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Professor Ian Symonds

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I have extensive experience in the design and funding of research project protocols including ethical committee approval, Health and Safety regulations, animal experiment regulations and regulations for the use of radioactive substances. As a Research Fellow funded by the Cancer Research Campaign in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at Nottingham University I developed an anti-mucin monoclonal antibody for use in the management of gynaecological cancer and set up a phase I clinical imaging study in patients with ovarian cancer. Results of this work were submitted for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. With Professor Arulkumaran I established the academic department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Derby in 1998. During its first 3 years the Department obtained external grant funding of more than ¿1.3 million.

In 2004 I took up the post of Head of Discipline and Professor of Reproductive Medicine in Newcastle. Although I am continuing to publish results of work carried out in the UK I have concentrated on buidling new reseach collaborations in Australia which would not have been sufficiently advanced to produced publications by the end of 2006. These include ongoing projects in immunity to sexually transmitted infections, genetics of endometrial cancer, psychosocial effects of maternal ageing and medical student selection. This has been achieved while also having been heavily involved in the undergraduate and postrgraduate education.

Research Expertise
I have had a broad range of research interests in obstetrics, gynaecology and medical education. I have been the principle investigator at Derby on projects on the detection of intrapartum fetal hypoxia by fetal ECG-ST analysis, treatment of dysfunctional uterine bleeding, genetics of pre-eclampsia, infrared spectroscopic analysis of cervical smears and detection of ovarian cancer using Tc-99 labeled monoclonal antibody. I have ongoing research projects in inate immunity to chlamydia, medical education including medical student selection and the psychosocial aspects of maternal age

Teaching Expertise
As Head of Discipline of Reproductive medicine at Newcastle University I am the course-coordinator for the 4th year module in reproductive health. I am a member of the Bachelor of Medicine Curriculum Committee at Newcastle and in this capacity I have a role in the development and monitoring of the medical course as a whole. I took an active role in the development of the new Nottingham Graduate Entry Medical Course in 2003 In collaboration with Child Health I helped to set up in 2002 an exchange scheme, supported by ERASMUS, to allow 2 students from Nottingham each year to undertake their O&G training in Oslo.

I helped to develop an inter-professional education programme for midwives and doctors in Newcastle and Nottingham. The results of this work have been published in peer review medical education journals and presented at international and national meetings. Postgraduate In addition to my undergraduate teaching I also lectured on taught masters courses in oncology and assisted reproduction.

I contribute to the formal and informal teaching of other groups of health care workers. I was a member of the faculty for the postgraduate diploma and Master of Science in midwifery courses at Nottingham. I devised a graduate research methods training programme for students undertaking research based higher degrees in Nottingham. This was subsequently combined with a similar programme from another school to from the basis of the current faculty-wide graduate training programme. I devised and supervised a Teaching fellowship programme for junior doctors in obstetrics and gynaecology based at Derby City Hospital. I was appointed as an examiner for the MRANZCOG in 2006

Administrative Expertise
1998 - 2002 Member of the mid-Trent postgraduate training education committee, UK 1998 - 2004 RCOG Education supervisor at Derby City Hospital 1999 - 2004 Lead clinician for out-patient hysteroscopy service at Derby City General Hospital 1999 - 2004 Chairman of O&G gynaecology development committee, Derby City Hospital 2000 - 2004 Chairman of O&G research governance group, Derby, UK 2001 - 2004 Member of hospital Research and Development Committee, SDAH Trust, UK 2002 - 2004 Lead academic for admissions to the Graduate Entry (GEM) Course at Derby 2004 Member of Committee for Continuing Medical Eduction John Hunter Hospital 2005 ITP supervisor for RANZCOG John Hunter Hospital 1997 - 2004 Member of the teaching sub-committee of the School of Human Development 2000 -2004 Faculty member for the postgraduate diploma and Master of Science in midwifery 2001- 2004 Member of the Curriculum Policy Group of Faculty of Health Sciences 2001 - 2003 Derby Research Strategy Group 2002 - 2004 Faculty Board Member, Nottingham Medical School, UK 2002 - 2004 Member of the admissions committee for Medicine, Nottingham, UK 2003 - Member of the Nottingham Faculty Advisory Group on Interprofessional Education 2003 - 2004 Member of Nottingham University Widening Access Group 2004 Member of Bachelor of Medicine Programme Committee Newcastle 2004 Course co-ordinator for Reproductive Medicine, University of Newcastle 2005 Chair Assessment Working Group 2006 Chair of the Curriculum Implementation Committee for UN-UNE joint medical programme


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Nottingham - UK
  • Bachelor of Medical Sciences (Honours), University of Nottingham - UK
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Nottingham - UK
  • Master of Medical Sciences in Clinical Education, University of Nottingham - UK

Keywords

  • Cervical screening
  • Fetal ECG
  • Gynaecology
  • Medical Education
  • Near Infrared spectroscopy
  • Obstetrics
  • Ovarian cancer

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 30
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/1998 - 1/9/2004 Senior Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Medical Education The University of Nottingham
School of Human Development
United Kingdom
1/1/2000 - 1/7/2004 Chairman of O&G Research Governance Group South Derbyshire NHS Trust
United Kingdom
1/1/2007 -  Co-ordinator of MRANZCOG written (SAQ) examination Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Clinical Panel Member - AMC (overseas trained doctors examination) Australian Medical Council (AMC)
Australia
Member - UK Academy of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education UK Academy of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
United Kingdom
Member - The Obstetrician and Gynaecologist Wiley Online Library
Australia
Editorial Board Member of Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology Elsevier Australia
Member of RANZCOG Board of Examiners Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/9/2004 -  Senior Staff Specialist Hunter Area Health Service
Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2003 Lord Dearing Award for Teaching and Learning
The University of Nottingham

Research Award

Year Award
1990 Young MRCOG new investigators award
Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2004 Arulkumaran S, Symonds IM, Fowlie A, Oxford Handbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom, 804 (2004) [A3]
2004 Symonds EM, Symonds IM, Essential obstetrics and gynaecology, Churchill Livingstone, New York, United States, 394 (2004) [A3]
2002 Symonds IM, Baker PN, Kean L, Problem Orientated Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Arnold, London, United Kingdom, 326 (2002) [A1]

Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Smyth R, Symonds I, McCormack C, 'Evaluating Student Experiences of Medical Education in the Joint Medical Programme: A Case Study of a Unique Dual University Programme', Enhancing Learning and Teaching Through Student Feedback in Medical and Health Sciences 1-19 (2014)

© The editor and contributors, 2014. All rights reserved. Establishing a medical education programme in which the students are shared between two universities and regarded as a si... [more]

© The editor and contributors, 2014. All rights reserved. Establishing a medical education programme in which the students are shared between two universities and regarded as a single cohort is only one complexity of an initiative begun in regional Australia in 2008. The University of Newcastle in New South Wales, which has a problem-based learning medical programme of considerable repute, partnered with the University of New England with a view to increasing understanding of rural perspectives and prompting more graduates to remain in rural locations. Assuring the quality of student outcomes was a high priority, requiring innovative approaches to devise appropriate program evaluation measures designed specifically to accommodate the unique features of the Joint Medical Programme. This chapter details the initial trials of purpose-designed instruments and methodologies and makes an initial valuation of their efficacy.

