Dr Jennifer St George

Dr Jennifer St George

Senior Lecturer

School of Health Sciences

The crucial role of fathers

As a family studies lecturer and researcher, Dr Jennifer St George is shining a light on fatherhood and its influence on positive early child development.

The first 1000 days of life is sometimes referred to as the brain’s “window of opportunity”. It’s a critical time for a child’s development, and Jennifer’s research shows that both parents have an important role to play.

“Those first 1000 days of a child’s life are crucial, and we need to know how both parents can make a difference during this period,” Jennifer says.

While Jennifer lectures across all aspects of family studies, her research is specifically focussed on fatherhood. From rough and tumble play, to more subtle psychological support, a father’s involvement contributes significantly to their children’s social and emotional development. And yet, the paternal relationship remains mostly under-researched.

“In the field of fatherhood research, there is much more to understand about the nature, impact and pathways of paternal influence on children.”

Play time: it’s serious business

To more deeply understand a father’s influence, Jennifer is researching a well-known pastime in many family homes: father-child play. Her current research examines fathers’ interactions with their children, between zero and five years of age, to see how stimulating play affects a child’s development and behaviour.

“I want to discover the physiological and neurological activity that occurs during stimulating and challenging play between father and child. This includes rough and tumble play, which children love so much!

“If we can understand how challenging and boisterous physical play affects brain development and cognitive processes, perhaps we can enrich parent involvement in the prevention and treatment of children’s behavioural disorders.”

Jennifer’s research is in collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of researchers, including Dr Emily Freeman, Dr Linda Campbell and Professor Shelly Lane. The team’s collective expertise in assessing children’s developmental functioning, father-inclusive practice, and intervention studies has informed multiple satellite studies investigating paternal play.

“In one collaborative study with occupational therapy professor, Shelly Lane, we considered the aspect of playfulness in child and father interactions to better understand how fathers may contribute to children’s therapy and education.

“In another study, carried out in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam’s Professor Mirjana Majdandzic, we investigated how challenging and stimulating parenting—such as teasing, competition, daring and physical play—might assist in lessening children’s anxiety and other internalising and externalising behaviours.

“Being a researcher gives my daily work a raison d'être; there is always something new being discovered!”

Highlights from Jennifer’s research career so far include participating in the University’s ThinkWell Early and Mid-Career Women’s Development Program in 2018, facilitated through the Faculty of Health and Medicine's Gender Equity Committee, and travelling to the University of Michigan for the SRCD-funded working group on Measurement of Fathering.

“The overall purpose of the working group of international fatherhood scholars was to discuss methods, paradigms and measures of father-child relationships in the field of child development.

“Both programs enabled me to connect with researchers in related fields and have put me on an exciting and productive research trajectory.”

Jennifer plans to dig deeper into father-child play in the coming years. She has multiple innovative projects on the cards, including designing a new way to measure rough and tumble play, and studying the biopsychological nature of fathers’ stimulating play with their children to determine if play helps children learn how to regulate stress.

Evidence-informed teaching

Jennifer advocates for fathers, and families more generally, as the University’s senior lecturer in family studies. With more than a decade of experience in teaching at a tertiary level, she enjoys encouraging and supporting students in their learning and frequently draws on her research insights to keep students at the forefront of new developments in the field of family studies.

“I embed a ‘researcherly’ spirit into my teaching by inviting students to create their own investigations and question their assumptions.

The crucial role of fathers

As a family studies lecturer and researcher, Dr Jennifer St George is shining a light on fatherhood and its influence on positive early child development

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Jennifer St George is a Senior Lecturer in Family Studies with the University of Newcastle’s School of Health Sciences, and Program Convenor for the University’s Graduate Certificate and Master of Family Studies. Jennifer’s family research work extends across health and education. Primarily, Jennifer explores parenting processes and is specifically interested in the engagement and role of fathers in child development. 

Jennifer commenced her research career with a mixed-methods doctoral study in educational psychology, which she completed in 2010. Her doctoral thesis was awarded the Newcastle Institute of Education Thesis Prize and the Callaway Doctoral Award from the Australian Society for Music Education.

While completing her PhD, Jennifer started working as a qualitative research assistant within the Family Action Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine. Led by Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, the research team has worked on multiple projects focused on fathers' roles in family life, child wellbeing and father-inclusive practice in human services. One project, developed in collaboration with Dr Richard Fletcher and Dr Emily Freeman, designed an observation tool to measure father-child interaction in rough-and-tumble play. The team has expertise in assessing children’s developmental functioning, father-inclusive practice, and intervention studies. The project has led to multiple ongoing spin-off projects in the area of father-child play research.  The collaboration facilitates an innovative configuration of expertise and resources across two faculties that has potential for upscaling collaboration and translation into practice. The team has supervised to completion the research projects of 3 Master of Clinical Psychology students. We currently supervise two Research Higher Degree candidates, and are keen to hear from those who want to pursue an exciting new direction in family and child development studies.

In 2015, Jennifer stepped into her current role as Senior Lecturer with the University. She also supervises research higher degree candidates and students completing their research masters, is expert in the use of NVivo (qualitative analysis software) and reviews journals in related fields.

