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Professor Philip Morgan

Professor

School of Education

Placing weight on men’s obesity

Internationally-renowned obesity expert for men, Professor Philip Morgan, believes children can help their fathers become healthier and through a suite of innovative programs he is proving that a family approach to fitness is key to tackling one of the world's major public health epidemics.

Professor Philip Morgan 

The Co-Director of the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, Professor Morgan's dedication and commitment to addressing obesity and promoting healthy lifestyles in children has seen him receive 27 academic awards - including nine national and international research excellence awards - over the past six years.

The world-first Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids program is one example of the obesity prevention initiatives Professor Morgan has designed that has been proven to help fathers manage their weight, engage children to eat more healthily, be more active and improve the overall quality of life of families.

"Men are seriously under-represented in weight loss research, which is a major concern considering 70 per cent of Australian males are considered to be overweight or obese," said Professor Morgan.

"Dads initially sign up to our programs to lose a few kilos, thinking that it would also be nice to spend some quality time with their kids participating in some fun physical activities," he said.

"During the program they come to understand the profound influence that their parenting practices, actions, behaviours, and attitudes have on their children – this realisation becomes a driving force behind their motivation to get fit and become more engaged in their children's lives."

The multi-award winning, evidence-based program uses the novel concept of reciprocal reinforcement by encouraging children to act as 'little personal trainers' for their dads in the home. In turn, the fathers are motivated by the importance of role modelling to engage with their children.

"The magic in Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids comes from both the dads and kids working together, motivated to help each other, and in turn changing their own behaviours," said Professor Morgan.

"For example, the children are told it's your job to help Dad eat well, so it's important for you to eat your veggies at the dinner table because these veggies are really important for your Dad and he might copy you. 

"Similarly, Dads in the program are shown how influential they can be in getting children to eat veggies by trying them in front of their children. In doing so, both are eating veggies for each other and may not have done it for themselves."

The physical activity sessions are interactive, highly active, fun and focus on elements found in extensive research to be associated with optimal child development outcomes across physical, cognitive and social-emotional domains. This includes fundamental movement skills, health-related fitness-based activities and rough-and-tumble play. The program also has the added benefit of helping fathers become more involved with all aspects of their children's lives, leading to enhanced social and emotional well-being for their children.

Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids has been tested through University of Newcastle-based trials and evaluated through numerous local community roll-outs across the Upper Hunter and Hunter Valley, and Great Lakes regions in New South Wales, Australia. Resources are available for communities and organisations anywhere in the world, with many of the messages transcending cultures.

"In general, a father's love for his child, his desire to do his best for that child, and the unique way fathers' play, physically interact and engage with their children; are universal feelings and behaviours that are incorporated and targeted in the program as motivating factors to deliver results in sustainable lifestyle change."

Tapping into the psyche of men has also been key to the success of Professor Morgan's other key research programs, with Morgan stating that, compared to women, men are reluctant to sign up to weight loss programs.

"The lack of understanding of motivators for weight-loss for men has led to programs that do not account for gender differences in design and delivery, and many men consider them to be unappealing," Professor Morgan said.

"This is concerning, especially since the burden of disease falls disproportionately with men due to greater abdominal fat tissue which greatly increases their cardiovascular disease risk," he said.

"With obesity costing the Australian economy approximately $60 billion per year, there is a real need for evidence-based, realistic, wide-reaching and easily disseminated programs that take into account the male physiological and psychological profile."

Professor Morgan's internationally acclaimed programs help men lose weight but don't outlaw the beer or foods they enjoy or make participants undertake unsustainable exercise regimes.

In the SHED-IT program, weight loss messages are tailored for blokes and delivered in a light hearted manner with the latest research simplified in an understandable and palatable manner. The program also utilises technology and engages with participants through a DVD, the internet, video messages and SMS.

SHED-IT has been described by the prestigious Annals of Behavioral Medicine journal as "a momentous step toward addressing the long overlooked need to develop behavioural weight control programs that appeal predominantly to men and have wide reaching potential to impact obesity among the male half of our population."

Professor Morgan's Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating like a Rabbit) is targeted directly towards men and is delivered in the workplace. The program uses a DVD resource or information session, an interactive website and a number of gender-tailored resources to educate men on how to improve their own lifestyles. Workplace POWER was recognised with an inaugural National Preventative Health Award in 2013 for the best intiative in Workplace Health and Well-being for large workplaces. 

"Instead of prescriptive diets to follow – which is likely to turn men off - these programs educate men about embedding physical activity and healthy eating into their day and use language and approaches they understand and relate to," adds Professor Morgan.

"This can range from teaching them how to read food labels to understanding energy balance, overcoming urges and increasing incidental activity."

Well regarded in his field, Professor Morgan has secured grants from the NH&MRC, Australian Research Council Discovery, Australian Research Council Linkage, Heart Foundation, NSW Health and large industry and community grants to help address the growing epidemic.

Watch the video below to hear Professor Morgan's tips on the best ways to make health messages memorable and engaging for staff in workplace programs.

Professor Philip Morgan

Placing weight on men’s obesity

Internationally-renowned obesity expert for men, Professor Philip Morgan, believes children can help their fathers become healthier and through a suite of innovative programs he is proving that a family approach to fitness is key to tackling one of the world's…

Read more

Tailor-made health education

Professor Philip Morgan is tackling the national obesity epidemic by developing innovative, targeted weight-loss education programs grounded in strong science.

Phil Morgan in the gym 

Professor Philip Morgan has a national icon in his sights: the much-maligned Aussie beer gut. The Co-Director of the University of Newcastle's Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, and 2012 Scopus Young Researcher of the Year, has waged a personal war on expanding waistlines by designing and delivering a suite of health education programs that have changed the body shapes and lives of many participants.

By recognising the importance of tailoring health messages for specific demographic sub-groups, Morgan has achieved significant success with programs promoting weight loss, healthy eating and exercise, particularly with high-risk male cohorts that health educators have traditionally found difficult to reach.

His high-profile programs include the men's online weight-loss program SHED-IT (Self-Help, Exercise and Diet Using Information Technology); Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids, which encourages overweight fathers to be healthy role models for their children; and Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating Like a Rabbit), which targets overweight male shiftworkers.

"People wrongly accuse men of being disinterested in weight loss, but if you design customised programs that appeal to men, it is easy to push the right buttons to engage them and rouse their interest and motivation," Morgan says.

"By creating programs that specifically speak to men, that allow them to not give up some of their 'dietary luxuries' and don't require frequent and potentially time-consuming face-to-face contact, they respond enthusiastically and achieve great weight-loss outcomes." 

Morgan's academic background is in health and physical education but the Faculty of Education and Arts researcher has built multidisciplinary expertise that draws from the fields of medicine, nutrition, psychology, epidemiology and health promotion.

Drawing from his teaching expertise, he has adopted a 'hands-on' approach to research, from supervising recruitment to delivering intervention sessions, featuring in DVDs and website blogs and training community facilitators. He uses the insight gleaned from those frontline activities to inform his innovative methods and ensure the key messages of each program remain relevant to their respective audiences.

Children's health and wellbeing is also a focus for Morgan and his work as part of a wider University of Newcastle research team evaluating targeted physical activity and healthy eating interventions in a host of school and community settings has been nationally and internationally recognised. As a chief investigator he has attracted more than $4 million in government and external funding from sources including the Australian Research Council, National Health and Medical Research Council, NSW Health, Coal & Allied, Tomago Aluminium, the Department of Education and Communities and the Heart Foundation.

Over the past six years, Morgan's work in research, teaching and the community has been recognised with more than 20 major academic awards, including the Scopus Award, a Young Tall Poppy Award from the Australian Institute of Policy and Science in 2009 and four national awards for teaching excellence.

Morgan won the Humanities and Social Science category of the Scopus Awards and is the first University of Newcastle researcher to receive the accolade. The awards recognise outstanding researchers under the age of 40 in Australasia who have made significant contributions in their areas of research.

The weight-loss programs Morgan has developed have matured into ongoing, community-based programs that not only play an important role in addressing the national obesity epidemic but also make a real difference to the quality of life of many individuals.

"An underlying philosophy of all our programs is teaching people how to lose weight in a sustainable and realistic manner, so we promote the mantra that whatever changes in your lifestyle you make to lose weight, you need to be prepared to maintain them for the rest of your life," he says.

"Obesity is a major community health problem in Australia, which affects 70 per cent of men, 55 per cent of women and 25 per cent of children and costs the country billions of dollars in direct and indirect health care costs every year. I am passionate about engaging and educating our community to address this serious national public health issue and improving the quality of life of Australians."

Visit the Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition

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Phil Morgan in the gym

Tailor-made health education

Professor Philip Morgan is tackling the national obesity epidemic by developing innovative, targeted weight-loss education programs grounded in strong science.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Morgan is a co-director of the University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition and lecturer in the School of Education. He graduated from the University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Education (Health and Physical Education) in 1997. He completed his PhD in 2003 which focused on primary school physical education and won both local and national awards. His research program is focused on the impact of school- and community- based interventions to prevent or treat obesity in child, adolescent and adult populations. As a chief investigator he has secured grants of over $4 million from: NH&MRC, ARC Discovery, ARC Linkage, Heart Foundation, NSW Health and Industry community grants. He has developed and led a number of major projects including the national and international award winning Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids program. His work in teaching research and the community has been recognised with national and international awards including 10 university teaching excellence awards (4 national) and five national/international research awards which highlight his career focus on the teaching/research nexus. Professor Morgan also has delivered numerous invited local, state and national presentations related to both his research and teaching.

Research Expertise
Targeted community-based interventions to prevent and treat obesity in child, adolescent and adult populations. School-based interventions to promote physical activity and healthy eating. Obesity in men. The role of fathers in promoting physical activity and healthy eating to their children. Parenting practices relating to physical activity and healthy eating. Physical education in primary schools. Teaching of fundamental movement skills.

Teaching Expertise
EDUC3034, Teaching & Learning in Primary PDHPE EDUC2514, Primary Kinetics (Games and Sports) EDUC3032, PE Studies 5 (Football) EDUC6801, Teaching Practice in K-6 PDHPE.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Education (Physical Education), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Community- and school-based interventions to prevent/treat obesity in child, adolescent and adult populations
  • Engaging students
  • Evaluating teaching
  • Obesity
  • Parenting and physical activity/nutrition
  • Primary school health and physical education
  • Quality teaching

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 35
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2011 -  Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/06/2008 - 1/06/2011 Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/06/2008 Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/02/2003 - 1/12/2006 Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia
1/02/2002 - 1/12/2002 Associate Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Education
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2001 Postgraduate Travel Award
Australian Association for Research in Education

Recipient

Year Award
2015 Winner of the ASICS Best Paper for Physical Activity and Health Promotion
Sports Medicine Australia
2015 Newcastle Innovation: Excellence in Innovation Award
Newcastle Innovation
2013 Winner, National Preventive Health Award for the Workplace POWER program - Tomago Aluminium
ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
2012 Australian Award for University Teaching: Teaching Excellence
Commonwealth Office for Learning and Teaching
2011 University of Newcastle & FordComm Leadership Award
University of Newcastle
2011 Excellence in Safety to Tomago Aluminium for the Workplace POWER program
Hunter Manufacturing Awards
2011 Mid Career Research Fellow (Educational Research Institute, Newcastle)
University of Newcastle
2010 NSW Community Father of the Year Award - Special Commendation
Unknown
2010 Faculty of Education & Arts Teaching Excellence Award
University of Newcastle
2010 University Teacher of the Year (Vice Chancellor’s Awards for Teaching Excellence)
University of Newcastle
2007 Pearson Education Teacher Educator of the Year
Australian Teacher Education Association
2006 Vice Chancellor's Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning
University of Newcastle
2006 NSW Minister for Education & Training Quality Teaching Award
Australian College of Educators
2006 Australian Teacher Educator of the Year
Australian Teacher Education Association
2006 Carrick Award for Australian University Teaching - Teaching Excellence
Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education
2006 Carrick Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education
2005 University Teacher of the Year (Vice Chancellor's Awards for Teaching Excellence)
University of Newcastle
2005 Early Career Academic Award, 2005 (Vice Chancellor's Awards for Teaching Excellence)
University of Newcastle
2004 University of Newcastle Excellence in Teaching Award - Special Commendation (2004)
University of Newcastle
1996 Outstanding Teaching Performance in Health and Physical Education
The University of Newcastle

Recognition

Year Award
2014 Best Community Engagement Collaboration for Healthy Dads', Healthy Kids'
Business / Higher Education Round Table
2014 National Excellence in Obesity Prevention Award for the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Program
Collaboration of Community-based Obesity Prevention Sites (CO-OPS Collaboration)
2013 Outstanding Contribution to Men's Physical Wellbeing - National Finalist
Australian Men's Health Forum
1996 Outstanding Academic Achievement in Health and Physical Education
The University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Community Acknowledgement of Research Excellence (C.A.R.E) Award in Quality Improvement - Healthy Dads', Healthy Kids'
Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
2015 Hunter Medical Research Institute: Director's Award for Mid-Career Research
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2015 Vice-Chancellor's Award for Research Supervision Excellence
University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
2012 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research Excellence
University of Newcastle
2012 Young Researcher of the Year Award for Australasia in Humanities and Social Sciences
Elsevier Australia
2010 ASICS Best Paper - Physical Activity and Health Promotion (Co-Author)
Australian Sports Medicine
2010 Poster Prize for Best Research Project in Public Health and Policy
Unknown
2009 Australian Sports Medicine Federation Fellows Award: Best Paper - Health Promotion
Sports Medicine Australia
2009 Hunter Medical Research Institute PULSE Early Career Researcher of the Year award
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2009 Young Tall Poppy Award
AIPS (Australian Institute of Policy and Science)
2004 Australian Council for Health, PE, & Recreation /AARE Biennial Doctoral Thesis Award
Australian Council of Health Physical Education and Recreation
2003 Newcastle Institute for Educational Research Doctoral Prize for Best PhD
Unknown

Invitations

Distinguished Visitor

Year Title / Rationale
2008
Organisation: Central Queensland University, Qld Campuses Description:
2008
Organisation: James Cook University, Qld Townsville and Cairns Campuses Description:
2007
Organisation: Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane Description:

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Workplace health programs- Men are interested in health
Organisation: Healthier Workplace WA Conference
2011 Family-based approaches to improving children’s health
Organisation: Launch of the ABC Children’s Research Network
2010 Healthy Dads Healthy Kids program: Engaging overweight dads to promote family health
Organisation: Performance Hunter New England Area Health Service Staff Annual Conference Description:

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2012 Schools, teachers and physical education
Organisation: International Congress of Physical Activity and Public Health Conference
2011 The Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating Like a Rabbit) program: A workplace-based weight loss program to improve both health and work-related outcomes
Organisation: 2nd International Life Sciences Institute / Centre for Health Innovation and Partnership
2009 Rules of Engagement for Generation Y am I here?
Organisation: ACHPER NSW Tertiary Educators Forum, Sydney Description:
2009 Research-informed teaching and teaching-informed research: Enhancing productivity as a university academic
Organisation: ATN Early Career Academic Symposium Australian Technology Teaching Network Teaching and Learning Committee, QUT, Brisbane Description:
2008 The Research-Teaching nexus
Organisation: NSW Teacher Education Annual Conference Description:
2008 Enhancing Education through Engagement and Evaluation
Organisation: Queensland University of Technology Teaching Fellows Symposium, Brisbane Description:
2008 Quality Improvements in University Teaching
Organisation: Teaching Excellence Showcase, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Qld. Description:
2008 Improving Teaching and Learning Outcomes at University
Organisation: James Cook University, Cairns & Townsville campus, Qld Description:
2007 Quality Teaching at University: Engaging Students and Evaluating Practice
Organisation: National Forum on the Carrick Awards for Australian University Teaching, Melbourne Description:
2007 Teaching Matters in Higher Education
Organisation: ATN Early Career Academic Symposium Australian Technology Teaching Network Teaching and Learning Committee, Sydney Description:

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2014 Fathers and child obesity prevention: Do dads matter?
Organisation: Child Obesity Treatment and Prevention Seminar, HMRI
2013 Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids- how to engage fathers in physical activity that impacts on the whole family’s wellbeing
Organisation: Special Olympics Health Symposium, ‘Our Time to Shine Health Symposium’, Newcastle
2013 Obesity, exercise and men
Organisation: The Australian Lifestyle Medicine Association (ALMA) annual conference
2013 Targeted interventions for weight loss in men
Organisation: Western Australian Healthy Workplace Support Service, Workplace Health Forum
2013 Physical activity & sport in primary schools
Organisation: DEC School Sport Unit State planning conference
2012 Interventions for physical activity and sedentary behaviour
Organisation: International Congress of Physical Activity and Public Health Conference: '2020 vision' Description: ‘2020 vision: Interventions for physical activity and sedentary behaviour’
2011 Child obesity prevention: interventions engaging mums and dads
Organisation: Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting
2011 Engaging fathers to improve family health: Translating the ‘Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids’ program in a community setting
Organisation: Deakin University, Melbourne
2011 Promoting family health by targeting fathers: Implementing the evidence-based ‘Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids’ program in a community setting
Organisation: Asia-Pacific Conference on the Metabolic Syndrome: Meeting the cardio-metabolic challenges of the 21st century
2010 The role of the food environment in influencing childrens consumption
Organisation: Australian Sports Commission Sites and Sports Forum (Sydney) Description:
2010 No Guts All Glory: Engaging Men in Weight Loss
Organisation: Nutrition Society of Australia, Newcastle. Description:
2010 Targeted Interventions to prevent and treat obesity in children
Organisation: Youth, Sport and Health Research Network Seminar, University of Sydney Description:
2009 Making Sense of the Obesity Epidemic: Rumours, confusion and hope?
Organisation: Australian Sports Commission NSW State Conference Description:
2009 Research into Practice: Increasing Childrens Involvement in Sport and Physical Activity
Organisation: Australian Sports Commission AASC NSW State Conference Description:
2008 The importance of positive childhood sporting experiences for a lifetime of activity
Organisation: Australian Sports Commission Sports Network Breakfast Description:
2008 Family Wellbeing: Raising Active Children in an Inactive World
Organisation: Hunter Medical Research Institute Community Forums Description:
2008 Weight Reduction in Men
Organisation: Hunter Medical Research Institute Lecture Series Description:
2007 School-based interventions to prevent childhood obesity
Organisation: Nutrition Society of Australia Meeting - The Science Behind Weight Management Description:
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (191 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Sutherland RL, Campbell EM, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The Physical Activity 4 Everyone Cluster Randomized Trial: 2-Year Outcomes of a School Physical Activity Intervention Among Adolescents.', Am J Prev Med, (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2016.02.020
Co-authors David Lubans, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Hutchesson MJ, Tan CY, Morgan P, Callister R, Collins C, 'Enhancement of Self-Monitoring in a Web-Based Weight Loss Program by Extra Individualized Feedback and Reminders: Randomized Trial.', J Med Internet Res, 18 e82 (2016)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4100
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
2016 Morgan PJ, Young MD, Smith JJ, Lubans DR, 'Targeted Health Behavior Interventions Promoting Physical Activity: A Conceptual Model.', Exerc Sport Sci Rev, 44 71-80 (2016)
DOI 10.1249/JES.0000000000000075
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Myles Young
2016 Hollis JL, Williams AJ, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels in elementary school physical education lessons.', Prev Med, 86 34-54 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.018
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, John Wiggers, David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Vella SA, Schranz NK, Davern M, Hardy LL, Hills AP, Morgan PJ, et al., 'The contribution of organised sports to physical activity in Australia: Results and directions from the Active Healthy Kids Australia 2014 Report Card on physical activity for children and young people', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 407-412 (2016)

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia.Youth participation in organised sport and physical activity is important for healthy development, growth and wellbeing. In 2014, Active Healthy ... [more]

