocial experiences for survivors and support persons, although a longitudinal study is required to confirm causality. Addressing unmet needs may be a potential target for improving outcomes for both groups.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3751-3
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Christopher Oldmeadow, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Forshaw K, Hall AE, Boyes AW, Carey ML, Martin J, 'Patients' experiences of preparation for radiation therapy: A qualitative study', Oncology Nursing Forum, 44 E1-E9 (2017) [C1]

Copyright 2016 by the Oncology Nursing Society. Purpose/Objectives: To explore patients&apos; experiences of and preferences for preparation for radiation therapy. Research Approa... [more]

Copyright 2016 by the Oncology Nursing Society. Purpose/Objectives: To explore patients' experiences of and preferences for preparation for radiation therapy. Research Approach: Qualitative study. Participants: 26 individuals who recently received radiation therapy for cancer. Setting: One Australian radiation oncology clinic located within a tertiary referral hospital in New South Wales. Methodologic Approach: Semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed based on a qualitative descriptive approach and content analysis of the transcribed interviews. Findings: Four main themes related to preparation techniques were identified: (a) psychological preparation (frame of mind, downward comparison, coping mechanisms, and reassurance); (b) information preparation (format, content, and knowledge from patients' own or others' experiences); (c) quality of health care; and (d) social support. Two themes related to outcomes of preparation were identified: feeling psychologically prepared and knowing what to expect. Overall, participants' accounts of preparation for radiation therapy revealed that provision of information was satisfactory. Some participants would have liked more information and support primarily in relation to side effects and the practicalities of what would happen during treatment. Conclusions: The information gained in this study indicates what strategies may best prepare patients for radiation therapy. Interpretation: Providing patients with information that creates a realistic expectation of what radiation therapy involves both before and after treatment seems particularly important in helping them feel prepared.

DOI 10.1188/17.ONF.E1-E9
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Mariko Carey, Kristy Fakes, Jarad Martin
2016 Bryant J, Boyes AW, Hall A, Girgis A, D'Este C, Sitas F, 'Prevalence and factors related to smoking and smoking cessation 6 months following a cancer diagnosis: a population-based study (vol 10, pg 645, 2016 )', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 10 1112-1112 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0561-4
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Jamie Bryant, Allison Boyes
2016 Paul C, Boyes A, Hall A, Bisquera A, Miller A, O Brien L, 'The impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment on employment, income, treatment decisions and financial assistance and their relationship to socioeconomic and disease factors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 4739-4746 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: The financial impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment can be considerable to individuals and their households, leading to chan... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: The financial impact of cancer diagnosis and treatment can be considerable to individuals and their households, leading to changes in treatment decision making. This study aimed to quantify effects on income and employment; describe how cost-related factors influence treatment decision making and need for financial assistance; and to identify patient sociodemographic factors associated with treatment decision making, use of financial assistance and financial effects. Methods: A cross-sectional self-report questionnaire was administered to oncology outpatients from two hospitals in Australia: one regional and one metropolitan. Results: Of 255 participants, 67¿% indicated a change in employment and 63¿% of those reported reduced household income since their diagnosis. Travel (15¿%), loss of income (14¿%) and cost of treatments (11¿%) were commonly cited factors influencing treatment decision making. Seventy-four percent of participants reported that they did not access financial assistance, with more than a third (37¿%) of those being unaware that financial assistance was available. Being currently not employed and more recent diagnosis were associated with a reduced income since diagnosis. After adjusting for employment status and age, patients with private health insurance had higher odds of reporting that financial factors had influenced treatment decision making (OR¿=¿2.5). Conclusion: Unemployment is a major driver of the financial impact of cancer. The costs of treatment may be particularly challenging for those with private health insurance who are more likely to be treated in the private health system where out-of-pocket costs are greater. Improved access to financial assistance is required to better avoid potential inequities.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3323-y
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Chris Paul, Allison Boyes
2016 Herrmann A, Mansfield E, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, 'Wilfully out of sight? A literature review on the effectiveness of cancer-related decision aids and implementation strategies', BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Herrmann et al. Background: There is evidence to suggest that decision aids improve a number of patient outcomes. However, little is known about the progression of research... [more]