Jennifer continues to undertake collaborative and independent research with the Family Action Centre focused on fathers' roles in child development (specifically challenging and physical play), and factors that relate to paternal roles such as perinatal depression and service provision. She has contributed to a suite of peer-reviewed publications that explore fathers' influence from quantitative, qualitative and observational research approaches.

Jennifer’s methodological strengths lie in qualitative, observational and mixed research methodologies. As well as investing in home-grown research, Jennifer provides critical support to researchers around the world, in countries such as Canada and the USA. 

Teaching
Courses include Research Methods, specialising in qualitative research techniques & NVivo training. 

Scientific Recognition
From 2019, member of Scientific Advisory Group, 10 to Men Study

Since 2018, Co-Convenor, Australian Fatherhood Research Symposium.

Since 2016, member of iDADS, International Dialogue on Assessment about Dads


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behaviour Observation Methods
  • Family Studies
  • Father Engagement
  • Father-child play
  • Men in Human Services
  • Music Educational Psychology
  • Qualitative Research Methods

Languages

  • French (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
520207 Social and affective neuroscience 20
520101 Child and adolescent development 70
420302 Digital health 10

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Awards

Member

Year Award
2019 Member Scientific Advisory Group Ten to Men
Australian Institute of Family Studies

Research Award

Year Award
2012 Australian Postgraduate Award
Unknown
2011 Callaway Doctoral Award
Unknown
2011 Newcastle Institute for Educational Research Thesis Prize
Unknown

Invitations

Contributor

Year Title / Rationale
2019 SRCD Pre-Conference: Fathers are Parents too! Broadening Research on Parenting for Child Development

The focus of this pre-conference is to bring together scholars from multiple disciplines (e.g., developmental psychology, family science, sociology, social work, public policy) and at a range of career stages (e.g., undergraduate and graduate students, early career researchers, leaders in the field) to share and discuss state-of-the-art research on fathers and fathering, and how we can best disseminate this work to influence the culture of parenting research, practice, and policy. This pre-conference will follow on the heels of a successful pre-conference to SRCD 2017 on Fathers and Families, which was well attended and received positive feedback from participants, and a recently published Child Development Perspectives article (Cabrera, Volling, & Barr, 2018) that outlines best practices in conceptualization and measurement of fathers’ parenting to further our understanding of the family contexts of children’s development.

2016 Advancing Measurement of Fathering for Research on Child Development
An SRCD-sponsored workshop entitled Advancing Measurement of Fathering for Research on Child Development.  The overall purpose of the workshop was to convene a working group of international fatherhood scholars to discuss methods, paradigms and measures of father-child relationships in the field of child development.

Grant Reviews

Year Grant Amount
2017 Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research
International - Competitive - 3IFA, International - Competitive - 3IFA
$22,500
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Outreach and Integration in Family Services : Enhancing the Capacity of the NGO Sector : Colloquium Report, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Newcastle, 80 (2011)
Co-authors Tamara Blakemore

Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Fletcher R, Macdonald J, St George J, 'Connection, IT and Identity: SMS4dads as Health Promotion for New Fathers', Handbook of Fathers and Child Development Prenatal to Preschool, Springer Nature, Switzerland 639-656 (2020) [B1]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2020 Lane SJ, St George J, 'Fathers, children, play and playfulness', International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Elsevier, London 71-106 (2020) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.irrdd.2020.07.005
Co-authors Shelly Lane

Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 May CD, St George JM, Lane S, 'Fathers Raising Children on the Autism Spectrum: Lower Stress and Higher Self-Efficacy Following SMS (Text2dads) Intervention.', J Autism Dev Disord, (2021)
DOI 10.1007/s10803-021-04925-w
Co-authors Shelly Lane
2021 Robinson EL, StGeorge J, Freeman EE, 'A Systematic Review of Father-Child Play Interactions and the Impacts on Child Development', CHILDREN-BASEL, 8 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children8050389
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2021 StGeorge JM, Campbell LE, Hadlow T, Freeman EE, 'Quality and Quantity: A Study of Father Toddler Rough-and-Tumble Play', Journal of Child and Family Studies, 30 1275-1289 (2021) [C1]

Parent¿child interactions are critical for a child¿s overall wellbeing and growth, however there are differences in the types of interactions that mothers and fathers engage in. F... [more]

Parent¿child interactions are critical for a child¿s overall wellbeing and growth, however there are differences in the types of interactions that mothers and fathers engage in. For example, fathers often utilize physical play, such as Rough-and-Tumble Play (RTP), to interact and bond with their child. Father-child RTP appears to contribute to a range of child outcomes, including social, emotional cognitive and behaviour development. Given the now robust evidence for these benefits of father¿child play and RTP specifically, there is a need for a more complete understanding of the factors that contribute to the quality of fathers¿ RTP. This study examined the association between quality of father¿toddler RTP and a range of paternal characteristics, parenting factors, child demographics and child developmental domains. The study included 64 sets of parents (mothers and fathers) and their toddler (age 18¿24 months). Parent-reported questionnaires (demographic information, frequency of father¿toddler RTP, father parenting stress, and child social-emotional development) were collected, observations of child developmental attainment (Bayley-III) completed and father¿toddler RTP play interactions were rated for quality. We found that RTP for fathers who engaged in more father¿toddler RTP, whose children were older and more socially-emotionally mature, was rated as higher quality in their RTP. By demonstrating links of RTP quality with both parenting behaviour and child development, this study contributes to a more complete understanding of the nature and context of father¿child interactions. Father¿child physical play, including RTP, may present an opportunity for professionals to bring fathers into their work with families.