© 2015 Sports Medicine Australia.Youth participation in organised sport and physical activity is important for healthy development, growth and wellbeing. In 2014, Active Healthy Kids Australia released its inaugural Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Young People, which synthesised the best available national- and state-level data for children and young people (<18 years). This paper provides a more detailed examination of the evidence informing the grade for Organised Sport from the 2014 Report Card, compares Australia's Organised Sport grade with other countries, identifies future directions for research and surveillance, and explores possible beneficial strategies. The Report Card highlighted that between 64% and 85% of Australians aged 5-17 years participate in organised sports, a rate higher than alternate forms of physical activity such as active transportation, active play and school based physical activity. This finding reflects Australia's position as one of the global leaders for participating in organised sport. Future research and surveillance methodologies however, need to incorporate standardised metrics that aim to capture more detailed data regarding organised sport participation. Facilitating access for all children and preventing dropout from organised sports are important initiatives to improve current levels of sport participation. However, given that 80% of Australians aged 5-17 years are not sufficiently physically active to achieve the daily recommendation, participation in sport alone is not enough to ensure that children can accrue the health benefits associated with being physically active. As such, there is a pressing need to develop strategies that engage children in other forms of physical activity such as active transportation and active play.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.04.011
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Holley TJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Hutchesson MJ, 'Weight expectations, motivations for weight change and perceived factors influencing weight management in young Australian women: A cross-sectional study', Public Health Nutrition, 19 275-286 (2016)

© 2015 The Authors.Objective To examine young Australian women's weight expectations, motivations for weight change and perceived factors influencing weight management, and to de... [more]

© 2015 The Authors.Objective To examine young Australian women's weight expectations, motivations for weight change and perceived factors influencing weight management, and to determine if these factors differ by age, BMI, marital status, education or income. Design Cross-sectional study. An online survey captured respondents' weight, height, ideal weight, main reasons for wanting to change their weight and challenges to managing their weight. Setting Online survey in Australia. Subjects Six hundred and twenty women aged 18-30 years currently living in Australia who completed the survey between 31 July and 30 September 2012. Results Approximately half of participants (53·1 %) were a healthy weight, 25·2 % overweight and 19·0 % obese. Women unhappy at their current weight (78·1 %) reported a median ideal weight -12·3 % less than their current weight. The key motivators for weight change were to improve health (24·4 %, ranked 1), feel better in oneself (22·3 %) and improve self-confidence (21·5 %). Lack of motivation, time constraints because of job commitments and cost were the most commonly reported factors influencing weight management. Age, BMI, marital status, education and income were found to influence weight expectations, motivations for weight change and/or factors perceived to influence weight management. Conclusions The findings suggest potential implications for weight management interventions and public health messaging targeting young women, to improve long-term health outcomes. Strategies that promote the health benefits of physical activity and healthy eating, feeling better about oneself and improved self-confidence, and address the main factors influencing weight management including lack of motivation, time constraints and cost, may be used to engage this target group.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980015000993
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2016 Williams RL, Wood LG, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Energy homeostasis and appetite regulating hormones as predictors of weight loss in men and women.', Appetite, 101 1-7 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.153
Co-authors Robin Callister, Lisa Wood, Clare Collins
2016 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'EHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, 18 S67 (2016)
DOI 10.1089/dia.2016.2506
Co-authors Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2016 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Pranata I, Skinner G, Collins CE, 'Be Positive Be Healthe: Development and Implementation of a Targeted e-Health Weight Loss Program for Young Women.', Telemed J E Health, 22 519-528 (2016)
DOI 10.1089/tmj.2015.0085
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ilung Pranata, Geoff Skinner, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
2016 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'Efficacy of the Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Using LifeStyle Education Program RCT', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 50 353-364 (2016)

© 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Self-administered lifestyle interventions have been suggested as an alternative to face-to-face delivery modes, althou... [more]

© 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Introduction Self-administered lifestyle interventions have been suggested as an alternative to face-to-face delivery modes, although their efficacy remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Type 2 diabetes mellitus Prevention Using LifeStyle Education (PULSE) Program, a self-administered and gender-tailored lifestyle intervention for men at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design/setting A 6-month, assessor-blinded, parallel-group RCT was conducted at the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2012-2013. Participants Men (aged 18-65 years, BMI 25-40 kg/m2, high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes mellitus) were stratified by age (<50 and >50 years) and BMI category (25.0-29.9, 30.0-35.9, and 35.0-40 kg/m2) and individually randomized (1:1 ratio) to the intervention (n=53) or waitlist control groups (n=48). Intervention The intervention group received the PULSE Program, which contained print and video resources on weight loss (Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology [SHED-IT] Weight Loss Program), diet modification, and exercise for Type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention. The waitlist control group received no information until 6 months. Main outcome measures Data were collected from September 2012 to September 2013 and analyzed in 2014-2015. Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) were used to determine group X time interactions (differences between groups in changes over time) at 6 months for the primary outcome (weight), glycated hemoglobin, and several secondary outcomes (significance level, p<0.05). Results Differences between groups in mean changes from baseline to 6 months (group × time interaction) favored the intervention over control group for weight loss (-5.50 kg, 95% CI=-7.40 kg, -3.61 kg, p<0.001, Cohen's d=1.15), glycated hemoglobin (-0.2%, 95% CI=-0.3%, -0.1%, p=0.002, d=0.64), and BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage, aerobic fitness, and lower body muscular fitness (all p<0.05). No group × time effects were observed for fasting plasma glucose, upper body muscular fitness, physical activity, or energy intake. Conclusions The PULSE Program improved several Type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in men, including weight and glycated hemoglobin. These findings provide evidence for a self-administered and gender-tailored lifestyle intervention, which has potential for dissemination in community settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.020
Co-authors Myles Young, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2016 Barnett LM, Lai SK, Veldman SL, Hardy LL, Cliff DP, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Correlates of Gross Motor Competence in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.', Sports Med, (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0495-z
Co-authors David Lubans
2016 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Stodden DF, Lubans DR, 'Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial', Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 772-779 (2016)

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness and phys... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis.The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness and physical activity among a sample of adolescent boys participating in a school-based obesity prevention intervention. Participants were 361 adolescent boys taking part in the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) cluster randomised controlled trial: a school-based program targeting the health behaviours of economically disadvantaged adolescent males considered ¿at-risk¿ of obesity. Body fat percentage (bioelectrical impedance), muscular fitness (hand grip dynamometry and push-ups), physical activity (accelerometry) and resistance training skill competency were assessed at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., 8 months). Three separate multi-level mediation models were analysed to investigate the potential mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on each of the study outcomes using a product-of-coefficients test. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. The intervention had a significant impact on the resistance training skill competency of the boys, and improvements in skill competency significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on percentage of body fat and the combined muscular fitness score. No significant mediated effects were found for physical activity. Improving resistance training skill competency may be an effective strategy for achieving improvements in body composition and muscular fitness in adolescent boys.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1069383
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2016 Lander N, Morgan PJ, Salmon J, Barnett LM, 'Teachers perceptions of a Fundamental Movement Skill (FMS) assessment battery in a school setting', Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 20 50-62 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor & Francis.Fundamental movement skills (FMS) competence is low in adolescent girls. An assessment tool for teachers is needed to monitor FMS in this demographic. The... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis.Fundamental movement skills (FMS) competence is low in adolescent girls. An assessment tool for teachers is needed to monitor FMS in this demographic. The present study explored whether the Canadian Agility and Movement Skill Assessment (CAMSA) is feasible for use by physical education (PE) teachers of Australian Year 7 girls in a school setting. Surveys, focus group interviews, and direct observation of 18 specialist PE teachers investigated teachers perceptions of this tool. Results indicated that the CAMSA was usable in a real-world school setting and was considered a promising means to assess FMS in Year 7 girls. However, future iterations may require minor logistical alterations and further training for teachers on how to utilize the assessment data to enhance teaching practice. These considerations could be used to improve future design, application, and training of the CAMSA in school-based PE.

DOI 10.1080/1091367X.2015.1095758
2016 Riddiford-Harland DL, Steele JR, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Baur LA, 'Does participation in a physical activity program impact upon the feet of overweight and obese children?', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 51-55 (2016)

© 2014.Objectives: To investigate the effect of a weight-bearing physical activity program on foot structure and plantar pressures generated by overweight/obese children. Design:... [more]

© 2014.Objectives: To investigate the effect of a weight-bearing physical activity program on foot structure and plantar pressures generated by overweight/obese children. Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Measurements were collected for a sample of children participating in an obesity treatment trial (mean±SD 8.5±1.1 y, 29.4% boys, 2.63±0.61 body mass index z-score). Children were randomised to physical activity (physical activity; n=24) and no physical activity (no physical activity; n=10) groups. Foot structure was characterised using anthropometry, an emed® AT-4 system quantified pressure distributions and Actigraph accelerometers objectively measured physical activity. Results: After 6 months there was a significant decrease in body mass index z-score (physical activity: p=0.002, no physical activity: p< 0.001), an increase in foot length (physical activity: p< 0.001, no physical activity: p< 0.001) and foot height (physical activity: p< 0.001, no physical activity: p=0.008), although no change in physical activity. Pressure-time integrals increased after 6 months (lateral midfoot; physical activity: p=0.036, medial forefoot; physical activity: p=0.002, no physical activity: p=0.013, middle forefoot; physical activity: p=0.044, lateral forefoot; physical activity: p=0.043) but there were no between-group differences in plantar pressures after the physical activity program. Conclusions: Although changes to foot structure and function in overweight/obese children could not be attributed to participating in the physical activity program, their developing feet may still be at risk of pain and discomfort due to higher plantar pressures and pressure-time integrals. Further research investigating ways to reduce plantar pressures generated by overweight/obese children while they are physically active is warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.11.008
2016 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Findings From the EASY Minds Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a Physical Activity Integration Program for Mathematics in Primary Schools.', J Phys Act Health, 13 198-206 (2016)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2015-0046
Co-authors Nicholas Riley, David Lubans
2016 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'Physical education in secondary schools located in low-income communities: Physical activity levels, lesson context and teacher interaction', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19 135-141 (2016)

© 2014.Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower... [more]

© 2014.Objectives: Physical education (PE) plays an important role in contributing to students' physical activity (PA); however, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) within PE is lower than recommended. Little is known about the PA levels of students from disadvantaged schools within PE. This study aimed to describe: (i) the PA levels of students from disadvantaged secondary schools during PE lessons, (ii) the lesson context and teacher interactions occurring during PE, and (iii) the associations between teacher, school or PE lesson characteristics with student physical activity levels in PE. Design: Cross-sectional study of 100 Grade 7 PE lessons across 10 secondary schools. Methods: System for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) was used to assess student PA, lesson context, and teacher interaction. Teacher and school characteristics were collected via survey. Mean proportion of lesson time was used to describe PA, lesson context and teacher interaction. Associations between each outcome variable and each characteristic were examined using 2-sample t-tests, ANOVAs and linear regression. Results: Thirty-nine percent of PE lesson was spent in MVPA, and less than 10% spent in VA. Lessons in schools in urban areas included significantly more MVPA than rural areas (P = 0.04). Male teachers and more experienced teachers conducted lessons with significantly more VA than female and less experienced teachers (P = 0.04 and 0.02). MVPA was also higher in lessons conducted by more experienced teachers. Conclusions: PA during PE lessons within disadvantaged secondary schools is below international recommendations. Male teachers, more experienced teachers and schools in urban regions teach more active lessons.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.12.003
Co-authors John Wiggers, David Lubans
2016 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., ''Physical activity 4 everyone' school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: 12 month (mid-intervention) report on a cluster randomised trial', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 488-495 (2016)

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multi... [more]

Background: Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods: A cluster randomised trial was undertaken in 10 secondary schools located in disadvantaged areas in New South Wales, Australia. Students in Grade 7 were recruited, with follow-up in Grade 8. The intervention was guided by socioecological theory and included seven physical activity strategies, and six implementation adoption strategies. The primary outcome was mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day assessed using Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Outcome data were analysed using repeated measures linear mixed models. Results: At baseline, 1150 (93%) students participated in the data collection (mean age 12 years, 48% boys) and 1050 (79%) students participated at 12-month follow-up. By the 12-month follow-up, the six implementation adoption strategies had been used to support schools to deliver four of the seven physical activity elements. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for mean minutes of MVPA per day in favour of the intervention group (adjusted difference between groups at follow-up=3.85 min, 95% CI (0.79 to 6.91), p=0.01), including significantly more vigorous physical activity (2.45 min, p=0.01), equating to 27 min more MVPA per week. Summary: At 12-month follow-up, the intervention had reduced the decline in physical activity among adolescents from disadvantaged schools. The intervention may assist students to meet physical activity guidelines.

DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2014-094523
Co-authors David Lubans, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'The 40-Something Randomised Controlled Trial improved fruit intake and nutrient density of the diet in mid-age women', Nutrition and Dietetics, (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia. Aim: The 40-Something Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) aimed to determine if a 12-month health professional-led intervention could im... [more]

© 2015 Dietitians Association of Australia. Aim: The 40-Something Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) aimed to determine if a 12-month health professional-led intervention could improve dietary intake and increase physical activity for weight gain prevention in non-obese premenopausal women. Methods: Fifty-four women were randomised to a motivational interviewing intervention (MI) (n = 28; five health professional consultations) or a self-directed intervention (SDI; n = 26; written advice). Weight control behaviours including dietary intake (four-day weighed food record) and physical activity (pedometer steps; minutes spent in light, moderate and vigorous activity; sitting time) were measured at baseline, and at 3 and 12 months. Participants completed a questionnaire containing demographic questions, Short Form 36 and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire at baseline and 12 months. Linear mixed model analyses adjusting for baseline and 3-month behaviour, covariates and interactions were used to test for between-group differences. Results: At 12 months, the MI group had diets significantly more nutrient dense in iron (P = 0.01) and potassium (P = 0.04), and consumed more fruits (P = 0.02) than the SDI women. Women who achieved their weight control goals consumed significantly more daily fruit servings (+0.76 servings/day, P = 0.02) and less meat/meat alternatives (-0.34 servings/day, P < 0.01) than women who did not achieve weight control. The lack of changes in physical activity indicates that more emphasis may need to be placed on promoting physical activity. Conclusions: The findings demonstrated the effectiveness of the 40-Something RCT in improving iron and potassium nutrient density and fruit servings per day in women soon to commence menopause.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12215
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis
2015 Barnes AT, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Maternal Correlates of Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Girls', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 19 2348-2357 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Objectives: Given the low levels of physical activity in girls, improving our understanding of the factors associated with girlsÂ... [more]

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.Objectives: Given the low levels of physical activity in girls, improving our understanding of the factors associated with girls¿ physical activity is important. In particular, exploring maternal correlates of girls¿ physical activity for both generations is important, given the paucity of research in this area. The primary aim of this study was to assess maternal correlates of objectively-measured physical activity in girls. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used to assess 40 girls [mean age 8.8¿years; mean body mass index (BMI) z-score¿=¿0.7] and their mothers (mean age 39.1¿years; mean BMI¿=¿27.6) prior to an intervention. Maternal correlates of daughters¿ accelerometer-assessed physical activity were evaluated. Daughters¿ outcomes included: % moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), counts per minute (CPM) and % sedentary behavior (SED), screen time (mother-proxy) and BMI z-score (objectively measured). Maternal correlates included demographic, anthropometric, behavioral, activity-related parenting practices, and physical activity cognitions. Correlates were examined using regression models. Results: For daughters¿ % MVPA, mothers¿ beliefs was significant in the final model (R2¿=¿0.14; P¿=¿0.01). For daughters¿ CPM, mothers¿ logistic support (P¿=¿0.03), mothers¿ CPM (P¿=¿0.02) and outcome expectations (P¿=¿0.01) were all significant (R2¿=¿0.24). For daughters¿ % SED, mothers¿ logistic support (P¿=¿0.02) was significant (R2¿=¿0.11). Conclusions for Practice: A number of maternal behaviors, social¿cognitive and parenting correlates were found to be significantly associated with daughters¿ physical activity. Experimental studies are warranted, targeting mothers as the primary agents of change to increase physical activity among girls.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-015-1752-8
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Alyce Barnes
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'A Test of Social Cognitive Theory to Explain Men's Physical Activity During a Gender-Tailored Weight Loss Program.', Am J Mens Health, (2015)
DOI 10.1177/1557988315600063
Co-authors Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2015 Young MD, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in the SHED-IT Community Randomized Controlled Trial for Overweight and Obese Men', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 286-292 (2015) [C1]

© 2014, The Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpos... [more]

© 2014, The Society of Behavioral Medicine.Background: Little is known about which behavioral strategies are most important to target in weight loss interventions for men. Purpose: The aim of the current study was to identify behavioral mediators of weight loss in the male-only Self-Help, Exercise, and Diet using Information Technology (SHED-IT) community weight loss study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with 159 overweight/obese men [mean (SD) age = 47.5 (11.0) years; body mass index = 32.7 (3.5) kg/m2] assessed at baseline, 3¿months (post-test) and 6¿months (follow-up). Results: In an intention-to-treat, multiple-mediator model, the significant intervention effect on weight at 6¿months (-3.70¿kg; p < 0.001) was mediated by increases in physical activity (steps/day) and decreases in takeaway meals (kJ/day) and portion size at 3¿months. The largest mediation effect was for physical activity (-0.6¿kg; 95¿% confidence interval -1.4, -0.1). Overall, the targeted mediators accounted for 47.0¿% of the intervention¿s effect on weight. Conclusion: Step counts, takeaway food consumption, and portion sizes may be key areas to target in future weight loss programs for men (ACTRN12610000699066).

DOI 10.1007/s12160-014-9657-0
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Myles Young
2015 Barnes AT, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of the MADE4Life Program: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.', J Phys Act Health, 12 1378-1393 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0331
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes
2015 Burrows TL, Lucas H, Morgan PJ, Bray J, Collins CE, 'Impact evaluation of an after-school cooking skills program in a disadvantaged community: Back to basics', Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, 76 126-132 (2015) [C1]

Purpose: Few efficacious child obesity interventions have been converted into ongoing community programs in the after-school setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the imp... [more]

Purpose: Few efficacious child obesity interventions have been converted into ongoing community programs in the after-school setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of phase 2 of the Back to Basics cooking club on dietary behaviours and fruit and vegetable variety in a population at risk of obesity at a low income school with > 10% indigenous population. Methods: Baseline and 3-month dietary intake and social cognitive theory (SCT) constructs were collected in 51 children, mean age 9 years, 61% female. McNemar tests were used for comparison of proportions between categorical variables. Cohen's d was used to compare effect sizes across different measures. Results: Consumption of one or more fruit servings per day significantly increased from 41% to 67% (P = 0.02, d = 0.13) and there was a trend for increasing the weekly variety of fruit and vegetables. The SCT constructs assessed within the current study improved significantly (P < 0.05), with moderate to large effect sizes (d = 0.33-0.78). Conclusion: This study documents that a previous efficacious healthy lifestyle program can be adapted for use as an obesity prevention program addressing improvements in vegetable and fruit intakes in a low income community with a relatively high indigenous population.

DOI 10.3148/cjdpr-2015-005
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2015 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in adolescents: the CrossFit Teens¿ randomised controlled trial', Journal of Sports Sciences, (2015)

© 2015 Taylor & FrancisThe aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of the CrossFit Teens¿ resistance training programme for improving health-r... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & FrancisThe aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of the CrossFit Teens¿ resistance training programme for improving health-related fitness and resistance training skill competency in adolescents. This assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in the Hunter Region, Australia, from July to September 2013. Ninety-six (96) students (age¿=¿15.4 (.5) years, 51.5% female) were randomised into intervention (n¿=¿51) or control (n¿=¿45) conditions for 8-weeks (60¿min twice per week). Waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), BMI-Z score (primary outcomes), cardiorespiratory fitness (shuttle run test), muscular fitness (standing jump, push-up, handgrip, curl-up test), flexibility (sit and reach) and resistance training skill competency were measured at baseline and immediate post-intervention. Feasibility measures of recruitment, retention, adherence and satisfaction were assessed. Significant group-by-time intervention effects were found for waist circumference [-3.1¿cm, P¿<¿0.001], BMI [-1.38¿kg · m¿2, P¿<¿0.001], BMI-Z [-0.5 z-scores, P¿<¿0.001], sit and reach [+3.0¿cm, P¿<¿0.001], standing jump [+0.1¿m, P¿=¿0.021] and shuttle run [+10.3 laps, P¿=¿0.019]. Retention rate was 82.3%. All programme sessions were delivered and participants¿ mean satisfaction scores ranged from 4.2 to 4.6 out of 5. The findings demonstrate that CrossFit Teens¿ is a feasible and efficacious programme for improving health-related fitness in adolescents.

DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1045925
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2015 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Beauchamp MR, Miller A, Lonsdale C, et al., 'Mediators of Psychological Well-being in Adolescent Boys', Journal of Adolescent Health, (2015)

© 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention on... [more]

© 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention on psychological well-being in adolescent boys and to examine the potential mediating mechanisms that might explain this effect. Methods: ATLAS was evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools located in low-income communities (N = 361 adolescent boys, mean age = 12.7 ± .5 years). The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and involved: professional development for teachers, provision of fitness equipment to schools, enhanced school sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies for reducing screen time. Assessments were conducted at baseline and immediately post intervention (8 months). Psychological well-being was measured using the Flourishing Scale. Motivational regulations (intrinsic, identified, introjected, controlled, and amotivation) and basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) in school sport, muscular fitness, resistance training skill competency, and recreational screen time were examined as potential mediating mechanisms of the intervention effect. Results: The intervention effect on well-being was small but statistically significant. Within a multiple mediator model, changes in autonomy needs satisfaction, recreational screen time, and muscular fitness significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on psychological well-being. Conclusions: In addition to the physical health benefits, targeted physical activity programs for adolescent boys may have utility for mental health promotion through the mechanisms of increasing autonomy support and muscular fitness and reducing screen time.

DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.10.010
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Jordan Smith, David Lubans
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan PJ, et al., 'eHealth interventions for the prevention and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 16 376-392 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12268
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of a male-only weight loss maintenance programme on social-cognitive determinants of physical activity and healthy eating: A randomized controlled trial.', Br J Health Psychol, 20 724-744 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/bjhp.12137
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2015 Hulteen RM, Lander NJ, Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Robertson SJ, Lubans DR, 'Validity and Reliability of Field-Based Measures for Assessing Movement Skill Competency in Lifelong Physical Activities: A Systematic Review', Sports Medicine, 45 1443-1454 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.Background: It has been suggested that young people should develop competence in a variety of ¿lifelong physical activities... [more]

© 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.Background: It has been suggested that young people should develop competence in a variety of ¿lifelong physical activities¿ to ensure that they can be active across the lifespan. Objective: The primary aim of this systematic review is to report the methodological properties, validity, reliability, and test duration of field-based measures that assess movement skill competency in lifelong physical activities. A secondary aim was to clearly define those characteristics unique to lifelong physical activities. Data Sources: A search of four electronic databases (Scopus, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest, and PubMed) was conducted between June 2014 and April 2015 with no date restrictions. Study Selection: Studies addressing the validity and/or reliability of lifelong physical activity tests were reviewed. Included articles were required to assess lifelong physical activities using process-oriented measures, as well as report either one type of validity or reliability. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods: Assessment criteria for methodological quality were adapted from a checklist used in a previous review of sport skill outcome assessments. Results: Movement skill assessments for eight different lifelong physical activities (badminton, cycling, dance, golf, racquetball, resistance training, swimming, and tennis) in 17 studies were identified for inclusion. Methodological quality, validity, reliability, and test duration (time to assess a single participant), for each article were assessed. Moderate to excellent reliability results were found in 16 of 17 studies, with 71¿% reporting inter-rater reliability and 41¿% reporting intra-rater reliability. Only four studies in this review reported test¿retest reliability. Ten studies reported validity results; content validity was cited in 41¿% of these studies. Construct validity was reported in 24¿% of studies, while criterion validity was only reported in 12¿% of studies. Limitations: Numerous assessments for lifelong physical activities may exist, yet only assessments for eight lifelong physical activities were included in this review. Generalizability of results may be more applicable if more heterogeneous samples are used in future research. Conclusion: Moderate to excellent levels of inter- and intra-rater reliability were reported in the majority of studies. However, future work should look to establish test¿retest reliability. Validity was less commonly reported than reliability, and further types of validity other than content validity need to be established in future research. Specifically, predictive validity of ¿lifelong physical activity¿ movement skill competency is needed to support the assertion that such activities provide the foundation for a lifetime of activity.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-015-0357-0
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors David Lubans
2015 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Young MD, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of SNAPO (Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity) randomized controlled trials in young adult men', Preventive Medicine, 81 221-231 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The secondary aim was to evaluate the recruitment, retention and engagement strategies. Methods: A search with no date restrictions was conducted across seven databases. Randomized controlled trials recruiting young men only (aged 18-35. years) into interventions targeting any SNAPO risk factors were included. Results: Ten studies were included (two nutrition, six alcohol use, two targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors). Six studies (two nutrition, three alcohol use and one targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors) demonstrated significant positive short-term intervention effects, but impact was either not assessed beyond the intervention (n = 3), had short-term follow-up (= 6 months) (n = 2) or not sustained beyond six months (n = 1). Overall, a high risk of bias was identified across studies. Only one study undertook a power calculation and recruited the required sample size. Adequate retention was achieved in three studies. Effectiveness of engagement strategies was not reported in any studies. Conclusions: Despite preliminary evidence of short-term effectiveness of SNAPO interventions in young men, few studies characterized by a high risk of bias were identified. High quality SNAPO interventions for young men are warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.09.005
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Lee Ashton, Myles Young, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2015 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, 'Reliability and validity of a single-item physical activity measure for adolescents', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 51 787-793 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jpc.12836
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2015 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, Eather N, Skinner G, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM): A cluster randomized controlled trial to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 40 150-158 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc.Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physi... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc.Introduction: Excessive recreational screen time (i.e., screen use for entertainment) is a global public health issue associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Considering the growing popularity of screen-based recreation in adolescents, there is a need to identify effective strategies for reducing screen time among adolescents. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' (S4HM) study, an intervention designed to reduce recreational screen time among adolescents. Methods: The S4HM intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in eight secondary schools (. N=. 322 students) in New South Wales, Australia. The 6-month multi-component intervention will encourage adolescents to manage their recreational screen time using a range of evidence-based strategies. The intervention is grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT) and includes the following components: an interactive seminar for students, eHealth messaging, behavioral contract and parental newsletters. All outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 6-months (i.e., immediate post-test). The primary outcome is recreational screen time measured by the Adolescent Sedentary Activity Questionnaire (ASAQ). Secondary outcomes include: self-reported psychological well-being, psychological distress, global physical self-concept, resilience, pathological video gaming and aggression, and objectively measured physical activity (accelerometry) and body mass index (BMI). Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: The S4HM study will involve the evaluation of an innovative, theory-driven, multi-component intervention that targets students and their parents and is designed to reduce recreational screen time in adolescents. The intervention has been designed for scalability and dissemination across Australian secondary schools.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2014.12.001
Co-authors David Lubans, Amanda Baker, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff, Geoff Skinner
2015 Riddiford-Harland DL, Steele JR, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Baur LA, 'Lower activity levels are related to higher plantar pressures in overweight children', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 357-362 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000403
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Barnett LM, Lubans DR, 'Improvements in fundamental movement skill competency mediate the effect of the SCORES intervention on physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in children', Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 1908-1918 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2015.1017734
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Riley N, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Young M, 'Outcomes and process evaluation of a programme integrating physical activity into the primary school mathematics curriculum: The EASY Minds pilot randomised controlled trial', JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT, 18 656-661 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.09.005
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Myles Young, Nicholas Riley, David Lubans
2015 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Determinants of weight loss success utilizing a meal replacement plan and/or exercise, in overweight and obese adults with asthma', Respirology, 20 243-250 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.Background and objective While weight loss has been shown to reduce obesity-related comorbidity, many weight loss treatments fail. Fac... [more]

© 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.Background and objective While weight loss has been shown to reduce obesity-related comorbidity, many weight loss treatments fail. Factors that enhance weight loss success are unknown, particularly in those with asthma. The aim of the study was to identify patient characteristics that predict weight loss success in adults with asthma. Methods Baseline and change in asthma characteristics and eating behaviours were investigated for relationships with weight loss and fat loss using multiple linear regression, in 38 overweight and obese adults with asthma randomized to dietary, exercise or combined interventions targeting weight loss for 10 weeks. Results Mean ± standard deviation weight loss was 6.6 ± 5.1 kg. Greater %weight loss and %fat loss was achieved in those with poorer asthma-related quality of life at baseline ((rs = 0.398, P = 0.015) and (rs = 0.455, P = 0.005) respectively), with 1.7% greater absolute weight loss at week 10 corresponding to each one unit reduction in the asthma-related quality of life score at baseline. Furthermore, a lower baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity correlated with greater weight loss (rs = 0.398, P = 0.015). Male sex was associated with a 3.6 kg greater weight loss (P = 0.087). Reducing emotional eating during the programme was associated with greater weight loss in women (rs = 0.576, P = 0.010). Conclusions This study demonstrates that individuals with more severe asthma at baseline are more successful in achieving weight loss, which could be a consequence of greater motivation and could be used as a motivational tool within the clinical setting. Gender tailoring of weight loss programmes may be useful to enhance weight loss success. Future studies are urgently needed to establish predictors of long-term weight loss maintenance in those with asthma. See Editorial, page 179 This study is the first to demonstrate that more severe asthma at baseline, male sex, and improvements in eating behaviours during weight loss are associated with greater weight loss success in overweight and obese adults with asthma. Our findings may inform the development of asthma-specific weight management guidelines.

DOI 10.1111/resp.12423
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Hayley Scott, Manohar Garg, Lisa Wood, Robin Callister
2015 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Physical activity and skills intervention: SCORES cluster randomized controlled trial', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 47 765-774 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000452
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adul... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al.Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Clare Collins, Marita Lynagh, Luke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri, Flora Tzelepis, John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2015 Lynagh M, Cliff K, Morgan PJ, 'Attitudes and Beliefs of Nonspecialist and Specialist Trainee Health and Physical Education Teachers Toward Obese Children: Evidence for "Anti-Fat" Bias', Journal of School Health, 85 595-603 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, American School Health Association.Background: The aim of this study was to assess the beliefs and attitudes of preservice health and physical education (HPE) specialist ... [more]

© 2015, American School Health Association.Background: The aim of this study was to assess the beliefs and attitudes of preservice health and physical education (HPE) specialist and nonspecialist schoolteachers toward obese children. Methods: A total of 177 nonspecialist and 62 HPE specialist trainee teachers completed a series of pen-and-paper validated measures of attitudes and beliefs toward obese children. Results: Both groups of preservice teachers reported strong implicit and moderate explicit anti-fat bias. Enrollment in the HPE specialist degree was found to be a significant predictor of both implicit bad/good anti-fat bias (ß=3.97, p=.002) and implicit bias on the stupid/smart scale (ß=2.983, p=.016) of the IAT. Beliefs that obese children were less healthy, more self-conscious, and less satisfied with themselves were strongly endorsed by the majority of participants. HPE specialists were found to have significantly lower expectations for obese children in regard to "reasoning" (mean difference=0.21, p=.0107) and "cooperation" skills (mean difference=0.25, p=.0354) compared to nonspecialist trainees. Conclusions: This study is the first to document the strong anti-fat bias of both preservice nonspecialist and HPE specialist teachers. It is also the first to find that preservice HPE specialist teachers have stronger anti-fat biases and differential expectations regarding particular abilities of obese children, compared to nonspecialists.

DOI 10.1111/josh.12287
Co-authors Marita Lynagh
2015 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Paternal lifestyle-related parenting practices mediate changes in children's dietary and physical activity behaviors: Findings from the healthy dads, healthy kids community randomized controlled trial', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 12 1327-1335 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.Background: This study examined potential parenting-related mediators of children's physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Healthy Dads, ... [more]

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc.Background: This study examined potential parenting-related mediators of children's physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) community program. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 45 overweight/obese (mean [SD] age = 39.8 [5.4] years; BMI = 32.4 [3.8]) fathers and their children (n = 77; 58% boys; mean [SD] age = 7.7 [2.5] years). Families were randomized to either the HDHK program or wait-list control group. The program involved 7 sessions. Fathers and their children were assessed at baseline and at 14 weeks for physical activity (pedometery) and core food intake (Questionnaire). Fathers' lifestyle-related parenting practices included; self-efficacy, beliefs, modeling, logistic support, rules, cophysical activity, shared mealtime frequency and intentions. Results: Significant intervention effects were found for cophysical activity and modeling physical activity. Cophysical activity mediated children's physical activity in the intervention ('mediated effect,' AB = 653, 95% CI = 4-2050) and was responsible for 59.5% of the intervention effect. Fathers' beliefs mediated children's percent energy from core foods (AB = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.05-5.55) and accounted for 72.9% of the intervention effect. Conclusions: Participation in the HDHK program positively impacted on fathers' cophysical activity with their child and beliefs about healthy eating which mediated changes in children's diet and physical activity behaviors.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0367
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Adam Lloyd
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2015 Colin Bell A, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Fitzgerald M, Morgan PJ, Jones J, et al., 'Child physical activity levels and associations with modifiable characteristics in centre-based childcare', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 232-236 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: To describe children's physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. Method... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.Objective: To describe children's physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 328 preschool children (43% girls; age 3-5 years) and 145 staff from 20 long day care centres in the Hunter Region of NSW, Australia. Pedometers assessed child physical activity levels. Centre characteristics and staff attitudes and behaviours towards children's physical activity were assessed using surveys, interviews and observational audit. Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Results: Over the measurement period, average step count of children was 15.8 (SD=6.8) steps/minute. Four-year-olds had the highest step counts (16.4, SD=7.1, p=0.03) with no differences by sex. Step counts were significantly higher in centres that had a written physical activity policy (+3.8 steps/minute, p=0.03) and where staff led structured physical activity (+3.7 steps/minute, p<0.001) and joined in active play (+2.9 steps/minute, p=0.06). Conclusions: Written physical activity policy, structured staff-led physical activity and staff joining in active play were associated with higher levels of physical activity. Implications: Childcare physical activity interventions should consider including strategies to encourage written physical activity policies and support structured staff led physical activities.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12314
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Williams LT, Hollis JL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Can a relatively low-intensity intervention by health professionals prevent weight gain in mid-age women? 12-Month outcomes of the 40-Something randomised controlled trial.', Nutrition & diabetes, 4 e116 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Jenna Hollis, Clare Collins
2014 O'Brien KM, Hutchesson MJ, Jensen M, Morgan P, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Participants in an online weight loss program can improve diet quality during weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.', Nutrition journal, 13 82 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
2014 Babic MJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Lonsdale C, White RL, Lubans DR, 'Physical Activity and Physical Self-Concept in Youth: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Sports Medicine, (2014) [C1]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been cond... [more]

Background Evidence suggests that physical self-concept is associated with physical activity in children and adolescents, but no systematic review of this literature has been conducted. Objective The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the strength of associations between physical activity and physical self-concept (general and sub-domains) in children and adolescents. The secondary aim was to examine potential moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. Methods A systematic search of six electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, Web of Science and Scopus) with no date restrictions was conducted. Random effects meta-analyses with correction for measurement were employed. The associations between physical activity and general physical self-concept and sub-domains were explored. A risk of bias assessment was conducted by two reviewers. Results The search identified 64 studies to be included in the meta-analysis. Thirty-three studies addressed multiple outcomes of general physical self-concept: 28 studies examined general physical self-concept, 59 examined perceived competence, 25 examined perceived fitness, and 55 examined perceived appearance. Perceived competence was most strongly associated with physical activity (r = 0.30, 95 % CI 0.24-0.35, p < 0.001), followed by perceived fitness (r = 0.26, 95 % CI 0.20-0.32, p < 0.001), general physical self-concept (r = 0.25, 95 % CI 0.16-0.34, p < 0.001) and perceived physical appearance (r = 0.12, 95 % CI 0.08-0.16, p < 0.001). Sex was a significant moderator for general physical self-concept (p < 0.05), and age was a significant moderator for perceived appearance (p = 0.01) and perceived competence (p < 0.05). No significant moderators were found for perceived fitness. Conclusion Overall, a significant association has been consistently demonstrated between physical activity and physical self-concept and its various sub-domains in children and adolescents. Age and sex are key moderators of the association between physical activity and physical self-concept. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0229-z
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2014 Thorne HT, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Babic MJ, Lubans DR, 'Video game genre preference, physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities', Journal of Adolescence, 37 1345-1352 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adoles... [more]

© 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.The primary aim of this study was to examine the association between the types of video games played by adolescent boys and their participation in physical activity and recreational screen-time. Participants were 320 boys (mean age=12.7, ±0.5 years) from 14 secondary schools located in low-income areas of New South Wales, Australia. Outcomes included height, weight, physical activity (accelerometers), total screen-time, and video game genre preference. Significant differences in both weekday and weekend screen-time were found between video game genre groups. In addition, significant differences in overall activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were found between genre groups on weekdays. Between-group differences in physical activity on weekends were not statistically significant. This cross-sectional study has demonstrated that video game genre preference is associated with physical activity and screen-time in adolescent boys from low-income communities.

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.09.012
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2014 Riley N, Lubans DR, Holmes K, Morgan PJ, 'Rationale and study protocol of the EASY Minds (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds) program: cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary school-based physical activity integration program for mathematics.', BMC Public Health, 14 816 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-816
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Lubans, Nicholas Riley
2014 Plotnikoff R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Rhodes R, Costigan SA, 'The Intersect of Theory, Methods, and Translation in Guiding Interventions for the Promotion of Physical Activity: A Case Example of a Research Programme', AUSTRALIAN PSYCHOLOGIST, 49 110-126 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ap.12037
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2014 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund M, Jones J, Wiggers J, 'A cluster randomized trial of a multi-level intervention, delivered by service staff, to increase physical activity of children attending center-based childcare', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 58 9-16 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows T, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community randomized controlled trial: A community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', Preventive Medicine, 61 90-99 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomi... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK)' program when delivered by trained facilitators in community settings. Method: A two-arm randomized controlled trial of 93 overweight/obese fathers (mean [SD] age=40.3 [5.3] years; BMI=32.5 [3.8] kg/m2) and their primary school-aged children (n=132) from the Hunter Region, Australia. In 2010-2011, families were randomized to either: (i) HDHK intervention (n=48 fathers, n=72 children) or (ii) wait-list control group. The 7-week intervention included seven sessions and resources (booklets, pedometers). Assessments were held at baseline and 14-weeks with fathers' weight (kg) as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes for fathers and children included waist, BMI, blood pressure, resting heart rate, physical activity (pedometry), and self-reported dietary intake and sedentary behaviors. Results: Linear mixed models (intention-to-treat) revealed significant between-group differences for fathers' weight (P < .001, d= 0.24), with HDHK fathers losing more weight (- 3.3. kg; 95%CI, - 4.3, - 2.4) than control fathers (0.1. kg; 95%CI, - 0.9,1.0). Significant treatment effects (P < .05) were also found for fathers' waist (d= 0.41), BMI (d= 0.26), resting heart rate (d= 0.59), energy intake (d= 0.49) and physical activity (d= 0.46) and for children's physical activity (d= 0.50) and adiposity (d= 0.07). Discussion: HDHK significantly improved health outcomes and behaviors in fathers and children, providing evidence for program effectiveness when delivered in a community setting. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.019
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Tracy Burrows, Adam Lloyd, David Lubans, Myles Young, Andrew Miller
2014 Lai SK, Costigan SA, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Stodden DF, Salmon J, Barnett LM, 'Do school-based interventions focusing on physical activity, fitness, or fundamental movement skill competency produce a sustained impact in these outcomes in children and adolescents? A systematic review of follow-up studies', Sports Medicine, 44 67-79 (2014) [C1]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and ad... [more]

