Mr Kim Colyvas

Mr Kim Colyvas

Consulting Unit Manager

School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (Statistics)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
Application of Statistics over a wide range of areas, mainly focused in Psychology, Ecology and Biology but also covering Health and Medicine, Linguistics and Speech pathology, Education, Business, Engineering, various sciences including Chemistry, Geology and Physics and industrial applications.  

Statistical help is provided in the analysis of data to understand the important effects in a study, setting up data in preparation for analysis, use of statistical software, how to prepare reports for publication, design of experiments, visualising data, process improvement, Total Quality Management, Statistical Process Control, sampling of raw materials, measurement systems and their performance.


Qualifications

  • Master of Statistics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Master of Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Ecology
  • Health
  • Psychology
  • Statistics

Languages

  • English (Mother)
  • Greek (Working)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 50
111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 25
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (38 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Zhang H-M, Colyvas K, Patrick JW, Offler CE, 'A Ca2+-dependent remodelled actin network directs vesicle trafficking to build wall ingrowth papillae in transfer cells', JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY, 68 4749-4764 (2017)
DOI 10.1093/jxb/erx315
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Patrick, Tina Offler
2017 Hulteen RM, Smith JJ, Morgan PJ, Barnett LM, Hallal PC, Colyvas K, Lubans DR, 'Global participation in sport and leisure-time physical activities: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 95 14-25 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. This review aimed to determine the most popular physical activities performed by children, adolescents, and adults globally. Statistic bureau websites and ar... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. This review aimed to determine the most popular physical activities performed by children, adolescents, and adults globally. Statistic bureau websites and article databases Scopus, ProQuest, SPORTDiscus, and Science Direct were searched between November 17th, 2014 and April 31st, 2015. Eligible studies were published in the last 10¿years with participation rates for specific physical activities among individuals five years or older. Data extraction for included articles (n¿=¿64) was assessed independently and agreed upon by two authors. A random-effects model was used to calculate participation rates in specific activities for each age group and region. In total 73,304 articles were retrieved and 64 articles representing 47 countries were included in the final meta-analysis. Among adults, walking was the most popular activity in the Americas (18.9%; 95% CI 10.2 to 32.5), Eastern Mediterranean (15.0%; 95% CI 5.8 to 33.6), Southeast Asia (39.3%; 95% CI 0.9 to 98.0) and Western Pacific (41.8%; 95% CI 25.2 to 60.6). In Europe and Africa, soccer (10.0%; 95% CI 6.5 to 15.1) and running (9.3%; 95% CI 0.9 to 53.9), respectively, were top activities. Child and adolescent participation results were highly dependent upon region. American youth team sport participation was high, while youth from the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Pacific were more likely to report participation in lifelong physical activities. Global data for adults reflects a consistent pattern of participation in running and walking. Among all age groups and regions soccer was popular. In children and adolescents, preferences were variable between regions.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.11.027
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jordan Smith, David Lubans, Philip Morgan
2017 Stuart A, Baker AL, Bowman J, McCarter K, Denham AMJ, Lee N, et al., 'Protocol for a systematic review of psychological treatment for methamphetamine use: an analysis of methamphetamine use and mental health symptom outcomes', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015383
Co-authors A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker
2017 Zhang H-M, Wheeler SL, Xia X, Colyvas K, Offler CE, Patrick JW, 'Transcript Profiling Identifies Gene Cohorts Controlled by Each Signal Regulating Trans-Differentiation of Epidermal Cells of Vicia faba Cotyledons to a Transfer Cell Phenotype', FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 8 (2017)
DOI 10.3389/fpls.2017.02021
Co-authors Tina Offler, John Patrick
2017 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'Efficacy of a universal smoking cessation intervention initiated in inpatient psychiatry and continued post-discharge: A randomised controlled trial', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51 366-381 (2017) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Interventions are required to redress the disproportionate tobacco-related health burden experienced b... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Interventions are required to redress the disproportionate tobacco-related health burden experienced by persons with a mental illness. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a universal smoking cessation intervention initiated within an acute psychiatric inpatient setting and continued post-discharge in reducing smoking prevalence and increasing quitting behaviours. Method: A randomised controlled trial was undertaken across four psychiatric inpatient facilities in Australia. Participants (N = 754) were randomised to receive either usual care (n = 375) or an intervention comprising a brief motivational interview and self-help material while in hospital, followed by a 4-month pharmacological and psychosocial intervention (n = 379) upon discharge. Primary outcomes assessed at 6 and 12 months post-discharge were 7-day point prevalence and 1-month prolonged smoking abstinence. A number of secondary smoking-related outcomes were also assessed. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on psychiatric diagnosis, baseline readiness to quit and nicotine dependence. Results: Seven-day point prevalence abstinence was higher for intervention participants (15.8%) than controls (9.3%) at 6 months post-discharge (odds ratio = 1.07, p = 0.04), but not at 12 months (13.4% and 10.0%, respectively; odds ratio = 1.03, p = 0.25). Significant intervention effects were not found on measures of prolonged abstinence at either 6 or 12 months post-discharge. Differential intervention effects for the primary outcomes were not detected for any subgroups. At both 6 and 12 months post-discharge, intervention group participants were significantly more likely to smoke fewer cigarettes per day, have reduced cigarette consumption by 3/450% and to have made at least one quit attempt, relative to controls. Conclusions: Universal smoking cessation treatment initiated in inpatient psychiatry and continued post-discharge was efficacious in increasing 7-day point prevalence smoking cessation rates and related quitting behaviours at 6 months post-discharge, with sustained effects on quitting behaviour at 12 months. Further research is required to identify strategies for achieving longer term smoking cessation.