DOI 10.1007/s10826-021-01927-1
Co-authors Linda E Campbell, Emily Freeman
2021 Macdonald JA, Graeme LG, Wynter K, Cooke D, Hutchinson D, Kendall G, et al., 'How are you sleeping? Starting the conversation with fathers about their mental health in the early parenting years', Journal of Affective Disorders, 281 727-737 (2021) [C1]

Background: Approximately 1 in 10 fathers of infants experience symptoms of common mental health disorders, prompting calls for paternal postpartum screening. However, numerous ob... [more]

Background: Approximately 1 in 10 fathers of infants experience symptoms of common mental health disorders, prompting calls for paternal postpartum screening. However, numerous obstacles exist to screening implementation. The aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence for an alternative approach that starts with asking fathers about their sleep. Methods: Using self-reported father data at 0 to 36 months postpartum (N=1204) from four Australian cohort studies, we assessed associations between responses to various single-item questions about sleep (good to poor), and scores on validated measures of mental health (depression, anxiety and stress). We conducted regressions, unadjusted and adjusted for father age, child age, household income, education, first or later child, and marital status, to test associations between sleep and each indicator of mental health. We then meta-analyzed effects and assessed interactions between sleep and each of the covariates. Results: Consistent associations between fathers¿ subjective poor sleep and depression, anxiety and stress were replicated across the four cohorts despite heterogeneity in the sleep questions. At the meta-analytic level, effects ranged from weak to moderate (0.25 to 0.37) and were robust to all adjustments. Interactions were only detected between family income and poor sleep, such that the association was stronger for high income fathers. Limitations: This study does not address the sensitivity or specificity of single-item sleep questions for assessing paternal mental health risk. Conclusions: A low-cost, non-stigmatizing single question to postpartum fathers about their sleep may present a gateway opportunity to enquiring about mental health.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2020.11.081
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Eileen Dowse
2021 May CD, St George JM, Lane S, 'From Presence to Participation: Engagement with an SMS Program for Fathers of Children on the Autism Spectrum', Journal of Child and Family Studies, 30 29-37 (2021) [C1]

Fathers of children on the autism spectrum are often in need of support due to high levels of parenting stress and the complexity associated with raising these children. While the... [more]

Fathers of children on the autism spectrum are often in need of support due to high levels of parenting stress and the complexity associated with raising these children. While the importance of the fathering role as both parent and partner is well recognized, the recruitment of fathers into support programs is often resource intensive and generally fails to achieve desired levels of enrollment and retention. Text2dads explored paternal engagement with a program providing text-based information and support to smartphones of Australian fathers (N = 184) raising children on the autism spectrum. The evaluation is scaffolded by Piotrowska et al.¿s CAPE model of engagement¿Connection, Attendance, Participation and Enactment. Analysis demonstrated high rates of connection and participation when compared to other father-focused interventions. Evidence from response rates, comments and surveys demonstrate that fathers actively participated in the project while also reporting that they applied information gained from Text2dads in their parenting behavior. Advances in mobile communication have created opportunities to engage with fathers using alternative modes of intervention. The present study demonstrates support for the acceptability of this cost effective and highly scalable program.

DOI 10.1007/s10826-020-01845-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Shelly Lane
2021 Benders T, StGeorge J, Fletcher R, 'Infant-directed Speech by Dutch Fathers: Increased Pitch Variability within and across Utterances', Language Learning and Development, 17 292-325 (2021) [C1]

Although both fathers and mothers speak differently in infant-directed speech (IDS) compared to adult-directed speech (ADS), the acoustic characteristics of present-day paternal I... [more]

Although both fathers and mothers speak differently in infant-directed speech (IDS) compared to adult-directed speech (ADS), the acoustic characteristics of present-day paternal IDS are still insufficiently understood. To extend this understanding, 11 fathers and 17 mothers in The Netherlands were recorded interacting with their infant (260¿476¿days old; for IDS) and with an adult experimenter (for ADS). Both fathers and mothers were found to raise their average pitch, expand their pitch variability within utterance, and increase their pitch variability across utterances in IDS. Moreover, fathers increased their pitch variability within and across utterances more than mothers. The IDS produced by present-day Dutch-speaking fathers is thus acoustically highly dynamic, in line with fathers¿ energetic interaction style.