Background: There is emerging evidence for positive associations between physical activity (PA), fitness, and fundamental movement skill (FMS) competence, for both children and adolescents. Current reviews of interventions to improve these variables note few studies conduct follow-up assessments to assess behavior maintenance. Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether typically developing children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years) who have participated in school-based interventions have sustained outcomes in PA, fitness, and/or FMS. Methods: A systematic search of six electronic databases (CINAHL® Plus with Full Text, Ovid MEDLINE®, SPORTDiscus¿, Scopus, PsycINFO® and ERIC) was conducted from 1995 to 26 July 2012. Included studies were school-based studies (including randomized controlled trials, longitudinal cohort, quasi-experimental, and experimental) that had a positive effect at post intervention in at least one variable and had a follow-up PA, fitness, or FMS assessment at least 6 months after the post-intervention assessment. Risk of bias assessment was guided by the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses" statement. Results: The search identified 14 articles, and some studies addressed multiple outcomes: 13 articles assessed PA; three assessed fitness; and two assessed FMS. No study in this review met four key methodological criteria that have been shown to influence results, i.e., clarity on the randomization process, assessor blinding, analyzing participants in their original groups, and retaining sufficient participants through the entire study. Three-quarters (ten of 13) of the studies addressing PA, reported PA behavior change maintenance. The length of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 20 years, and the degree of PA difference reported was between 3 and 14 min per day. Only one of the three studies assessing fitness reported a sustained impact, whilst both studies that assessed FMS reported maintenance of effects. Conclusion: It is likely that PA is a sustainable outcome from interventions in children and adolescents, and there is reasonable evidence that interventions of longer than 1 year and interventions that utilize a theoretical model or framework are effective in producing this sustained impact. It would seem probable that FMS are a sustainable outcome in children and adolescents; however, this finding should be viewed with caution given the lack of studies and the risk of bias assessment. More research is needed to assess the sustainability of fitness interventions as this review only included a handful of studies that addressed fitness and only one of these studies found a sustained impact. © 2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-013-0099-9
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, David Lubans
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Narelle Eather
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Characteristics of men classified at high-risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the AUSDRISK screening tool', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, (2014) [C1]

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) t... [more]

Aims: The primary aim was to describe characteristics of men identified at high-risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the Australian diabetes risk assessment (AUSDRISK) tool. Secondary aims were to determine the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome in these men. Methods: Men (n = 209) completed the AUSDRISK tool, with 165 identified as high-risk for T2DM (score =. 12, maximum 38). Demographic, anthropometric, physiological and behavioural outcomes were assessed for 101 men. Comparisons (one-way ANOVA) among three AUSDRISK score groups (12-15, 16-19, =. 20) were performed (significance level, P <. 0.05). Results: Common risk factors (percentages) among high-risk men were waist circumference (>90cm; 93%), age (>44 years; 79%), physical activity level (<150minwk-1; 59%), family history of diabetes (39%) and previously high blood glucose levels (32%). Men with AUSDRISK scores =20 had higher (mean±SD) HbA1C (6.0±0.4% [42±4.4mmol.mol-1], P <0.001), FPG (5.3±0.6mmol.L-1, P =0.001) and waist circumference (113.2±9.8cm, P =0.026) than men with scores of 12-15. Mean FPG for the sample was 5.0±0.6mmol.L-1, whereas mean HbA1C was 5.8±0.5% [40±5.5mmol.mol-1]. Pre-diabetes prevalence was 70% and metabolic syndrome prevalence was 62%. Conclusions: The AUSDRISK tool identified men who were mostly older than 44, and had large waist circumferences and elevated HbA1C. These findings provide evidence supporting the usefulness of the AUSDRISK screening tool for T2DM screening in clinical and research settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2015.01.017
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Collins CE, Dewar DL, Schumacher TL, Finn T, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, '12 Month changes in dietary intake of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities following the NEAT Girls cluster randomized controlled trial', APPETITE, 73 147-155 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2013.11.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children's adiposity, screen-time, diet and physical activity', Appetite, 79 149-157 (2014) [C1]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlat... [more]

The primary aim of this study was to examine a range of potential behavioral and maternal/paternal correlates of adiposity in children. Secondary aims were to examine (a) correlates of screen-time, diet and physical activity and (b) if there were differences in maternal and paternal physical activity- and dietary-related parenting practices. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using 70 families with children (59% boys (41/70), mean age 8.4 (±2.4) years). Parenting practices were measured using the Parenting Strategies for Eating and Activity Scale. Children's outcomes included: 7-day pedometry (physical activity), screen-time, percent energy from core foods (Food frequency questionnaire) and BMI z-score. Multiple regression models were generated to examine the associations between maternal and paternal parenting practices and children's variables. In the regression analyses, fathers' BMI (p < .01) and mothers' control (p < .001) were significantly associated with child weight status. Fathers' reinforcement (p < .01) was significantly associated with child physical activity. For screen-time, mothers' monitoring (p < .001) and child characteristics [age (p = .01), sex (p = .01), BMI z-score (p = .03)] were significant predictors. Mothers' parenting practices [limit setting (p = .01), reinforcement (p = .02)] and child screen-time (p = .02) were significantly associated with intake of core foods. Despite some similarities within families, three out of five parenting constructs were significantly different between mothers and fathers. Mothers and fathers have different parental influences on their children's weight status and lifestyle behaviors and both should be included in lifestyle interventions targeting children. A focus on maternal parenting specifically relating to screen-time and diet, and father's physical activity parenting and weight status may support their children in developing more healthy behaviors. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2014.04.010
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Adam Lloyd, Clare Collins
2014 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Young MD, Pollard KT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Compliance to step count and vegetable serve recommendations mediates weight gain prevention in mid-age, premenopausal women. Findings of the 40-Something RCT.', Appetite, 83 33-41 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Myles Young, Jenna Hollis, Clare Collins
2014 Scott JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Trost SG, Lubans DR, 'Adolescent pedometer protocols: examining reactivity, tampering and participants' perceptions', Journal of Sports Sciences, 32 183-190 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2013.815361
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2014 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Watson JF, Guest M, Callister R, 'Changes to dietary intake during a 12-week commercial web-based weight loss program: a randomized controlled trial.', European journal of clinical nutrition, 68 64-70 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, McCoy P, Collins CE, 'Response to: Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review of reviews.', Journal of medical Internet research, 16 e178 (2014) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Batterham M, Lubans DR, 'Exploring changes in physical activity, sedentary behaviors and hypothesized mediators in the NEAT girls group randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 39-46 (2014) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of ... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a 12-month school-based multi-component program on adolescent girls' physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior change. Design: Group randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Methods: The intervention, guided by Social Cognitive Theory, involved 357 adolescent girls (13.2. ±. 0.5 years) from 12 secondary schools (6 intervention schools, 6 control schools) in low-income communities in the Hunter and Central Coast regions of New South Wales, Australia.The intervention included enhanced school sport, lunchtime physical activity sessions, interactive seminars, student handbooks, nutrition workshops, pedometers, parent newsletters and text messages to encourage physical activity and healthy eating, and a decrease in sedentary behavior. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12-months and included: physical activity (accelerometers), sedentary behaviors (questionnaire and accelerometers), and social-cognitive mediators of physical activity (questionnaire). Results: There were significant between group differences in favor of the intervention group for self-reported recreational computer use (-26.0. min; 95% CI, -46.9 to -5.1), and sedentary activities summed (-56.4. min; 95% CI, -110.1 to -2.7), however objective sedentary behavior showed no differences. There were no group-by-time effects for any of the physical activity outcomes or hypothesized mediators. Conclusions: A school-based intervention tailored for adolescent girls from schools located in low-income communities significantly reduced time spent in sedentary activities. However, improvements in physical activity and hypothesized mediators of physical activity behavior were not observed. Future studies are encouraged to explore alternative mechanisms of behavior change derived from integrated and socio-ecological theories. © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Schumacher TL, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Watson J, Guest M, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight low consumption of core foods', Nutrition and Dietetics, 71 127-134 (2014) [C1]

Aim: Overweight and obesity prevalence is high among adolescent girls of low socioeconomic position and this increases their risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders... [more]

Aim: Overweight and obesity prevalence is high among adolescent girls of low socioeconomic position and this increases their risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders in adulthood. The aim of this present study was to describe the dietary patterns of adolescent girls in terms of the relative contribution of core food groups to overall diet and by weight status category. Methods: Year 8 female students were recruited from schools in low-income communities. Weight status (i.e. underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese) was determined using age- and sex-adjusted body mass index (BMI; z score). Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Individual foods were collated into core food group or energy-dense, nutrient-poor categories in line with the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE) and the percentage contribution to total energy intake calculated. Results: Participants (n = 332) were (mean ± SD) 13.7 ± 0.4 years old with BMI z score 0.63 ± 1.22. Few girls met AGHE core food group recommendations for daily serves; meat and substitutes 69.3%, vegetables 28.6%, fruit 23.8%, dairy 15.7% and breads/cereals 5.7%. Total percentage energy derived from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods was 46.6% (37.2-54.6%) (median (interquartile range)), with takeaways 9.8% (7.0-13.6%), confectionery 7.0% (4.1-10.9%) and packaged snacks 6.8% (4.0-10.7%), with no significant differences by weight status. Conclusions: Core food intakes are poor with excessive consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods in these adolescent girls. Nutrition education programs targeting this population are needed to address this imbalance. Strategies could include substitution of unhealthy snacks for core food items and greater inclusion of core foods within main meals. © 2013 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12084
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014 Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Social cognitive theory and physical activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 15 983-995 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO).This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to exp... [more]

© 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO).This review investigated three research questions (i) What is the utility of social cognitive theory (SCT) to explain physical activity (PA)?; (ii) Is the effectiveness of SCT moderated by sample or methodological characteristics? and (iii) What is the frequency of significant associations between the core SCT constructs and PA? Ten electronic databases were searched with no date or sample restrictions. Forty-four studies were retrieved containing 55 SCT models of PA. Methodological quality was assessed using a standardized tool. A random-effects meta-analysis revealed that SCT accounted for 31% of the variance in PA. However, methodological quality was mostly poor for these models. Methodological quality and sample age moderated the PA effect size, with increases in both associated with greater variance explained. Although self-efficacy and goals were consistently associated with PA, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors were not. This review determined that SCT is a useful framework to explain PA behaviour. Higher quality models explained more PA variance, but overall methodological quality was poor. As such, high-quality studies examining the utility of SCT to explain PA are warranted.

DOI 10.1111/obr.12225
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Myles Young, Robin Callister
2014 Morgan PJ, Scott HA, Young MD, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Associations between program outcomes and adherence to Social Cognitive Theory tasks: process evaluation of the SHED-IT community weight loss trial for men', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 11 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0089-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Schranz N, Olds T, Cliff D, Davern M, Engelen L, Giles-Corti B, et al., 'Results From Australia¿s 2014 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 S21-S25 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0164
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2014 Young MD, Collins CE, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Doran CM, Morgan PJ, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance trial protocol: A randomised controlled trial of a weight loss maintenance program for overweight and obese men', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 37 84-97 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.004
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) group randomized controlled trial: An obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys from schools in low-income communities', Contemporary Clinical Trials, 37 106-119 (2014) [C3]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth w... [more]

Introduction: The negative consequences of unhealthy weight gain and the high likelihood of pediatric obesity tracking into adulthood highlight the importance of targeting youth who are 'at risk' of obesity. The aim of this paper is to report the rationale and study protocol for the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities. Methods/design: The ATLAS intervention will be evaluated using a cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 secondary schools in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia (2012 to 2014). ATLAS is an 8-month multi-component, school-based program informed by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory. The intervention consists of teacher professional development, enhanced school-sport sessions, researcher-led seminars, lunch-time physical activity mentoring sessions, pedometers for self-monitoring, provision of equipment to schools, parental newsletters, and a smartphone application and website. Assessments were conducted at baseline and will be completed again at 9- and 18-months from baseline. Primary outcomes are body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Secondary outcomes include BMI z-scores, body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis), physical activity (accelerometers), muscular fitness (grip strength and push-ups), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, resistance training skill competency, daytime sleepiness, subjective well-being, physical self-perception, pathological video gaming, and aggression. Hypothesized mediators of behavior change will also be explored. Discussion: ATLAS is an innovative school-based intervention designed to improve the health behaviors and related outcomes of adolescent males in low-income communities. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2013.11.008
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 6
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Geoff Skinner, Ron Plotnikoff, Kerry Dally
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Callister R, 'The PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) trial protocol: a randomised controlled trial of a Type 2 Diabetes Prevention programme for men.', Contemporary clinical trials, 39 132-144 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' lifestyle programme on the activity- and diet-related parenting practices of fathers and mothers', Pediatric Obesity, 9 e149-e155 (2014)

© 2014 The Authors.Objectives The aim was to evaluate the impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' programme on fathers' and mothers' activity- and diet-related parenting pract... [more]

© 2014 The Authors.Objectives The aim was to evaluate the impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' programme on fathers' and mothers' activity- and diet-related parenting practices. Methods Overweight/obese fathers (n = 87) and their primary school-aged children (56% boys) were randomized to either (i) 7-week programme (n = 45) or (ii) control group (n = 42). The programme involved four sessions for fathers only and three for fathers/children. Mothers were not directly involved. Parenting practices of both fathers and mothers were measured using the parenting strategies for eating and activity scale at baseline and 14-week follow-up. Results Intention-to-treat analysis using linear mixed models revealed significant group-by-time effects for fathers' limit setting (P = 0.048, d = 0.36) and reinforcement for multiple lifestyle behaviours (P = 0.001, d = 0.79). No significant intervention effects were found for fathers' control, monitoring, discipline or mothers' parenting practices (P > 0.05). Conclusions The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids programme had a positive impact on some parenting practices for fathers but not mothers.

DOI 10.1111/ijpo.248
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Dally KA, Salmon J, Okely AD, et al., 'Smart-phone obesity prevention trial for adolescent boys in low-income communities: The ATLAS RCT', Pediatrics, 134 e723-e731 (2014) [C1]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention interv... [more]

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) intervention for adolescent boys, an obesity prevention intervention using smartphone technology.METHODS: ATLAS was a cluster randomized controlled trial conducted in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) considered at risk of obesity. The 20-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory and social cognitive theory and involved: teacher professional development, provision of fitness equipment to schools, face-to-face physical activity sessions, lunchtime student mentoring sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application and Web site, and parental strategies for reducing screen-time. Outcome measures included BMI and waist circumference, percent body fat, physical activity (accelerometers), screen-time, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, muscular fitness, and resistance training skill competency.RESULTS: Overall, there were no significant intervention effects for BMI, waist circumference, percent body fat, or physical activity. Significant intervention effects were found for screen-time (mean ± SE:-30 ± 10.08 min/d; P = .03), sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (mean:-0.6 ± 0.26 glass/d; P = .01), muscular fitness (mean: 0.9 ± 0.49 repetition; P = .04), and resistance training skills (mean: 5.7 6 0.67 units; P < .001).CONCLUSIONS: This school-based intervention targeting low-income adolescent boys did not result in significant effects on body composition, perhaps due to an insufficient activity dose. However, the intervention was successful in improving muscular fitness, movement skills, and key weight-related behaviors.

DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-1012
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Kerry Dally, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Blomfield RL, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Young MD, Jensen ME, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of self-help weight loss resources with or without online support on the dietary intake of overweight and obese men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e476-e487 (2014) [C1]

©2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns comp... [more]

©2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.Background: Obese men are more likely to have poor dietary patterns compared to women, increasing diet-related chronic disease risk. The impact of a male-only weight loss intervention on dietary intakes is under-evaluated. The aim was to deter-mine whether overweight/obese men randomised to self-help paper-based resources with or without online support, achieved greater improvements in diet compared with Wait-list controls at 3 and 6 months following a gender tailored weight-loss intervention.Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using a 120-item semi-quantitative food fre-quency questionnaire (FFQ), in a secondary analysis of a three-arm weight lossRCT grounded in Social Cognitive Theory; (1) Resources: gender-tailored weight lossresources (DVD, handbooks, pedometer, tape measure); (2) Online: resources pluswebsite and efeedback, (3) Wait-list control.Results: Energy, total fat, saturated fat, and carbohydrate intakes decreased in theonline group, which differed significantly from controls at 3- and 6-month follow-up(P <0.05). There was a significant reduction in energy, fat and carbohydrate intakesin the Resource group at 3 and 6 months, but no difference from controls (P>0.05).In the online group there was an increase in %energy from core foods and decreasein %energy from energy-dense nutrient-poor foods (P<0.05) that was significantlydifferent compared to controls at 3 and 6 months (P<0.05).Conclusion: Results suggest that men randomised to the SHED-IT intervention armswere able to implement key dietary messages up to 6 months compared to con-trols. Future interventions should include targeted and gender-tailored messages asa strategy to improve mens dietary intake within weight loss interventions.© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.09.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Myles Young, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Jones RA, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Parletta N, Wolfenden L, et al., 'School-based obesity prevention interventions: Practicalities and considerations', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 8 e497-e510 (2014) [C1]

© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore w... [more]

© 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity.Pediatric obesity continues to be a major public health concern. Once established it is difficult to treat, therefore well-designed and evaluated prevention interventions are vitally important. Schools have an important role in the prevention of childhood obesity, however, their involvement can be limited by a number of constraints and barriers, which need to be considered when designing interventions. Members of the Prevention Stream of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network have extensive experience in implementing and evaluating school-based obesity prevention initiatives. Based on their collective experience and evidence from implementation research, the aim of this paper was to highlight six areas to consider when designing, implementing and evaluating obesity prevention initiatives in schools. Further, this paper aimed to provide guidance for overcoming some of the challenges and barriers faced in school-based obesity prevention research. The six key areas discussed include: design and analysis; school-community engagement; planning and recruitment; evaluation; implementation; and feedback and sustainability.

DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton, Megan Rollo
2014 Cliff DP, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur LA, Okely AD, 'Volumes and bouts of sedentary behavior and physical activity: Associations with cardiometabolic health in obese children', Obesity, 22 (2014) [C1]

Objective To examine associations of volumes and bouts of sedentary behavior (SED) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with individual and clustered cardio-metabolic... [more]

Objective To examine associations of volumes and bouts of sedentary behavior (SED) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with individual and clustered cardio-metabolic outcomes in overweight/obese children. Methods Cross-sectional data from 120 overweight/obese children (8.3 ± 1.1 years, 62% girls, 74% obese) with SED and MVPA assessed using accelerometry. Children were categorized into quartiles of mean bouts per day of SED (10, 20, and 30 min) and MVPA (5, 10, and 15 min). Associations with triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, glucose, insulin, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and clustered cardio-metabolic risk (cMet) were examined using linear regression, adjusted for confounders. Results Independent of MVPA, SED volume was inversely associated with HDL cholesterol (ß [95% CI] = -0.29 [-0.52, -0.05]). MVPA volume was inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure, independent of SED (ß = -0.22 [-0.44, -0.001]), and cMet (ß = -0.19 [-0.36, -0.01]) although not after adjustment for SED (ß = -0.14 [-0.33, 0.06]). Independent of MVPA and SED volumes, participants in the highest quartile of 30 min bouts per day of SED had 12% lower HDL cholesterol than those in the lowest quartile (d = 0.53, P = 0.046, Ptrend = 0.11). Conclusions In addition to increasing MVPA, targeting reduced SED and limiting bouts of SED to <30 min may contribute to improved HDL cholesterol levels and cardio-metabolic health in overweight/obese children. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

DOI 10.1002/oby.20698
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014 Schumacher T, Burrows T, Cliff D, Jones R, Okely A, Baur L, et al., 'Dietary Intake Is Related to Multifactor Cardiovascular Risk Score in Obese Boys', Healthcare, 2 282-298 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare2030282
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2014 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Does Motivational Interviewing Align with International Scope of Practice, Professional Competency Standards, and Best Practice Guidelines in Dietetics Practice?', JOURNAL OF THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 114 676-687 (2014) [C2]
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2013.12.023
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams
2014 Smith JJ, Eather N, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Faigenbaum AD, Lubans DR, 'The health benefits of muscular fitness for children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 44 1209-1223 (2014)

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally... [more]

BACKGROUND: Physical fitness during childhood and adolescence has been identified as an important determinant of current and future health status. While research has traditionally focused on the association between cardio-respiratory fitness and health outcomes, the association between muscular fitness (MF) and health status has recently received increased attention. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the potential physiological and psychological benefits associated with MF among children and adolescents. METHODS: A systematic search of six electronic databases (PubMed, SPORTDiscus, Scopus, EMBASE, PsycINFO and OVID MEDLINE) was performed on the 20th May, 2013. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and experimental studies that quantitatively examined the association between MF and potential health benefits among children and adolescents were included. The search yielded 110 eligible studies, encompassing six health outcomes (i.e., adiposity, bone health, cardiovascular disease [CVD] and metabolic risk factors, musculoskeletal pain, psychological health and cognitive ability). The percentage of studies reporting statistically significant associations between MF and the outcome of interest was used to determine the strength of the evidence for an association and additional coding was conducted to account for risk of bias. Meta-analyses were also performed to determine the pooled effect size if there were at least three studies providing standardised coefficients. RESULTS: Strong evidence was found for an inverse association between MF and total and central adiposity, and CVD and metabolic risk factors. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and adiposity was r = -0.25 (95% CI -0.41 to -0.08). Strong evidence was also found for a positive association between MF and bone health and self-esteem. The pooled effect size for the relationship between MF and perceived sports competence was r = 0.39 (95% CI 0.34-0.45). The evidence for an association between MF and musculoskeletal pain and cognitive ability was inconsistent/uncertain. Where evidence of an association was found, the associations were generally low to moderate. CONCLUSION: The findings of this review highlight the importance of developing MF in youth for a number of health-related benefits.

DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0196-4
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Jordan Smith, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2014 Lubans DR, Smith JJ, Skinner G, Morgan PJ, 'Development and implementation of a smartphone application to promote physical activity and reduce screen-time in adolescent boys.', Front Public Health, 2 42 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00042
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Geoff Skinner
2014 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' lifestyle programme on the activity- and diet-related parenting practices of fathers and mothers', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e149-e155 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijpo.248
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Efficacy of interventions that include diet, aerobic and resistance training components for type 2 diabetes prevention: A systematic review with meta-analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014) [C1]

Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the effic... [more]

Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the efficacy of multi-component interventions involving a combination of these three components has not been established. The aims of this review were to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on multi-component (diet + aerobic exercise + resistance training) lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention. Eight electronic databases (Medline, Embase, SportDiscus, Web of Science, CINAHL, Informit health collection, Cochrane library and Scopus) were searched up to June 2013. Eligible studies 1) recruited prediabetic adults or individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes; 2) conducted diet and exercise [including both physical activity/aerobic and resistance training] programs; and 3) reported weight and plasma glucose outcomes. In total, 23 articles from eight studies were eligible including five randomized controlled trials, one quasi-experimental, one two-group comparison and one single-group pre-post study. Four studies had a low risk of bias (score = 6/10). Median intervention length was 12 months (range 4-48 months) with a follow-up of 18 months (range 6.5 - 48 months). The diet and exercise interventions varied slightly in terms of their specific prescriptions. Meta-analysis favored interventions over controls for weight loss (-3.79 kg [-6.13, -1.46; 95% CI], Z = 3.19, P = 0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (-0.13 mmol.L-1 [-0.24, -0.02; 95% CI], Z = 2.42, P = 0.02). Diabetes incidence was only reported in two studies, with reductions of 58% and 56% versus control groups. In summary, multi-component lifestyle type 2 diabetes prevention interventions that include diet and both aerobic and resistance exercise training are modestly effective in inducing weight loss and improving impaired fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, dietary and exercise outcomes in at risk and prediabetic adult populations. These results support the current exercise guidelines for the inclusion of resistance training in type 2 diabetes prevention, however there remains a need for more rigorous studies, with long-term follow-up evaluating program efficacy, muscular fitness outcomes, diabetes incidence and risk reduction. © 2014 Aguiar et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-2
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2014 Cohen KE, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Lubans DR, 'Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: A cross-sectional study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11 (2014) [C1]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known... [more]

Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children's fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities.Methods: Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5 ± 0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children's fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X + accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA.Results: After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P = 0.002, r = 0.15) and after-school (P = 0.014, r = 0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P < 0.001, r = 0.20), lunchtime (P = 0.03, r = 0.10), recess (P = 0.006, r = 0.11) and after-school (P = 0.022, r = 0.13) MVPA.Conclusions: Object-control skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children's MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children's MVPA throughout the day.Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12611001080910. © 2014 Cohen et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-11-49
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2013 Williams LT, Hollis JL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The 40-Something randomized controlled trial to prevent weight gain in mid-age women', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1007
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams
2013 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, 'Efficacy of standard versus enhanced features in a Web-based commercial weight-loss program for obese adults, part 2: Randomized controlled trial', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 84-105 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2626
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
2013 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'An 8-week Web-based weight loss challenge with celebrity endorsement and enhanced social support: Observational study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 25-32 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2540
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2013 Lubans DR, Lonsdale C, Plotnikoff RC, Smith J, Dally K, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of the Motivation to Limit Screen-time Questionnaire (MLSQ) for adolescents.', Prev Med, 57 561-566 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.07.023
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Kerry Dally, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Jordan Smith
2013 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray J, Asher R, Young MD, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood overweight and obesity in community settings: a systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 11 180-257 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Myles Young
2013 Collins CE, Neve MJ, Morgan PJ, Fletcher K, Williams R, Young M, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions with a dietary component on weight loss maintenance: A systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews & Implementation Reports, 11 317-414 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2013-708
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Myles Young
2013 Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Scott HA, Cohen KE, Lubans DR, 'Fundamental movement skill interventions in youth: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Pediatrics, 132 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2013-1167
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Hayley Scott, David Lubans
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving the fitness and physical activity levels of primary school children: Results of the Fit-4-Fun group randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 56 12-19 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity... [more]

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a multi-component school-based physical activity intervention (Fit-4-Fun) on health-related fitness and objectively measured physical activity in primary school children. Methods: Four Hunter primary schools were recruited in April, 2011 and randomized by school into treatment or control conditions. Participants included 213 children (mean age=10.72years±0.6; 52.2% female) with the treatment group (n=118) completing the 8-week Fit-4-Fun Program. Participants were assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up, with a 91% retention rate. Cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) (20m shuttle run) was the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes included body composition (BMI, BMIZ), muscular fitness (7-stage sit-up test, push-up test, basketball throw test, Standing Jump), flexibility (sit and reach) and physical activity (7days pedometry). Results: After 6-months, significant treatment effects were found for CRF (adjusted mean difference, 1.14 levels, p<0.001), body composition (BMI mean, -0.96kg/m2, p<0.001 and BMI z-score mean -0.47 z-scores, p<0.001), flexibility (sit and reach mean, 1.52cm, p=0.0013), muscular fitness (sit-ups) (mean 0.62 stages, p=0.003) and physical activity (mean, 3253 steps/day, p<0.001). There were no group by time effects for the other muscular fitness measures. Conclusions: A primary school-based intervention focusing on fitness education significantly improved health-related fitness and physical activity levels in children. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.10.019
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 12
Co-authors David Lubans, Narelle Eather
2013 Burrows TL, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Davies PSW, Collins CE, 'A comparison and validation of child versus parent reporting of children's energy intake using food frequency questionnaires versus food records: Who's an accurate reporter?', Clinical Nutrition, 32 613-618 (2013) [C1]

Background & aims: The aim of this study was to (i) to compare the accuracy of reporting for child's total energy intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed indepe... [more]

Background & aims: The aim of this study was to (i) to compare the accuracy of reporting for child's total energy intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) completed independently by the mother, father and child in comparison to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using doubly labeled water (DLW) (ii) compare the accuracy of the weighed food record (WFR) and DLW. Methods: Healthy weight children (mean±SD age 9.8±1.3years, n=6 girls/3 boys) and their parents independently completed an FFQ about children's intake. A 4-day WFR of child intake was recorded simultaneously. The accuracy of energy intakes reports were determined by the absolute and percentage differences between estimated energy intake and TEE measured by DLW. Results: The mean difference (limits of agreement LOA, ±2SD) when compared to DLW was; child 130 (-1518, 1258)kcal or (113±35% of TEE); father 398 (0,796)kcal or (121±13%); mother 807 (-213, 1824)kcal or (144±26%) and for the WFR-153 (1089,-1395)kcal or 95±32%. Conclusions: Children were the most accurate reporters when compared to their parents, with fathers more accurate than mothers. The 4-day WFR was approximately equal to the child report FFQ in estimating EI in children 8-11 years. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2012.11.006
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013 Dewar DL, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, Lubans DR, 'Testing Social-Cognitive Theory to Explain Physical Activity Change in Adolescent Girls From Low-Income Communities', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT, 84 483-491 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02701367.2013.842454
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2013 Dewar DL, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'The nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls study: A cluster randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 45 313-317 (2013) [C1]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the ... [more]

Background Obesity prevention among youth of low SES is a public health priority given the higher prevalence of youth obesity in this population subgroup. Purpose To evaluate the 24-month impact of a school-based obesity prevention program among adolescent girls living in low-income communities. Design The study was a school-based group RCT, the Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) intervention. Setting/participants The study involved 12 secondary schools located in low-income communities in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 357 adolescent girls (aged 13.2±0.5 years). Intervention The 12-month multicomponent intervention was guided by social cognitive theory and involved strategies to promote physical activity, reduce sedentary behaviors, and improve dietary outcomes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was BMI, and secondary outcomes were BMI z-score; percentage body fat (bioelectrical impedance analysis); physical activity (accelerometers); dietary intake; and recreational screen-time (self-report). Data were collected in 2010-2012 and analyzed in 2012. Results After 24 months, there were no intervention effects on BMI (adjusted mean difference -0.33, 95% CI= -0.97, 0.28, p=0.353) and BMI z-score (-0.12, 95% CI= -0.27, 0.04, p=0.178). However, there was a group-by-time interaction for percentage body fat (-1.96%, 95% CI= -3.02, -0.89, p=0.006). Intervention effects for physical activity, screen time, and dietary intake were not significant. Conclusions The NEAT Girls intervention did not result in effects on the primary outcome. Further study of youth who are "at risk" of obesity should focus on strategies to improve retention and adherence in prevention programs. Trial registration This study is registered at Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials ACTRN1261000033004. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.04.014
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2013 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry N, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet- and Paper-Based Weight Loss Programs Tailored for Overweight and Obese Men', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 45 139-152 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-012-9424-z
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2013 Hutchesson MJ, Truby H, Callister R, Morgan PJ, Davies PSW, Collins CE, 'Can a web-based food record accurately assess energy intake in overweight and obese women? A pilot study', JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 26 140-144 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12094
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2013 Barnett LM, Hardy LL, Lubans DR, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Hills AP, Morgan PJ, 'Australian children lack the basic movement skills to be active and healthy', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24 82-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE12920
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, 'Pre-service primary school teachers' experiences of physical education', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 37 294-294 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12056
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2013 Barnett L, Cliff K, Morgan P, van Beurden E, 'Adolescents' perception of the relationship between movement skills, physical activity and sport', European Physical Education Review, 19 271-285 (2013) [C1]

Movement skill competence is important to organised youth physical activity participation, but it is unclear how adolescents view this relationship. The primary aim of this study ... [more]

Movement skill competence is important to organised youth physical activity participation, but it is unclear how adolescents view this relationship. The primary aim of this study was to explore adolescents' perception of the relationship between movement skills, physical activity and sport, and whether their perceptions differed according to extent of participation in organised physical activities. We recruited 33 (17 male) Grade 11 and 12 students (aged 16 to 18) from two secondary schools in Australia. Focus groups were allocated according to whether or not students participated in organised physical activity, where 'organised activity' was defined as activity which involved regular classes, training or competition, was reasonably structured or formal, or had a teacher, instructor or coach. There were three all-male 'organised' groups, one mixed-gender 'organised' group and one all-female 'not-organised' group. Students were asked about their attitudes towards physical activity and sport, the relationship between childhood skill proficiency and later physical activity and their perceptions of the appropriate time taken to learn movement skills. Group discussions lasted for approximately 50 minutes, were recorded and were then transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were read using a constant comparison method, in which quotes were continually compared to other quotes. A thematic analysis was conducted in which the transcripts were analysed inductively. Participation in organised sport had no bearing on opinions regarding whether lack of childhood skill development would negatively impact latter participation. It did, however, subtly influence opinions regarding whether skill could be successfully acquired later in life. When asked whether not having well-developed skills as a child would negatively impact on participation in sport/physical activity later in life, the response was mixed, but this was not related to their involvement in organised sport or activities. Students who believed early skill proficiency related to subsequent activity thought this was due to skill ability and motivation. An alternate view was that subsequent activity did not need to be based on skill proficiency; also, one's environment might change, resulting in differing opportunities/constraints. Students felt skills could be learnt at any time in life (dependent on motivation), but that learning skills at a younger age would be easier and that skills learnt later would not be as developed. Fear of failure was identified as a barrier to learning when older. We conclude that motivation towards participation in sport and physical activity is affected by adolescents' perception of their own movement skill ability. Therefore, developing children's actual and perceived movement skills may help to increase adolescent physical activity. Since those with intrinsic achievement orientations were not as inclined towards organised activity, we may also need to provide physical activity options that resonate with intrinsic achievement motivations. © The Author(s) 2013.

DOI 10.1177/1356336X13486061
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2013 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Dietary restriction and exercise improve airway inflammation and clinical outcomes in overweight and obese asthma: a randomized trial', Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 43 36-49 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/cea.12004
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg, Hayley Scott, Peter Gibson
2013 Hardy LL, Hills AP, Timperio A, Cliff D, Lubans D, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A hitchhiker's guide to assessing sedentary behaviour among young people: Deciding what method to use', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16 28-35 (2013) [C1]

Objective: To provide a user's guide for selecting an appropriate method to assess sedentary behaviours among children and adolescents. Design: While recommendations regarding spe... [more]

Objective: To provide a user's guide for selecting an appropriate method to assess sedentary behaviours among children and adolescents. Design: While recommendations regarding specific instruments are not provided, the guide offers information about key attributes and considerations for objective (accelerometry; inclinometers; direct observation; screen monitoring devices) and subjective (self-report; parent report; and time use diaries/logs) approaches to assess sedentary behaviour Attributes of instruments and other factors to be considered in the selection of assessment instruments include: population (age); sample size; respondent burden; method/delivery mode; assessment time frame; physical activity information required (data output); data management; measurement error; cost (instrument and administration) and other limitations. Methods: Expert consensus among members of the Australasian Child and Adolescent Obesity Research Network's (ACAORN) Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Special Interest Group. Results: We developed decision flow charts to assist researchers and practitioners select an appropriate method of assessing sedentary behaviour, identified attributes of each method and described five real-life scenarios to illustrate considerations associated with the selection of each method of measurement. Conclusions: It is important that researchers, practitioners and policy makers understand the strengths and limitations of different methods of assessing sedentary behaviour among youth, and are guided on selection of the most appropriate instrument/s to suit their needs. © 2012 .

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.05.010
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
Co-authors David Lubans
2013 Burrows T, Bray J, Morgan PJ, Collins C, 'Pilot intervention in an economically disadvantaged community: The back-to-basics after-school healthy lifestyle program', Nutrition and Dietetics, 70 270-277 (2013) [C1]

Aim: The objective of the present study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an after-school obesity prevention strategy for families. Methods: Ten children aged 5-1... [more]

Aim: The objective of the present study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of an after-school obesity prevention strategy for families. Methods: Ten children aged 5-12 years and their parents/guardians from an economically disadvantaged area participated in an after-school healthy lifestyle program, which was run over a school term. It consisted of five face-to-face sessions that were run fortnightly with an additional social barbeque session at program completion. Results: Feasibility was demonstrated by successful recruitment, retention (80%) and collection of a high percentage of usable data (96% at baseline, 80% at follow up). Acceptability was demonstrated by a session attendance of 83%, 100% positive enjoyment response. There was no significant change in anthropometrics, child or adult fruit and vegetable intake with no or little effect on all other dietary variables. Conclusions: The present study illustrated an approach to the translation of a program used in an evidence-based efficacious clinical trial into a sustainable community setting. © 2013 Dietitians Association of Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12023
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Nathan N, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: study protocol for the 'Physical Activity 4 Everyone' trial', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-57
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, David Lubans
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Bell AC, Barker D, Wiggers J, 'Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-75
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Social support from teachers mediates physical activity behavior change in children participating in the Fit-4-Fun intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-68
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 7
Co-authors David Lubans, Narelle Eather
2013 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent physical activity', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10 544-555 (2013) [C1]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adol... [more]

Background: This study aimed to develop and evaluate the construct validity and reliability of modernized social cognitive measures relating to physical activity behaviors in adolescents. Methods: An instrument was developed based on constructs from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and included the following scales: self-efficacy, situation (perceived physical environment), social support, behavioral strategies, and outcome expectations and expectancies. The questionnaire was administered in a sample of 171 adolescents (age = 13.6 ± 1.2 years, females = 61%). Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to examine model-fit for each scale using multiple indices, including chi-square index, comparative-fit index (CFI), goodness-of-fit index (GFI), and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Reliability properties were also examined (ICC and Cronbach's alpha). Results: Each scale represented a statistically sound measure: fit indices indicated each model to be an adequate-to-exact fit to the data; internal consistency was acceptable to good (a = 0.63-0.79); rank order repeatability was strong (ICC = 0.82-0.91). Conclusions: Results support the validity and reliability of social cognitive scales relating to physical activity among adolescents. As such, the developed scales have utility for the identification of potential social cognitive correlates of youth physical activity, mediators of physical activity behavior changes and the testing of theoretical models based on Social Cognitive Theory. © 2013 Human Kinetics, Inc..

Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2013 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the Fit4Fun intervention for improving physical fitness in a sample of primary school children: a pilot study', PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT PEDAGOGY, 18 389-411 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408989.2012.690375
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2013 Collins CE, Jensen ME, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Improvement in erectile function following weight loss in obese men: The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 7 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2013.07.004
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Jones RA, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur LA, 'Objectively measured sedentary behavior, physical activity, and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children', Obesity, 21 382-385 (2013) [C1]

Objective: This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), ... [more]

Objective: This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children. Design and Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were conducted among 126 children aged 5.5-9.9 years. Sedentary behavior, LPA, and MVPA were assessed using accelerometry. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], total cholesterol [TC], and triglycerides [TG]). Results: MVPA was not related to plasma lipids (P > 0.05). Independent of age, sex, energy intake, and waist circumference z-score, sedentary behavior and LPA were associated with HDL-C (ß = -0.23, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.04, P = 0.020; ß = 0.20, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.39, P = 0.036, respectively). The strength of the associations remained after additionally adjusting for MVPA (sedentary behavior: ß = -0.22, 95% CI -0.44 to 0.006, P = 0.056; LPA: ß = 0.19, 95% CI -0.005 to 0.38, P = 0.056, respectively). Conclusion: Substituting at least LPA for sedentary time may contribute to the development of healthy HDL-C levels among overweight and obese children, independent of their adiposity. Comprehensive prevention and treatment strategies to improve plasma HDL-C among overweight and obese children should target reductions in total sedentary time and promote the benefits of LPA, in addition to promoting healthy levels of adiposity, healthy dietary behaviors, and MVPA.