© 2016 Herrmann et al. Background: There is evidence to suggest that decision aids improve a number of patient outcomes. However, little is known about the progression of research effort in this area over time. This literature review examined the volume of research published in 2000, 2007 and 2014 which tested the effectiveness of decision aids in improving cancer patient outcomes, coded by cancer site and decision type being targeted. These numbers were compared with the volume of research examining the effectiveness of strategies to increase the adoption of decision aids by healthcare providers. Methods: A literature review of intervention studies was undertaken. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched. The search was limited to human studies published in English, French, or German. Abstracts were assessed against eligibility criteria by one reviewer and a random sample of 20 % checked by a second. Eligible intervention studies in the three time periods were categorised by: i) whether they tested the effectiveness of decision aids, coded by cancer site and decision type, and ii) whether they tested strategies to increase healthcare provider adoption of decision aids. Results: Over the three time points assessed, increasing research effort has been directed towards testing the effectiveness of decision aids in improving patient outcomes (p < 0.0001). The number of studies on decision aids for cancer screening or prevention increased statistically significantly (p < 0.0001) whereas the number of studies on cancer treatment did not (p = 1.00). The majority of studies examined the effectiveness of decision aids for prostate (n = 10), breast (n = 9) or colon cancer (n = 7). Only two studies assessed the effectiveness of implementation strategies to increase healthcare provider adoption of decision aids. Conclusions: While the number of studies testing the effectiveness of decision aids has increased, the majority of research has focused on screening and prevention decision aids for only a few cancer sites. This neglects a number of cancer populations, as well as other areas of cancer care such as treatment decisions. Also, given the apparent effectiveness of decision aids, more effort needs to be made to implement this evidence into meaningful benefits for patients.

DOI 10.1186/s12911-016-0273-8
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Elise Mansfield, Nick Zdenkowski
2016 Bryant J, Boyes AW, Hall A, Girgis A, D Este C, Sitas F, 'Prevalence and factors related to smoking and smoking cessation 6 months following a cancer diagnosis: a population-based study', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 10 645-653 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: Limited research has examined smoking amongst recent cancer survivors or the relative contribution of factors on smoking... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: Limited research has examined smoking amongst recent cancer survivors or the relative contribution of factors on smoking behaviour. This study aimed to describe amongst recent Australian cancer survivors (i) prevalence of smoking by cancer type, (ii) characteristics associated with continued smoking following diagnosis, (iii) intention to quit among those who continue to smoke and (iv) characteristics associated with quitting following diagnosis. Method: Cross-sectional data were analysed from 1299 cancer survivors diagnosed with their first primary cancer recruited from two Australian cancer registries in Australia between 2006 and 2008. Results: Of participants, 8.6¿% reported current smoking. Participants who were younger and single or widowed reported higher odds of current smoking. Participants who had a certificate/diploma or tertiary education reported lower odds of smoking. Among current smokers, 53¿% intended to quit in the future. Lung cancer survivors reported more than four times the odds of quitting smoking since diagnosis compared to other cancer types. Conclusion: Of recent Australian cancer survivors, 14¿% report continued smoking. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Smoking following a cancer diagnosis is associated with increased risk of mortality and further morbidity. There is a need to target cessation efforts towards survivors who are younger, without a partner and with a low level of education.

DOI 10.1007/s11764-015-0510-7
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Allison Boyes, Catherine Deste
2016 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Paul C, Williamson A, Bradstock K, Campbell HS, 'Prevalence and associates of psychological distress in haematological cancer survivors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 4413-4422 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To explore outcomes of psychological distress, including anxiety, depression and stress, amongst adult haematological cancer su... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: To explore outcomes of psychological distress, including anxiety, depression and stress, amongst adult haematological cancer survivors, with a specific focus on potential differences between rural and urban survivors. Methods: One thousand four hundred fourteen urban and rural survivors were recruited from five Australian population-based cancer registries and completed a self-report pen-and-paper survey on their well-being, including the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale 21-item version. Results: A quarter of survivors were identified as reporting above normal levels of anxiety and depression, respectively, and almost one fifth (17¿%) reported above normal levels of stress. There were no statistically significant differences in the percentage of rural and urban survivors reporting above normal levels of anxiety, depression, or stress. Survivors who had experienced financial burden due to their cancer or were of middle age had higher odds of reporting multiple domains of psychological distress, compared to their counterparts. Conclusions: Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed during middle age or who experience increased financial burden as a result of their diagnosis may require additional support and care with regards to psychological distress.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3282-3
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Fradgley EA, Bryant J, Paul CL, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Oldmeadow C, 'Cross-sectional data that explore the relationship between outpatients' quality of life and preferences for quality improvement in oncology settings', Journal of Oncology Practice, 12 e746-e754 (2016) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients&apos; quality improvement prefe... [more]

Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed the association between oncology outpatients' quality improvement preferences and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Implementation of specific initiatives preferred by patients with lower HRQoL may be a strategic approach to enhancing care for potentially vulnerable patients. Methods English-speaking adults were recruited from five outpatient chemotherapy clinics located in New South Wales, Australia. Using touch screen devices, participants selected up to 25 initiatives that would improve their experiences and completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) survey. The logistic odds of selecting an initiative according to FACT-G scores were calculated to determine whether preferences were associated with HRQoL after controlling for potential confounders. Results Of the 411 eligible outpatients approached to participate, 263 (64%) completed surveys. Commonly selected initiatives were up-to-date information on treatment and condition progress (19.8%), access to or information on financial assistance (18.3%), and reduced clinic wait times (17.5%). For those with relatively lower FACT-G scores, the adjusted odds of selecting five initiatives illustrated an increasing trend: convenient appointment scheduling systems (+23% [P =.002]), reduced wait times (+15% [P =.01]), information on medical emergencies (+14% [P =.04]), access to or information on financial assistance (+15% [P =.009]), help to maintain daily living activities (+18% [P =.007]). Conclusion Two areas of improvement were commonly selected: easily accessible health services and information and support for self-management. Although the results suggest an association between a few quality improvement preferences and HRQoL, a wider spectrum of patient characteristics must be considered when targeting quality improvement to patient subgroups.

DOI 10.1200/JOP.2016.011023
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Christopher Oldmeadow, Elizabeth Fradgley, Chris Paul
2016 Hall A, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bryant J, 'How can we help haematological cancer survivors cope with the changes they experience as a result of their cancer?', Ann Hematol, 95 2065-2076 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00277-016-2806-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Jamie Bryant
2016 Bryant J, Mansfield E, Hall A, Waller A, Boyes A, Jayakody A, et al., 'The psychosocial outcomes of individuals with hematological cancers: Are we doing enough high quality research, and what is it telling us?', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 101 21-31 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This systematic review assessed the quantity and quality of research examining the psychosocial outcomes among hematological cancer patients. Studies were categorised as either measurement, descriptive or intervention. Intervention studies were further assessed according to Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) methodological criteria. A total of 261 eligible papers were identified. The number of publications increased by 8.8% each year (95% CI = 7.5-10.2%; p < 0.0001). The majority of studies were descriptive (n = 232; 89%), with few measurement (n = 8; 3%) and intervention (n = 21; 8%) studies identified. Ten intervention studies met EPOC design criteria, however only two interventions, one targeted at individuals with Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and one targeted at individuals with leukaemia, lymphoma or myelomatosis were successful in improving patients' psychosocial outcomes. Despite an increasing volume of research examining psychosocial outcomes of hematological cancer patients, there is a need for robust measurement and methodologically rigorous intervention research in this area.

DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2016.02.016
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Allison Boyes, Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield
2016 Forshaw KL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Boyes AW, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparing patients for medical interventions: A systematic review of the psychometric qualities of published instruments', Patient Education and Counseling, 99 960-973 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: Preparing patients for medical interventions improves patient outcomes and is an ethical and legal imperative. This review examines the cha... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objective: Preparing patients for medical interventions improves patient outcomes and is an ethical and legal imperative. This review examines the characteristics and psychometric properties of published instruments which assess patients' preparation for medical interventions. Methods: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched from the date of their inception to November 2015. Data-based publications describing the development or validation of a self-report instrument designed to assess the quality of adult patients' perceived preparation for a medical intervention were included. Results: Nine publications described the development or validation of seven instruments which met inclusion criteria. The psychometric qualities of the instruments varied. None met all of the accepted criteria for psychometric rigour. Although the Satisfaction with Cancer Information Profile met the highest number (n = 5) of the defined psychometric properties, the study sample size was less than 100. Overall, content validity of the included instruments was the most frequently assessed criteria. Conclusion: Few instruments have been specifically developed to assess patients' self-reported preparation for medical interventions. Of the available instruments, none demonstrated adequate rigour across essential psychometric properties. Practice Implications: The need to develop instruments examining patient preparation for medical interventions is apparent given the limitations of the instruments reviewed.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.008
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Kristy Fakes
2015 Yoong SL, Hall A, Williams CM, Skelton E, Oldmeadow C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews and the database of abstracts and reviews of effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: A bibliographic analysis', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69 708-714 (2015) [C1]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burde... [more]

Background: Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods: A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. Results: 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between percentage mortality and number of systematic reviews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. Conclusions: The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews.