DOI 10.1080/15475441.2021.1876698
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2021 Lanning P, Rawlinson C, Hoehn E, De Young A, StGeorge J, Fletcher R, 'Primary mental health prevention in partners of mothers with a major mental illness: SMS4Dads.', J Reprod Infant Psychol, 1-10 (2021)
DOI 10.1080/02646838.2021.1921715
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2021 Livingston JD, Youssef GJ, StGeorge J, Wynter K, Dowse E, Francis LM, et al., 'Paternal coping and psychopathology during the perinatal period: A mixed studies systematic review and meta-analysis.', Clin Psychol Rev, 86 102028 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.cpr.2021.102028
Co-authors Eileen Dowse
2020 Fletcher R, StGeorge J, Newman L, Wroe J, 'Male callers to an Australian perinatal depression and anxiety help line Understanding issues and concerns', Infant Mental Health Journal, 41 145-157 (2020) [C1]

There is increasing recognition of the issues facing men in the perinatal period. Vulnerability factors and issues in the partner relationship contribute to mental health risk and... [more]

There is increasing recognition of the issues facing men in the perinatal period. Vulnerability factors and issues in the partner relationship contribute to mental health risk and can impact the quality of the father¿infant relationship. Yet, there is limited understanding of fathers¿ help-seeking when they or their partner are experiencing mental health issues in the context of caring for a new baby. The present study examines fathers¿ contacts with the Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Australia (PANDA) National Helpline. The study reviewed contacts from fathers and their identified needs for assistance, relationship issues, and support needs; 70% of male callers (N = 129) reported concerns about the mother's mental health, and 57% were concerned about relationship breakdown. Significant numbers of men raised issues about their own mental health (43%) and many were concerned about the impact of maternal mental state on the relationship with the infant. When compared to community data, there were elevated rates of concerns about depression and anxiety. Men also described difficulties with the fathering role and with regulating their own feelings of guilt and frustration. These findings highlight the needs of men for support when a mother experiences perinatal problems and also the risk for distress in fathers.

DOI 10.1002/imhj.21829
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2020 Fletcher R, StGeorge JM, Rawlinson C, Baldwin A, Lanning P, Hoehn E, 'Supporting partners of mothers with severe mental illness through text a feasibility study', Australasian Psychiatry, 28 548-551 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1039856220917073
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2019 Anderson S, StGeorge J, Roggman LA, 'Measuring the Quality of Early Father Child Rough and Tumble Play: Tools for Practice and Research', Child and Youth Care Forum, 48 889-915 (2019) [C1]

Background: Fathers are increasingly acknowledged as active participants in rearing young children, yet few observational measures recognize gender-differentiated parenting and ca... [more]

Background: Fathers are increasingly acknowledged as active participants in rearing young children, yet few observational measures recognize gender-differentiated parenting and can be used by practitioners and researchers to assess and improve fathers¿ parenting capacity in playful settings, in order to inform program effectiveness. Two potential measures are the Rough-and-Tumble Play Quality Scale (RTPQ), which is based on evolutionary and attachment theory and assesses rough-and-tumble play behaviors related to social-emotional competencies. The second is Dads¿ Parenting Interaction with Children: Checklist of Observations Linked to Outcomes (PICCOLO-D), which is grounded in a systemic approach linking parenting behaviors to child outcomes. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the two observational measures for suitability of assessment of fathers¿ parenting capacity with diverse low-income families. Method: A correlational longitudinal design was used to examine naturalistic rough-and-tumble play extant video observations of 25 fathers and their 2- to 4-year-old children independently coded with each measure, with child prekindergarten and fifth grade outcomes. Results: Convergent validity showed strong association between the two measures. No associations were found with family characteristics. Both measures predicted child prekindergarten attention regulation and aggression (inversely). PICCOLO-D predicted prekindergarten language and cognition, and language/literacy in fifth grade. Conclusions: The similarities and subtle differences between the measures confirm the distinctive theoretical approaches underpinning each measure, and suggest both are suitable tools for practitioners and researchers. PICCOLO-D may be useful for multiple type of play, while the RTPQ may be more relevant to specific qualities of paternal physical play interaction.

DOI 10.1007/s10566-019-09513-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2019 Fletcher R, Knight T, Macdonald JA, StGeorge J, 'Process evaluation of text-based support for fathers during the transition to fatherhood (SMS4dads): mechanisms of impact', BMC psychology, 7 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40359-019-0338-4
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2019 Fletcher R, Campbell L, Sved Williams A, Rawlinson C, Dye J, Baldwin A, et al., 'SMS4 perinatal parents: designing parenting support via text messages for mothers with severe mental illness (SMI) and their partners', Advances in Mental Health, 17 85-95 (2019) [C1]

Objective: This paper will describe the development of a programme of SMS messages including parenting information and support to be sent to the mobile phones of mothers with seve... [more]

Objective: This paper will describe the development of a programme of SMS messages including parenting information and support to be sent to the mobile phones of mothers with severe mental illness (SMI) and their partners from early pregnancy to 24 weeks post birth. Method: Text messages (total 176) designed and tested for fathers (SMS4Dads) addressing father-infant attachment, co-parenting and self-care (including Mood Tracker texts asking fathers to rate their mood) were adapted by an expert advisory group of clinicians with experience across perinatal mental health services. Messages were rated on importance, clarity, acceptability (separately for mothers and fathers) and being consistent with current evidence. Additional messages were developed specifically for this population and all messages were tested for literacy level. The SMS4dads ¿Mood Tracker¿ was redesigned to address common stress-inducing parenting issues such as infant crying, lack of sleep, and self-doubt about capacity to parent with an escalation process in cases of significant distress. Results: Separate protocol tested text-message banks for mothers (141 messages), and fathers (141 messages) were developed. Fourteen Mood Tracker topics were developed with two levels of distress escalation linked to local mental health services. Discussion: The need for accurate descriptions of health interventions processes is widely recognised, particularly in the case of digital mental health. This study provides a detailed description of the adaptive design by clinicians and researchers of brief text messages suitable for mothers with severe mental illness and their partners.