DOI 10.1533/9781780634333.1

Journal article (65 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Doherty E, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, Anderson AE, Elliott EJ, Symonds I, et al., 'Barriers to the implementation of clinical guidelines for maternal alcohol consumption in antenatal services: A survey using the theoretical domains framework', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 31 133-139 (2020)

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: The aim of this study was to assess potential barriers to the implementation of clinical guideline recommendations ... [more]

© 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association Issue addressed: The aim of this study was to assess potential barriers to the implementation of clinical guideline recommendations regarding maternal alcohol consumption by antenatal clinicians and managers. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of antenatal clinicians and managers employed in a New South Wales Local Health District were undertaken. Survey items were developed based on 11 domains of the Theoretical Domains Framework. Consistent with previous studies, a cut point of less than 4 was applied to mean values of survey items (range: 1-5) to identify domains representing barriers to the implementation. Results: Thirty-three antenatal clinicians and eight managers completed the surveys. For clinicians, the domains with the lowest mean values included ¿environmental context and resources¿ (ie, complexity of appointments and availability of supporting systems) (mean: 3.13, SD: 0.93); ¿social influences¿ (ie, expectations of others that alcohol will be addressed) (mean: 3.33, SD: 0.68); ¿beliefs about capabilities¿ (ie, confidence in providing guideline recommendations) (mean: 3.51, SD: 0.67); and ¿behavioural regulation¿ (ie, planning and responding to feedback) (mean: 3.53, SD: 0.64). For managers, ¿emotion regulation¿ (ie, stress in managing change) (mean: 2.13, SD: 0.64) and ¿environmental context and resources¿ (ie, complexities of managing change) (mean: 3.13, SD: 0.83) were the lowest scoring domains. Conclusions: The antenatal service environment and availability of resources appear to be primary barriers to both clinicians and managers implementing guidelines for maternal alcohol consumption. So what?: In the development of interventions to support the delivery of clinical guideline recommendations addressing alcohol consumption during pregnancy, a broad range of potential barriers at both the clinician and manager levels need to be considered and targeted by effective implementation strategies.

DOI 10.1002/hpja.258
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, John Wiggers, Amy Anderson
2019 Bunjo Z, Bunjo LJ, Bacchi S, Donnelly F, Hudson JN, Symonds I, 'Sleep Patterns and Risky Driving Behaviors in Clinical Medical and Nursing Students', ACADEMIC PSYCHIATRY, 43 555-556 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s40596-019-01100-3
Co-authors Nicky Hudson
2019 Doherty E, Kingsland M, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, Dray J, Hollis J, et al., 'Implementation strategies to improve preconception and antenatal care for tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and weight management: a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 8 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-019-1193-3
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Attia, Jenna Hollis, Kylie Bailey, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, John Wiggers
2018 Symonds I, 'A common medical schools curriculum in obstetrics and gynaecology', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 58 491-493 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ajo.12887
2018 You W, Symonds I, Henneberg M, 'Low fertility may be a significant determinant of ovarian cancer worldwide: An ecological analysis of cross- sectional data from 182 countries', Journal of Ovarian Research, 11 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Ageing, socioeconomic level, obesity, fertility, relaxed natural selection and urbanization have been postulated as the risk factors of ovarian c... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Ageing, socioeconomic level, obesity, fertility, relaxed natural selection and urbanization have been postulated as the risk factors of ovarian cancer (OC56). We sought to identify which factor plays the most significant role in predicting OC56 incidence rate worldwide. Methods: Bivariate correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationships between country-specific estimates of ageing (measured by life expectancy), GDP PPP (Purchasing power parity), obesity prevalence, fertility (indexed by the crude birth rate), opportunity for natural selection (Ibs) and urbanization. Partial correlation was used to compare contribution of different variables. Fisher A-to-Z was used to compare the correlation coefficients. Multiple linear regression (Enter and Stepwise) was conducted to identify significant determinants of OC56 incidence. ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni analysis was performed to compare differences between the means of OC56 incidence rate and residuals of OC56 standardised on fertility and GDP respectively between the six WHO regions. Results: Bivariate analyses revealed that OC56 was significantly and strongly correlated to ageing, GDP, obesity, low fertility, Ibs and urbanization. However, partial correlation analysis identified that fertility and ageing were the only variables that had a significant correlation to OC56 incidence when the other five variables were kept statistically constant. Fisher A-to-Z revealed that OC56 had a significantly stronger correlation to low fertility than to ageing. Stepwise linear regression analysis only identified fertility as the significant predictor of OC56. ANOVA showed that, between the six WHO regions, multiple mean differences of OC56 incidence were significant, but all disappeared when the contributing effect of fertility on OC56 incidence rate was removed. Conclusions: Low fertility may be the most significant determining predictor of OC56 incidence worldwide.

DOI 10.1186/s13048-018-0441-9
2018 Waller A, Bryant J, Cameron E, Galal M, Symonds I, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Screening for recommended antenatal risk factors: How long does it take?', Women and Birth, 31 489-495 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: Detection and management of antenatal risk factors is critical for quality care. Aims: To determine (1) women's views about ... [more]