DOI 10.1177/0004867417692424
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Richard Clancy, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2017 Yang WY, Burrows T, MacDonald-Wicks L, Williams LT, Collins CE, Chee WSS, Colyvas K, 'Body Weight Status and Dietary Intakes of Urban Malay Primary School Children: Evidence from the Family Diet Study', CHILDREN-BASEL, 4 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children4010005
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins, Lesley Wicks, Lauren Williams
2016 Dempsey I, Valentine M, Colyvas K, 'The Effects of Special Education Support on Young Australian School Students', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DISABILITY DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION, 63 271-292 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/1034912X.2015.1091066
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2015 Stockings EAL, Bowman JA, Bartlem KM, Mcelwaine KM, Baker AL, Terry M, et al., 'Implementation of a smoke-free policy in an inpatient psychiatric facility: Patient-reported adherence, support, and receipt of nicotine-dependence treatment', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 24 342-349 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The implementation of smoke-free policies in inpatient psychiatric facilities, including patient adherence, mental health n... [more]

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The implementation of smoke-free policies in inpatient psychiatric facilities, including patient adherence, mental health nursing staff support, and provision of nicotine-dependence treatment to patients, has been reported to be poor. The extent to which the quality of smoke-free policy implementation is associated with patient views of a policy is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 181 patients (53.6%, n = 97 smokers; and 46.4%, n = 84 non-smokers) in an Australian inpatient psychiatric facility with a total smoke-free policy. Smokers' adherence to the policy was poor (83.5% smoked). Only half (53.6%) perceived staff to be supportive of the policy. Most smokers used nicotine-replacement therapy (75.3%); although few received optimal nicotine-dependence treatment (19.6%). Overall, 45.9% of patients viewed the smoke-free policy in the unit as positive (29.9% smokers; 64.3% non-smokers). For smokers, adhering to the ban, perceiving staff to be supportive, and reporting that the nicotine-replacement therapy reduced cravings to smoke were associated with a more positive view towards the smoke-free policy. These findings support the importance of patient adherence, mental health nursing staff support, and adequate provision of nicotine-dependence treatment in strengthening smoke-free policy implementation in inpatient psychiatric settings.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12128
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, Amanda Baker
2015 Moffiet T, Alterman D, Hands S, Colyvas K, Page A, Moghtaderi B, 'A statistical study on the combined effects of wall thermal mass and thermal resistance on internal air temperatures', Journal of Building Physics, 38 419-443 (2015) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2014. Statistical analyses are important for real-world validation of theoretical model predictions. In this article, a statistical analysis of real data shows em... [more]

© The Author(s) 2014. Statistical analyses are important for real-world validation of theoretical model predictions. In this article, a statistical analysis of real data shows empirically how thermal resistance, thermal mass, building design, season and external air temperature collectively affect indoor air temperature. A simple, four-point, diurnal, temperature-by-time profile is used to summarise daily thermal performance and is used as the response variable for the analysis of performance. The findings from the statistical analysis imply that, at least for moderate climates, the best performing construction/design will be one in which insulation and thermal mass arrangements can be dynamically altered to suit weather and season.

