Dr Mezbaul Bahar

Dr Mezbaul Bahar

Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise

Mezbaul’s research has focused on the risk assessment of toxic chemicals as well as developing cost effective remediation of contaminants from the contaminated land and/or water. His current research interests are investigating the insights into metal-microbe interactions, ecological and human health risk assessments of heavy metals, bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and rehabilitation of derelict mines.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia
  • Bachelor of Environmental Science, Khulna University - Bangladesh
  • Master of Environmental Studies, University of Tokyo - Japan

Keywords

  • bioremediation
  • heavy metals
  • risk assessment
  • toxicology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
410303 Bioremediation 50
410503 Groundwater quality processes and contaminated land assessment 30
410603 Soil biology 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ERAR6006 Ecological Risk Assessment
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia
The course offers students with advanced knowledge in ecotoxicology that underpins risk assessment and management of contaminated sites. Students will gain knowledge toxicity, ecological receptors, biomarkers, bioavailability, bioaccessibility, bioaccumulation, in vitro & in vivo ecotoxicology and its application in contaminated site management. Upon completing the course students should achieve an up to date knowledge and hands on experience in ecological risk assessment of contaminated sites.
Teacher and Tutor 27/2/2018 - 29/5/2018
ERAR6006 Ecological Risk Assessment
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia
The course offers students with advanced knowledge in ecotoxicology that underpins risk assessment and management of contaminated sites. Students will gain knowledge toxicity, ecological receptors, biomarkers, bioavailability, bioaccessibility, bioaccumulation, in vitro & in vivo ecotoxicology and its application in contaminated site management. Upon completing the course students should achieve an up to date knowledge and hands on experience in ecological risk assessment of contaminated sites.
Teacher and Tutor 28/2/2017 - 23/5/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Asaeda T, Gomes PIA, Rashid H, Bahar M, 'Morphology and biomass allocation of perennial emergent plants in different environmental conditions - A Review', Encyclopedia of Environmental Research (2 Volume Set), Nova Science Publishers, New York 769-798 (2011)

Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hossain MZ, Bahar MM, Sarkar B, Donne SW, Wade P, Bolan N, 'Assessment of the fertilizer potential of biochars produced from slow pyrolysis of biosolid and animal manures', Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, 155 (2021) [C1]

Excessive amounts of animal manures and production of a large volume of biosolids pose serious environmental issues in terms of their safe disposal and management. Thermochemical ... [more]

Excessive amounts of animal manures and production of a large volume of biosolids pose serious environmental issues in terms of their safe disposal and management. Thermochemical treatment of bio-waste materials via pyrolysis can convert them into value-added products such as biochar-based fertilizers. In this study, fourteen biochars were produced from one biosolid and thirteen animal manures by slow pyrolysis at 300 °C. All feedstock and biochar samples were characterized by determining the yield, and physicochemical and surface properties, including the C-containing functional groups. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to classify the feedstock/biochar materials based on their mineral constituents. The biochar yield of various feedstocks ranged from 39 to 81%, with the highest yield for grain-fed cow manure. The highest N and K content was found in chicken manure biochar (57.8 and 29.2 g kg¿1, respectively), while the highest P was found in biosolid biochar (40.5 g kg¿1). The specific surface area of biochars ranged from 96.06¿110.83 m2 g-1. Hierarchical analyses of the chemical compositions of feedstocks and biochars enabled grouping of the materials respectively into four and five distinguished clusters. Three principal components (PC) explained 86.8% and 83.3% of the variances in the feedstocks and biochars, respectively. The PC1 represented the content of the major nutrients (N, P and K), whereas PC2 and PC3 represented other nutrients (secondary and micronutrients) contents and physicochemical properties (pH and EC). The results of this study suggested that biochars produced from different manures and biosolids may potentially be a source of soil nutrients and trace elements. In addition, different biochars may be applied to different nutrient-deficient soils to avoid plausible nutrient and potentially toxic element contamination.

