Dr Balaji Seshadri

Dr Balaji Seshadri

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

I am a researcher from India, working in Environmental remediation with focus towards the restoration of the degraded ecosystems. Although my Bachelors and Masters degrees were in Biotechnology (Bharathiar University, India), my research career till now has focussed on Environmental conservation and restoration. My past research experiences include Plant Biodiversity assessment in Western Ghats (prominent Mountain ranges in South Western India) and I was coordinating a project on the "Restoration of agricultural lands in Tsunami affected coastal areas of South India." I also had a brief stint at Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History for a project entitled "People's Biodiversity Register" where I was gathering information on the traditional wisdom of the rural communities by coordinating school students for the task. 

I would like to stretch my basic knowledge in Biology and Chemistry for the restoration of degraded ecosystems. I am currently learning GIS and remote sensing, targeting application in the planning and management of the environment.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Phosphorus transformation
  • Nutrient dynamics
  • Rhizosphere chemistry
  • Heavy metals
  • Gut microbes
  • Waste utilisation
  • Mine rehabilitation

Languages

  • Tamil (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)
  • Telugu (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
039901 Environmental Chemistry (incl. Atmospheric Chemistry) 50
050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl. Bioremediation) 30
060599 Microbiology not elsewhere classified 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
6/07/2015 - 30/12/2016 Research Associate

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

University of Newcastle
Australia
1/08/2012 - 30/06/2015 Research Associate

Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation

The University of South Australia
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Seshadri B, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Thangarajan R, Chuasavathi T, Recycled water irrigation in Australia, Springer, Cham, Switzerland (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-81-322-2056-5_2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan

Chapter (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Yang C-Y, Reijonen I, Yu H, Dharmarajan R, Seshadri B, Bolan N, 'Back to basic slags as a phosphorus source and liming material', Soil Amendments for Sustainability: Challenges and Perspectives, CRC Press, US (2018)
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Khan N, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Saint CP, Kirkham MB, Chowdhury S, et al., 'Root iron plaque on wetland plants as a dynamic pool of nutrients and contaminants', Advances in Agronomy, Elsevier, London, UK 1-96 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.04.002
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Kumarathilaka P, Geekiyanage N, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, et al., 'Biosolids Enhance Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Elsevier, Amerstand, Netherlands 45-71 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00003-2
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Karunanithi R, Szogi A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Ok YS, Krishnamurthy S, Seshadri B, 'Phosphorus Recovery From Wastes', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands 687-705 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00027-5
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Xu Y, Mandal S, Gleeson DB, et al., 'Functional Relationships of Soil Acidification, Liming, and Greenhouse Gas Flux', Advances in Agronomy, Elsevier, Amsterdam 1-71 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.05.001
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Weerasundara L, Nupearachchi CN, Kumarathilaka P, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Vithanage M, 'Bio-retention systems for storm water treatment and management in urban systems', Phytoremediation: Management of Environmental Contaminants, Volume 4, Springer International, Switzerland 175-200 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-41811-7_10
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Thangarajan R, Chuasavathi T, 'Recycled water irrigation in Australia', Environmental Sustainability: Role of Green Technologies, Springer, New Delhi, India 39-48 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-81-322-2056-5_2
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Chatskikh D, Ovchinnikova A, Seshadri B, Bolan N, 'Biofuel Crops and Soil Quality and Erosion', Biofuel Crop Sustainability 261-299 (2013)

This chapter discusses the soil quality aspect of biofuel production. The production of biofuel crops might simultaneously affect a combination of soil properties and stipulating ... [more]