© 2018 Australian College of Midwives Background: Detection and management of antenatal risk factors is critical for quality care. Aims: To determine (1) women's views about when they should be asked about antenatal health factors as recommended in the Australian antenatal guidelines; and (2) the time required to provide recommended care using a clinical scenario. Methods: In Phase 1, pregnant women attending an outpatient obstetrics clinic at a public hospital were surveyed about preferred screening for antenatal risk factors during visit(s). In Phase 2, a hypothetical clinical scenario of a woman attending her first antenatal visit with a practising midwife was video-recorded to extrapolate the time taken to ask about and offer assistance to manage clinical, screening and lifestyle risk factors. Findings: Most women (96%) perceived they should be asked about each of the risk factors at least once (i.e. at first visit). Total time taken to ask about all risk factors was 52 min. More time was spent discussing clinical (11 min) than lifestyle factors (4 min). Adjusting for the estimated prevalence of each risk factor, the time taken to offer assistance was 8 min per woman. Average time required for detecting and offering assistance to manage risk factors is 60 min per average risk woman. Conclusion: Women are willing to be asked about risk factors; however this process is time-consuming. Strategies to streamline visits and prioritise recommendations so time-efficient yet comprehensive care can be delivered are needed, particularly when factors require monitoring over time and for those who may be ¿at-risk¿ for multiple factors.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2018.01.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller, Jamie Bryant
2018 Kingsland M, Doherty E, Anderson AE, Crooks K, Tully B, Tremain D, et al., 'A practice change intervention to improve antenatal care addressing alcohol consumption by women during pregnancy: research protocol for a randomised stepped-wedge cluster trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 13 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13012-018-0806-x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, John Wiggers, Amy Anderson, Luke Wolfenden, A Dunlop, Andrew Searles
2016 Lovett S, Roche J, Hunter S, Symonds I, Tomlinson N, Gagnon R, et al., 'Respective value of the traditional clinical rotation and high fidelity simulation on the acquisition of clinical reasoning skills in medical students A Randomized Controlled Trial.', MedEdPublish, 5 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.15694/mep.2016.000037
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter, Joerg Mattes
2015 Southgate E, Kelly BJ, Symonds IM, 'Disadvantage and the 'capacity to aspire' to medical school', Medical Education, 49 73-83 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objectives: This study was designed to elucidate why students from backgrounds of lower socio-economic status (SES) and who may be first in the... [more]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objectives: This study was designed to elucidate why students from backgrounds of lower socio-economic status (SES) and who may be first in their family (FIF) to enter university continue to be under-represented in medical schools. Methods: Academically able high school students (n = 33) from a range of socio-economic backgrounds participated in focus groups. School careers advisors (n = 5) were interviewed. Students discussed their career and education plans and ideas about a medical career. Careers advisors discussed enablers and barriers to a medical career for their students. Results: Students of lower SES and of FIF status attending schools situated in poorer geographic locations had limited access to suitable work experience and, despite their participation in gifted and talented classes, were considered to be at greater risk of not achieving the high level of academic achievement required for admission to medical school. Conclusions: There is utility in exploring intersecting differences and Appardurai's theory of the 'capacity to aspire' for the purpose of understanding the causes of the under-representation of disadvantaged students in medical schools. A focused materialist approach to building the aspirations of disadvantaged students, particularly those attending schools located in poorer areas, is required if effective pre-entry equity programmes are to be developed and evaluated. Alternatively, medical schools might rethink their reliance on very high academic attainment in the admission process. Discuss ideas arising from the article at www.mededuc.com discuss.

DOI 10.1111/medu.12540
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Brian Kelly
2014 Symonds IM, 'The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - A personal perspective', Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 34 551-552 (2014)
DOI 10.3109/01443615.2014.954856
2014 Wan C, Latter JL, Amirshahi A, Symonds I, Finnie J, Bowden N, et al., 'Progesterone Activates Multiple Innate Immune Pathways in Chlamydia trachomatis-Infected Endocervical Cells', American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 71 165-177 (2014) [C1]

Problem: Susceptibility to Chlamydia trachomatis infection is increased by oral contraceptives and modulated by sex hormones. We therefore sought to determine the effects of femal... [more]

Problem: Susceptibility to Chlamydia trachomatis infection is increased by oral contraceptives and modulated by sex hormones. We therefore sought to determine the effects of female sex hormones on the innate immune response to C. trachomatis infection. Method of study: ECC-1 endometrial cells, pre-treated with oestradiol or progesterone, were infected with C. trachomatis and the host transcriptome analysed by Illumina Sentrix HumanRef-8 microarray. Primary endocervical epithelial cells, prepared at either the proliferative or secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, were infected with C. trachomatis and cytokine gene expression determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results: Chlamydia trachomatis yield from progesterone-primed ECC-1 cells was significantly reduced compared with oestradiol-treated cells. Genes upregulated in progesterone-treated and Chlamydia-infected cells only included multiple CC and CXC chemokines, IL-17C, IL-29, IL-32, TNF-a, DEFB4B, LCN2, S100A7-9, ITGAM, NOD2, JAK1, IL-6ST, type I and II interferon receptors, numerous interferon-stimulated genes and STAT6. CXCL10, CXCL11, CX3CL1 and IL-17C, which were also upregulated in infected secretory-stage primary cells, and there was a trend towards higher levels of immune mediators in infected secretory-phase compared with proliferative-phase cells. Conclusion: Progesterone treatment primes multiple innate immune pathways in hormone-responsive epithelial cells that could potentially increase resistance to chlamydial infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/aji.12168
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Joanna Latter, Rodney Scott, Nikola Bowden
2013 Symonds IM, Talley NJ, 'Can professionalism be taught?: Yes, but a more strategic approach should replace didactic methods', Medical Journal of Australia, 199 380-381 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.5694/mja13.10656
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nicholas Talley
2013 Symonds IM, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Medicine, 23 14-19 (2013) [C1]

Well-organized cervical screening programmes have reduced the mortality from cervical cancer by up to 50% in the developed world. Despite the successful development of human papil... [more]

Well-organized cervical screening programmes have reduced the mortality from cervical cancer by up to 50% in the developed world. Despite the successful development of human papillomavirus vaccines there is likely to remain a need for cervical screening for the foreseeable future. In contrast, the value of mass screening for other gynaecological cancers remains unproven, although current screening methods can detect early stage ovarian cancer in asymptomatic individuals. Breast screening does appear to be associated with a reduction in mortality in women aged 50-69 years but disagreement remains about its value in younger and older women. Testing for sexually transmitted infections is effective in reducing morbidity but tends to be selective at present because of concerns over the cost and psychosocial implications of general population screening. © 2012.

DOI 10.1016/j.ogrm.2012.11.005
2012 Foster AB, Symonds IM, 'A comparative study of efficacy and outcomes of large loop excision of the transformation zone procedure performed under general anaesthesia versus local anaesthesia', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 52 128-132 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2012 Nair BR, Hensley MJ, Parvathy MSD, Lloyd DM, Murphy B, Ingham K, et al., 'A systematic approach to workplace-based assessment for international medical graduates', Medical Journal of Australia, 196 399-402 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Michael Hensley
2012 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher RW, Symonds IM, Scott A, Hall AE, Oldmeadow CJ, 'An RCT protocol of varying financial incentive amounts for smoking cessation among pregnant women', BMC Public Health, 12 1032 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall, Marita Lynagh
2012 Galal M, Symonds IM, Murray H, Petraglia F, Smith R, 'Postterm pregnancy', Facts, Views & Visions in OBGYN, 4 175-187 (2012) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Roger Smith
2011 Amirshahi A, Wan C, Beagley K, Latter JL, Symonds IM, Timms P, 'Modulation of the Chlamydia trachomatis In vitro transcriptome response by the sex hormones estradiol and progesterone', BMC Microbiology, 11 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2180-11-150
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Joanna Latter
2011 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Symonds IM, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Paying women to quit smoking during pregnancy? Acceptability among pregnant women', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 13 1029-1036 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntr108
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Billie Bonevski
2010 Lumsden MA, Symonds IM, 'New undergraduate curricula in the UK and Australia', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 24 795-806 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2010.05.002
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2010 Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, Gilbert M, et al., 'Polymorphisms in genes of the steroid hormone biosynthesis and metabolism pathways and endometrial cancer risk', Cancer Epidemiology, 34 328-337 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.canep.2010.03.005
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2010 Palliser HK, Zakar T, Symonds IM, Hirst JJ, 'Progesterone receptor isoform expression in the guinea pig myometrium from normal and growth restricted pregnancies', Reproductive Sciences, 17 776-782 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1933719110371517
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Hannah Palliser, Jon Hirst
2010 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, Scott R, 'Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) and Nucleosome-binding Oligomerization Domain (NOD) gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk', BMC Cancer, 10 1-7 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-10-382
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2009 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, et al., 'Estrogen receptor polymorphisms and the risk of endometrial cancer', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 116 1053-1061 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2009.02185.x
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors John Attia, Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott
2009 James D, Ferguson E, Powis DA, Bore MR, Munro D, Symonds IM, Yates J, 'Graduate entry to medicine: Widening psychological diversity', BMC Medical Education, 9 1-8 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6920-9-67
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Miles Bore
2009 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, Scott R, 'Genetic variants in MUTYH are not associated with endometrial cancer risk', Hereditary Cancer in Clinical Practice, 7 1-5 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1897-4287-7-3
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rodney Scott
2009 Symonds IM, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Medicine, 19 301-307 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ogrm.2009.07.005
Citations Scopus - 1
2009 Angstetra D, Tait T, Tan J, Symonds IM, 'Should liquid-based cytology be performed prior to colposcopy? A comparison of the accuracy, unsatisfactory rates and cost in a tertiary referral setting', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 49 681-684 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828x.2009.01095.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2009 Soltani H, Dickinson F, Symonds IM, 'Placental cord drainage after spontaneous vaginal delivery as part of the management of the third stage of labour', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2009)