DOI 10.1136/jech-2014-205389
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Eliza Skelton, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Cancer Society. BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome mea... [more]

© 2015 American Cancer Society. BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'What do haematological cancer survivors want help with? A cross-sectional investigation of unmet supportive care needs', BMC research notes, 8 221 (2015) [C1]

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify the most prevalent unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors. METHODS: Haematological cancer survivors aged 18-80 years at time of re... [more]

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify the most prevalent unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors. METHODS: Haematological cancer survivors aged 18-80 years at time of recruitment were selected from four Australian state cancer registries. Survivors completed the Survivor Unmet Needs Survey. The most frequently reported "high/very high" unmet needs items were identified, as well as characteristics associated with the three most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs reported by haematological cancer survivors. RESULTS: A total of 715 eligible survivors returned a completed survey. "Dealing with feeling tired" (17%), was the most frequently endorsed "high/very high" unmet need. Seven out of the ten most frequently endorsed unmet needs related to emotional health. Higher levels of psychological distress (e.g., anxiety, depression and stress) and indicators of financial burden as a result of cancer (e.g., having used up savings and trouble meeting day-to-day expenses due to cancer) were consistently identified as characteristics associated with the three most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs. CONCLUSIONS: A minority of haematological cancer survivors endorsed a "high/very high" unmet need on individual items. Additional emotional support may be needed by a minority of survivors. Survivors reporting high levels of psychological distress or those who experience increased financial burden as a result of their cancer diagnosis may be at risk of experiencing the most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs identified by this study.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1188-7
Citations Scopus - 24
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patien... [more]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Sang NM, Hall A, Huong TTT, Giang LM, Hinh ND, 'Validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale', Global Public Health, 10 S131-S148 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Taylor &amp; Francis. Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale... [more]

© 2014 Taylor & Francis. Physician values influence a physician¿s clinical practice and level of medical professionalism. Currently, there is no psychometrically valid scale to assess physician values in Vietnam. This study assessed the initial validity and reliability of the Vietnamese Physician Professional Values Scale (VPPVS). Hartung¿s original Physician Values in Practice Scale (PVIPS) was translated from English into Vietnamese and adapted to reflect the cultural values of Vietnamese physicians. A sample of clinical experts reviewed the VPPVS to ensure face and content validity of the scale, resulting in a draft 37-item measure. A cross-sectional survey of 1086 physicians from Hanoi, Hue and Ho Chi Minh City completed a self-report survey, which included the draft of the VPPVS. Exploratory Factor Analysis was used to assess construct validity, resulting in 35 items assessing physician¿s professional values across five main factors: lifestyle, professionalism, prestige, management and finance. The final five-factor scale illustrated acceptable internal consistency, with Cronbach¿s alpha coefficients ranging from 0.73 to 0.86 and all item-total correlations >0.2. Limited floor or ceiling effects were found. This study supports the application of the VPPVS to measure medical professional values of Vietnamese physicians. Future studies should further assess the psychometric properties of the VPPVS using large samples.

DOI 10.1080/17441692.2014.981830
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2015 Lynagh MC, Clinton-McHarg T, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Tiley C, Bisquera A, 'Are Australian clinicians monitoring medication adherence in hematological cancer survivors? Two cross-sectional studies.', Experimental Hematology & Oncology, 4 1-8 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40164-015-0011-4
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bryant J, Passey ME, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'A systematic review of the quality of reporting in published smoking cessation trials for pregnant women: An explanation for the evidence-practice gap?', Implementation Science, 9 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed informat... [more]