DOI 10.1177/1744259113516248
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Trevor Moffiet, Adrian Page, Behdad Moghtaderi
2015 Unicomb R, Colyvas K, Harrison E, Hewat S, 'Assessment of reliable change using 95% credible intervals for the differences in proportions: A statistical analysis for case-study methodology', Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58 728-739 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Purpose: Case-study methodology studying change is often used in the field of speech-language pathology, but it can be critic... [more]

© 2015 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Purpose: Case-study methodology studying change is often used in the field of speech-language pathology, but it can be criticized for not being statistically robust. Yet with the heterogeneous nature of many communication disorders, case studies allow clinicians and researchers to closely observe and report on change. Such information is valuable and can further inform large-scale experimental designs. In this research note, a statistical analysis for case-study data is outlined that employs a modification to the Reliable Change Index (Jacobson & Truax, 1991). The relationship between reliable change and clinical significance is discussed. Example data are used to guide the reader through the use and application of this analysis. Method: A method of analysis is detailed that is suitable for assessing change in measures with binary categorical outcomes. The analysis is illustrated using data from one individual, measured before and after treatment for stuttering. Conclusions: The application of this approach to assess change in categorical, binary data has potential application in speech-language pathology. It enables clinicians and researchers to analyze results from case studies for their statistical and clinical significance. This new method addresses a gap in the research design literature, that is, the lack of analysis methods for noncontinuous data (such as counts, rates, proportions of events) that may be used in case-study designs.

DOI 10.1044/2015_JSLHR-S-14-0158
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rachael Unicomb, Sally Hewat
2015 Doody JS, James H, Colyvas K, Mchenry CR, Clulow S, 'Deep nesting in a lizard, déjà vu devil's corkscrews: First helical reptile burrow and deepest vertebrate nest', Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, (2015) [C1]

Dating back to 255 Mya, a diversity of vertebrate species have excavated mysterious, deep helical burrows called Daimonelix (devil's corkscrews). The possible functions of su... [more]

Dating back to 255 Mya, a diversity of vertebrate species have excavated mysterious, deep helical burrows called Daimonelix (devil's corkscrews). The possible functions of such structures are manifold, but their paucity in extant animals has frustrated their adaptive explanation. We recently discovered the first helical reptile burrows, created by the monitor lizard Varanus panoptes. The plugged burrows terminated in nest chambers that were the deepest known of any vertebrate, and by far the deepest of any reptile (mean = 2.3 m, range = 1.0-3.6 m, N = 52). A significant positive relationship between soil moisture and nest depth persisted at depths > 1 m, suggesting that deep nesting in V. panoptes may be an evolutionary response to egg desiccation during the long (approximately 8 months) dry season incubation period. Alternatively, lizards may avoid shallower nesting because even slight daily temperature fluctuations are detrimental to developing embryos; our data show that this species may have the most stable incubation environment of any reptile and possibly any ectotherm. Soil-filled burrows do not support the hypothesis generated for Daimonelix that the helix would provide more consistent temperature and humidity as a result of limited air circulation in dry palaeoclimates. We suggest that Daimonelix were used mainly for nesting or rearing young, because helical burrows of extant vertebrates are generally associated with a nest. The extraordinary nesting in this lizard reflects a system in which adaptive hypotheses for the function of fossil helical burrows can be readily tested.