Background: Cord drainage in the third stage of labour involves unclamping the previously clamped and separated umbilical cord and allowing the blood from the placenta to drain fr... [more]

Background: Cord drainage in the third stage of labour involves unclamping the previously clamped and separated umbilical cord and allowing the blood from the placenta to drain freely into an appropriate receptacle. Currently there are no systematic reviews of the effects of placental cord drainage on the management of the third stage of labour. Objectives: The objective of this review was to assess the specific effects of placental cord drainage on the third stage of labour, with or without the prophylactic use of oxytocics. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (July 2005), CINAHL (1982 to December 2004) and the National Research Register (December 2004). We updated the search of the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register on 16 July 2009 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. Selection criteria: Randomised trials involving placental cord drainage as a variable within the package of interventions as part of the management of the third stage of labour. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently assessed the quality of trials and extracted data. Main results: Two studies met our inclusion criteria in terms of quality and relevance. Cord drainage could impact the third stage of labour as the results show a statistically significant reduction in the length of third stage of labour (one trial, n = 147, weighted mean difference (minutes) -5.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) -8.02 to -2.90). In the incidence of retained placenta at 30 minutes after birth (one trial, n = 477, relative risk 0.28, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.73) a significant difference was found, but this should be interpreted with caution due to potential intervention bias. Authors' conclusions: It is difficult to draw conclusions from such a small number of studies, especially where the review outcomes were presented in a variety of formats. However, there does appear to be some potential benefit from the use of placental cord drainage in terms of reducing the length of the third stage of labour. More research is required to investigate the impact of cord drainage on the management of the third stage of labour. Copyright © 2009 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD004665.pub2
Citations Scopus - 15
2009 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, et al., 'Polymorphisms in TP53 and MDM2 combined are associated with high grade endometrial cancer', Gynecologic Oncology, 113 109-114 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ygyno.2008.12.036
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2008 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, et al., 'The influence of the Cyclin D1 870 G\A polymorphism as an endometrial cancer risk factor', BMC Cancer, 8 1-6 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-8-272
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia
2008 James D, Feguson E, Powis DA, Symonds I, Yates J, 'Graduate entry to medicine: Widening academic and socio-demographic access', Medical Education, 42 294-300 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2923.2008.03006.x
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27
2007 Shaw RW, Symonds IM, Tamizian O, Chaplain J, Mukhopadhyay S, 'Randomised comparative trial of thermal balloon ablation and levonorgestrel intrauterine system in patients with idiopathic menorrhagia', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 47 335-340 (2007)

Aims: To compare the effectiveness of thermal balloon ablation (TBA) and levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in the management of idiopathic menorrhagia and changes in pi... [more]

Aims: To compare the effectiveness of thermal balloon ablation (TBA) and levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in the management of idiopathic menorrhagia and changes in pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC) scores in patients who had failed on oral medical treatment. Methods: Phase III, single-centre, open randomised controlled trial. Following full screening and evaluation of 104 women, 33 were randomised to TBA and 33 to LNG-IUS. Primary outcomes were changes in PBAC scores from baseline to 12 months. Secondary outcomes were changes in haemoglobin and serum ferritin, at six.months, continuation with treatment and hysterectomy rates at two years and changes in PBAC scores at three, six and nine months. Results: All patients randomised had a PBAC score of =120. At all assessment times, median PBAC scores were less than baseline, the greatest reductions being seen at 12 months for both treatments. When the median PBAC for the LNG-IUS (26 (0-68)) was significantly different to the median PBAC for the TBA cohort (62 (0-142)) P<0.001. Irregular bleeding problems were the most common reason for discontinuation of the LNG-IUS and resulted in more women (39.8%) seeking other treatment by two years than the TBA (23.1%) (P<0.05) and more undergoing a hysterectomy (20.7% vs 13.3%, respectively) (p>0.05). Patient acceptability of the LNG-IUS and TBA was similar at 12 and 24.months in terms of their perceived satisfaction of effect on menorrhagia. Conclusions: Both TBA and LNG-IUS achieved significant decreases in PBAC scores, with those for the LNG-IUS being significantly greater at 12 months. However, prolonged days of bleeding resulted in fewer women continuing with the LNG-IUS at two years. © 2007 The AuthorsJournal compilation © 2007 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2007.00747.x
Citations Scopus - 30
2007 Broughton Pipkin F, Broughton Pipkin F, Kalsheker N, Morgan L, O'Malley S, Henfrey M, et al., 'Babies, pre-eclamptic mothers and grandparents: A three-generation phenotyping study', Journal of Hypertension, 25 849-854 (2007)

OBJECTIVES: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in later life. Daughters of PE mothers have an increased risk of developing the ... [more]