© 2014 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: To facilitate translation of evidence into clinical practice, it is critical that clear, specific, and detailed information about interventions is provided in publications to promote replication, appropriate aggregation in meta-analysis, and implementation. This study examined whether twenty elements of interventions deemed essential for such translational application were reported in sufficient detail in smoking cessation trials with pregnant women. Methods: Searches of electronic databases using MeSH terms and keywords identified peer-reviewed English language studies published between 2001 and 2012. Eligible studies reported a smoking cessation intervention targeted at pregnant women and met Cochrane's Effective Practice and Organization of Care group study design criteria. Each intervention arm of eligible studies was assessed against the developed twenty criteria. Results: Thirty relevant studies reported the findings of 45 intervention arms. The mode of delivery of the intervention was reported in 100% of intervention arms. Other well-reported criteria included reporting of the provider who delivered the intervention (96%), sample characteristics (80%), and the intervention setting (80%). Criteria not reported adequately included care provided to women who relapse (96% not reported), details about training given to providers (77% not reported), and the method of quit advice advised (76% not reported). No studies reported 100% of relevant criteria. Conclusions: Current standards of reporting of intervention content and implementation are suboptimal. The use of smoking cessation specific checklists for reporting of trials, standard reporting using behaviour change taxonomies, and the publication of protocols as supplements should be considered as ways of improving the specificity of reporting.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0094-z
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Campbell HS, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, 'Development and validation of the Short-Form Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SF-SUNS)', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1071-1079 (2014) [C1]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. A... [more]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. At 89 items, the current scale is quite burdensome. The current study aimed to develop a valid and reliable short version of this survey. Methods: A heterogeneous sample of 1,589 cancer survivors, aged 19 years or over at diagnosis, diagnosed with a histologically confirmed cancer in the previous 12 to 60 months, completed the SUNS. Using these data, we employed a combined theoretical and statistical method of reducing the number of items in the SUNS. The shortened survey was examined for construct validity, internal consistency, discriminant validity and floor and ceiling effects. Results: Fifty-nine items were removed. Construct validity closely reflected the original structure of the SUNS. However, all items from the Emotional health and Relationships domains loaded onto one factor. Cronbach's alpha for the final four domains were 0.85 or above, demonstrating strong internal consistency. Intra-class correlations of the three domains from the original survey (Financial concerns, Information and Access and continuity of care) and shortened survey were high (>0.9). Discriminant validity illustrated the short-form SUNS' ability to discriminate between those who had recently received treatment and those who had not. Conclusions: This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the short-form SUNS (SF-SUNS). Future studies should confirm the test-retest reliability and predictive validity of the SF-SUNS utilising large, independent, population-based samples of cancer survivors. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-013-2061-7
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Daniel Barker, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, D Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Factors associated with haematological cancer survivors experiencing a high level of unmet need across multiple items of supportive care: a cross-sectional survey study', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 2899-2909 (2014) [C1]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to identify subgroups of haematological cancer survivors who report a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on ... [more]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to identify subgroups of haematological cancer survivors who report a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on multiple (=7) items of supportive care.Results: Of the 696 survivors included in this study, 175 (n = 25¿%) reported a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on seven or more items of the SUNS. Survivors who: had relocated due to their cancer (OR: 2.04; 95¿% CI: 1.18, 3.52), had difficulty paying bills (OR: 2.42; 95¿% CI: 1.34, 4.38), had used up their savings as a result of cancer (OR: 1.90; 95¿% CI: 1.06, 3.40), and were classified as having above normal symptoms of depression (OR: 3.65; 95¿% CI: 2.17, 6.15) and stress (OR: 5.94; 95¿% CI: 3.22, 10.95) on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) had statistically significantly higher odds of reporting seven or more ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs.Methods: Haematological cancer survivors, aged 18 to 80¿years at recruitment were selected from four Australian state-based cancer registries. Eligible survivors were sent a survey containing the Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with haematological cancer survivors reporting a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on =7 items of the SUNS.Conclusions: Additional and intensive supportive care may be needed for this subgroup of haematological cancer survivors experiencing multiple ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs. Assistance with accessing relevant financial support and highly accessible services that provide emotional and information support, such as online and telephone peer support programs may prove beneficial in addressing the needs of this subgroup of haematological cancer survivors. It is suggested that future, methodologically rigorous intervention studies assess such strategies.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2264-6