DOI 10.1111/bij.12589
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Simon Clulow
2015 Masoe AV, Blinkhorn AS, Colyvas K, Taylor J, Blinkhorn FA, 'Reliability study of clinical electronic records with paper records in the NSW Public Oral Health Service.', Public health research & practice, 25 e2521519 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.17061/phrp2521519
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jane Taylor
2015 Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig H, Colyvas K, Hankey GJ, Flicker L, 'Propositional idea density in older men's written language: Findings from the HIMS study using computerised analysis', Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 29 85-101 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Informa UK Ltd. Decline in linguistic function has been associated with decline in cognitive function in previous research. This research investigated the informativeness ... [more]

© 2015 Informa UK Ltd. Decline in linguistic function has been associated with decline in cognitive function in previous research. This research investigated the informativeness of written language samples of Australian men from the Health in Men's Study (HIMS) aged from 76 to 93 years using the Computerised Propositional Idea Density Rater (CPIDR 5.1). In total, 60 255 words in 1147 comments were analysed using a linear-mixed model for statistical analysis. Results indicated no relationship with education level (p = 0.79). Participants for whom English was not their first learnt language showed Propositional Idea Density (PD) scores slightly lower (0.018 per 1 word). Mean PD per 1 word for those for whom English was their first language for comments below 60 words was 0.494 and above 60 words 0.526. Text length was found to have an effect (p = < 0.0001). The mean PD was higher than previously reported for men and lower than previously reported for a similar cohort for Australian women.

DOI 10.3109/02699206.2014.956263
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson, Hugh Craig
2014 Manning J, Dwyer P, Rosamilia A, Colyvas K, Murray C, Fitzgerald E, 'A multicentre, prospective, randomised, double-blind study to measure the treatment effectiveness of abobotulinum A (AboBTXA) among women with refractory interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome', INTERNATIONAL UROGYNECOLOGY JOURNAL, 25 593-599 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00192-013-2267-8
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2014 Ferguson A, Spencer E, Craig H, Colyvas K, 'Propositional Idea Density in women's written language over the lifespan: Computerized analysis', Cortex, 55 107-121 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cortex.2013.05.012
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Hugh Craig, Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson
2014 Foreman P, Arthur-Kelly M, Bennett D, Neilands J, Colyvas K, 'Observed changes in the alertness and communicative involvement of students with multiple and severe disability following in-class mentor modelling for staff in segregated and general education classrooms', JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, 58 704-720 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jir.12066
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Phil Foreman, Michael Arthur-Kelly
2014 Stockings EAL, Bowman JA, Baker AL, Terry M, Clancy R, Wye PM, et al., 'Impact of a postdischarge smoking cessation intervention for smokers admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility: A randomized controlled trial', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 16 1417-1428 (2014) [C1]

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. Introduction: Persons with a mental di... [more]

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. Introduction: Persons with a mental disorder smoke at higher rates and suffer disproportionate tobacco-related burden compared with the general population. The aim of this study was to determine if a smoking cessation intervention initiated during a psychiatric hospitalization and continued postdischarge was effective in reducing smoking behaviors among persons with a mental disorder. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted at an Australian inpatient psychiatric facility. Participants were 205 patient smokers allocated to a treatment as usual control (n = 101) or a smoking cessation intervention (n = 104) incorporating psychosocial and pharmacological support for 4 months postdischarge. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 1 week, 2, 4, and 6 months postdischarge and included abstinence from cigarettes, quit attempts, daily cigarette consumption, and nicotine dependence. Results: Rates of continuous and 7-day point prevalence abstinence did not differ between treatment conditions at the 6-month follow-up; however, point prevalence abstinence was significantly higher for intervention (11.5%) compared with control (2%) participants at 4 months (OR = 6.46, p = .01). Participants in the intervention condition reported significantly more quit attempts (F[1, 202.5] = 15.23, p = .0001), lower daily cigarette consumption (F[4, 586] = 6.5, p < .001), and lower levels of nicotine dependence (F[3, 406] = 8.5, p < .0001) compared with controls at all follow-up assessments. Conclusions: Postdischarge cessation support was effective in encouraging quit attempts and reducing cigarette consumption up to 6 months postdischarge. Additional support strategies are required to facilitate longer-term cessation benefits for smokers with a mental disorder.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntu097
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker, John Wiggers, Richard Clancy
2014 Patrick JW, Colyvas K, 'Crop yield components - photoassimilate supply- or utilisation limited-organ development?', FUNCTIONAL PLANT BIOLOGY, 41 893-913 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/FP14048
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Patrick
2014 Cassey J, Salter J, Colyvas K, Burstal R, Stanger R, 'The effect of convective heating on evaporative heat loss in anesthetized children', Paediatric Anaesthesia, 24 1274-1280 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd. Background: Convective warming is effective in maintaining core temperature under anesthesia. It may increase evaporative water loss (EWL). If... [more]