DOI 10.1002/oby.20005
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Wright IMR, Davies PSW, Callister R, 'Comparison of Energy Intake in Toddlers Assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire and Total Energy Expenditure Measured by the Doubly Labeled Water Method', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 113 459-463 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2012.09.021
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Ian Wright, Robin Callister
2012 Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, Collins CE, 'Explaining dietary intake in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools. A test of Social Cognitive Theory', Appetite, 58 517-524 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Sarah Costigan, Clare Collins, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Cotton W, Puglisi L, Miller J, 'Description and evaluation of a social cognitive model of physical activity behaviour tailored for adolescent girls', Health Education Research, 27 115-128 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Bray JF, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 55 408-411 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2012 Freeman EE, Fletcher R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Preventing and treating childhood obesity: Time to target fathers', International Journal of Obesity, 36 12-15 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Clare Collins, Emily Freeman, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: One-year outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls (NEAT Girls) cluster randomized controlled trial', Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 166 821-827 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 29
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'The impact of a workplace-based weight loss program on work-related outcomes in overweight male shift workers', Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 54 122-127 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Robin Callister, Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Jaenke RL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Warren JM, 'The impact of a school garden and cooking program on boys' and girls' fruit and vegetable preferences, taste rating, and intake', Health Education & Behavior, 39 131-141 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans
2012 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Behavioural factors related with successful weight loss 15 months post-enrolment in a commercial web-based weight-loss programme', Public Health Nutrition, 15 1299-1309 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2012 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones P, Fletcher K, Martin JE, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'A 12-week commercial web-based weight-loss program for overweight and obese adults: Randomized controlled trial comparing basic versus enhanced features', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 14 e57 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Potential moderators and mediators of intervention effects in an obesity prevention program for adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 519-525 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.03.011
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robin Callister, David Lubans
2012 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Relationship between body composition, inflammation and lung function in overweight and obese asthma', Respiratory Research, 13 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Peter Gibson, Manohar Garg, Robin Callister, Hayley Scott
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 13 393-408 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Myles Young, Robin Callister
2012 Nathan NK, Wolfenden L, Bell AC, Wyse R, Morgan PJ, Butler MT, et al., 'Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: A non-randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 651 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-651
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Weaver KE, Callister R, Dewar DL, Costigan SA, et al., 'Rationale and study protocol for the Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) group randomized controlled trial: A physical activity and fundamental movement skills intervention for primary schools in low-income communities', BMC Public Health, 12 1-11 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Development and evaluation of social cognitive measures related to adolescent dietary behaviours', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Callister R, 'Mediators of weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot study for overweight fathers', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 9 45 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2012 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of interventions using Motivational Interviewing for dietary and physical activity modification in adults: A systematic review', The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 10 S1-S12 (2012) [C3]
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins
2012 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Steele JR, Baur LA, 'Proficiency deficiency: Mastery of fundamental movement skills and skill components in overweight and obese children', Obesity, 20 1024-1033 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2011.241
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 10
2012 Morgan PJ, Saunders KL, Lubans DR, 'Improving physical self-perception in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools: Psychological outcomes from the Physical Activity Leaders randomized controlled trial', Pediatric Obesity, 7 e27-e32 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Kelty TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Efficacy and feasibility of the 'Girls' Recreational Activity Support Program Using Information Technology': A pilot randomised controlled trial', Advances in Physical Education, 2 10-16 (2012) [C1]
Co-authors Tracey Kelty, David Lubans
2011 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial study protocol', BMC Public Health, 11 902 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-902
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2011 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Wyse R, Wiggers JH, 'A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 10 534 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-534
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Okely AD, Cotton WG, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Puglisi L, Miller J, et al., 'A school-based intervention to promote physical activity among adolescent girls: Rationale, design, and baseline data from the Girls in Sport group randomised controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 11 658 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community effectiveness trial: Study protocol of a community-based healthy lifestyle program for fathers and their children', BMC Public Health, 11 876 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-876
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Ron Plotnikoff, Tracy Burrows, Adam Lloyd, Clare Collins, David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Robin Callister, Myles Young
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, McCormack AC, 'Adolescents and school sport: The relationship between beliefs, social support and physical self-perception', Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 16 237-250 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408989.2010.532784
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Jones RA, Sinn N, Campbell KJ, Hesketh K, Denney-Wilson E, Morgan PJ, et al., 'The importance of long-term follow-up in child and adolescent obesity prevention interventions', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 6 178-181 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/17477166.2011.575155
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough-and-tumble play: Implications for early childhood services', Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 36 131-138 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors David Lubans, Jennifer Stgeorge, Richard Fletcher
2011 Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Engaging men in weight loss: Experiences of men who participated in the male only SHED-IT pilot study', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 5 e239-e248 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2011.03.002
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, '12-month outcomes and process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT: An internet-based weight loss program targeting men', Obesity, 19 142-151 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2010.119
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2011 Hall LE, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Children's intake of fruit and selected energy-dense nutrient-poor foods is associated with fathers' intake', Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 111 1039-1044 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jada.2011.04.008
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans, Tracy Burrows
2011 Collins CE, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, et al., 'Parent diet modification, child activity, or both in obese children: An RCT', Pediatrics, 127 619-627 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2010-1518
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kim Colyvas, Tracy Burrows
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'Efficacy of a workplace-based weight loss program for overweight male shift workers: The Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating like a Rabbit) randomized controlled trial', Preventive Medicine, 52 317-325 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.031
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Aguiar EJ, Callister R, 'Randomized controlled trial of the Physical Activity Leaders (PALs) program for adolescent boys from disadvantaged secondary schools', Preventive Medicine, 52 239-246 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.009
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister
2011 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Steele JR, Jones RA, Colyvas KJ, Baur LA, 'Movement skills and physical activity in obese children: Randomized controlled trial', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43 90-100 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181e741e8
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Kim Colyvas
2011 Barnett LM, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Ball K, Lubans DR, 'A reverse pathway? Actual and perceived skill proficiency and physical activity', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43 898-904 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e3181fdfadd
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 33
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Eather N, Riley N, Smith CJ, 'Test-retest reliability of a battery of field-based health-related fitness measures for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 29 685-693 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2010.551215
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 18
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Narelle Eather, Ron Plotnikoff, Nicholas Riley
2011 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', International Journal of Obesity, 35 436-447 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2011 Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Effects of a preseason intervention on anthropometric characteristics of semiprofessional rugby league players', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25 432-440 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0b013e3181bf43eb
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Robin Callister
2011 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Callister R, 'Men participating in a weight-loss intervention are able to implement key dietary messages, but not those relating to vegetables or alcohol: the Self-Help, Exercise and Diet using Internet Technology (SHED-IT) study', Public Health Nutrition, 14 168-175 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980010001916
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2011 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Weight change in a commercial web-based weight loss program and its association with website use: Cohort study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13 e83 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2011 Lubans DR, Hesketh K, Cliff DP, Barnett LM, Salmon J, Dollman J, et al., 'A systematic review of the validity and reliability of sedentary behaviour measures used with children and adolescents', Obesity Reviews, 12 781-799 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 50
Co-authors David Lubans
2010 Jones RA, Warren JM, Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Cliff DP, et al., 'Process evaluation of the Hunter Illawarra kids challenge using parent support study: A multisite randomized controlled trial for the management of child obesity', Health Promotion Practice, 11 917-927 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1524839908328994
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2010 Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Warren JM, Cliff DP, et al., 'Multi-site randomized controlled trial of a child-centered physical activity program, a parent-centered dietary-modification program, or both in overweight children: The HIKCUPS study', Journal of Pediatrics, 157 388-394 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.03.028
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Cliff DP, Barnett LM, Okely AD, 'Fundamental movement skills in children and adolescents: Review of associated health benefits', Sports Medicine, 40 1019-1035 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2165/11536850-000000000-00000
Citations Scopus - 190Web of Science - 143
Co-authors David Lubans
2010 Barnett LM, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks LO, Beard JR, 'Gender differences in motor skill proficiency from childhood to adolescence: A longitudinal study', Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 81 162-170 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.5641/027013610x13088554297116
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 28
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Exploring the mechanisms of physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Program X intervention for adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 47 83-91 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.12.015
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2010 Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Quick GIE, Collins CE, 'The impact of nutrition education with and without a school garden on knowledge, vegetable intake and preferences and quality of school life among primary-school students', Public Health Nutrition, 13 1931-1940 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980010000959
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Dropout, nonusage attrition, and pretreatment predictors of nonusage attrition in a commercial web-based weight loss program', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 12 81-96 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.1640
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Participant characteristics and reach of a commercial web-based weight loss program', Nutrition & Dietetics, 67 267-274 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01474.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Jones PR, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of web-based interventions in achieving weight loss and weight loss maintenance in overweight and obese adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 11 306-321 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789x.2009.00646.x
Citations Scopus - 156Web of Science - 116
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2010 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Steele JR, 'The impact of child and adolescent obesity treatment interventions on physical activity: A systematic review', Obesity Reviews, 11 516-530 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2009.00625.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2010 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, McElduff P, Burrows TL, Warren JM, et al., 'The SHED-IT community trial study protocol: A randomised controlled trial of weight loss programs for overweight and obese men', BMC Public Health, 10 1-11 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-701
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2010 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones P, Fletcher K, Martin JE, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'Evaluation of a commercial web-based weight loss and weight loss maintenance program in overweight and obese adults: A randomized controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 10 669 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-669
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, et al., 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', BMC Public Health, 10 652 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2009 Barnett LM, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks LO, Zask A, Beard JR, 'Six year follow-up of students who participated in a school-based physical activity intervention: A longitudinal cohort study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 1-8 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-48
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'Exploring the mechanisms of weight loss in the SHED-IT intervention for overweight men: A mediation analysis', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6 Article 76 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-6-76
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 12
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'The SHED-IT Randomized Controlled Trial: Evaluation of an Internet-based weight-loss program for men', Obesity, 17 2025-2032 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2009.85
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 64
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Tudor-Locke C, 'A systematic review of studies using pedometers to promote physical activity among youth', Preventive Medicine, 48 307-315 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.02.014
Citations Scopus - 83Web of Science - 57
Co-authors David Lubans
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Boreham CA, Callister R, 'The relationship between heart rate intensity and pedometer step counts in adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 27 591-597 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640410802676687
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2009 Barnett L, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Lincoln D, Zask A, Beard J, 'Interrater objectivity for field-based fundamental motor skill assessment', Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 80 363-368 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2009 Barnett LM, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks LO, Beard JR, 'Childhood motor skill proficiency as a predictor of adolescent physical activity', Journal of Adolescent Health, 44 252-259 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.07.004
Citations Scopus - 170Web of Science - 117
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effects of integrating pedometers, parental materials, and e-mail support within an extracurricular school sport intervention', Journal of Adolescent Health, 44 176-183 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2008.06.020
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 40
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Social, psychological and behavioural correlates of pedometer step counts in a sample of Australian adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 141-147 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2007.06.010
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors David Lubans
2008 Morgan PJ, Hansen V, 'The relationship between PE biographies and PE teaching practices of classroom teachers', Sport, Education and Society, 13 373-391 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13573320802444994
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 15
2008 Morgan PJ, 'The course improvement flowchart: A description of a tool and process for the evaluation of university teaching', Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 5 1-14 (2008) [C1]
2008 Barnett LM, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Beard JR, 'Perceived sports competence mediates the relationship between childhood motor skill proficiency and adolescent physical activity and fitness: A longitudinal assessment', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5 1-12 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-5-40
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 59
2008 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, 'Non-specialist teachers' confidence to teach PE: The nature and influence of personal school experiences in PE', Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy, 13 1-29 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17408980701345550
2008 Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Cliff DP, Jones RA, Baur LA, 'Correlates of objectively measured physical activity in obese children', Obesity, 16 2634-2641 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2008.463
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 31
2008 Morgan PJ, Hansen V, 'Physical education in primary schools: Classroom teachers' perceptions of benefits and outcomes', Health Education Journal, 67 196-207 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0017896908094637
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of an extra-curricular school sport programme on determinants of objectively measured physical activity among adolescents', Health Education Journal, 67 305-320 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0017896908097072
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors David Lubans
2008 Morgan PJ, 'Teacher perceptions of physical education in the primary school: attitudes, values and curriculum preferences', Physical Educator, 65 46-56 (2008) [C1]
2008 Barnett LM, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks LO, Beard JR, 'Does childhood motor skill proficiency predict adolescent fitness?', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 40 2137-2144 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/mss.0b013e31818160d3
Citations Scopus - 111Web of Science - 82
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Evaluation of an extra-curricular school sport programme promoting lifestyle and lifetime activity for adolescents', Journal of Sports Sciences, 26 519-529 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02640410701624549
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 29
Co-authors David Lubans
2008 Morgan PJ, Hansen V, 'Classroom teachers' perceptions of the impact of barriers to teaching physical education on the quality of physical education programs', Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 79 506-516 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 38
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'The relationship between pedometer step counts and estimated VO2 max as determined by a submaximal fitness test in adolescents', Pediatric Exercise Science, 20 273-284 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2007 Warren JM, Golley RK, Collins CE, Okely AD, Jones RA, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Randomised controlled trials in overweight children: Practicalities and realities', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 2 73-85 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17477160601133671
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Clare Collins
2007 Jones RA, Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Steele JR, Warren JM, et al., 'The HIKCUPS trial: a multi-site randomized controlled trial of a combined physical activity skill-development and dietary modification program in overweight and obese children', BMC Public Health, 7 1-9 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-7-15
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2007 Lubans DR, Sylva K, Morgan PJ, 'Factors associated with physical activity in a sample of British secondary school students', Australian Journal of Educational & Developmental Psychology, 7 22-30 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors David Lubans
2007 Morgan PJ, Hansen V, 'Recommendations to Improve Primary School Physical Education: Classroom Teachers' Perspective', Journal of Educational Research, 101 99-111 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.3200/JOER.101.2.99-112
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 27
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'The 'Learning to Enjoy Activity with Friends' Programme', Education & Health, 25 10-14 (2007) [C2]
Co-authors David Lubans
2007 Lubans D, Morgan P, 'The 'learning to enjoy activity with friends' programme', Education and Health, 25 10-14 (2007) [C1]
Co-authors Phillip Morgan
2006 Morgan PJ, 'Preparing children for positive sporting experience', Every Child, 12 12-13 (2006) [C2]
2006 Morgan PJ, 'Obesity : what should schools be doing?', Leadership in Focus, 2-5 (2006) [C2]
2005 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, 'An Investigation of pre-service and primary school teachers' perspectives of PE teaching confidence and PE teacher education', ACHPER Healthy Lifestyles Journal, 52 7-13 (2005) [C1]
2005 Morgan PJ, 'Primary School Physical Education - Far from Realising Its Potential', Every Child, 11 20-21 (2005) [C3]
Show 188 more journal articles