DOI 10.1016/j.jaap.2021.105043
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Scott Donne, Nanthi Bolan
2021 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Bahar MM, Sanderson P, Lamb D, 'Antimonate sequestration from aqueous solution using zirconium, iron and zirconium-iron modified biochars.', Sci Rep, 11 8113 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-021-86978-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Mahmud Rahman
2021 Gao Y, Du J, Bahar MM, Wang H, Subashchandrabose S, Duan L, et al., 'Metagenomics analysis identifies nitrogen metabolic pathway in bioremediation of diesel contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 271 (2021) [C1]

Nitrogen amendment is known to effectively enhance the bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, but the nitrogen metabolism in this process is not well understood. To unra... [more]

Nitrogen amendment is known to effectively enhance the bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, but the nitrogen metabolism in this process is not well understood. To unravel the nitrogen metabolic pathway(s) of diesel contaminated soil, six types of nitrogen sources were added to the diesel contaminated soil. Changes in microbial community and soil enzyme genes were investigated by metagenomics analysis and chemical analysis through a 30-day incubation study. The results showed that ammonium based nitrogen sources significantly accelerated the degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) (79¿81%) compared to the control treatment (38%) and other non-ammonium based nitrogen amendments (43¿57%). Different types of nitrogen sources could dramatically change the microbial community structure and soil enzyme gene abundance. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were identified as the two dominant phyla in the remediation of diesel contaminated soil. Metagenomics analysis revealed that the preferred metabolic pathway of nitrogen was from ammonium to glutamate via glutamine, and the enzymes governing this transformation were glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthetase; while in nitrate based amendment, the conversion from nitrite to ammonium was restrained by the low abundance of nitrite reductase enzyme and therefore retarded the TPH degradation rate. It is concluded that during the process of nitrogen enhanced bioremediation, the most efficient nitrogen cycling direction was from ammonium to glutamine, then to glutamate, and finally joined with carbon metabolism after transforming to 2-oxoglutarate.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.129566
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2021 Rahman MA, Lamb D, Rahman MM, Bahar MM, Sanderson P, Abbasi S, et al., 'Removal of arsenate from contaminated waters by novel zirconium and zirconium-iron modified biochar', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 409 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.124488
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Peter Sanderson, Ravi Naidu
2021 Hasan SMM, Akber MA, Bahar MM, Islam MA, Akbor MA, Siddique MAB, Islam MA, 'Chromium Contamination from Tanning Industries and Phytoremediation Potential of Native Plants: A Study of Savar Tannery Industrial Estate in Dhaka, Bangladesh', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 106 1024-1032 (2021)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-021-03262-z
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2021 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Bahar M, Sanderson P, Lamb D, 'Transformation of Antimonate at the Biochar Solution Interface', ACS ES&T Water, 1 2029-2036 (2021)
DOI 10.1021/acsestwater.1c00115
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2020 Bahar MM, Mahbub KR, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'A simple spectrophotometric method for rapid quantitative screening of arsenic bio-transforming bacteria', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 19 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100840
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2020 Hossain MZ, Bahar MM, Sarkar B, Donne SW, Ok YS, Palansooriya KN, et al., 'Biochar and its importance on nutrient dynamics in soil and plant', BIOCHAR, 2 379-420 (2020)
DOI 10.1007/s42773-020-00065-z
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Scott Donne
2020 Lal MS, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Bahar MM, 'Uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by common home-grown vegetable plants and potential risks to human health', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 19 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100863
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2018 Bahar MM, Mahbub KR, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'As(V) removal from aqueous solution using a low-cost adsorbent coir pith ash: Equilibrium and kinetic study', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 9 198-209 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.12.005
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2018 Mahbub KR, Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Labbate M, 'Are the existing guideline values adequate to protect soil health from inorganic mercury contamination?', Environment International, 117 10-15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2018.04.037
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Mahbub KR, Bahar MM, Labbate M, Krishnan K, Andrews S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Bioremediation of mercury: not properly exploited in contaminated soils!', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 101 963-976 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-8079-2
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Dong Z, Bahar MM, Jit J, Kennedy B, Priestly B, Ng J, et al., 'Issues raised by the reference doses for perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 105 86-94 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.05.006
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu, Luchun Duan
2016 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in growth medium and groundwater using a novel arsenite-oxidizing diazotrophic bacterium isolated from soil', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 106 178-182 (2016) [C1]