This chapter discusses the soil quality aspect of biofuel production. The production of biofuel crops might simultaneously affect a combination of soil properties and stipulating severe human-driven soil quality threats, out of which the decline of soil organic matter (SOM), the increase of erosion risks, and onand off-site pollution and nutrient losses are the most pronounced. The chapter analyzes differences between annual and perennial crops out of the effects of management and land-use change (LUC), including an issue of soil organic carbon (SOC) budget and sustainable removal of crop residues for energy production. Consequently, it focuses on soil quality under biofuel crop production as affected by these threats to provide essential soil services. The chapter further concentrates on the challenges of the soil quality aspect of sustainable biofuel crop production, which include by-product management, soil remediation potential, and utilization of idle and degraded soils for biofuels. This edition first published 2013 © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/9781118635797.ch8
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Wang H, Sajwan K, 'Clean Coal Technology Combustion Products: Properties, Agricultural and Environmental Applications, and Risk Management', , ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC 309-370 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-407247-3.00006-8
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Chatskikh D, Ovchninnikova A, Seshadri B, Bolan N, 'Biofuel Crops and Soil Quality and Erosion', Biofuel Crop Sustainability, Wiley, Iowa, USA 261-300 (2013)
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2012 Thangarajan R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Greenhouse gas emission from wastewater irrigated soils', 225-236 (2012)

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater o... [more]

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater originates from many sources and hence its composition differs from origin and treatment processes. Wastewater rich in organic matter acts as a soil conditioner, thereby enhancing soil health. Wastewater also acts as a source of nutrient input in agriculture which in turn can reduce, or even eliminate the need for commercial fertilisers. However, wastewater usage in agriculture poses several threats like eutrophication, salinity, toxic chemicals (heavy metal(loids), pesticides), pathogen contamination, and most notably, nutrient leaching, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. These threats affect public health, soil and ground water resources, environment, crop quality, ecological, and property values. Biological degradation of the organic matter present in wastewater is considered one of the anthropogenic sources of major GHGs (carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), and methane (CH 4 ). In this paper, an overview of various sources of wastewater, effects of wastewater application on GHG emission from soil, and the strategies to mitigate wastewater-induced GHG emission from soils is presented. © 2012 WIT Press.

DOI 10.2495/SI120191
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
Show 8 more chapters