DOI 10.1080/18387357.2018.1550367
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Linda E Campbell
2018 StGeorge JM, Goodwin JC, Fletcher RJ, 'Parents Views of Father Child Rough-and-Tumble Play', Journal of Child and Family Studies, 27 1502-1512 (2018) [C1]

Abstract: Parent-child play directly influences child development. One aspect of parent-child play that is gaining interest is a form of physical play, ¿rough-and-tumble play¿ (RT... [more]

Abstract: Parent-child play directly influences child development. One aspect of parent-child play that is gaining interest is a form of physical play, ¿rough-and-tumble play¿ (RTP), or roughhousing. RTP is most often played by fathers and has been shown to have positive benefits for children. However, little is known about parents¿ perceptions of this type of play, although beliefs and values about learning through play shape parents¿ interactions with their children. In this study, we investigated parents¿ beliefs and knowledge about father¿child RTP. A qualitative design was used to create a conceptual description of parents¿ views, and 52 (31% male) Australian parents participated in semi-structured interviews supported by a video stimulus of father¿child RTP. Three conceptual themes characterized parents¿ perspectives on RTP: Strength Challenge describes the physicality and inter-personal challenge of the game; Dynamic Bonding describes how parents view RTP as fostering close father-child relationships, confidence and a playful state of mind; the final theme, Context and Caveats, integrates the contended and contingent aspects of RTP perceived to influence the short and long-term effects of this play. The study provides insight into how parents perceive the broad function of parent-child RTP and fathers¿ role within this play.

DOI 10.1007/s10826-017-0993-0
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2018 StGeorge JM, Wroe JK, Cashin ME, 'The concept and measurement of fathers stimulating play: a review', Attachment and Human Development, 20 634-658 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14616734.2018.1465106
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2018 St George J, Freeman EE, 'Social-emotional learning through a drumming intervention', Approaches: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Music Therapy, (2018)
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2017 Fletcher R, Dowse E, St George J, Payling T, 'Mental health screening of fathers attending early parenting services in Australia', Journal of Child Health Care, 21 498-508 (2017) [C1]

Paternal perinatal depression and anxiety is a common, though under-recognized mental health condition experienced by men during their transition to fatherhood. An opportunity to ... [more]

Paternal perinatal depression and anxiety is a common, though under-recognized mental health condition experienced by men during their transition to fatherhood. An opportunity to screen for paternal mental health issues occurs when parents present for assistance with the care of their baby at early parenting services (EPSs). There are 10 EPSs located across Australia that provide specialist, multidisciplinary interventions to support parents experiencing complex parenting difficulties. Using structured telephone interviews, this qualitative study explored the views of 18 professional staff from nine EPSs regarding screening, referral processes and acceptability of screening fathers for mental health issues. A thematic analysis revealed that most EPSs screened fathers for depression. Participants agreed screening was important and that routine approaches to screening would help normalize the process for both men and services. Despite this, no uniform, comprehensive approach to identifying the mental health needs of fathers was found. EPSs provide a unique opportunity to address the mental health needs of fathers. Results from this study point to the need for a national approach to the development of father-specific screening guidelines for EPSs to improve family well-being, in parallel to those informing the Australian National Perinatal Mental Health Initiative for mothers.

DOI 10.1177/1367493517732166
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Eileen Dowse, Richard Fletcher
2017 St George J, Fletcher R, Palazzi K, 'Comparing Fathers' Physical and Toy Play and Links to Child Behaviour: An Exploratory Study', INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT, 26 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/icd.1958
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2017 St George JM, Freeman E, 'Measurement of rough-and-tumble play and its relations to child behaviour', Journal of Infant Mental Health, 38 709-725 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/imhj.21676
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Emily Freeman
2017 May CD, St George JM, Fletcher RJ, Dempsey I, Newman LK, 'Coparenting Competence in Parents of Children with ASD: A Marker of Coparenting Quality', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 47 2969-2980 (2017) [C1]

The coparenting relationship has been linked to parenting stress, parenting self-efficacy and many other concerns associated with the development of children with ASD. Parents of ... [more]

The coparenting relationship has been linked to parenting stress, parenting self-efficacy and many other concerns associated with the development of children with ASD. Parents of children with ASD (N = 22) were interviewed to explore three domains of their coparenting relationship; (1) adaptation to the emergence of their child¿s autism, (2) parenting their child with ASD, (3) expectations for their child¿s developmental outcomes. The concept of coparenting competence, developed during analysis, describes collective perceptions of parenting efficacy. Parents linked perceptions of coparenting competence to their, ability to cope with diagnosis and parenting, motivation to do what they could for their child, and hopes for their child¿s development. The concept of coparenting competence could play an important role in future research and intervention.