An arsenic hyper-tolerant diazotrophic bacterium was isolated from a heavy metal contaminated soil. The pure isolate MM-17 was identified as Azospirillum sp. based on phylogenetic... [more]

An arsenic hyper-tolerant diazotrophic bacterium was isolated from a heavy metal contaminated soil. The pure isolate MM-17 was identified as Azospirillum sp. based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA. The strain oxidized 100 µM As(III) to As(V) in both culture media (minimal salts) and real groundwater within 8 and 10 h, respectively. The oxidation of As(III) by this strain was observed within the pH range 5-10 with the best performance at pH 7-8. As(III) oxidation was found to be independent of cell growth which implies the oxidation enzymes are constitutively expressed. The whole cell kinetic study highlighted a lower value of kinetic constant, Ks as 32.9 µM As(III), which indicates that the strain MM-17 has greater affinity for As(III). The gene sequence of the large subunit of arsenite oxidase of MM-17 showed 99 and 72% similarity to the large subunit of arsenite oxidase of Stenotrophomonas sp. MM-7 and Sinorhizobium sp. M14, respectively. Sphaeroplasts experiments suggest that arsenite oxidase is a membrane associated protein in MM-17.

DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.10.019
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Influence of phosphate on toxicity and bioaccumulation of arsenic in a soil isolate of microalga Chlorella sp.', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 2663-2668 (2016) [C1]

In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels.... [more]

In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels. The results indicated that arsenate was highly toxic than arsenite to the alga, and the phosphate limitation in growth media greatly enhanced arsenate toxicity. The uptake of arsenate in algal cells was more than that of arsenite, and the predominant species in the growth media was arsenate after 8¿days of exposure to arsenite or arsenate, indicating arsenite oxidation by this microalga. Arsenate reduction was also observed when the alga was incubated in a phosphate-limiting growth medium. Similar to the process of biotransformation, the alga accumulated more arsenic when it was exposed to arsenate and preferably more in a phosphate-limiting condition. Although phosphate significantly influences the biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenic, the oxidizing ability and higher accumulation capacity of this alga have great potential for its application in arsenic bioremediation.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5510-7
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Water: Recent Advances and Future Prospects', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1722-y
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated water: Recent advances and future prospects topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013)

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Considering its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of ... [more]