Journal article (34 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Park JH, Bush R, Bolan N, 'Comparative sorption of chromium species as influenced by pH, surface charge and organic matter content in contaminated soils', Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 184 255-260 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2016.07.012
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Richard Bush
2018 Wijesekara H, Bolan N, Bradney L, Obadamudalige N, Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, et al., 'Trace element dynamics of biosolids-derived microbeads', Chemosphere, 199 331-339 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.01.166
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Nanthi Bolan
2018 Shilpi S, Seshadri B, Sarkar B, Bolan N, Lamb D, Naidu R, 'Comparative values of various wastewater streams as a soil nutrient source', CHEMOSPHERE, 192 272-281 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.118
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2018 Xu Y, Seshadri B, Sarkar B, Wang H, Rumpel C, Sparks D, et al., 'Biochar modulates heavy metal toxicity and improves microbial carbon use efficiency in soil', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 621 148-159 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.214
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2018 Sanderson P, Qi F, Seshadri B, Wijayawardena A, Naidu R, 'Contamination, Fate and Management of Metals in Shooting Range Soils - a Review', Current Pollution Reports, 4 175-187 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40726-018-0089-5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2018 Liu Y, Yan Y, Seshadri B, Qi F, Xu Y, Bolan N, et al., 'Immobilization of lead and copper in aqueous solution and soil using hydroxyapatite derived from flue gas desulphurization gypsum', JOURNAL OF GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION, 184 239-246 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2016.08.006
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Karunanithi R, Sik Ok Y, Dharmarajan R, Ahmad M, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Sorption, kinetics and thermodynamics of phosphate sorption onto soybean stover derived biochar', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 113-125 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.002
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Raja Dharmarajan
2017 Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Thangavel R, Seshadri B, Surapaneni A, Saint C, et al., 'The impact of biosolids application on organic carbon and carbon dioxide fluxes in soil', Chemosphere, 189 565-573 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.09.090
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Seshadri B, Naidu R, Ok YS, 'Comparative analysis of speciation and bioaccessibility of arsenic in rice grains and complementary medicines', CHEMOSPHERE, 182 433-440 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.126
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Sanderson P, Wang H, et al., 'Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil', Chemosphere, 184 197-206 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobil... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56¿76.2%, 3.21¿83.56%, and 2.31¿74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13¿23.4% and 14.3¿54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.172
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Seshadri B, Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Mbene K, Kim W-I, 'Impact of wastewater derived dissolved organic carbon on reduction, mobility, and bioavailability of As(V) and Cr(VI) in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 186 183-191 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.08.020
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Matheyarasu R, Sheshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Nutrient Budgeting as an Approach to Assess and Manage the Impacts of Long-Term Irrigation Using Abattoir Wastewater', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 228 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-017-3542-y
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Naidu R, Bolan NS, et al., 'Sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 108 103-118 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.08.005
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2016 Chowdhury S, Bolan NS, Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, Wijesekara H, Xu Y, et al., 'Co-composting solid biowastes with alkaline materials to enhance carbon stabilization and revegetation potential', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 7099-7110 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowast... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowastes. This study investigated the effect of co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials on C stabilization and monitored the fertilization and revegetation values of these co-composts. The stabilization of C in biowastes (poultry manure and biosolids) was examined by their composting in the presence of various alkaline amendments (lime, fluidized bed boiler ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and red mud) for 6¿months in a controlled environment. The effects of co-composting on the biowastes¿ properties were assessed for different physical C fractions, microbial biomass C, priming effect, potentially mineralizable nitrogen, bioavailable phosphorus, and revegetation of an urban landfill soil. Co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials increased C stabilization, attributed to interaction with alkaline materials, thereby protecting it from microbial decomposition. The co-composted biowastes also increased the fertility of the landfill soil, thereby enhancing its revegetation potential. Stabilization of biowastes using alkaline materials through co-composting maintains their fertilization value in terms of improving plant growth. The co-composted biowastes also contribute to long-term soil C sequestration and reduction of bioavailability of heavy metals.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5411-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Bolan S, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Palanisami T, et al., 'Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines', Science of the Total Environment, 539 304-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six her bal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.124
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Morrow Dong, Thava Palanisami
2016 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Wijesekara H, Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Qi F, et al., 'Phosphorus-cadmium interactions in paddy soils', Geoderma, 270 43-59 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricultu... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricultural soils. Some of these P fertilisers that act as a source of Cd contamination of soils have also been found to act as a sink for the immobilisation of this metal(loid). In paddy soils, redox reactions play an important role in the (im)mobilisation of nutrients and heavy metal(loid)s, as a result of flooding of the rice plains. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of P compounds in the immobilisation of metals in contaminated soils, there has been no comprehensive review on the mechanisms involved in the P-induced (im)mobilisation of Cd in paddy soils. There are a number of factors that influences P induced Cd (im)mobilisation in paddy soils that include pH, redox reactions, liming effect, rhizosphere acidification and root iron plaques. Following a brief overview of the reactions of Cd and common P compounds that are used as fertiliser in soils, the review focuses on the above mentioned mechanisms for the (im)mobilisation of Cd by P compounds in paddy soils. The role of iron plaques on Cd status in soil and rice plants is also discussed followed by a summary and future research needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.11.029
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2016 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Murtaza G, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, et al., 'Remediation of arsenic-contaminated water using agricultural wastes as biosorbents', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 46 467-499 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater reservoirs is a global environmental and health issue given to its toxic and carcinogenic natur... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Arsenic (As) contamination of groundwater reservoirs is a global environmental and health issue given to its toxic and carcinogenic nature. Over 170 million people have been affected by As due to the ingestion of As-contaminated groundwater. Conventional methods such as reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis are commonly used for the remediation of As-contaminated water; however, the high cost and sludge production put limitations on their application to remove As from water. This review critically addresses the use of various agricultural waste materials (e.g., sugarcane bagasse, peels of various fruits, wheat straw) as biosorbents, thereby offering an eco-friendly and low-cost solution for the removal of As from contaminated water supplies. The effect of solution chemistry such as solution pH, cations, anions, organic ligands, and various other factors (e.g., temperature, contact time, sorbent dose) on As biosorption, and safe disposal methods for As-loaded biosorbents to reduce secondary As contamination are also discussed.