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Background: Convective warming is effective in maintaining core temperature under anesthesia. It may increase evaporative water loss (EWL). If significant, further investigation of warming modifications to minimize this impact would be warranted. Objectives: To quantify EWL in two groups of children (warmed and nonwarmed) having surgical procedures under anesthesia. Methods: We performed an observational study of well children having general anesthesia for elective surgical procedures lasting =60 min. They were recruited sequentially to each of three age groups: 1-12 months, 13 months - 5 years, and 5-12 years - with each age group divided into convectively warmed (43°C) and nonwarmed (21°C) subgroups. Evaporative heat loss (EHL) was calculated from accurate measurement of net EWL during the surgical period. Results: Sixty children were studied. As a percentage of body mass, mean EWLs were 0.29 (warmed) and 0.09 (nonwarmed). Using an ANCOVA model, only procedure duration had a significant impact and explained why the extended procedural time in some convectively warmed children led to higher mean EWLs for that group. For the nonwarmed group, the mean T core drop was 1.27°C with a contribution from EWL of 0.6°C over ~70 min. Conclusions: Within the age range 1 month-12 years, EHL is not significantly influenced by convective heating under anesthesia. There is no thermal advantage in exploring technique modifications such as humidifying the warming air. Previous estimates of the contribution of EHL to total heat loss in anesthetized children may require revision.

DOI 10.1111/pan.12454
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rohan Stanger
2013 Bryant L, Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig H, Colyvas K, Worrall L, 'Propositional Idea Density in aphasic discourse', Aphasiology, 27 992-1009 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2013.803514
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer, Hugh Craig
2013 Cassey J, Armstrong P, Colyvas K, Stanger R, 'Comment on 'Prevention of intraoperative hypothermia...' Witt L, Denhardt N, Eich C et al.', PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA, 23 970-970 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/pan.12251
Co-authors Rohan Stanger
2012 Spencer EL, Craig DH, Ferguson AJ, Colyvas KJ, 'Language and ageing - Exploring propositional density in written language - Stability over time', Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 26 743-754 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Hugh Craig, Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer
2012 Morrison MK, Koh D, Lowe J, Miller YD, Marshall AL, Colyvas KJ, Collins CE, 'Postpartum diet quality in Australian women following a gestational diabetes pregnancy', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 66 1160-1165 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Clare Collins
2012 Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Colyvas KJ, Wye PM, Walsh RA, Bartlem KM, 'Smoking cessation among Australian methadone clients: Prevalence, characteristics and a need for action', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 507-513 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00408.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2011 Collins CE, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Burrows TL, Cliff DP, et al., 'Parent diet modification, child activity, or both in obese children: An RCT', Pediatrics, 127 619-627 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1542/peds.2010-1518
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2011 Cliff DP, Okely AD, Morgan PJ, Steele JR, Jones RA, Colyvas KJ, Baur LA, 'Movement skills and physical activity in obese children: Randomized controlled trial', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43 90-100 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181e741e8
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Philip Morgan
2010 Al-Dala'In TA, Luo S, Summons PF, Colyvas KJ, 'Evaluating the utilisation of mobile devices in online payments from the consumer perspective', Journal of Convergence Information Technology, 5 7-16 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.4156/jcit.vol5.issue2.1
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Suhuai Luo, Peter Summons
2010 Turner A, Phillips L, Hambridge JA, Baker AL, Bowman JA, Colyvas KJ, 'Clinical outcomes associated with depression, anxiety and social support among cardiac rehabilitation attendees', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44 658-666 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/00048671003646751
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Jenny Bowman
2010 Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Warren JM, Cliff DP, et al., 'Multi-site randomized controlled trial of a child-centered physical activity program, a parent-centered dietary-modification program, or both in overweight children: The HIKCUPS study', Journal of Pediatrics, 157 388-394 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.03.028
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2010 Okely AD, Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Jones RA, Warren JM, Cliff DP, et al., 'Multi-site randomized controlled trial of a child-centered physical activity program, a parent-centered dietary-modification program, or both in overweight children: the HIKCUPS study', The Journal of pediatrics, 157 394.e1-394394 (2010)

Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether a child-centered physical activity program, combined with a parent-centered dietary program, was... [more]

Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether a child-centered physical activity program, combined with a parent-centered dietary program, was more efficacious than each treatment alone, in preventing unhealthy weight-gain in overweight children. STUDY DESIGN: An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial involving 165 overweight/obese 5.5- to 9.9- year-old children. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 interventions: a parent-centered dietary program (Diet); a child-centered physical activity program (Activity); or a combination of both (Diet+Activity). All groups received 10 weekly face-to-face sessions followed by 3 monthly relapse-prevention phone calls. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. The primary outcome was change in body mass index z-score at 6 and 12 months (n=114 and 106, respectively). RESULTS: Body mass index z-scores were reduced at 12-months in all groups, with the Diet (mean [95% confidence interval]) (-0.39 [-0.51 to 0.27] ) and Diet + Activity (-0.32, [-0.36, -0.23]) groups showing a greater reduction than the Activity group (-0.17 [-0.28, -0.06] ) (P=.02). Changes in other outcomes (waist circumference and metabolic profile) were not statistically significant among groups. CONCLUSION: Relative body weight decreased at 6 months and was sustained at 12 months through treatment with a child-centered physical activity program, a parent-centered dietary program, or both. The greatest effect was achieved when a parent-centered dietary component was included.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.03.028
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2009 Burrows TL, Warren JM, Colyvas KJ, Garg ML, Collins CE, 'Validation of overweight children's fruit and vegetable intake using plasma carotenoids', Obesity, 17 162-168 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/oby.2008.495
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows, Manohar Garg
2009 Stanger RJ, Colyvas KJ, Cassey JG, Robinson IA, Armstrong P, 'Predicting the efficacy of convection warming in anaesthetized children', British Journal of Anaesthesia, 103 275-282 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/bja/aep160
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rohan Stanger
2009 Smart CE, Ross K, Edge JA, Collins CE, Colyvas KJ, King BR, 'Children and adolescents on intensive insulin therapy maintain postprandial glycaemic control without precise carbohydrate counting', Diabetic Medicine, 26 279-285 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1464-5491.2009.02669.x
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Clare Collins, Bruce King
2008 Reeves SG, Rich D, Meldrum CJ, Colyvas KJ, Kurzawski G, Suchy J, et al., 'IGF1 is a modifier of disease risk in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer', International Journal of Cancer, 123 1339-1343 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ijc.23668
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Rodney Scott
2005 Fahy KM, Colyvas KJ, 'Safety of the Stockholm birth center study: A critical review', Birth-Issues in Perinatal Care, 32 145-150 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.0730-7659.2005.00358.x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
1998 Flanagan K, Colyvas K, Tuyl F, 'Injury after absence: a steel industry study', Journal of Occupational Health and Safety, Australia and New Zealand, 14 167-178 (1998)
Co-authors Frank Tuyl
1982 COLYVAS K, TIETZE HR, EGRI SKJ, 'THE STRUCTURE OF DICHLORO(L-HISTIDINE)COPPER(II)', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMISTRY, 35 1581-1586 (1982)
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
1973 Colyvas K, Cooney RP, Walker WR, 'Laser raman and infrared spectral studies on imidazolium complexes of bivalent copper and zinc', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 26 2059-2062 (1973)

The complexes [imH 2 ]2 [CuCl 4 ], [imH 2 ], [CuBr 4 ], and [imH 2 ] 2 [ZnCl 4 ] containing the imidazolium cation [imH2] + have been prepared for the first time and studied by la... [more]