DOI 10.1007/s10803-017-3208-z
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2016 Fletcher R, Dowse E, St George J, 'Screening dads for depression in Early Parenting Centres', Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, 24 36-36 (2016)
Co-authors Eileen Dowse, Richard Fletcher
2015 Fletcher R, St George J, May C, Hartman D, King A, 'Father-Inclusive Practice in a Family Center - An Australian Perspective', Zero to Three, 35 60-67 (2015) [C2]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2015 StGeorge J, Fletcher R, Freeman E, Paquette D, Dumont C, 'Father child interactions and children's risk of injury', Early Child Development and Care, (2015) [C1]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that mat... [more]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers¿ parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in risk-taking behaviour. Recent theoretical developments suggest that father's parenting may be particularly effective in encouraging safe risk taking. In this study, we examine how well parenting practices typically undertaken by fathers predict rates of children's injury risk at three years. Questionnaire data were collected from 46 fathers. Results show that both duration of rough-and-tumble play and fathers¿ encouragement of perseverance predicted lower rates of injury behaviours, while their stimulation of risk taking predicted higher rates of injury behaviours. The results are discussed in the light of developmentally appropriate risk taking and fathering.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2014.1000888
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Emily Freeman
2014 StGeorge JM, Fletcher RJ, 'Men's experiences of grandfatherhood: A welcome surprise', International Journal of Aging and Human Development, 78 351-378 (2014) [C1]

The present-day involvement of men in many facets of childrearing stands in contrast to previous eras when men accepted that the major task of fathering was to provide a secure in... [more]

The present-day involvement of men in many facets of childrearing stands in contrast to previous eras when men accepted that the major task of fathering was to provide a secure income to support the family. This imperative often required long hours away from the family. However, when men whose contact with children has been limited due to work and cultural constraints retire, their newly acquired lifestyle may bring fresh opportunities for involvement with grandchildren. An important question therefore concerns the impact of caring for young children on men's perceptions of their role as grandfathers. This interview study explores the experiences of 19 Australian grandfathers. The analysis found themes that relate to relationships and change, as well as themes concerning core beliefs and existential questions. The findings demonstrate the potential for insight into family relationships and personal growth in older age when studying the topic of grandparenting and caring from the male perspective. © 2014, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.

DOI 10.2190/AG.78.4.c
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2014 StGeorge J, Holbrook A, Cantwell R, 'Affinity for music: A study of the role of emotion in musical instrument learning', International Journal of Music Education, 32 264-277 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0255761413491178
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook
2014 StGeorge JM, Fletcher RJ, 'Men's experiences of grandfatherhood: a welcome surprise.', Int J Aging Hum Dev, 78 351-378 (2014)
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2014 May CD, Fletcher, St george, 'A father's prenatal relationship with 'their' baby and 'her' pregnancy - implications for antenatal education', International Journal of Birth and Parenting Education, 1 5-12 (2014) [C2]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2013 Fletcher R, StGeorge J, Freeman E, 'Rough and tumble play quality: Theoretical foundations for a new measure of father-child interaction', Early Child Development and Care, 183 746-759 (2013) [C1]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relations... [more]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of RTP between father and child and its relationship to child development and to describe a theoretically informed measure of the quality of father-child RTP. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2012.723439
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Emily Freeman, Richard Fletcher
2013 Freeman E, Ross NM, St George J, Fletcher R, 'A quantitative analysis of practitioners' knowledge of fathers and fathers' engagement in family relationship services', Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal, 24 270-277 (2013) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicola Ross, Emily Freeman, Richard Fletcher
2012 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Fathers' role in school readiness', Every Child, 18 22-24 (2012) [C3]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2012 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Time for work, commuting, and parenting? Commuting parents' involvement with their children', Community, Work and Family, 15 273-291 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13668803.2012.662802
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2012 St George JM, Holbrook AP, Cantwell RH, 'Learning patterns in music practice: Links between disposition, practice strategies and outcomes', Music Education Research, 14 243-263 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14613808.2012.685454
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook
2011 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough-and-tumble play: Implications for early childhood services', Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36 131-138 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22
Co-authors David Lubans, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher
2011 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Heading into fatherhood-nervously: Support for fathering from online dads', Qualitative Health Research, 21 1101-1114 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1049732311404903
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2011 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Fathers online: Learning about fatherhood through the internet', Journal of Perinatal Education, 20 154-162 (2011) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2010 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Men's help-seeking in the context of family separation', Advances in Mental Health, 9 49-62 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/jamh.9.1.49
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2010 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Practitioners' understanding of father engagement in the context of family dispute resolution', Journal of Family Studies, 16 101-115 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/jfs.16.2.101
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2006 Holbrook AP, St George JM, Ashburn EA, Graham AM, Lawry MJ, 'Assessment practice in fine art higher degrees', Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy, 118 86-97 (2006) [C1]
Co-authors Miranda Lawry, Allyson Holbrook
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 St George J, Hartman D, 'Translating practice knowledge and expertise into qualifications for the family & community workforce', Melbourne (2018)
2016 StGeorge J, Hartman DK, 'Adapting through learning: Family Studies as a strategic choice for the future', Family Relationship Service Australia ejournal, Canberra (2016) [E1]
2012 St George JM, Holbrook AH, 'Cognitive, social and affective factors related to engagement in instrumental music learning', EARLI 2011 14th Biennial Conference: Education for a Global Networked Society. Book of Abstracts and Extended Summaries, Exeter (2012)
2011 St George JM, Holbrook AP, 'Cognitive, social and affective factors related to engagement in instrumental music learning', EARLI 2011 14th Biennial Conference: Education for a Global Networked Society. Book of Abstracts and Extended Summaries, Exeter (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook
2011 St George JM, 'Continuing engagement with music: The role of cognitive, social and affective disorders', The Seventh International Conference for Research in Music Education: Summaries and Abstracts, Exeter (2011) [E3]
2010 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough and tumble play', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference Proceedings, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Morgan, David Lubans, Richard Fletcher
2010 St George JM, Fletcher R, 'Travelling well: Commuting parents' involvement with their children', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference. Program and Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2010 Holbrook AP, St George JM, Sebalj DA, Shaw KM, 'Managing degrees of uncertainty: Management expectations in supervision', AARE International Education Research Conference - 2010, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Kylie Shaw, Allyson Holbrook
2009 Fletcher R, St George JM, Douglas SL, Gray KM, 'The dad, the chat and the cam: New father's use of the web', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts, Newcastle, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2009 Simmons BA, Holbrook AP, St George JM, Lawry MJ, Graham AM, 'Developing a researcher perspective during the course of a fine art research degree: Issues relating to supervision', AARE 2008 Conference Papers Collection: Proceedings, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E2]
Co-authors Allyson Holbrook, Miranda Lawry
2008 Fletcher R, St George JM, 'Practitioners' understanding of father engagement in the context of family dispute resolution', 10th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference: Program & Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2004 St George JM, 'The musical dropout: A new perspective', Proceedings of the XXVIth Annual Conference, Southern Cross University Tweed Heads (2004) [E1]
Show 9 more conferences