OBJECTIVES: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in later life. Daughters of PE mothers have an increased risk of developing the disease; recent epidemiological data suggest a (grand)paternal contribution. We have directly studied the parents of 673 women with stringently defined PE in relation to their daughters' disease. METHODS: (Grand)parental medical history, current medication and blood pressure (using an Omron 705 automated monitor) were recorded, with obstetric history for the grandmother, including directly verified pregnancy hypertension. RESULTS: The age of the 649 participating grandmothers was 55.5 ± 7.5 years (mean ± SD) and that of the 542 participating grandfathers was 58.0 ± 7.3 years. Essential hypertension (EHT) requiring therapy was present in 23.4% of the grandmothers and 22.8% of the grandfathers. Patients had moderate to severe PE; a quarter were delivered before 34 weeks' gestation. A third of the babies had birthweights below the third centile; the perinatal mortality rate was 2.1%. Grandpaternal absolute systolic pressures and EHT status were highly significant determinants of maternal systolic pressure during gestation (F = 11.8, P < 0.001; F = 8.91, P = 0.003, respectively); maternal body mass index (BMI) had less effect. A similar, less marked, pattern was seen for diastolic pressure (F = 6.01, P = 0.014; F = 11.50, P < 0.0001). Grandmaternal EHT did not influence her daughter's systolic or diastolic pressure (P > 0.2 for both). CONCLUSIONS: A paternal, but not maternal, history of EHT is associated with increased risks of non-pregnant hypertension in the children, the risk being greater in daughters than sons. Pregnancy may unveil or exacerbate this effect, possibly reflecting underlying endothelial vulnerability. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

DOI 10.1097/HJH.0b013e32803fb634
Citations Scopus - 11
2007 Symonds IM, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', The Foundation Years, 3 263-267 (2007) [C2]
2006 Symonds IM, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 16 337-343 (2006) [C2]
Citations Scopus - 1
2006 Symonds IM, 'Gynaecological surgery: Techniques, training, skills and assessment - Preface', Best Practice & Research in Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 20 1-2 (2006) [C3]
2006 Symonds I, 'Preface', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 20 1-2 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2005.09.002
2005 Fraser DM, Symonds IM, Cullen L, 'Multiprofessional or interprofessional education in gynaecology', The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, 7 271-275 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1576/toag.7.4.271.27123
Citations Web of Science - 4
2005 Morgan L, Farrall M, Baker PN, Pipkin FB, Kalsheker N, O Malley S, et al., 'Disentangling fetal and maternal susceptibility for pre-eclampsia: A British multicenter candidate-gene study', American Journal of Human Genetics, 77 127-131 (2005)

© 2005 by The American Society of Human Genetics. The Genetics of Pre-Eclampsia (GOPEC) collaboration aims to identify genetic factors in U.K. families affected by pre-eclampsia. ... [more]

© 2005 by The American Society of Human Genetics. The Genetics of Pre-Eclampsia (GOPEC) collaboration aims to identify genetic factors in U.K. families affected by pre-eclampsia. A number of genetic studies have reported associations with pre-eclampsia, but attempts to replicate these findings have yielded inconsistent results. We describe the results of extensive genotyping of seven candidate genes previously reported as conferring susceptibility to pre-eclampsia. Six hundred fifty-seven women affected by pre-eclampsia and their families were genotyped at 28 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding angiotensinogen, the angiotensin receptors, factor V Leiden variant, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, nitric oxide synthase, and TNFa. Genotypes were analyzed by the transmission/disequilibrium test. Genotype risk ratios (GRRs) associated with maternal genotypes had a range of 0.70-1.16; GRRs associated with fetal genotypes had a range of 0.72-1.11. No GRR achieved the prespecified criteria for statistical significance (posterior probability >.05). We conclude that none of the genetic variants tested in this large study of strictly defined pre-eclamptic pregnancies confers a high risk of disease. The results emphasize the importance of conducting rigorously designed studies of adequate size to provide precise genetic risks with narrow confidence intervals, if overreporting of falsepositive results is to be avoided.

DOI 10.1086/431245
Citations Scopus - 84
2004 Tao S, Symonds I, 'Menstrual disturbance', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 14 216-219 (2004)

In the past, the mainstay of surgical treatment of menorrhagia was hysterectomy. This is an effective form of treatment in terms of outcome but it does carry a degree of morbidity... [more]

In the past, the mainstay of surgical treatment of menorrhagia was hysterectomy. This is an effective form of treatment in terms of outcome but it does carry a degree of morbidity and prolonged convalescence. Endometrial ablation techniques were initially developed using the urological resectoscope, and recently, simpler methods have been developed to strive to obtain high patient satisfaction rates with less associated morbidity. This article looks at the considerations in the development of these new treatments, as well as medical treatment options such as the use of intra-uterine progestogens. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.curobgyn.2004.02.009
Citations Scopus - 1
2004 Tobin MJ, Chesters MA, Chalmers JM, Rutten JM, Fisher SE, Symonds IM, et al., 'Infrared microscopy of epithelial cancer cells in whole tissues and in tissue culture, using synchrotron radiation.', Faraday Discussions, 126 27-40 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b306689d
2003 Symonds IM, 'Evidence based management of ectopic pregnancy', Sri Lankan Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 25 (2003) [C3]
2003 Condous GS, Arulkumaran SA, Symonds IM, Chapman R, Sinha A, Razvi K, 'The "tamponade test" in the management of massive postpartum haemorrhage.', Obstetrics and Gynecology, 101 767-772 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 132
2003 Symonds IM, Cullen L, Fraser D, 'An Evaluation of a Formative Interprofessional Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination (ITOSCE): a Method of Shared Learning in Maternity Education.', Medical Teacher, 25 38-41 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/0142159021000061404
Citations Scopus - 27
2003 Cullen L, Fraser D, Symonds IM, 'Strategies for interprofessional education: the Interprofessional Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination for midwifery and medical students', Nurse Education Today, 23 427-433 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0260-6917(03)00049-2
Citations Scopus - 31
2002 Symonds IM, Cullen L, Fraser D, 'Inter-professional education in obstetrics using formative team objective structured clinical examination', ANZJ Obstet Gynaecol, 42 (2002) [C3]
2002 Symonds IM, Thomas A-M, Rutten F, Hitchcock A, Chesters M, 'Single cell analysis of cervical smears using infrared microspectroscopy', ANZJ Obstet Gynaecol, 42 (2002) [C3]
2002 Tobin M, Rutten F, Chesters M, Chalmers J, Symonds IM, Fisher S, et al., 'Investigating the Potential for Infrared Microanalysis in Cancer Screening.', European Clinical Laboratory 2002, (2002) [C1]
2002 Tamizian O, Gilby J, Symonds IM, Cust MP, Arulkumaran SA, 'Immediate and associated complications of hysterectomy for benign disease.', ANZJ Obstet Gynaecol, 2002 :42:2:292, (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2001 Symonds I, 'Ultrasound, hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy in the investigation of endometrial cancer', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 15 381-391 (2001)

Over the course of the last two decades hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy has begun to replace dilation and curettage as the method of choice for the diagnosis of endometrial c... [more]

Over the course of the last two decades hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy has begun to replace dilation and curettage as the method of choice for the diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma. In the majority of women this can be performed as an outpatient procedure with no loss in diagnostic accuracy. Transvaginal ultrasound measurement of endometrial thickness provides a highly sensitive and less invasive alternative means of assessing the endometrium but has a low positive predictive value for cancer, especially in women taking hormone replacement therapy. The cut-off value used to define normality needs to take into account patient age and ethnic origin. Ultrasound screening may not be suitable for women taking tamoxifen and those with recurrent or late-onset abnormal uterine bleeding.

