Dr Emily Freeman

Dr Emily Freeman

Lecturer

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Emily Freeman is a Lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Newcastle. Her PhD and Postdoc focused on Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience with projects examining the process(es) underlying recognition memory decisions. 

Research Expertise

Human Memory
My first research focus was Human Memory, specifically the study of Recognition Memory. I have examined such things as the effect of lexical characteristics of stimuli, study and test context effects, and the process(es) underlying the recognition memory decision. Although the majority of my initial research focused recognition memory, I am now involved in studies looking at working memory. For example, I am involved in projects examining the relationship between working memory and achievement in children and projects looking at the impact of Early Life Stress on adult working memory ability. 

Father-Child Play Research

Since 2009 I have worked with the Fathers and Families Research Program led by Dr Richard Fletcher from the Family Action Centre at The University of Newcastle. The research team has  worked on a number of different projects with a core focus on fathers' role in family life and child well-being and father-inclusive practice in human services. 

The latest development in the Father-Child Play research is the establishment of an interdisciplinary team of researchers, including Dr Jennifer StGeorge, Dr Linda Campbell and Professor Shelly Lane. With this leadership, the team has expertise in assessing children’s developmental functioning, father-inclusive practice, and intervention studies. The collaboration facilitates an innovative configuration of expertise and resources across two faculties that has potential for upscaling collaboration and translation into practice. The team has supervised to completion the research projects of 5 master of Clinical Psychology students, and are able to supervise Research Higher Degree candidates who want to pursue an exciting new direction in family and child development studies.

Teaching Expertise

I currently teach into the Undergraduate Bachelor of Psychological Science program where I coordinate PSYC3000 and PSYC2200. I predominantly cover such topics as cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, research methods and statistics. 


Qualifications

  • PhD (Psychology), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Psychology)(Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • ERP
  • child development
  • cognitive neuroscience
  • cognitive psychology
  • developmental psychology
  • educational psychology
  • experimental psychology
  • family studies
  • father-child play
  • psychology
  • research methods
  • statistics

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing 50
170299 Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 - 1/12/2013 Research Associate University of Newcastle
Science & IT
Australia
1/07/2009 - 1/02/2012 Senior Researcher University of Newcastle
Family Action Centre
Australia
1/04/2009 - 1/06/2009 Research Associate The University of Adelaide
Faculty of Health Sciences
Australia
1/07/2008 - 1/04/2009 Research Associate The Ohio State University
Department of Psychology
United States
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Chalmers KA, Freeman EE, 'A Comparison of Single and Multi-Test Working Memory Assessments in Predicting Academic Achievement in Children.', J Psychol, 1-17 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/00223980.2018.1491469
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2018 St George J, Freeman EE, 'Social-emotional learning through a drumming intervention', Approaches: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Music Therapy, (2018)
2018 Chalmers KA, Freeman EE, 'Does accuracy and confidence in working memory performance relate to academic achievement in NAPLAN, the Australian national curriculum assessment?', Australian Journal of Psychology, 70 388-395 (2018)

© 2018 The Australian Psychological Society Objective: The aim of this study was to examine how accuracy and confidence in working memory performance relates to academic achieveme... [more]

© 2018 The Australian Psychological Society Objective: The aim of this study was to examine how accuracy and confidence in working memory performance relates to academic achievement as assessed in the Australian national curriculum assessment (National Assessment Program¿Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN)). Method: A total of 150 Australian schoolchildren enrolled in Year 4 participated in the study. Accuracy and confidence in performance of a working memory task were assessed. Associations between these working memory measurements and scores in each of the NAPLAN domains (numeracy, reading, persuasive writing, grammar, and spelling) were examined, separately for males and females. Results: Accuracy in working memory performance was associated with achievement in all five NAPLAN domains, in both males and females. Confidence in working memory performance was also related to achievement, but the pattern of results differed for males and females. For females, significant associations were found between confidence and achievement in numeracy, reading, writing, and spelling. For males, confidence was associated with achievement in numeracy only. Females outperformed males in persuasive writing. There was a non-significant trend for males to outperform females in numeracy. Conclusion: The strong links between working memory and achievement highlight the importance of early detection of working memory problems. Further research is needed to examine the extent to which the pattern of results generalises to other year levels.