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Fletcher R, St George J, 'Refining father-Inclusive Practice Webinar', Refining father-Inclusive Practice: Australian Institute of Family Studies (2015)
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2014 Fletcher R, may C, st george, stoker L, oshan M, 'Engaging Fathers - Evidence Review', . http://www.aracy.org.au/publications-resources/area?command=record&id=197&cid=6: ARACY (2014)
Co-authors Richard Fletcher

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Fletcher R, Dowse E, 'Fatherhood Research Bulletin', Fathers & Families Research Program, 14 (2017)
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $3,843,784

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

SMS4dads for Rural and Remote Fathers (SMS4RRDads)$2,588,700

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Jennifer St George, Mr Craig Hammond, Doctor Chris May, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Dr Mick Adams, Dr Mark Wenitong, Louise Newman, Professor Louise Newman, Julie Borninkhof, Dr Alka Kothari, Neil Drew, Dr Jacqui Macdonald, Dr Anne Sved-Williams, Nicholas Kowalenko, Rawlinson Catherine, Dr Elizabeth Hoehn, Dr Mark Wenitong, Professor Megan Galbally, Anne Sved-Williams, Dr Jacqui Macdonald, Amy Finlay-Jones, Nick Kowalenko, Catherine Rawlinson, Jackie Mead, Julie Borninkhof, Dr Amy Finlay-Jones, Jackie Mead
Scheme Perinatal Mental Health and Wellbeing Program - Emerging Priorities
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G2001378
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

DadsPlay2 – Feasibility of a father-child play program for children with behavioural difficulties$88,221

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Doctor Jennifer St George, Professor Alison Lane, Associate Professor Linda Campbell, Doctor Emily Freeman
Scheme Child and Youth Health GO2648
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1901441
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

20211 grants / $2,588,700

SMS4dads for Rural and Remote Fathers (SMS4RRDads)$2,588,700

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Jennifer St George, Mr Craig Hammond, Doctor Chris May, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Dr Mick Adams, Dr Mark Wenitong, Louise Newman, Professor Louise Newman, Julie Borninkhof, Dr Alka Kothari, Neil Drew, Dr Jacqui Macdonald, Dr Anne Sved-Williams, Nicholas Kowalenko, Rawlinson Catherine, Dr Elizabeth Hoehn, Dr Mark Wenitong, Professor Megan Galbally, Anne Sved-Williams, Dr Jacqui Macdonald, Amy Finlay-Jones, Nick Kowalenko, Catherine Rawlinson, Jackie Mead, Julie Borninkhof, Dr Amy Finlay-Jones, Jackie Mead
Scheme Perinatal Mental Health and Wellbeing Program - Emerging Priorities
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2024
GNo G2001378
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

20203 grants / $672,857

Focus on New Fathers$521,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Professor Frances Kay-Lambkin, Professor John Attia, Dr Jacqui Macdonald, Nick Kowalenko, Dr Rebecca Giallo, Professor Louise Newman
Scheme Research Funds
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1901208
Type Of Funding C2300 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Own Purpose
Category 2300
UON Y

DadsPlay2 – Feasibility of a father-child play program for children with behavioural difficulties$88,221

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Doctor Jennifer St George, Professor Alison Lane, Associate Professor Linda Campbell, Doctor Emily Freeman
Scheme Child and Youth Health GO2648
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1901441
Type Of Funding C1500 - Aust Competitive - Commonwealth Other
Category 1500
UON Y