DOI 10.1053/beog.2000.0183
Citations Scopus - 30
2001 Symonds I, 'Balliere''s Best Practice', Research in Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 15 381-391 (2001) [C1]
2001 Nunns D, Symonds IM, 'The Vulval Pain Syndromes.', Journal of Pediatrics,Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2001:27(6);42-48., 42-48 (2001) [C1]
2000 Fraser D, Symonds M, Cullen L, Symonds I, 'A university department merger of midwifery and obstetrics: A step on the journey to enhancing interprofessional learning', Medical Teacher, 22 179-183 (2000)

A first-class maternity service requires effective team working and opportunities for multiprofessional learning. However, it has been found that collaboration and cohesive workin... [more]

A first-class maternity service requires effective team working and opportunities for multiprofessional learning. However, it has been found that collaboration and cohesive working between doctors and midwives is not always evident. This paper describes the context for a unique merger of two academic departments, obstetrics/gynaecology and midwifery, with a view to enhancing interprofessional collaboration in teaching and research. Although interprofessional learning, particularly at undergraduate level, can be difficult to design and implement it is argued that it is necessary to enhance multiprofessional teamwork. It was found that a staged programme of action is needed to develop and evaluate curricular initiatives in interprofessional learning. Whilst learning about and valuing each other's roles is as important as sharing curriculum content it can involve an element of risk and considerable resources. Pilot work locally suggests that it is well worth the time and effort involved but long-term success will be dependent upon staff commitment and evaluation of the process as well as the outcomes.

DOI 10.1080/01421590078625
Citations Scopus - 8
2000 Symonds IM, 'Self-assessment questions: Vulval disorders', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 10 55-58 (2000)
DOI 10.1054/cuog.2000.0110
1999 Nunns D, Symonds IM, 'Vulval Pain Syndrome Study Day, Derby, 5 March 1999', Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 19 566-568 (1999)
DOI 10.1080/01443619964571
1999 Arulkumaran S, Symonds IM, 'Psychosocial support or active management of labour or both to improve the outcome of labour', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 106 617-619 (1999)
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.1999.tb08356.x
Citations Scopus - 5
1999 Symonds IM, 'Establishing an outpatient hysteroscopy service', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 9 158-162 (1999)

Hysteroscopic examination of the endometrium can be carried out as an outpatient procedure with no loss in diagnostic accuracy and at considerably lower cost than when done as a d... [more]

Hysteroscopic examination of the endometrium can be carried out as an outpatient procedure with no loss in diagnostic accuracy and at considerably lower cost than when done as a day-case. Cervical dilation is required in less than 20% of cases and only one-third of patients require local anaesthetic. Over 90% of women find the procedure acceptable and report minimal discomfort. Approximately 50% of women will have some abnormality identified at hysteroscopy of whom 1-2% will have endometrial malignancy. Twenty per cent of patients require subsequent hysteroscopic surgery under general anaesthetic, mostly for the removal of benign lesions. The initial capital investment required to establish a new service is small when compared to the long-term savings on the cost per patient procedure.

DOI 10.1016/S0957-5847(99)90059-8
Citations Scopus - 4
1999 Symonds IM, 'Self-assesment questions: Diagnosis and management of cervical neoplasia', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 9 173-176 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/S0957-5847(99)90062-8
1998 Symonds IM, 'Ectopic pregnancy: Modern management', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 8 27-31 (1998)

Laparoscopy is increasingly being replaced by transvaginal ultrasound and quantitative serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) measurement in the diagnosis of suspected ectopic ... [more]

Laparoscopy is increasingly being replaced by transvaginal ultrasound and quantitative serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) measurement in the diagnosis of suspected ectopic pregnancy. For haemodynamically-stable patients, laparoscopic treatment is associated with less morbidity and lower costs than laparotomy. The rate of successful intrauterine pregnancy is higher following linear salpingotomy than salpingectomy. However, conservative surgery also appears to be associated with higher rates of recurrent ectopic pregnancy and is more likely to be complicated by persistent trophoblastic tissue. Medical treatment with local or systemic injection of methotrexate is a suitable alternative for selected patients.

DOI 10.1016/S0957-5847(98)80007-3
Citations Scopus - 3
1996 Davies Q, Symonds IM, Perkins AC, Kerslake RW, Wastie ML, Worthington BS, Symonds EM, 'Magnetic resonance imaging, OC125 immunoscintigraphy and serum CA125 levels in the management of patients with suspected primary or recurrent ovarian carcinoma', Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 16 108-116 (1996)

A total of 39 patients with suspected primary (n = 17) or recurrent/residual (n = 22) ovarian carcinoma were investigated by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunoscin... [more]

A total of 39 patients with suspected primary (n = 17) or recurrent/residual (n = 22) ovarian carcinoma were investigated by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody OC-125 labelled with Indium-111. The results of the imaging studies were compared with surgical evaluation and pathological examination of resected material in each case. In patients with suspected primary tumours, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for the diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma was 37.5 and 66 per cent respectively, and for immunoscintigraphy 75 and 22 per cent. In patients with suspected recurrent disease, the sensitivity and specificity were 88 and 40 per cent for MRI and 82 and 60 per cent for immunoscintigraphy, compared with serum CA125 levels which had a sensitivity of 81 per cent and specificity of 50 per cent. The predictive value of a positive result was 83 per cent for MRI, 87 per cent for immunoscintigraphy and 81 per cent for serum CA125, with a negative predictive value of 50 per cent for all three techniques. These techniques are proving to be the main imaging methods for the assessment of patients with ovarian carcinoma, however, both techniques showed limitations in the detection of very small volume disease and were no more sensitive than serum CA125 in the detection of recurrence.

DOI 10.3109/01443619609007757
Citations Scopus - 2
1993 Perkins AC, Symonds IM, Pimm MV, Price MR, Wastie ML, Symonds EM, 'Immunoscintigraphy of ovarian carcinoma using a monoclonal antibody (

An anti-polymorphic epithelial mucin (PKM) monoclonal antibody NCRC48 (IgG3) has been tested for its capacity to localize in tumours according to accepted guidelines for human adm... [more]

An anti-polymorphic epithelial mucin (PKM) monoclonal antibody NCRC48 (IgG3) has been tested for its capacity to localize in tumours according to accepted guidelines for human administration. Following radiolabelling with 111In, 1 mg antibody was administered to 19 patients with a clinical suspicion of ovarian malignancy. Initial imaging and biodistribution studies confirm the safety of this conjugate although six out of 11 patients tested developed an antibody response to the monoclonal antibody. Immunoscintigraphy with this antibody was compared with magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound in relation to the final tumour histology, the final accuracies being 79, 79 and 64% respectively. Positive localization of antibody was confirmed in malignant tissue with little evidence of uptake in benign tissue. © 1993 Chapman and Hall Ltd.