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014) [C1]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person&apos;s Unmet Nee... [more]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS). Cancer survivors [n = 1589, 612 (52%) men, mean age of 62.5 years, SD 11.5] 1-5 years post diagnosis and recruited through three Canadian population-based cancer registries were asked to pass a survey package on to their principal support person. Surveys were returned by 1183 support persons. The survey included the long form of the SPUNS, which contains 78 items. Fifty-two items were deleted using a combination of expert opinion and statistical criteria. Analysis of the remaining items revealed a five-factor structure. The original factors were retained with the exception of a merging of the personal and emotional needs subscales. Cronbach's alpha co-efficients for all subscales were =0.87, and intraclass correlation of domain scores of the short and long versions of the SPUNS were high. The SPUNS short form was able to discriminate between support persons of survivors who had (n = 147), and those who had not received treatment in the past month (n = 969). At just 26 items, it is likely to have strong clinical and research applicability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Daniel Barker, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, 'The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study assessing the relevance and psychometric properties', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-211
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'A COMPARISON OF THE UNMET NEEDS OF YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULT HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 162-163 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Passey ME, Bryant J, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'How will we close the gap in smoking rates for pregnant Indigenous women?', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 199 39-41 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.5694/mja12.11848
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Paul CL, Hall AE, Carey ML, Cameron EC, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Access to Care and Impacts of Cancer on Daily Life: Do They Differ for Metropolitan Versus Regional Hematological Cancer Survivors?', Journal of Rural Health, 29 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jrh.12020
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2013 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Threlfall T, D'Este CA, 'Format and readability of an enhanced invitation letter did not affect participation rates in a cancer registry-based study: a randomized controlled trial', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, 66 85-94 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2012.07.016
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Supportive care needs of hematological cancer survivors: A critical review of the literature', Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology, 88 102-116 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2013.03.008
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Marita Lynagh
2013 Hall A, Campbell HS, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, D'Este C, Burkhalter R, Carey M, 'Unmet needs of Australian and Canadian haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional international comparative study', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 22 2032-2038 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3247
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman JA, Walsh RA, James EL, Girgis A, 'Young adult cancer survivors' psychosocial well-being: A cross-sectional study assessing quality of life, unmet needs, and health behaviors', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 1333-1341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-011-1221-x
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 66
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Erica James, Jenny Bowman
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Hall AE, 'Cancer patients' willingness to answer survey questions about life expectancy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 3335-3341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1477-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Cameron EC, Lynagh MC, Hall AE, Tzelepis F, 'Financial and social impact of supporting a haematological cancer survivor', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 169-176 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul
2012 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, Symonds IM, Scott A, Hall AE, Oldmeadow CJ, 'An RCT protocol of varying financial incentive amounts for smoking cessation among pregnant women', BMC Public Health, 12 1032 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ian Symonds, Christopher Oldmeadow, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Newling G, Hall AE, Girgis A, 'Travelling all over the countryside: Travel-related burden and financial difficulties reported by cancer patients in New South Wales and Victoria', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 298-305 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01232.x
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alison Zucca
2011 Paul CL, Carey ML, Hall AE, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Henskens FA, 'Improving access to information and support for patients with less common cancers: hematologic cancer patients' views about web-based approaches', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1894
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Frans Henskens, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Delaney T, Mclaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O'Brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26698
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Julia Dray, Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Rachel Sutherland, Serene Yoong
Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.23180
Co-authors John Wiggers, Matthew Mclaughlin Mc, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly
Show 87 more journal articles