Developing stillbirth prevention messages for SMS4dads$63,636

Funding body: Red Nose Limited

Funding body Red Nose Limited
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Eileen Dowse, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Professor Ian Symonds, Associate Professor Jane Warland, Associate Professor Michael Stark, Dr Alka Kothari
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2000203
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

20192 grants / $73,214

Evaluating rural uptake of SMS4dads$54,564

Funding body: Royal Society for the Welfare of Mothers & Babies

Funding body Royal Society for the Welfare of Mothers & Babies
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner
Scheme Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901016
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

FHEAM Equipment Grant$18,650

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Jennifer StGeorge, Linda E Campbell, Emily Freeman, Alison Lane

Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20182 grants / $80,945

sms4dadsSA$60,500

Funding body: South Australia Minister for Health

Funding body South Australia Minister for Health
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Dr Jacqui Macdonald
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800221
Type Of Funding C2300 – Aust StateTerritoryLocal – Own Purpose
Category 2300
UON Y

Text2dad$20,445

Funding body: Autism Spectrum Australia

Funding body Autism Spectrum Australia
Project Team Doctor Chris May, Doctor Jennifer St George, Professor Shelly Lane, Ms Laura Boyle, Ms Alison McCrae, Mr Craig Smith
Scheme Positive Partnerships
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801153
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

20162 grants / $8,002

FACULTY SMALL GRANT AWARD, FACULTY OF SCIENCE$7,000

Prospective study of the impact of father-child interaction on child behaviour

The aim of the current research is to develop and test models of causal associations between fathers’ play and children’s behavioural development using a longitudinal design. We propose a follow-up study of the toddlers engaged in our previous research. Specifically, the research will determine whether the quality of play prospectively improves children’s attention, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity at age 3-4, accounting for father and family variables.

Funding body: The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body The University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Dr Jennifer StGeorge; Dr Linda Campbell; Dr Emily Freeman

Scheme Faculty of Science
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

FHEAM 2016 Strategic Pilot Grant$1,002

Neurological and cognitive correlates of father-child play

This application seeks funding to purchase a set of validated assessment tools to assess executive
function and sensory processing in children aged 18 months to 5 years.

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Jennifer StGeorge; Professor Shelly Lane; Dr Emily Freeman

Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $82,881

Family and Children Expert Panel$82,881

Funding body: Department of Social Services

Funding body Department of Social Services
Project Team Ms Penny Crofts, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Deborah Hartman, Ms Kate Akhurst-Dennis, Doctor Chris May, Ms Karen Menzies, Doctor Jennifer St George, Ms Lynette Stoker, Doctor Graeme Stuart
Scheme Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401357
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20142 grants / $27,255

ERF Teaching Relief - St George$23,520

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jennifer St George, Professor Darren Rivett
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301435
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Validation of the Rough-and-Tumble Play Quality (RTP-Q) measure of father-child interaction$3,735

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jennifer St George
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301230
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $9,930

Evaluation of the effectiveness of a drumming-based intervention on the social and emotional wellbeing of at risk youth$9,930

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jennifer St George
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301040
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $300,000

Building Connections through Play-Interrelate$300,000

Funding body: Interrelate Family Centres

Funding body Interrelate Family Centres
Project Team Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Doctor Jennifer St George
Scheme Research Consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1101168
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Navigating the Negative: Early Postnatal Negative Thoughts and Father-Infant Interrelations at 9 Months PhD (Psychology - Science), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD What are the Physiological Mechanisms Effecting the Nature, Quality and Frequency of Fathers’ Physical Play on Child Behaviour, Attachment and Functioning? PhD (Family Studies), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD SMSb4school: A Pilot SMS Program for Engaging Fathers in Preschoolers’ School Readiness PhD (Family Studies), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Children's Development of Strategising and Positive Dispositions in Music and Mathematics: Implications for Learning in the Primary Classroom PhD (Education), College of Human and Social Futures, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Masters The Effect of Father-Child Rough and Tumble Play on Child Behavioural Development
The aim of this study is to explore the prospective relationship between the frequency and the quality of father interaction through father-child RTP on markers of externalising behaviours in children aged between 18-24 months old.
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Masters The relationship between child anxiety and paternal facilitation of child exploration Psychology, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Masters The relation of father stress to rough and tumble play, and toy play in children with internalising and externalising problems Psychology, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Masters Father-infant play: The impact of paternal anxiety Psychology, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters The Relationship between Father-Child Rough and Tumble Play and Motor Development: An Exploratory Study Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

DadPlay: Tackling challenging behaviour in 3–5-year-olds

May 13, 2021

Australian fathers in rural, regional and remote areas, who are raising children aged three to five, with challenging behaviour, will have a helping hand through a new mobile-phone-based service.

Helping dads cope with postnatal depression

August 31, 2018

A new study is aiming to support new dads who experience postnatal depression.

Dr Jennifer St George

Position

Senior Lecturer
Fathers & Families Research Programme, Family Action Centre
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email jennifer.stgeorge@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 6690
Links Personal webpage
Personal webpage
Personal webpage

Office

Room GO.3
Building International House Common Room
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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