DOI 10.1097/00006231-199307000-00011
Citations Scopus - 22
1992 Symonds IM, 'Monoclonal antibodies in ovarian cancer', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2 212-217 (1992)

Monoclonal antibodies recognising a number of antigens are used in the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian carcinoma. Conventional histology and cytology can be supplemented by imm... [more]

Monoclonal antibodies recognising a number of antigens are used in the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian carcinoma. Conventional histology and cytology can be supplemented by immunohistology. Antigens shed from tumours are routinely measured in patients sera by monoclonal based assays to monitor disease progression. Radiolabelled antibodies can be used to localise tumour in vivo by gamma camera imaging or intraoperatively using a hand held probe. Antibodies conjugated to radionuclides have been successfully used in the treatment of patients with small volume residual disease and malignant serous effusions. © 1992.

DOI 10.1016/0957-5847(92)90022-4
1990 Price MR, Pugh JA, Hudecz F, Griffiths W, Jacobs E, Symonds IM, et al., 'C595 - a monoclonal antibody against the protein core of human urinary epithelial mucin commonly expressed in breast carcinomas', British Journal of Cancer, 61 681-686 (1990)

Urinary mucins which express determinants for the anti-breast carcinoma monoclonal antibody, NCRC-11 (IgM), closely resemble the mammary mucins found in milk fat globules and carc... [more]

Urinary mucins which express determinants for the anti-breast carcinoma monoclonal antibody, NCRC-11 (IgM), closely resemble the mammary mucins found in milk fat globules and carcinomas. An IgG3 monoclonal antibody, C595, was prepared against urinary mucins isolated on a NCRC-11 antibody affinity column, and this ¿second generation¿ antibody was shown to have a very similar pattern of reactivity to the original NCRC-11 antibody. By immunohistology, the profile of reactivity of both antibodies with tumour and normal tissue specimens was virtually identical. Both antibodies reacted with epithelial mucins isolated from breast tumours or normal urine using an NCRC-11 antibody affinity column, although the antibodies were unreactive with other antigen preparations. Heterologous immunoradiometric assays (¿sandwich¿ tests) confirmed that NCRC-11 and C595 epitopes were co-expressed on the same molecule. C595 antibodies inhibited the binding of radiolabelled NCRC-11 antibodies to antigen, suggesting that the two epitopes were in close topographical proximity. The protein core of the mammary mucins has recently been shown to consist predominantly of a repeated 20 amino acid sequence (Gendler et al., 1988). Peptides with this complete sequence and small fragments were synthesised, and the C595 antibody was found to recognise an epitope within this repeat. The ability to identify and synthesise monoclonal antibody-defined determinants, as well as those in the adjacent or overlapping sequences within the protein core of epithelial mucins, is viewed as a strategy for facilitating the production of antibodies of new and novel specificity to complement the panels of existing anti-breast cancer reagents. © The MacMillan Press Ltd., 1990.

DOI 10.1038/bjc.1990.154
Citations Scopus - 69
Lynagh M, Kelly B, Horton G, Walker B, Powis D, Bore M, et al., 'Have we got the selection process right? The validity of selection tools for predicting academic performance in the first year of undergraduate medicine', MedEdPublish, 6
DOI 10.15694/mep.2017.000042
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Patrick Mcelduff, Graeme Horton, Marita Lynagh
Show 62 more journal articles

Review (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2005 Soltani H, Dickinson F, Symonds IM, 'Placental cord drainage after spontaneous vaginal delivery as part of the management of the third stage of labour', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2005) [D1]
Citations Scopus - 20
2003 Symonds I, 'Ultrasound, hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy in the investigation of endometrial cancer', Review in Gynaecological Practice (2003) [D2]
Citations Scopus - 6

Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Byrne J, Perry N, Murray E, Symonds I, Dunlop A, 'A RETROSPECTIVE AUDIT OF THE DRUGS IN PREGNANCY SERVICE IN NEWCASTLE, NEW SOUTH WALES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Southgate E, Kelly B, Symonds I, 'Getting to be a doctor: how socioeconomic status influences opportunities to navigate towards medical school', Sunway University, Kuala Lumpur (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Erica Southgate, Brian Kelly
2013 Lynagh MC, Bonevski B, Sanson-Fisher R, Symonds I, Scott A, Hall A, Oldmeadow C, 'Should we pay pregnant smokers to quit? Preliminary findings of a feasibility trial.', Journal of Smoking Cessation, Sydney (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.26
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall
2011 Palliser HK, Welsh TN, Zakar T, Symonds IM, Hirst JJ, 'Changes to the balance of prostaglandin synthesis and metabolism with intrauterine growth restriction contributes to preterm labour in the guinea pig', Reproductive Sciences, Miami Beach, Florida (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jon Hirst, Hannah Palliser
2011 Palliser HK, Welsh TN, Zakar T, Symonds IM, Hirst JJ, 'Intrauterine growth restriction leads to increased prostaglandin synthesis and reduced metabolism contributing to preterm labour in the guinea pig', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Hobart, Tasmania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Hannah Palliser, Jon Hirst
2010 Lynagh M, Symonds I, Sanson-Fisher R, Bonevski B, 'THE ACCEPTABILITY OF PERSONAL FINANCIAL INCENTIVES(PFI) FOR REDUCING ANTENATAL SMOKING', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2008 Ashton KA, Proietto AM, Otton GR, Symonds IM, McEvoy MA, Attia JR, et al., 'Combined tp53 r72p and mdm2 snp309 genotypes are associated with high grade endometrial cancer', ASMR XVII NSW Scientific Meeting: Programme and Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Rodney Scott, John Attia
2004 Symonds IM, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology (2004)

Well organised cervical screening programmes have reduced the mortality from cervical cancer by up to 50% in the developed world. Despite this, questions remain over: high false n... [more]

Well organised cervical screening programmes have reduced the mortality from cervical cancer by up to 50% in the developed world. Despite this, questions remain over: high false negative rates; the role of Human Papillama Virus (HPV) testing; and the management of low grade abnormalities. In contrast, the value of mass screening for ovarian cancer remains unproven, although current screening methods can detect early stage disease in asymptomatic individuals. Breast screening does appear to be associated with a reduction in mortality in the long term but paradoxically may increase death rates in young women in the short term. Testing for sexually transmitted infections is effective in reducing morbidity, but tends to be selective at present because of concerns over the cost and psychosocial implications of general, population screening. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.curobgyn.2003.10.007
Citations Scopus - 2
2001 Latthe PM, Shafi MI, 'Screening for gynaecological conditions', Current Obstetrics and Gynaecology (2001)

Screening is one of the most often discussed areas of gynaecology today. In this chapter, after a brief review of WHO criteria for a screening programme and relevant statistical t... [more]