DOI 10.1111/ajpy.12207
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2017 St George JM, Freeman E, 'Measurement of rough-and-tumble play and its relations to child behaviour', Journal of Infant Mental Health, 38 709-725 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/imhj.21676
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge
2017 Freeman EE, Karayanidis F, Chalmers KA, 'Metacognitive monitoring of working memory performance and its relationship to academic achievement in Grade 4 children', Learning and Individual Differences, 57 58-64 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. The relationship between metacognitive monitoring of working memory performance and academic achievement was examined in 73 Grade 4 children. Working memory w... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. The relationship between metacognitive monitoring of working memory performance and academic achievement was examined in 73 Grade 4 children. Working memory was assessed using the Working Memory Power Test (WMPT) for children. Metacognitive monitoring was assessed by confidence ratings and two calibration measures, the Bias Index and the Absolute Accuracy Index, calculated from WMPT scores. Children also completed the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - Australian Abbreviated (WIAT-II). Regression analyses showed the Bias Index was the best metacognitive monitoring calibration measure for predicting academic achievement. These findings extend previous research in two important ways. Firstly, we have shown that Grade 4 children have metacognitive monitoring abilities. Secondly, we have demonstrated that children are able to metacognitively monitor their working memory performance and that the calibration of this monitoring is related to their academic achievement.

DOI 10.1016/j.lindif.2017.06.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers, Frini Karayanidis
2015 StGeorge J, Fletcher R, Freeman E, Paquette D, Dumont C, 'Father¿child interactions and children's risk of injury', Early Child Development and Care, (2015) [C1]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that mat... [more]

Unintentional injury is an important cause of infant and child hospitalisation and parents play a key role in reducing children's risk-taking behaviour. Studies show that maternal and paternal parenting and supervision of children differ, but there is little research showing how fathers¿ parenting may influence children's tendency to engage in risk-taking behaviour. Recent theoretical developments suggest that father's parenting may be particularly effective in encouraging safe risk taking. In this study, we examine how well parenting practices typically undertaken by fathers predict rates of children's injury risk at three years. Questionnaire data were collected from 46 fathers. Results show that both duration of rough-and-tumble play and fathers¿ encouragement of perseverance predicted lower rates of injury behaviours, while their stimulation of risk taking predicted higher rates of injury behaviours. The results are discussed in the light of developmentally appropriate risk taking and fathering.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2014.1000888
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 Fletcher R, StGeorge J, Freeman E, 'Rough and tumble play quality: Theoretical foundations for a new measure of father-child interaction', Early Child Development and Care, 183 746-759 (2013) [C1]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relations... [more]

Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of RTP between father and child and its relationship to child development and to describe a theoretically informed measure of the quality of father-child RTP. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/03004430.2012.723439
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Jennifer Stgeorge
2013 Freeman E, Ross NM, St George J, Fletcher R, 'A quantitative analysis of practitioners' knowledge of fathers and fathers' engagement in family relationship services', Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal, 24 270-277 (2013) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, Richard Fletcher, Nicola Ross
2012 Freeman EE, Fletcher R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Preventing and treating childhood obesity: Time to target fathers', International Journal of Obesity, 36 12-15 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2011.198
Citations Scopus - 61Web of Science - 57
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Philip Morgan, Richard Fletcher
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Matthey S, 'The impact of behavioural parent training on fathers' parenting: A meta-analysis of the triple-p positive parenting program', Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, & Practice about Men as Fathers, 9 291-312 (2011) [C1]
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2011 Fletcher R, Freeman EE, Garfield C, Vimpani GV, 'The effects of early paternal depression on children's development', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 685-689 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Richard Fletcher
2010 Freeman EE, Heathcote AJ, Chalmers KA, Hockley W, 'Item effects in recognition memory for words', Journal of Memory and Language, 62 1-18 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jml.2009.09.004
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers, Andrew Heathcote
2010 Heathcote AJ, Bora B, Freeman EE, 'Recollection and confidence in two-alternative forced choice episodic recognition', Journal of Memory and Language, 62 183-203 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jml.2009.11.003
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Andrew Heathcote
2009 Heathcote AJ, Freeman EE, Etherington JL, Tonkin J, Bora B, 'A dissociation between similarity effects in episodic face recognition', Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16 824-831 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.3758/pbr.16.5.824
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Andrew Heathcote
Show 11 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Chalmers KA, Freeman EE, 'Validation of the Working Memory Power Test for Children', Granada, Spain (2016)
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2016 Chalmers KA, Goodman JB, freeman EE, 'Assessment of working memory: Implications for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder', Athens, Greece (2016)
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2015 Chalmers KA, Freeman E, 'The working memory power test for children', University of Sydney (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2015 Freeman E, Tillman G, 'Recognition memory for familiar and unfamiliar words: Links between encoding and retrieval', Chicago, IL (2015) [E3]
2015 Chalmers KA, Freeman E, Pritchard LM, 'The structure of working meory: Does it differ for children and adults?', Chicago, Illinois (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2014 Chalmers KA, Freeman E, Karayanidis F, 'Working memory confidence and accuracy as predictors of reading, spelling and numeracy', Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach California (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers, Frini Karayanidis
2014 Freeman E, Dunn JC, Dennis SJ, Rhodes G, 'An examination of the processes underlying the recognition memory decision: A statetrace analysis of behavioural and ERP data', Long Beach, California (2014)
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2014 Chalmers KA, Freeman E, 'Working memory confidence and accuracy as predictors of reading, spelling and numeracy', Long Beach, California (2014)
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2013 Dunn JC, Dennis SJ, Freeman E, 'A procedure for identifying a recognition memory signal in event-related potentials using monotonic regression', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2012 Dunn JC, Dennis S, Freeman E, Burdakov O, 'Identifying the functional components of event-related potentials using state-trace analysis', Sardinia (2012)
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2006 Bohlscheid EE, Chalmers KA, Heathcote AJ, Hockley WE, 'Reflections on the mirror effect: Comparisons of word frequency and nonword pronounceability', Australian Journal of Psychology V58, Suppl: Proceedings of the 33rd Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Brisbane (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers, Andrew Heathcote
Show 8 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $119,280

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $7,000

Prospective study of the impact of father-child interaction on child behaviour$7,000

Prospective study of the impact of father-child interaction on child behaviour

The aim of the current research is to develop and test models of causal associations between fathers’ play and children’s behavioural development using a longitudinal design. We propose a follow-up study of the toddlers engaged in our previous research. Specifically, the research will determine whether the quality of play prospectively improves children’s attention, hyperactivity and/or impulsivity at age 3-4, accounting for father and family variables.

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Project Team

Dr Jennifer StGeorge; Dr Linda Campbell; Dr Emily Freeman

Scheme Strategic small grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20161 grants / $1,002

FHEAM 2016 Strategic Pilot Grant$1,002

Neurological and cognitive correlates of father-child play

This application seeks funding to purchase a set of validated assessment tools to assess executive
function and sensory processing in children aged 18 months to 5 years.

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Jennifer StGeorge; Professor Shelly Lane; Dr Emily Freeman

Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20141 grants / $8,778

Are short and long term memory really different systems? A context-based alternative $8,778

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding body Keats Endowment Research Fund
Project Team Doctor Emily Freeman, Conjoint Professor Simon Dennis, Associate Professor Kerry Chalmers, Doctor Adam Osth
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400745
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20121 grants / $12,500

Are two processes one too many? A state-trace analysis of recognition memory for familiar and unfamiliar words.$12,500

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding body Keats Endowment Research Fund
Project Team Associate Professor Kerry Chalmers, Doctor Emily Freeman
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1201245
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20111 grants / $90,000

Investigation of recognition memory in behavioural, electrophysiological, and functional neuroimaging domains using state trace analysis$90,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Dunn, Dr Greig De Zubicaray, Doctor Emily Freeman
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100467
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Child-Father Play Interactions and the Influence on Child Development PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Masters The relationship between paternal parenting stress and rough and tumble play Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia Principal Supervisor
2016 Masters The relationship between child anxiety and paternal facilitation of child exploration Psychology, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The relationship between working memory, early life stress, aggression, and resilience PhD (Clinical Psychology), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Emily Freeman

Position

Lecturer
Cognitive Research Group
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email emily.freeman@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 4921 6115

Office

Room AVG11
Building Aviation Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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