DOI 10.1080/10643389.2015.1109910
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Assessment of nitrogen losses through nitrous oxide from abattoir wastewater-irrigated soils', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 22633-22646 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7438-y
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2016 Bolan S, Seshadri B, Talley NJ, Naidu R, 'Bio-banking gut microbiome samples', EMBO REPORTS, 17 929-930 (2016)
DOI 10.15252/embr.201642572
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicholas Talley, Ravi Naidu
2016 Yan Y, Qi F, Balaji S, Xu Y, Hou J, Ok YS, et al., 'Utilization of phosphorus loaded alkaline residue to immobilize lead in a shooting range soil', Chemosphere, 162 315-323 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier LtdThe alkaline residue generated from the production of soda ash using the ammonia-soda method has been successfully used in removing phosphorus (P) from aqueous ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier LtdThe alkaline residue generated from the production of soda ash using the ammonia-soda method has been successfully used in removing phosphorus (P) from aqueous solution. But the accumulation of P-containing solid after P removal is an undesirable menace to the environment. To achieve the goal of recycling, this study explored the feasibility of reusing the P loaded alkaline residue as an amendment for immobilization of lead (Pb) in a shooting range soil. The main crystalline phase and micromorphology of amendments were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), sequential extraction procedure, and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) were employed to evaluate the effectiveness of Pb immobilization in soil after 45¿d incubation. Treatment with P loaded alkaline residue was significantly effective in reducing the TCLP and PBET extractable Pb concentrations in contrast to the untreated soil. Moreover, a positive change in the distribution of Pb fractions was observed in the treated soil, i.e., more than 60% of soil-Pb was transformed to the residual fraction compared to the original soil. On the other hand, P loaded amendments also resulted in a drastic reduction in phytoavailable Pb to the winter wheat and a mild release of P as a nutrient in treated soil, which also confirmed the improvement of soil quality.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.07.068
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Tripathi N, Choppala G, Singh RS, Srivastava P, Seshadri B, 'Sorption kinetics of zinc and nickel on modified chitosan', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 188 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10661-016-5499-5
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2015 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Thangarajan R, 'Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8866-8875 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1827-2
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Rhizosphere-induced heavy metal(Loid) transformation in relation to bioavailability and remediation', Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 15 524-548 (2015) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2015 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Skinner W, Seshadri B, 'Concomitant reduction and immobilization of chromium in relation to its bioavailability in soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8969-8978 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1653-6
Citations Scopus - 12
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Skinner W, Seshadri B, 'Concomitant reduction and immobilization of chromium in relation to its bioavailability in soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8969-8978 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1653-6
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2014 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Effect of coal combustion products in reducing soluble phosphorus in soil II: Leaching study', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 225 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1777-9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2014 Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Effect of industrial waste products on phosphorus mobilisation and biomass production in abattoir wastewater irrigated soil', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 21 10013-10021 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3030-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Effect of clean coal combustion products in reducing soluble phosphorus in soil I. Adsorption study', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1524-2
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Seshadri B, 'Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 261 718-724 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.03.040
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Differential effect of coal combustion products on the bioavailability of phosphorus between inorganic and organic nutrient sources', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 817-825 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.04.051
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bolan NS, Thangarajan R, Seshadri B, Jena U, Das KC, Wang H, Naidu R, 'Landfills as a biorefinery to produce biomass and capture biogas', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 135 578-587 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2012.08.135
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Nutrient management in effluents derived from agricultural industries: An Australian perspective', WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.2495/SI120181
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2010 Bolan NS, Szogi AA, Chuasavathi T, Seshadri B, Rothrock MJ, Panneerselvam P, 'Uses and management of poultry litter', WORLDS POULTRY SCIENCE JOURNAL, 66 673-698 (2010)
DOI 10.1017/S0043933910000656
Citations Scopus - 111Web of Science - 101
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2010 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Brodie K, 'THE ROLE OF COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN MANAGING THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF NUTRIENTS AND HEAVY METALS IN SOILS', JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION, 10 378-398 (2010)
DOI 10.4067/S0718-95162010000100011
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Ravi Naidu
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Bolan SS, Seshadri B, Wijayawardena AMA, Grainge I, Naidu R, Nicholas JT, 'Diffential toxicity effect of arsenic species on gut microbiome', Melbourne, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2015 Bolan S, Naidu R, Clark I, Palanisami T, Seshadri B, 'Sources, speciation and bioavailability of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Thava Palanisami
2014 Chuasavathi T, Bolan NS, Naidus R, Seshadris B, 'Biosolids-Based Co-Composts Reduce the Bioavailability of Heavy Metals', I INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ORGANIC MATTER MANAGEMENT AND COMPOST USE IN HORTICULTURE, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA (2014)
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Nutrient management in effluents derived from agricultural industries: An Australian perspective', WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment (2012)