Conference (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Murawski B, Hall A, Reilly K, Hope K, Nathan N, 'Reducing cancer risk through the workplace: Findings from a pilot trial to improve the physical activity and diet of school staff', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2020)
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Kathryn L Reilly, Beatrice Murawski
2020 Hasnain M, Attia J, Akter S, Rahman T, Hall A, Hubbart I, et al., 'WHAT THROMBOLYSIS IMPLEMENTATION INTERVENTIONS HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2020)
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Attia
2020 Fakes K, Boyes A, Carey M, Leigh L, Hall A, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Cancer-related medical imaging procedures: Prevalence and predictors of raised postprocedure anxiety among outpatients', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2020)
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes
2019 Uchida M, Hall A, Tran VT, Noble N, Akechi T, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Differences in experiences and preferences for cancer treatment decision making among patients undergoing radiotherapy in Australia, Japan and Vietnam', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Comparing cancer patients' and support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a treatment decision', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Munich, GERMANY (2018)
Co-authors Nick Zdenkowski, Amy Waller, Laura Wall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Luu Q, Day J, Hall A, Limaye V, Major G, 'Performance of the 2017 European League Against Rheumatism / American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) Classification Criteria for Adult Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies (IIM) in an Australian Cohort', ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATOLOGY (2018)
2018 Griffiths E, Rayner S, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Risk factors for obstetric anal sphincter injury: The impact of birthing position, Type of Delivery and Other Aspects of Intrapartum Care', BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow
2018 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Pearce A, Hall A, Evans T, 'Are Medical Oncology Outpatients Conveying their End-of-Life Wishes and Do They Want to?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Charles Douglas, Nick Zdenkowski, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2018 Gould G, Bovill M, Pollock L, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Atkins L, et al., 'Feasibility and Acceptability of ICAN QUIT in Pregnancy Multicomponent Implementation Intervention and Research Design for Australian Indigenous Pregnant Women: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Step-Wedge Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Michelle Bovill, Gillian Gould, Christopher Oldmeadow
2018 Bovill M, Bar-Zeev Y, Bonevski B, Gruppetta M, Oldmeadow C, Hall A, et al., 'Wingadhan Birrang (Woman's Journey) of Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women Participating in the Indigenous Counselling and Nicotine (ICAN) QUIT in Pregnancy Pilot Study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Michelle Bovill, Billie Bonevski, Christopher Oldmeadow, Gillian Gould
2017 Forshaw K, Carey M, Hall A, Boyes A, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preparation for Radiotherapy: A Cross-Sectional Study Assessing Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Procedural Preparation', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Kristy Fakes, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2017 Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Douglas C, Walsh J, Hall A, 'Are older and seriously ill Australians planning for their future medical care?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Amy Waller, Nick Zdenkowski, Charles Douglas, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Cancer patients' preferences for models of peer support in the digital age: A cross-sectional survey', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Heidi Turon
2016 Lynam J, Hall A, Ayoola A, Sridharan S, Henskens F, Smith A, et al., 'DECISION-MAKING PREFERENCES AND SATISFACTION OF STAGE ONE TESTICULAR CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Frans Henskens, Nick Zdenkowski, Bree Hobden
2016 Hall AE, Paul C, Bryant J, Lynagh MC, Rowlings P, Enjeti A, Small H, 'To adhere or not to adhere: Rates and reasons of medication adherence in hematological cancer patients', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.08.025
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul, Anoop Enjeti
2016 Hall A, Lynam J, Ayoola A, Sridharan S, Henskens F, Smith A, et al., 'ASSESSING THE INFORMATION NEEDS OF STAGE ONE TESTICULAR CANCER PATIENTS AND THEIR CARERS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Newcastle, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Nick Zdenkowski, Frans Henskens
2016 Herrmann A, Mansfield E, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, 'EXAMINING WHERE RESEARCH EFFORTS ON CANCER-RELATED DECISION AIDS HAVE BEEN MADE', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Newcastle, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nick Zdenkowski
2016 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'WHAT MODELS OF PEER SUPPORT ARE MOST APPEALING TO CANCER PATIENTS? A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Heidi Turon, Allison Boyes
2015 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, Hall A, Bisquera A, 'CANCER MEDICINE AFFORDABILITY AND FINANCIAL IMPACTS OF CANCER IN AUSTRALIA: IMPACTS ON DECISION-MAKING AND PERCEIVED FINANCIAL BURDEN', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Heidi Turon, Andrew Searles, Allison Boyes
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, Nguyen S, Tran H, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, 'PATIENTS PERCEPTIONS OF WHAT MAY HAVE CAUSED THEIR CANCER: A CROSS-SECTIONAL INVESTIGATION OF VIETNAMESE RADIOTHERAPY CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Hall A, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATES OF THE TOP HIGH/VERY HIGH UNMET NEEDS OF AUSTRALIAN HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'Unmet Needs: What do Hematological Cancer Survivors Want Help With?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for Hematological Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Assessment', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Flora Tzelepis, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, Symonds I, Scott A, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Should we pay pregnant smokers to quit? Preliminary findings of a feasibility trial.', Journal of Smoking Cessation, Sydney (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.26
Co-authors Ian Symonds, Christopher Oldmeadow, Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2011 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Hall AE, 'Who should make disclosure decisions? Cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, Antalya, Turkey (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Mackenzie, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2009 Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman JA, Zucca AC, Girgis A, ''The young ones': Psychosocial wellbeing and service utilisation of young cancer survivors', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Alison Zucca, Allison Boyes
2009 Zucca AC, Boyes AW, Girgis A, Hall AE, 'Travel all over the countryside: Travelling for cancer treatment in NSW and Victoria', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Gold Coast, QLD (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2009.01252.x
Co-authors Alison Zucca, Allison Boyes
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $114,703