Screening is one of the most often discussed areas of gynaecology today. In this chapter, after a brief review of WHO criteria for a screening programme and relevant statistical terms, the pros and cons of screening are considered. Its role in gynaecological cancers, genetic conditions and chlamydial infection is discussed. Ultrasound and multimodal screening can detect ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women, but there is insufficient evidence on whether screening improves outcome including mortality for women in any risk group. BRCA 1 and 2 screening is offered to women with families in which two or more first-degree relatives are affected by ovarian or premenopausal breast cancer. This gives a 65% chance of identifying a mutation. We have considered some of the interesting developments in cervical screening like PAPNET, thin prep and HPV testing. After discussing some of the controversies in breast cancer screening programmes, the case for introduction of chlamydia screening is debated. © 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

DOI 10.1054/cuog.2000.0146
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 24
Total funding $3,566,024

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20156 grants / $1,484,239

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$795,108

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1500584
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$273,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500682
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $270,909

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$80,000

Funding body: NSW Office of Preventative Health

Funding body NSW Office of Preventative Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500683
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$40,000

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Elizabeth Elliott, Conjoint Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor John Attia, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Chris Rissel
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1500681
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Novel mechanisms whereby fetal sex and the maternal decidua regulates labour onset$25,222

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Eric Wang, Professor Eugenie Lumbers, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500373
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20141 grants / $27,512

Progesterone therapy for preterm labour - evaluation of effects on fetal neuroactive steroid profiles$27,512

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Jon Hirst, Professor Ian Symonds, Doctor Hannah Palliser
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400122
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20132 grants / $125,000

Nikon C2 + Si Confocal Microscope$75,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor John Fitter, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200747
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Teaching Relief - $50,000 - Lynagh ALL COMMUNICATIONS REGARDING TEACHING RELIEF FUNDS TO BE DIRECTED TO THE HEAD OF SCHOOL ONLY” $50,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Marita Lynagh, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Career Enhancement Fellowship for Academic Women
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201123
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20123 grants / $184,454

Nikon C2 + Si Confocal Microscope$75,000

Funding body: Ramaciotti Foundations

Funding body Ramaciotti Foundations
Project Team Professor Ian Symonds, Doctor John Fitter
Scheme Major Equipment Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200728
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

The validity of UMAT and other selection tools for predicting student academic and non-academic performance in a medical program$75,000

Funding body: ACER (Australian Council for Educational Research)

Funding body ACER (Australian Council for Educational Research)
Project Team Associate Professor Marita Lynagh, Professor Brian Kelly, Doctor Graeme Horton, Emeritus Professor David Powis, Associate Professor Miles Bore, Conjoint Associate Professor Donald Munro, Professor Ian Symonds, Conjoint Professor Nicky Hudson
Scheme UMAT Consortium Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201096
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Disruption of gestational neurosteroid concentrations by stressful events leads to adverse neurodevelopmental and behavioural outcomes in children form these pregnancies$34,454

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Jon Hirst, Professor Ian Symonds, Doctor Hannah Palliser
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200176
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20112 grants / $154,000

Randomised controlled trial of a personal financial incentive (PFI) intervention to reduce antenatal smoking in women receiving public antenatal care$129,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Marita Lynagh, Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Robert Carter, Professor Anthony Scott
Scheme Grant-In-Aid
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1000355
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Role of the renin-angiotensin system in pregnancies complicated by placental insufficiency$25,000

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Associate Professor Kirsty Pringle, Professor Eugenie Lumbers, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100637
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20101 grants / $23,025

Investigation of IUGR-associated preterm labour using a guinea pig model$23,025

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Hannah Palliser, Professor Jon Hirst, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000119
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20084 grants / $87,868

An attachment-based group parenting intervention for substance dependent mothers and infants$54,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Conjoint Professor Louise Newman, Conjoint Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Mr Peter Walsh
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189627
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Does fetal growth restriction increase uterine activity and upregulate labour associated genes preterm?$15,208

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Professor Jon Hirst, Doctor Hannah Palliser, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189368
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

LED fluorescence illuminators and filter set (525nm + 575DF20) for LAS3000 image analysis system$9,600

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Ian Symonds, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bisits, Conjoint Professor Tamas Zakar, Doctor John Fitter, Doctor Eng-Cheng Chan, Conjoint Associate Professor Rick Nicholson, Doctor Giavanna Angeli, Doctor Kaushik Maiti, Doctor Jonathan Paul, Professor Jon Hirst, Doctor Hannah Palliser, Professor Eugenie Lumbers
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188543
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Improving parenting risk assessment in a 'high risk' drug and alcohol abusing antenatal population$9,060

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Kumudu Rathnayaka, Conjoint Professor Louise Newman, Conjoint Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Mr Peter Walsh
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189628
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20071 grants / $25,670

Beta Radiation Counter Instrument facility$25,670

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Conjoint Associate Professor Vicki Clifton, Conjoint Professor Tamas Zakar, Conjoint Associate Professor Rick Nicholson, Dr Mark Read, Doctor Eng-Cheng Chan, Doctor John Fitter, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bisits, Professor Jon Hirst, Doctor Hannah Palliser, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188194
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20064 grants / $1,454,256

PRC - Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Science$544,282

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Laureate Professor John Aitken, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Eileen McLaughlin, Professor Brett Nixon, Doctor Shaun Roman, Conjoint Associate Professor Vicki Clifton, Conjoint Professor Warwick Giles, Professor Jon Hirst, Conjoint Associate Professor Rick Nicholson, Professor Ian Symonds
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0186945
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Innate immunity and Chlamydia infection: Bacterial:epithelial cell cross-talk at the mucosal surface$479,349

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Conjoint Professor Kenneth Beagley, Conjoint Associate Professor Michael Boyle, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Peter Timms
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0185156
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Innate immunity and Chlamydia infection: Bacterial: epithelial cell cross-talk at the mucosal surface $420,625

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Project Team

Beagley K

Scheme Unknown
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

The psyhcosocial consequences of advance maternal age: a longitudinal study$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ian Symonds, Doctor Libby Campbell, Conjoint Professor Warwick Giles
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186078
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current0

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Towards Better Clinicopathological Diagnosis of Lichen Planus PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2003 Honours Comparison of infrared microspectroscopic analysis of cytologically normal cervical cells in women at low and high risk of cervical neoplasia Medical Science, Unknown Sole Supervisor
2001 Honours Analysis of cervical smears using infrared microspectroscopy Medical Science, Unknown Sole Supervisor
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News

Global health and medical powerhouse

March 27, 2015

More than 650 of the world’s leading health and medical educators are in Newcastle for the ANZAHPE AMEA 2015 conference

Future doctors examined

December 6, 2013

The bedside manner of Australia’s potential future doctors is being tested as candidates compete for a place in the prestigious Bachelor of Medicine - JMP.

University of Newcastle wins international medical conference

April 26, 2013

More than four hundred medical education experts will flock to Newcastle in March 2015 for The Asian Medical Education Association (AMEA) Conference 2015 to be

Professor Ian Symonds

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email ian.symonds@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7776
Fax (02) 4921 7788

Office

Room BB1-19
Building Bowman Building
Location Other

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