The effluents derived from agricultural industries are major sources of wastewater with significant amounts of nutrients and organic load. Australia's agricultural industries... [more]

The effluents derived from agricultural industries are major sources of wastewater with significant amounts of nutrients and organic load. Australia's agricultural industries have experienced rapid growth in recent years, with nearly 152 abattoirs, 1798 wine industries, 9256 dairy farms and 1835 piggeries in operation. Agricultural industries require huge volumes of water for processing the farm products towards commercial value and quality. For instance, around 200 L of water required for processing a cattle in an abattoir; around 2.4-2.5 L for producing 1 L of wine; 500-800 L for 1 L of milk; and 12-45 L for sow and litter management in piggeries. As a result, these industries generate huge volumes of wastewater. For example, Australian meat industries produce an average of 4000 m 3 /day wastewater, with high concentration of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The annual average N and P loads in some of the farm effluents are: abattoir - 722 and 722 t; winery - 280 and 280 t; dairy - 150000 and 110000 t; and piggery - 72895 and 5075t. With Australia's average fertiliser consumption being 1 Mt N and 0.5 Mt P, the huge amounts of N and P from the agricultural effluents can be re-used as a potential alternative for fertiliser usage. Sustainable management of nutrients in the wastewater irrigated soil is a critical step to prevent contamination of both surface and ground-water. The available technologies for wastewater treatment require high investment. Hence, using high biomass-producing plants (e.g., Pennisetum purpureum and Arundo donax) as remediators, which also has the potential to uptake high amount of nutrients and heavy metals, can serve as a cost effective technology. Consequently, the plants used not only act as remediators, but also provide biomass that can also be used for energy generation, paper production and as a feed for animals. © 2012 WIT Press.

DOI 10.2495/SI120181
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
Show 1 more conference
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $12,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $12,500

Potential avenues for brine wastewater remediation$12,500

Funding body: Restech Australia Pty Ltd

Funding body Restech Australia Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Balaji Seshadri
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800904
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD1.8

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Phytocapping: An Alternative Technology for the Sustainable Management of Landfill Sites PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Characterisation of Heavy Metals (As, Cd, Pb) Contaminated Soil and Their Remediation by Using Different Methods PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Capturing and Utilization of Gaseous Emissions From Flue Gas in Coal-Fired Power Station PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metal(loid)s in Complementary Medicines PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Wastewater Driven Biomass Production for Energy Generation PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Biosolids Application on Carbon Sequestration in Soils. PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD A Study on Microbial Carbon Use Efficiency in Soil PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Phosphorus Recovery From Waste Streams Using Absorbents PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 42
Korea, Republic of 23
United States 10
China 9
India 5
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Dr Balaji Seshadri

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER)
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email balaji.seshadri@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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