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $4,995

Statistical support to explore changes in the delivery of antenatal care addressing alcohol consumption by women during pregnancy once implementation support is withdrawn$4,995

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2100158
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20171 grants / $39,944

Design and implementation of an exercise and wellness program for haematology cancer patients before, during and after treatment$39,944

Funding body: HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Project Team

Professor Philip Rowlings, Alix Hall, Casey Hutchinson, Louisa Brown, Jackie Wykes, Judy Holland, Kerrie Clover, Jennifer Martin, Benjamin Britton, Lisa Lincz

Scheme Implementation Science and Impact Flagship Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20151 grants / $20,064

Prospective validation study of a web-based tool to support treatment decision making in stage 1 testicular cancer patients and their support persons’$20,064

Funding body: HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance

Funding body HCRA Hunter Cancer Research Alliance
Project Team

Doctor James Lynam, Doctor Alix Hall, Professor Frans Hensken, Doctor Allan Smith

Scheme Implementation Science and Impact Flagship Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20142 grants / $40,000

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Mariko Carey, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Doctor Alix Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie, Dr Megumi Uchida
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Develop and evaluate a three-year strategic plan addressing sun exposure, skin cancer prevention and vitamin D$20,000

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Professor Mariko Carey, Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Amy Waller, Mrs Elizabeth Tracey, Doctor Alix Hall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400744
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20121 grants / $9,700

Successful interventions for improving medication adherence among haematological cancer patients: A systematic review$9,700

Funding body: Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit

Funding body Hunter Translational Cancer Research Unit
Project Team

Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Alix Hall, Doctor Anoop Enjeti, Professor Marita Lynagh, Professor Philip Rowlings, Doctor Jamie Bryant

Scheme EOI funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD A Randomised Trial of an Intervention to Sustain Primary Schools’ Implementation of a State-Wide Physical Activity Policy PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Patient Perceptions of Potentially Threatening Interventions PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Advance Planning for Healthcare and Research Participation: Law, Ethics and Practice PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Working Towards Patient-Centred Decision Making in Cancer Care PhD (Behavioural Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Patient preferences in oncology care 2015 -

Publications

Zdenkowski N, Lynam JF, Wall L, Brown S, Wells K, Sproule V, 'Breast cancer patients' willingness to travel to participate in a clinical trial.', Journal of Clinical Oncology (2017)

Zdenkowski N, Lynam J, Wall L, Brown S, Sproule V, 'Results of a Survey Investigating Cancer Patients' Willingness to Travel to Participate in a Clinical Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Comparing cancer patients' and support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a treatment decision', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Munich, GERMANY (2018)

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a cancer treatment decision', BMC Research Notes, 11 1-6 (2018) [C1]

Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Brown SD, Wall L, Walsh J, 'Quality versus quantity in end-of-life choices of cancer patients and support persons: a discrete choice experiment', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 3593-3599 (2018) [C1]

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'A discrete choice experiment to assess cancer patients preferences for when and how to make treatment decisions', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 1215-1220 (2018) [C1]

Hobden B, Turon H, Bryant J, Wall L, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Oncology patient preferences for depression care: A discrete choice experiment', Psycho-Oncology, 28 807-814 (2019) [C1]

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Doctor Amy Elizabeth Waller University of Newcastle
Miss Breanne Hobden
Ms Anne Herrmann University of Newcastle
Mr Justin Robert Walsh University of Newcastle
Doctor Heidi Erin Turon University of Newcastle
Professor Scott David Brown University of Newcastle
Doctor Nick Zdenkowski
Laureate Professor Robert William Sanson-Fisher University of Newcastle
Doctor Jamie Lee Bryant University of Newcastle
Doctor Alix Edna Hall University of Newcastle

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Dr Alix Hall

Position

Post Doctoral Researcher
Mon-Fri: HNE Population Health
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email alix.hall@newcastle.edu.au
Phone Monday-Friday:(02) 4924 6121

Office

Room Monday to Friday: HNE Booth Building Wallsend Campus
Building Booth Building
Location Wallsend

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