The complexes [imH 2 ]2 [CuCl 4 ], [imH 2 ], [CuBr 4 ], and [imH 2 ] 2 [ZnCl 4 ] containing the imidazolium cation [imH2] + have been prepared for the first time and studied by laser Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The spectroscopic data are compared to those from studies with imidazole, imidazolium chloride, methylammonium tetrachlorocuprate(II), caesium tetrachlorocuprate(II), and caesium tetrachlorozincate(II). It is concluded that in [imH 2 ] 2 [MCl 4 ] (M = Cu and Zn), a distorted tetrahedral (D 2d ) model is favoured for [CuCl 4 ]2- and that [ZnCl 4 ] 2 - possesses a slight distortion from T d symmetry. © 1973, CSIRO. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1071/CH9732059
Citations Scopus - 4
Show 35 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'An integrated smoking intervention for mental health patients: a randomised controlled trial', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2015 Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig DH, Colyvas K, Hankey G, Flicker L, 'Propositional Idea Density as a Measure of Informativeness in Older Men¿s Written Descriptions of Health: Considerations for Clinical Use', Monterey, CA (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Hugh Craig, Alison Ferguson, Elizabeth Spencer
2014 Stockings EA, Bowman JA, Baker AL, Terry M, Clancy R, Wye PM, et al., 'IMPACT OF A POST-DISCHARGE SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR SMOKERS ADMITTED TO A SMOKE-FREE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Richard Clancy, John Wiggers, Amanda Baker, Jenny Bowman
2014 Stockings EA, Bowman JA, Bartlem KM, McElwaine KM, Baker AL, Terry M, et al., 'QUALITY OF IMPLEMENTATION OF A SMOKE-FREE POLICY IN AN INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC FACILITY: ASSOCIATION WITH PATIENT ACCEPTABILITY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2013 Spencer EL, Craig H, Colyvas K, 'Propositional Idea Density in written descriptions of health: Potential clinical applications', ., Tuscon, AZ (2013)
Co-authors Hugh Craig, Elizabeth Spencer
2013 Spencer E, Ferguson A, Craig DH, Colyvas K, '43rd Clinical Aphasiology Conference', Tuscon, AZ (2013)
Co-authors Elizabeth Spencer, Alison Ferguson, Hugh Craig
2012 Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Colyvas KJ, Wye PM, Walsh RA, Bartlem K, 'The need and potential for assisting clients of opioid substitution programs to quit smoking', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2011 Colyvas KJ, Moffiet TN, 'Statistical consulting under ASEARC', Proceedings of the 4th Applied Statistics Education and Research Collaboration (ASEARC) Conference, Parramatta, NSW (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Trevor Moffiet
2008 O'Brien S, Michie PT, Halpin S, Colyvas KJ, Schall UA, Carr VJ, 'Neuropsychological profiles in ultra high risk individuals and in first episode of psychosis or schizophrenia', Early Intervention in Psychiatry, Melbourne, VIC (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Pat Michie, Ulrich Schall, Sean Halpin
2008 Guy LM, Learmouth A, Colyvas KJ, Peres C, Pitkin A, 'Effects of a workplace health & wellness program on employee fitness, strength and well-being', The Safety Conference. Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
2008 Phillips L, Turner A, Hambridge J, Baker AL, Bowman JA, Colyvas KJ, 'Clinical outcomes associated with depression, anxiety and social support among cardiac rehabiliation attendees', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Newcastle, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker
2008 Michie PT, O'Brien-Dines ST, Halpin S, Colyvas KJ, Schall UA, Carr VJ, 'Neurophychological profiles of young people at risk of developing schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Research, Venice, Italy (2008) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/s0920-9964(08)70468-7
Co-authors Ulrich Schall, Pat Michie
2007 Reeves SG, Scott R, Rich D, Meldrum CJ, Colyvas KJ, Kurzawski G, et al., 'IGF-1 is a modifier of disease risk in Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer', Journal of Medical Genetics, York, U.K. (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Rodney Scott
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Mr Kim Colyvas

Positions

Consulting Unit Manager
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science

Casual Consulting Unit Manager
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Statistics

Contact Details

Email kim.colyvas@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7759
Fax (02) 4921 6898

Office

Room V240
Building Mathematics Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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