Conference (199 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Lubans DR, Smith J, Miller A, Dally K, Morgan P, 'Reducing screen-time improves well-being in adolescent boys: findings from the ATLAS Cluster RCT' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Dally, David Lubans, Andrew Miller
2015 Young MD, Plotnikoff R, Collins C, Callister R, Morgan P, 'A test of social cognitive theory to explain physical activity changes in a weight loss program for men' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Morgan PJ, Lloyd A, Barnes A, Young M, Miller A, Lubans D, et al., 'Engaging fathers to improve family physical and mental health: the impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Adam Lloyd, Myles Young, Alyce Barnes, Andrew Miller
2015 Sutherland RL, Campbell L, Lubans D, Morgan P, Oakley A, Nathan N, et al., 'Mid-intervention findings from the Physical Activity 4 Every1 trial: a cluster RCT in secondary schools located in low-income communities' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Burrows TL, Lucas H, Morgan P, Collins, 'Evaluation of phase 2 of an after-school cooking skills program in a disadvantaged community: the Back-to-Basics program' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Krukowski R, Ells L, Harvey J, Morgan P, et al., 'Are weight loss interventions delivered using eHealth technologies effective? A systematic review with meta-analysis.', ISBNPA 2015: Advancing Behavior Change Science: Abstract Book (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Megan Rollo, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Thompson D, Collins CE, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Lee Ashton
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Pranata I, Skinner G, Collins CE, 'The ¿Be Positive Be Healthe¿ eHealth weight loss program for young women: A pilot study' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Geoff Skinner, Melinda Hutchesson, Ilung Pranata
2015 Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, Morgan PJ, Pranata I, Skinner G, Collins CE, 'Be Positive Be Healthe: A targeted and tailored eHealth weight loss program for young women', http://www.anzos2015.org/assets/ANZOS2015/ANZOS-2015-Abstracts.pdf (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ilung Pranata
2015 Lloyd AB, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Fathers¿ parenting practices mediate changes in children's dietary and physical activity behaviours: findings from the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community randomised controlled trial' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Adam Lloyd
2015 Collins, Aguiar E, Morgan P, Plotnikoff R, Young M, Callister R, 'Improvements in diet, fitness and weight in men following the PULSE type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention program; arandomised controlled trial' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Myles Young, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men: a cross-sectional study.' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Young men's motivators and barriers to healthy eating and their preferences for a healthy eating intervention' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Improvements in biomarkers of type 2 diabetes risk following a home-based lifestyle intervention: the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ a multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Reviews (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12151
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2014 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins CE, 'Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature.', Obesity Reviews (2014)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2014 Webster CA, Schaefer J, Morgan P, Lubans D, Penney D, Okely A, Parrish A-M, 'Defining Quality Physical Education: An Analysis of International Documents', RESEARCH QUARTERLY FOR EXERCISE AND SPORT (2014) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2014 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Improvements in weight, HbA1C and fitness following lifestyle intervention: the PULSE trial for type 2 diabetes prevention in men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2014, 18(S1): e68 (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.11.298
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, McElduff P, 'Physical activity as a mediator of weight loss in mid­-age women: mediation analysis of the 40-­Something RCT', 2013 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins
2013 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'A health professional intervention can increase vigorous physical activity in mid-­age women at 12 months: results from the 40-­Something RCT', 2013 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis
2013 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Neve M, Callister R, 'Efficacy of a web-­based commercial weight loss program applying automated and personalised e­-feedback', 2013 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2013 Aguiar E, Morgan P, Collins C, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Characteristics of men evaluated as at high risk of type 2 diabetes based on the Australian diabetes risk assessment tool', IDF 2013 World Diabetes Congress Abstracts (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister
2013 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'An examination of young women¿s weight loss expectations', Nutrition and Dietetics (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2013 Williams L, Hollis J, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Can a relatively low intensity, Motivational Interviewing based intervention prevent weight gain in mid-age women? Outcomes of the 40-Something RCT', Nutrition and Dietetics (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Clare Collins
2013 Lloyd A, Lubans D, Plotnikoff R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'A comparison of maternal and paternal parenting practices and their influence on children¿s physical activity, screen-time, diet and adiposity', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Adam Lloyd, David Lubans
2013 Aguiar E, Morgan P, Collins CE, Plotnikoff R, Callister R, 'Preliminary outcomes from the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ A multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Lee Ashton
2013 Lubans DR, Dewar D, Plotnikoff RC, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Two Year Outcomes and Moderators of Intervention Effects from the NEAT Girls Obesity Prevention Group Randomised Controlled Trial.', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Collins CE, Jensen MJ, Young MD, Callister R, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, 'Erectile function improves in obese men following weight loss during the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Myles Young, Robin Callister
2013 Callister R, Williams R, Wood L, Morgan P, Collins CE, 'Energy and appetite regulating hormones: Sex and weight category differences prior to weight loss', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Lisa Wood
2013 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'Preliminary outcomes from the PULSE randomised controlled trial ¿ a multi-component type 2 diabetes prevention program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2013 Lubans D, Dewar D, Plotnikoff R, Okely AD, Collins CE, Batterham M, Morgan PJ, 'Two year outcomes and moderators of intervention effects from the NEAT Girls obesity prevention group randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Paras L, James E, Morgan PJ, Lynagh M, 'The FamilyFit program: Feasibility of an innovative family-based intervention to increase physical activity levels in primary school-aged children', Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference (2013) [E3]
2013 Hollis J, Williams L, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'A health professional motivational interviewing intervention is an acceptable and feasible weight gain prevention treatment for mid-age women: process evaluation results from the 40-Something RCT', The Australian New Zealand Obesity Society Annual Scientific Meeting 2013 Abstracts (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lauren Williams, Jenna Hollis
2013 Collins CE, Burrows T, Lucas H, Morgan PJ, 'Translating an efficacious child obesity RCT to socio-economically disadvantaged communities', The Proceedings of The 2nd Annual NHMRC Research Translation Faculty Symposium: From Bench to Bourke (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2013 Morgan PJ, Smith J, Plotnikoff R, Dally K, Finn T, Okley A, et al., 'Group randomised controlled trial of the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-Time (ATLAS) obesity prevention intervention for adolescent boys living in low-income communities', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference (2013) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Jordan Smith, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 Lubans D, Lonsdale C, Morgan PJ, Smith J, Dally K, Plotnikoff R, 'Instrument development and initial validity for a scale to measure adolescents¿ motivation to limit their screen time', The Proceedings of The Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine 10th Annual Scientific Conference (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2013 O'Brien K, Neve M, Morgan P, Callister R, Collins C, 'Participants in a commercial online weight loss program can improve diet quality during weight loss: A randomized controlled trial', Obesity Facts: the European journal of obesity (2013) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2012 Morgan PJ, MacDonald D, Clark V, Telford A, Dudley D, Ribeiro J, et al., 'Schools, teachers and physical education.', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(6) (Dec 2012 Suppl.) (2012)
2012 Morgan PJ, Mutrie N, Adams E, Mechelen W, McKay H, Kolbe-Alexander T, Anderssen S, '2020 vision: Interventions for physical activity and sedentary behaviour.', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(6) (Dec 2012 Suppl.) (2012)
2012 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Costigan SA, 'Explaining physical activity behaviour in adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: A test of social cognitive theory', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, 'Relationship between physical activity outcomes and adherence to paper-based social cognitive tasks in a weight loss program for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, et al., 'Insights into engaging men in weight loss: Process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT of gender-sensitised weight loss programs for overweight men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Myles Young
2012 Paras LE, James EL, Morgan PJ, Lynagh MC, 'The FamilyFIT Program: Feasibility of an innovative family-based intervention designed to increase physical activity levels', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James, Marita Lynagh
2012 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'An examination of the association between a mother's parenting practices relating to physical activity and their daughter's physical activity levels', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes
2012 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'The impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community RCT on fathers' physical activity-related parenting practices and children's physical activity', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans, Adam Lloyd
2012 Weaver K, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Dewar DL, Finn TL, et al., 'Rationale and intervention description of the Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills physical activity intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2012 Stacey FG, James EL, Lubans DR, Chapman K, Boyes AW, Courneya K, et al., 'Acceptability of home-based resistance training for cancer survivors', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Erica James, Ron Plotnikoff, Allison Boyes
2012 Hardy LL, Hills A, Timperio A, Cliff D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A hitchhiker's guide to assessing sedentary behavior among young people: Deciding what method to use', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Eather N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Improving health-related fitness in children: The Fit-4-Fun randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Narelle Eather, David Lubans
2012 Bell C, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Jones J, Wiggers JH, 'Predictors of preschool age children's physical activity at long day care', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2012 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Preliminary findings of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) Minds feasibility study: A curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Nicholas Riley
2012 Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of lifestyle interventions including resistance training for type 2 diabetes prevention: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Cliff D, Okely T, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Jones RA, Baur L, 'Levels and bouts of sedentary behaviour and physical activity: Associations with cardio-metabolic health in overweight and obese children', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Scott J, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Trost S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Pedometer protocols for measuring physical activity: An examination of reactivity, tampering and perceptions among adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'Physical activity outcomes from the SHED-IT RCT: An evaluation of theoretically-based, gender-sensitised weight loss programs for men', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2012 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, Collins CE, Batterham M, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls: Outcomes of the nutrition and enjoyable activity for teen girls cluster randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 James EL, Boyes AW, Courbeya K, Lubans DR, Stacey FG, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A home-based resistance training program for survivors of prostate cancer: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Allison Boyes, Erica James, David Lubans
2012 Smith J, Morgan PJ, Saunders KL, Lubans DR, 'Improving physical self-perception in adolescent boys from disadvantaged communities: Psychological outcomes from the PALs intervention', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2012 Bray JF, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Evaluation of the 'Back to Basics' After-School Cooking Club for children and their families from a socio-economically disadvantaged community', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Use of motivational enhancement therapy in a dietitian-led intervention results in decreased energy and fat intake: Behaviour change results from the 40-something RCT', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams, Clare Collins
2012 Aguiar EJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, 'The effectiveness of multi-component Type 2 Diabetes prevention programs including diet, aerobic exercise and resistance training: a systematic review and meta-analyses', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Callister R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Sex differences in the time course of weight loss using a commercial online weight-loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2012 Cliff D, Okely A, Burrows TL, Jones R, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur L, 'Associations between sedentary behaviour, physical activity and cardio-metabolic health in overweight and obese children', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Collins CE, Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Schumacher T, Plotnikoff RC, 'Associations between mother and daughter dietary intakes', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Collins CE, Schumacher R, Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Finn TL, Morgan PJ, et al., 'Dietary patterns of adolescent girls attending schools in low-income communities highlight inadequate consumption of core food groups', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, David Lubans, Clare Collins
2012 Collins CE, Williams A, Morgan PJ, Lloyd AB, Burrows TL, 'The association between father-child dietary intakes: Results from the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Effectiveness of interventions using motivational interviewing for physical activity and dietary modification in adults: A systematic review', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis, Lauren Williams
2012 Finn TL, Plotnikoff RC, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Okely A, Dewar DL, et al., 'Preventing obesity among adolescent girls in low-income secondary schools: One year outcomes of the NEAT girls randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2012 Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Young MD, Berry NJ, et al., 'The SHED-IT Community Trial: A randomised controlled trial of Internet- and paper-based weight loss programs tailored for overweight and obese men', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Evaluating weight loss, website use, and attrition in commercial web-based weight loss programs', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2012 Riddiford-Harland D, Steele J, Baur L, Cliff D, Okely A, Morgan PJ, Jones R, 'Effects of a physical activity program on plantar pressures in overweight and obese children: RCT findings at 12 months follow-up', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
2012 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Weight loss improves clinical asthma outcomes and airway inflammation in overweight and obese asthmatics', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg, Hayley Scott, Peter Gibson
2012 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of male-only weight loss and weight loss maintenance interventions: A systematic review with meta-analysis', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff
2012 Burrows TL, Collins CE, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Davies P, 'Who is the most accurate reporter of child energy intake - mothers, fathers or the child? - A doubly labelled water validation study of an FFQ', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2012 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Truby H, Wright IM, Morgan PJ, Davies P, Callister R, 'Doubly labelled water validation of toddler total energy intake assessed by a food frequency questionnaire', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Ian Wright
2012 Martin L, Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Guest M, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Characteristics and dietary intakes of adult mis-reporters entering a weight loss study', 8th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM 8). Abstract Book (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2011 Burrows TL, Collins CE, Truby H, Callister RJ, Morgan PJ, Davies PSW, 'Doubly labelled water validation of child versus parent report of total energy intake by food frequency questionnaire', Australasian Medical Journal (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Robert Callister
2011 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'The influence of body composition and inflammation on lung function in asthma', Australasian Medical Journal (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Robin Callister, Lisa Wood, Peter Gibson, Manohar Garg
2011 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, McElduff P, Callister R, '6-Month outcomes in a randomised controlled trial comparing basic and enhanced versions of a commercial web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson
2011 Collins CE, Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, Morgan PJ, 'Changes in dietary intake after 12-week commercial web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011 Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, Callister R, Okely AD, et al., 'Effective strategies for the recruitment of overweight men and their children into a community trial: The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids recruitment story', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Adam Lloyd, Myles Young, Clare Collins, Richard Fletcher, Andrew Miller, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows
2011 Morgan PJ, 'Child obesity prevention: Interventions engaging mums and dads', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'Development of a male-only weight loss maintenance program: Evaluating the SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance program materials for quality, suitability and theoretical merit', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Myles Young
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'Investigating the measurement and operationalisation of obesity-related parenting variables of overweight fathers in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2011 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Behavioural factors associated with long-term weight loss success in a commercial web-based weight loss program', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2011 Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Evaluation of a theory-based, after-school cooking club for children and their families living in a socio-economically disadvantaged community', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2011 Callister R, Lucas AR, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Sex differences in weight loss and biomarker responses to an online weight loss program', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Plotnikoff RC, 'Dietary and physical activity behaviours of overweight and obese male shift workers', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Robin Callister
2011 Cliff D, Okely A, Jones R, Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Baur L, 'Associations between objectively measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2011 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, 'The M.A.D.E (Mothers and Daughters Exercising) 4 LIFE feasibility study: Description of a theory-based physical activity intervention targeting mothers and their daughters', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes
2011 Eather N, Morgan PJ, 'The Fit 4 Fun Program: promoting fitness and health in primary school children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Narelle Eather
2011 Fletcher K, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Effectiveness of interventions with a dietary component on weight loss maintenance: A systematic review', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011 Lloyd AB, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Plotnikoff RC, 'A description of the operationalisation and measurement of key parenting variables in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program for overweight fathers and their children', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Adam Lloyd, Ron Plotnikoff, David Lubans
2011 Lubans DR, Okely A, Morgan PJ, Cotton W, Puglisi L, Miller J, 'Description and evaluation of a social cognitive model of physical activity behavior tailored for adolescent girls', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyr039
Co-authors David Lubans
2011 Paras LE, Morgan PJ, Lynagh MC, James EL, Bonevski B, 'A family focused community-based RCT to increase physical activity levels in children and their parents: Rationale and intervention description of the FamilyFIT study', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Billie Bonevski, Erica James
2011 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Methodology of the E.A.S.Y. (Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young) minds study: evaluation of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Nicholas Riley
2011 Williams LT, Hollis JL, McQualter KA, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Can an intervention in mid-age women prevent weight gain associated with menopause? Data from the 40-Something Study', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Lauren Williams, Jenna Hollis
2011 Young MD, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The SHED-IT Weight Loss Maintenance study: Development of a theory-based weight loss maintenance intervention exclusively targeting men', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'Efficacy of a workplace-based weight loss program for overweight male shift workers: the Workplace POWER (Preventing Obesity Without Eating like a Rabbit) randomized controlled trial', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.031
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Robin Callister
2011 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Truby H, Morgan PJ, Davies P, Callister R, 'Accuracy of self-reported energy intake using a web-based food diary', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2011 Dewar DL, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Callister R, Okely T, 'The Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) randomized controlled trial for adolescent girls from disadvantaged secondary schools: Rationale, study protocol, and baseline results', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-652
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, Cook AT, Berthon B, Mitchell S, Callister R, 'The impact of a workplace-based weight loss program on work-related outcomes in overweight male shift workers', Proceedings of the 47th Annual Conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31824329ab
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Robin Callister, Alyce Barnes
2011 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, McElduff P, Callister R, 'Efficacy of commercial web-based weight loss: A randomized controlled trial comparing programs with basic versus enhanced features', Journal of the American Dietetic Association (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2011 Morgan PJ, 'Innovative approaches to weight loss in men', National Health and Medical Research Council 75th Anniversary Scientific Symposium: Research for a Healthy Future. Symposium Handbook (2011) [E3]
2011 Morgan PJ, 'Childhood obesity prevention: Interventions engaging mums and dads.', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 5(Supplement 1) (2011)
2011 Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Neve M, McElduff P, Callister R, '6-Month outcomes in a randomized controlled trial comparing basic and enhanced versions of a commercial web-based weight loss program.', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 5(Supplement 1) (2011)
2011 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Clinical asthma outcomes are improved after body fat reduction in overweight and obese asthmatics', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg, Hayley Scott, Peter Gibson
2011 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Success in a weight loss trial is greatest in subjects with more severe asthma', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Peter Gibson, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg, Hayley Scott
2011 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Success in a weight loss trial is related to asthma severity', Respirology (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Peter Gibson, Hayley Scott, Manohar Garg, Lisa Wood
2011 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Body fat reduction improves clinical asthma outcomes in overweight and obese asthma', Respirology (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Peter Gibson, Lisa Wood, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg
2011 Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The Back to Basics Cooking Club study: A theory based, family-focussed nutrition intervention in a socio-economically disadvantaged community', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2011 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'The Healthy Dads Healthy Kids randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts (2011) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authors Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2011 Hollis JL, Williams LT, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The application of motivational interviewing to a weight control intervention for mid age women: The 40-something study', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Lauren Williams, Clare Collins, Jenna Hollis
2011 Williams LT, Hollis JL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Can a weight gain prevention intervention in mid-age women prevent development of metabolic syndrome usually associated with menopause? The 40-something study', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Clare Collins, Lauren Williams
2010 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Caloric restriction and exercise improve clinical asthma outcomes in overweight and obese asthma', Obesity Research & Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Hayley Scott, Peter Gibson, Robin Callister, Manohar Garg, Lisa Wood
2010 Bray JF, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Burrows TL, 'Effectiveness of parent-centred interventions for the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity in community settings: A systematic review', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2010 Burrows TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely T, Collins CE, 'Dietary outcomes of the healthy dads healthy kids randomised controlled trial', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1097/MPG.0b013e318259aee6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2010 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Cook AT, Berthon B, Collins CE, Plotnikoff RC, 'Characteristics of male shift workers as a target for a workplace-based weight loss program', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Alyce Barnes, Ron Plotnikoff, Clare Collins
2010 Berthon B, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Callister R, Cook AT, Plotnikoff RC, 'Dietary habits of male shift workers enrolled in the workplace power program', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2010 Cook AT, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, 'Rationale and intervention description of the M.A.D.E. (Mothers and Daughters Eating/Exercising) 4 Fun feasibility study: An obesity prevention program for mothers and their daughters', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Alyce Barnes
2010 Kelty TL, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'The Girls Recreational Activity Support Program using Internet Technology (GRASP-IT) feasibility and preliminary efficacy', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Tracey Kelty
2010 Saunders KL, Morgan PJ, Warren JM, Lubans DR, Quick GIE, Collins CE, 'Impact of a school garden-enhanced nutrition education on primary students vegetable intake and preferences, knowledge, and quality of school life', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans
2010 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Caloric consumption and exercise improve clinical asthma outcomes in overweight and obese asthma', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Lisa Wood, Manohar Garg, Robin Callister, Hayley Scott
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Exploring the effects of the physical activity leaders (PALs) intervention for low-active adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools: A mediation analysis', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, David Lubans
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Burrows TL, Collins CE, et al., 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Richard Fletcher, Robin Callister, Myles Young, Tracy Burrows, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, McElduff P, Morgan PJ, 'Weight change among participants who subscribe to a commerical-web based weight loss program for 1-year', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, McElduff P, Collins CE, 'Is website use associated with weight loss in a commercial web-based weight loss program?', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2010 Paras LE, Morgan PJ, Lynagh MC, James EL, Bonevski B, 'Rationale and intervention description of the familyFIT study: A family-focused community-based RCT, to increase physical activity levels in children and their parents', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James, Marita Lynagh, Billie Bonevski
2010 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Fletcher K, Martin JE, Jones P, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial using a commerical web-based weight loss program', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2010 Eather A, Morgan PJ, 'The Fit 4 Fun Program: A curriculum-based approach to promoting health-related fitness in primary school children', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Narelle Eather
2010 Riley N, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Rationale and intervention description of a primary school-based program to integrate physical activity across the curriculum and engage children in movement-based learning', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Nicholas Riley
2010 Fletcher R, May C, St George JM, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, 'Fathers' perceptions of rough and tumble play', 11th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference Proceedings (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Stgeorge, David Lubans, Richard Fletcher
2010 Scott HA, Gibson PG, Garg ML, Pretto JJ, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Wood LG, 'Clinical asthma outcomes are improved by caloric restriction and exercise in overweight and obese asthma', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Lisa Wood, Peter Gibson, Hayley Scott, Manohar Garg, Robin Callister
2010 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, 'Strategies For Successful Weight Loss In Men: Lessons From The SHED-IT Randomised Controlled Trial', MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2010 Barnett L, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Ball K, Lubans DR, 'Evidence for a reciprocal dynamic relationship between fundamental motor skill proficiency, perceived sports competence, and physical activity', Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2010 Dewar D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Plotnikoff RC, 'The development of scales for assessing social cognitive constructs relating to physical activity participation in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Aguiar EJ, Callister R, 'Randomised controlled trial of the Physical Activity Leaders (PALs) program for low-active adolescent boys from disadvantaged secondary schools', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. Program and Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister
2010 Bray JF, Burrows TL, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'The prevention of childhood obesity in economically disadvantage communities: Process evaluation of an after-school program for families', Nutrition & Dietetics (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2010 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Web-based weight loss: How can the internet support dietitians to treat overweight and obese clients?', Nutrition & Dietetics (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren J, Callister R, '12-month outcomes and process evaluation of the SHED-IT RCT: An Internet-based weight loss program targeting men', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2010.119
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2010 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Okely AD, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, Collins CE, 'The 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' randomized controlled trial: Efficacy of a healthy lifestyle program for overweight fathers and their children', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2010.151
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Robin Callister, Tracy Burrows, Richard Fletcher
2010 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Oakley AD, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, Jones RA, et al., 'HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) reduces BMI z-score up to 2 years: Results of a multi-site randomized trial for overweight children', Obesity Reviews (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2009 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren JM, Collins CE, 'Strategies for successful weight loss in men: Lessons from the SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, '12-month outcomes of an Internet-based weight loss program for men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2009 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Weight loss in the real world: Outcomes of a commercial web-based weight loss program', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2009 Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, et al., 'Efficacy of HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) in reducing BMI Z-score at 24 months: Results of a multi-site randomised trial for overweight 5-9 year olds', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, 'Rationale and intervention description of a school-based obesity prevention program for economically disadvantaged adolescent boys', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister
2009 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Steele JR, 'The impact of child and adolescent obesity treatment interventions on physical activity: A systematic review', 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australia/New Zealand Obesity Society: Meeting Proceedings & Abstract Book (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2009.00625.x
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, McCormack AC, 'Exploring adolescents' perceptions of school sport: A survey of secondary school students from the Hunter Region and Central Coast', 26th ACHPER International Conference: Creating Active Futures: Program & Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2009 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Callister RJ, Morgan PJ, 'Validity of self-reported energy intake from a web-based food diary before and after a web-based weight loss program', 7th International Conference on Diet and Activity Methods (ICDAM7): Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robert Callister
2009 Callister R, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Strategies used to lose weight in the SHED-IT weight loss study for men', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Clare Collins, David Lubans
2009 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Burrows TL, Bray JF, Fletcher R, et al., 'Using mediation analysis to explain weight loss in the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, David Lubans, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Fletcher R, Bray JF, Okely T, et al., 'Engaging overweight men to improve their health: Lessons learnt from the 'SHED-IT' and 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trials', National Men's Health Gathering 2009: Program and Abstracts (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher
2009 Hutchesson MJ, Callister R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Under-reporting of energy intake among overweight women using a web-based food diary', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1159/000248277
Co-authors Robin Callister, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2009 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Warren JM, Callister R, 'Dietary intake changes in men participating in the SHED-IT weight loss intervention', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2009 Hutchesson MJ, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, 'Predictors of retention rates in a 12-week commerical web-based weight loss program', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2009 Jaenke R, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Quick GIE, Warren JM, 'Does a school garden program have a differential impact on vegetable intakes in boys versus girls attending primary school?', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins
2009 Quick GIE, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Lubans DR, Saunders KL, Warren JM, 'Process evaluation of a primary school garden-enhanced nutrition curriculum', Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins
2009 Barnett L, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks L, Beard J, 'Longitudinal evidence for the importance of motor skill proficiency to physical activity', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
2009 Cliff D, Okely T, Morgan PJ, Steele J, Jones R, Baur L, 'Efficacy of a skill development program in promoting motor skill proficiency and physical activity in overweight children', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
2009 Fernance D, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'The development of scales for assessing social cognitive constructs relating to physical activity participation in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2009 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Bray JF, Burrows TL, Fletcher R, et al., 'Intervention description and preliminary findings of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Richard Fletcher, David Lubans, Tracy Burrows
2009 Morgan PJ, McIntyre F, Hands B, Cliff D, Barnett L, Walkley J, Okely T, 'How important is motor skill proficiency to physical activity participation?', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
2009 Callister R, Simpson N, Dyson RM, Miller AD, Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, 'Reliability of the ImpSFB7 bio-impedance analyser for body composition analysis', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2009) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Andrew Miller, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Callister R, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Evaluation of the impact of an internet-based weight loss program for men: The SHED-IT randomised controlled trial', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2008 Barnett L, Morgan PJ, Van Beurden E, Beard J, 'Does perceived sports competence mediate between childhood motor skill proficiency and adolescent physical activity?', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2008) [E3]
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Effects of a school-based intervention incorporating pedometers and email support to promote physical activity and health eating in adolescents', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, David Lubans, Robin Callister
2008 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Jones PR, Collins CE, 'Effectiveness of web-based interventions in achieving weight loss and weight maintenance', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2008 Morgan PJ, Lubans DR, Collins CE, Warren JM, Callister R, 'The SHED-IT randomized controlled trial: Evaluation of an Internet-based weight loss program for men', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008 (2008) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Clare Collins, Robin Callister
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Tudor-Locke C, 'A review of studies using pedometers to promote physical activity among youth', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008 (2008) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2008 Riddiford-Harland DL, Steele R, Baur LA, Cliff DP, Okely AP, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, 'Plantar pressure, physical activity, motor development and obesity: Are these moderated by an activity program?', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008 (2008) [E3]
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Callister R, Warren J, Collins CE, 'Hypothesized mediators of weight change in an Internet-based weight loss intervention for overweight men: The self-help exercise & diet using information technology (SHED-IT) RCT', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008 (2008) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Hutchesson MJ, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Who enrols in a commercially available web-based weight loss program?', Proceedings of the Australian Health and Medical Research Congress 2008 (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2008 Cliff D, Okely A, Morgan P, Steele J, Jones R, Baur L, 'Efficacy of HIKCUPS (Hunter & Illawarra Kids' Challenge Using Parent Support) in Promoting Movement Competency, Perceived Competence and Physical Activity at 1-year Follow-Up: Results of a Multi-Site Randomized Trial for Overweight 5-9 Year Olds', OBESITY (2008) [E3]
2008 Barnett L, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks L, Beard J, 'Do skilled children become active adolescents?', 55th Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (2008) [E3]
2008 Riddiford-Harland DL, Steele JR, Baur LA, Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, 'What is the effect of a physical activity program on foot structure & function in overweight & obese children?', Proceedings: ESM 2008 (2008) [E3]
2008 Barnett L, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Brooks L, Beard J, 'Do skilled children become fit adolescents?', Program & Abstracts: 7th Annual Conference of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (2008) [E3]
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Boreham C, Callister R, 'The relationship between heart rate intensity and pedometer step counts in adolescents', Proceedings of the 3rd Australian Association for Exercise and Sports Science Conference and the 5th Sports Dietitians Australia Update: From Research to Practice (2008) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans, Robin Callister, Clare Collins
2008 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, Callister R, 'The relationship between pedometer step counts and cardiorespiratory fitness as determined by a submaximal fitness test in adolescents', Proceedings of the 3rd Australian Association for Exercise and Sports Science Conference and the 5th Sports Dietitians Australia Update: From Research to Practice (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Robin Callister, David Lubans
2007 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Steele JS, Jones RA, 'Relationships between objectively measured physical activity, movement competency and psychosocial outcomes in overweight and obese children', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport (2007) [E3]
2007 Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Patterson MJ, Warren JM, et al., 'Multi-site randomised trial of a weight management program for overweight and obese children: 6- and 12-mo outcomes from HIKUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge using Parent Support)', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2007 Riddiford-Harland D, Steele J, Baur L, Cliff D, Okley A, Morgan PJ, Jones R, 'Plantar pressure and physical activity: Is there a relationship?', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Morgan PJ, Okely AD, Cliff DP, Jones RA, Steele JR, 'Correlates of physical activity among a sample Of overweight and obese children', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Jones RA, Warren JM, Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Cliff DP, et al., 'Process evaluation of the HIKCUPS Study: A multi-site randomised controlled trial for the management of child obesity', ASSO 15th Annual Scientific Meeting 2007. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins
2007 Collins CE, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Warren JM, Cliff DP, et al., 'Efficacy of HIKCUPS (Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support) in reducing BMI z-score at 1 year: Results of a multi-site randomized trial for overweight 5-9 year olds', Annual Scientific Meeting of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Effects of an extra-curricular school sport program on lifestyle physical activity and sedentary behaviour', International Conference on Physical Activity & Obesity in Children. Science, Policy, Practice. Presentation and Poster Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2007 Barnett L, Van Beurden E, Morgan PJ, Beard J, 'Does motor skill proficiency as a child influence physical activity participation as an adolescent?: The Physical Activity and Skills Study (PASS)', PACE Yourself 2007: 25th National/International ACHPER Biennial Conference. Book of Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2007 Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, 'Impact of an extra-curricular school sport programme on potential determinants of physical activity', Pace Yourself 2007: The 25th National/International ACHPER Biennial Conference. Book of Abstracts (2007) [E3]
Co-authors David Lubans
2007 Morgan PJ, Hansen V, 'The impact of barriers to teaching PE on the quality of PE programs delivered by classroom teachers', Pace Yourself 2007: The 25th National/International ACHPER Biennial Conference. Book of Abstracts (2007) [E3]
2006 Morgan PJ, Cliff D, Okely A, Puglisi L, 'Promoting movement skills, self-confidence and physical activity in overweight children: the HIKCUPS Physical Activity Treatment Program', 10th International Congress on Obesity - Abstract Book (2006) [E3]
2005 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, 'Influences on physical education teacher efficacy: A causal analysis focusing on the primary school teacher', Annual Meeting Program - American Educational Research Association (2005) [E3]
2005 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, ''I know it's important but I'd rather teach something else!': An investigation into generalist teacher's perceptions of physical education in the primary school curriculum', AARE 2004 Conference Papers Collection (2005) [E1]
2005 Smith SR, Robinson GL, Arthur-Kelly MD, Morgan PJ, 'The relationship between instructional differentiation, student diversity and academic-engagement: A pilot observation study', AARE 2004 Conference Papers Collection (2005) [E2]
Co-authors Michael Arthur-Kelly
2005 Smith SR, Robinson GL, Arthur-Kelly MD, Morgan PJ, 'Teachers' perceptions of instructional differentiation to cater for student diversity: A pilot survey study', AARE 2004 Conference Papers Collection (2005) [E2]
Co-authors Michael Arthur-Kelly
2005 Warren JM, Okley A, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones R, Burrows TL, et al., 'The realities of undertaking a randomised controlled trial in children : experience from the HICKUPS study', Proceedings of the 14th Annual Scientific Meeting of Australasian Society for the Study of Obesity (2005) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2004 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, ''I know it's important but I'd rather teach something else!': An investigation into generalist teachers' perceptions of physical education in the primary school curriculum', Abstracts of Papers (2004) [E3]
2004 Smith SR, Robinson GL, Arthur-Kelly MD, Morgan PJ, 'The relationship between instructional differentiation, student diversity and academic-engagement', Abstracts of Papers (2004) [E3]
Co-authors Michael Arthur-Kelly
2002 Morgan PJ, 'Physical Educators' Perceptions about Physical Education: An Analysis of the Prospective and Practising Teacher', AARE 2002 Conference Papers (2002) [E2]
2001 Morgan PJ, Bourke SF, Thompson KW, 'The influence of personal school physical education experiences on non-specialist teachers' attitudes', AARE 2001 = Conference Papers, Abstracts (2001) [E2]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 57
Total funding $4,488,967

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20165 grants / $989,659

Evidence-based physical activity promotion in primary schools: Improving children’s health through sustainable partnerships$493,478

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Dr Chris Lonsdale, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Mrs Kristen Cohen, Professor Jo Salmon, Dr Philip Parker, Professor Marjory Moodie, Professor Heather McKay
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1600623
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Scheduling frequent opportunities for outdoor play – a simple approach to increase physical activity in childcare$350,732

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1400149
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Thinking while Moving (EASY Minds)$70,000

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team Doctor Nick Riley, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans
Scheme NSW School Support Unit
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600482
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids UK: a cultural adaptation and feasibility study of a weight management programme for fathers of younger children$60,449

Funding body: National Institute for Health Research

Funding body National Institute for Health Research
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Myles Young, Professor Kate Jolly, Professor Peymane Adab, Ms Andrea Roalfe, Ms Adrienne Burgess, Dr Emma Frew, Dr Amanda Daley, Dr Manbinder Sidhu, Dr Laura Jones, Dr Miranda Pallan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600394
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Director's Award for Mid-Career Research$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501473
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20153 grants / $42,000

Greaves Family Early Career Support Grants$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Myles Young, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Greaves Family Early Career Support Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501453
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Myles Young, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500657
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

International Society of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) 14th Annual Meeting, Edinburgh Scotland, 3-6 June 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500695
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20147 grants / $434,588

Engaging dads and daughters to increase physical activity and social and emotional well-being in pre-adolescent girls: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Exercising and Empowered) program$327,813

Funding body: Port Waratah Coal Services Limited

Funding body Port Waratah Coal Services Limited
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Alyce Barnes, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Myles Young
Scheme Community Investment and Partnership Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401411
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Engaging fathers to improve physical activity levels and social-emotional well-being in their daughters: The DADEE (Dads And Daughters Enjoying Exercise) study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather, Doctor Alyce Barnes
Scheme Youth Research Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301335
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Evaluation of a multi-component intervention to reduce screen-time in adolescents: The ‘Stand Up for Healthy Minds’ study$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Geoffrey Skinner, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301432
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Long-term follow up of the PULSE Type 2 Diabetes prevention program for men$24,775

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301374
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Efficacy of a Home-based Resistance Training Intervention for Men with Prostate Cancer$20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Dennis Taaffe, Miss Fiona Stacey
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301395
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Using focus groups to understand young adult males motivators and barriers to participating in a Healthy Lifestyle Program$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Melinda Hutchesson, Doctor Megan Rollo, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301360
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural, Nutrition and Physical Activity, San Diego USA, 21-24 May 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400593
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $73,436

Translation of the Healthy Dads Healthy Kids program in local communities: Transitioning for sustainability$73,436

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301006
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20125 grants / $389,545

Increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour to improve health and wellbeing in adolescent boys from disadvantaged schools$261,837

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Kerry Dally, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100085
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Thinking while moving: Development of a curriculum-based physical activity integration program in the primary school$54,568

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Communities

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Communities
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Nick Riley, Associate Professor Kathryn Holmes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201201
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Feasibility and efficacy of a diet and exercise prevention program for men at high risk of Type 2 Diabetes$51,960

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200815
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Reducing mid-aged men’s risk of Type 2 Diabetes$19,680

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200853
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society's Annual Scientific Meeting, Auckland, 18-20 Oct 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200872
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20118 grants / $783,136

Physical Activity and Nutrition: The University of Newcastle's Approach Toward Better Population Health and Education$321,711

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Benjamin Ewald, Professor Manohar Garg, Associate Professor Erica James, Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100058
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Supporting Children's Outcomes using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) study$220,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100880
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Physical Activity 4 Every 1$110,000

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Promotion Demonstration Research Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100605
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

HNEPH Health Promotion Demonstration Grant- PA4E1$87,875

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding body NSW Health
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Promotion Demonstration Research Grant Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100762
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

FamilyFIT: An innovative approach to increasing physical activity for the whole family$21,000

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Ms Lorraine Paras, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Marita Lynagh
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001012
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Engaging men to maintain weight loss using innovative and cost-effective interventions: The SHED-IT weight loss maintenance pilot study$19,800

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Mr Chris Doran
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1101216
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

The Fit-4-Fun Program: promoting fitness and health in primary school children$2,000

Funding body: Sports Medicine Australia

Funding body Sports Medicine Australia
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Doctor Narelle Eather
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100582
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Australia, 15 - 18 June 2011$750

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100265
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20108 grants / $968,223

The Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community program: Promoting family health through sustainable school and community partnerships$524,453

Funding body: Coal & Allied Trust

Funding body Coal & Allied Trust
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Victoria Clay, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Professor Robin Callister, Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Professor Anthony Okely
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1000001
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Engaging economically disadvantaged adolescent girls in physical activity and healthy eating to improve health and prevent obesity$155,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Anthony Okely, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0190012
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Evaluation of innovative and cost effective community approaches to reduce obesity in men: The SHED-IT study$128,729

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Grant-In-Aid
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190315
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Physical Activity and Population Health Education$100,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Ron Plotnikoff

Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Healthy Dads Healthy Kids for Indigenous populations$24,994

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Mr Craig Hammond, Professor John Lester, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Tracy Burrows
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900155
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase child physical activity during attendance at childcare$24,547

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Doctor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900142
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

PULSE - Early Career Medical Research of the Year Award$9,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme PULSE Early Career Researcher of the Year Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900141
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

International Congress on Obesity 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, 11 - 15 July 2010$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000546
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20098 grants / $483,481

Development and evaluation of novel strategies to enhance Internet-based weight loss and weight maintenance programs$239,993

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0189752
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Development and evaluation of novel strategies to enhance Internet-based weight loss and weight maintenance programs$94,050

Funding body: SP Health Co. Pty Ltd

Funding body SP Health Co. Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0189753
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Does the HIKCUPS weight managment program for overweight children work in the parents' workplace or in sfter school care settings$68,181

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Tracy Burrows
Scheme Newcastle Permanent Building Society
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0189768
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Evaluation of a workplace based weight-loss program for men: The Workplace POWER trial at Tomago$35,000

Funding body: Tomago Aluminium

Funding body Tomago Aluminium
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0190642
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Validation of energy intake and expenditure in young children using Food Frequency Questionnaires, doubly-labelled water and accelerometers.$24,940

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Conjoint Professor Ian Wright, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Alexis Hure
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190405
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Promotion of physical activity and healthy eating among low-SES adolescent boys$9,905

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Youth Research Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189812
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Girls in sport intervention and research project 2008-2011$7,327

Funding body: NSW Department of Education and Training

Funding body NSW Department of Education and Training
Project Team Professor David Lubans, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G0190216
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Development of the SHED-IT weight loss programs for men.$4,085

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister, Professor Clare Collins
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190388
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20085 grants / $120,484

Healthy dads, healthy kids project: feasibility and benefits of a father-focused child obesity prevention intervention$50,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Clare Collins, Professor David Lubans, Professor Robin Callister, Associate Professor Richard Fletcher, Dr Janet Warren, Professor Anthony Okely
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189179
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Evaluation of the benefit of a school garden$41,284

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Clare Collins
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188614
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Strategies to increase effectiveness of an internet weight management program on weight loss and weight loss maintenance long-term$22,500

Funding body: SP Health Co. Pty Ltd

Funding body SP Health Co. Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0188957
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Validation of child and parent reported dietary intake via The Australian Child and Adolescent Eating Survey$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Tracy Burrows, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189394
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Asics Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Hamiliton Island, 16/10/2008 - 18/10/2008$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189253
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20072 grants / $16,476

Evaluation of an Internet-based Weight Loss Program for Men$14,796

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan, Professor David Lubans, Professor Robin Callister
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187848
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

PACE Yourself 2007 - The 25th ACHPER National/International Biennial Conference, Esplande Hotel Fremantle WA, 3/10/2007 - 6/10/2007$1,680

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188040
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20061 grants / $1,240

10th International Congress on Obesity, 3-8 September 2006, Sydney$1,240

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186930
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20052 grants / $175,984

Effect of a weight management program for overweight and obese children: A randomised controlled trial$173,601

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Professor Anthony Okely, Dr Julie Steele, Professor Philip Morgan, Professor L Baur
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0185030
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, 11-15 April 2005$2,383

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185106
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $10,715

The classroom teacher and physical education: An investigation into key factors affecting the delivery of physical education programs in the primary school$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184004
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

AARE International Educational Research Annual Conference, 28 November - 2 December 2004$715

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Philip Morgan
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184599
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed17
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.35

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 PhD Evaluation of a Multi-Component Screen-Time Reduction Intervention in Adolescents: The 'Switch-off 4 Healthy Minds' Study
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Lifelong Physical Activities: Conceptual Definition, Participation Rates and Importance of Movement Skill Competency
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD A Multi-Component Intervention in Disadvantaged Secondary Schools to Reduce the Decline in Adolescent Physical Activity
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD The Measurement of Physical Activity: An Examination of the Adolescent Population
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2013 PhD Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health.
PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD A Family-Based Approach to Increasing Physical Activity in Children
PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Evaluation of a School-based Physical Activity and Fundamental Movement Skill Intervention for Children Living in Low-income Communities: The Supporting Children's Outcomes Using Rewards, Exercise and Skills (SCORES) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Encouraging Activity to Stimulate Young Minds Study: A Curriculum-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Enhance Learning and Health Outcomes in the Primary School
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD The Feasibility and Efficacy of the Type 2 Diabetes PULSE (Prevention Using LifeStyle Education) Randomised Controlled Trial: a Self-Administered, Gender-Tailored, Multi-Component Lifestyle Intervention for Men at High-risk for Type 2 Diabetes
PhD (Human Physiology), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The M.A.D.E (Mothers and Daughters Exercising) 4 Life Pilot Randomised Control Trial: A Theory-Based, Physical Activity Intervention Targeting Mothers and Their Daughters
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention Designed to Improve Health-Related Fitness in Adolescent Boys from Schools in Low-Income Communities: The 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD The Impact of the 'Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids' Program for Overweight Fathers and Their Children on Lifestyle-related Parenting
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD A Causal Analysis of the Relationship Between Teacher Job Satisfaction and Student Achievement
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Physical Activity During Weight Loss and Weight Loss Maintenance in Men: An Experimental Application of Social Cognitive Theory
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Fit-4-Fun Study: Promoting Physical Activity and Physical Fitness in Primary School-Aged Children
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD Nutrition and Enjoyable Activity for Teen Girls (NEAT Girls) Group Randomised Controlled Trial: Evaluation of a School-based Obesity Prevention Program for Adolescent Girls from Low-income Communities
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Dietary Intake and Physical Activity Behaviour Change for Weight Gain Prevention in Mid-Age Australian Women
PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2012 Masters Feasibility of the 'Girls Recreational Activity Support Program using Information Technology' (GRASP-IT) Pilot Study: A Randomised Controlled Trial to Increase Physical Activity Among Older Adolescent Girls using a Social Networking Website
M Philosophy (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2011 PhD Innovative Approaches to Treat Overweight and Obesity in Adults: An Investigation of a Commercial Web-based Weight Loss Program
PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD Does FMS proficiency as a child influence physical activity as an adolescent?: The Physical Activity and Skills Study (PASS)
Education Not Elswr Classified, University of Sydney
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD Promoting Skills, Confidence and Physical Activity in Overweight Children: The HIKCUPS Physical Activity Treatment Program
Education Not Elswr Classified, University of Wollongong
Co-Supervisor
2007 PhD The Relationship Between Student Literacy Diversity, Instructional Differentiation and Academic Engagement in Inclusive Primary Classrooms
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2006 PhD Learning English as a Foreign Language in Bali: The Relationship Between Student Beliefs and Language Strategies
PhD (Education), Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 188
United Kingdom 14
United States 13
Canada 5
Switzerland 2
More...
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News

David Lubans and Kristen Cohen

Physical activity study for schools scores $1.3m funding boost

April 22, 2016

Professor David Lubans from the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PAN) in collaboration with Associate Professor Chris Lonsdale from the Institute for Positive Psychology & Education (IPPE) at the Australian Catholic University have been awarded a $1.3m NHMRC partnership grant entitled Evidence-Based Physical Activity in Primary Schools: Improving Children’s Health Through Sustainable Partnerships.

Professor Philip Morgan

UON obesity prevention program to be rolled out internationally

April 21, 2016

The University of Newcastle’s (UON) multi award winning Healthy Dads Healthy Kids program led by Professor Philip Morgan will be adapted for an ethnically diverse population in Birmingham in the United Kingdom (UK), after the program received a $916,315 grant from the UK National Institute of Health Research with the University of Birmingham and The Fatherhood Institute (UK).

Professor Philip Morgan with General Manager of Asics Oceania Mark Doherty at the 2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference.

2015 ASICS Award winners

October 29, 2015

The Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition's (PAN) Professor David Lubans and Professor Philip Morgan have both been recognised with 'Best Paper' awards at the 2015 Asics Sports Medicine Australia Conference.

Healthy Dads Healthy Kids award

2015 Community Acknowledgement of Research Excellence award

October 20, 2015

The University of Newcastle's (UON) Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition initiative: Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) has been awarded a 2015 Community Acknowledgement of Research Excellence for Achievement in Quality Improvement.

Are PE teachers biased against overweight children?

August 10, 2015

Whether it's conscious or unconscious, a new University of Newcastle study has revealed that trainee PE teachers have a bias against obese children.

Dadee

DADEE activity program benefits daughters

December 2, 2014

A world-first lifestyle program developed to enhance the physical and social-emotional well-being of young girls was launched today by University of Newcastle researchers.

Professor Phil Morgan BHERT award

National recognition for healthy engagement

November 21, 2014

Innovative education program Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) has been recognised with a 2014 national award for Best Community Engagement Collaboration.

Phil Morgan widget

Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids in global spotlight

May 13, 2014

University of Newcastle (UON) Professor Philip Morgan's highly successful obesity prevention program Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHKTM) has received global recognition for excellence and leadership in promoting health and well-being in the community.

Professor Philip Morgan and his daughters

Philip Morgan in the media

November 26, 2013

Dads and daughters, both are happier and healthier together

SHED-IT

Obese men SHED-IT

October 17, 2013

An internationally-recognised University of Newcastle weight loss program tailored specifically for men has produced a benefit that is likely to be a powerful motivator to shed the excess kilos – improved erectile function.

Philip Morgan

Acclaim for researchers

July 29, 2013

University of Newcastle researchers have won two awards at the National Preventative Health Awards presented at the National Preventive Health Symposium at Parliament House in Canberra.

Professor Philip Morgan

Position

Professor
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Education
Faculty of Education and Arts

Contact Details

Email philip.morgan@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7265
Fax (02) 4921 7407

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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