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Considering its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsenic-contaminated water has become a high priority. There are several physicochemical-based conventional technologies available for removing arsenic from water. However, these technologies possess a number of limitations such as high cost and generation of toxic by-products, etc. Therefore, research on new sustainable and cost-effective arsenic removal technologies for water has recently become an area of intense research activity. Bioremediation technology offers great potential for possible future application in decontamination of pollutants from the natural environment. It is not only environmentally friendly but cost-effective as well. This review focuses on the state-of-art knowledge of currently available arsenic remediation methods, their prospects, and recent advances with particular emphasis on bioremediation strategies. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1722-y
Citations Scopus - 29
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Kinetics of arsenite oxidation by Variovorax sp MM-1 isolated from a soil and identification of arsenite oxidase gene', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 997-1003 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.11.064
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity, transformation and accumulation of inorganic arsenic species in a microalga Scenedesmus sp isolated from soil', JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYCOLOGY, 25 913-917 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10811-012-9923-0
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic bioremediation potential of a new arsenite-oxidizing bacterium Stenotrophomonas sp MM-7 isolated from soil', BIODEGRADATION, 23 803-812 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9567-4
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 71
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Islam MN, Rahman K-S, Bahar MM, Habib MA, Ando K, Hattori N, 'Pollution attenuation by roadside greenbelt in and around urban areas', URBAN FORESTRY & URBAN GREENING, 11 460-464 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ufug.2012.06.004
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 51
2010 Bahar MM, Reza MS, 'Hydrochemical characteristics and quality assessment of shallow groundwater in a coastal area of Southwest Bangladesh', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 61 1065-1073 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s12665-009-0427-4
Citations Scopus - 108Web of Science - 110
2008 Bahar MM, Uddin MN, Islam MA, Harun AYA, 'Extensive shrimp culture in the coastal areas of Bangladesh: An alarming threat to Mangrove ecosystem', Journal of Science Foundation, 6 56-64 (2008)
2008 Bahara M, Yamamuro M, 'Assessing the influence of watershed land use patterns on the major ion chemistry of river waters in the Shimousa Upland, Japan', CHEMISTRY AND ECOLOGY, 24 341-355 (2008)
DOI 10.1080/02757540802342291
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
2008 Bahar MM, Ohmori H, Yamamuro M, 'Relationship between river water quality and land use in a small river basin running through the urbanizing area of Central Japan', LIMNOLOGY, 9 19-26 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s10201-007-0227-z
Citations Scopus - 65Web of Science - 45
2007 Harun AYA, Uddin MN, Islam MA, Bahar MM, 'Effects of small scale water development projects on fisheries: A case study from saline water subprojects', Khulna University Studies, 8 57-63 (2007)
2006 Uddin MN, Bahar MM, Islam MA, Harun AYA, 'An evaluation of water supply scenario in Khulna City Corporation area', Khulna University Studies, 7 33-36 (2006)
2005 Zuthi MFR, Bahar MM, 'A comparative risk assessment of hazardous toxic and potentially toxic elements generating from coal fired power plant and waste water treatment plant', Khulna University Studies, 6 25-28 (2005)
2005 Uddin MN, Bahar MM, Islam MA, Harun AYA, 'Options for development of water supply systems in Khulna City Corporation area: A sustainable approach', Journal of Science Foundation, 3 11-15 (2005)
2003 Azad AK, Bahar MM, Sultana J, 'Study on the use of biomass as cooking fuel in a village peripheral to the Sundarbans. Journal of Science Foundation', Journal of Science Foundation, 1 35-41 (2003)
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Rahman MA, Lamb D, Rahman M, Sanderson P, Bahar M, Hossain Z, Naidu R, 'Zirconium-modified biochar for the removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solution', Adelaide, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Mahmud Rahman, Peter Sanderson
2019 Rahman MA, Lamb D, Rahman (Mahmud) M, Bahar M, Saderson P, Hossain Z, et al., 'Antimony (V) removal from aqueous solution by biosolid and animal manure biochar: characterization, equilibrium and kinetics study', Nanjing, China (2019)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2019 Rahman MA, Lamb D, Rahman MM, Sanderson P, Bahar MM, Sedigheh A, Naidu R, 'In situ Arsenic immobilization by zirconium in highly polluted mine soils', Nanjing, China (2019)
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson
2019 Rahman MA, Lamb D, Rahman M, Sanderson P, Bahar M, Naidu R, 'DRINKING WATER QUALITY FROM AN ARSENIC CONTAMINATED DISTRICT, BANGLADESH: HUMAN HEALTH RISK', Adelaide, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson
2012 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Oxidation of arsenic (III) by a Stenotrophomonas sp. isolated from soil', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

The involvement of microorganism in global cycling of arsenic is well-known. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria play an important role in reducing arsenic toxicity and mobility in arseni... [more]

The involvement of microorganism in global cycling of arsenic is well-known. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria play an important role in reducing arsenic toxicity and mobility in arsenic contaminated environment. In this study, a gram negative bacterium, MM-7 able to efficiently oxidize arsenite [As (III)] to arsenate [As (V)] was isolated from soil. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the strain is a close relative to Stenotrophomonas panacihumi with 99% identity. The presence of the arsenite oxidase gene was detected in this bacterium. The amino acid sequences of the arsenite oxidase from MM-7 showed the highest identity with the arsenite oxidase from Bosea sp. (67%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of As (III) oxidation by Stenotrophomonas sp. This strain has great potential for remediation of arsenic contaminated water. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

DOI 10.1201/b12522-142
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2012 Megharaj M, Bahar MM, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of arsenic contaminated water: Prospects and recent advances', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Due to its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsen... [more]

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Due to its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsenic contaminated water has become a high priority. There are several physico-chemical based conventional technologies available for arsenic removal from water. However, these technologies have some limitations such as high cost, generation of toxic by-products etc. Therefore, research on sustainable and cost-effective arsenic removal technologies for water has gained enormous attention recently. This paper will focus on the state-of-art knowledge on the currently available arsenic remediation methods, their prospects and recent advances with particular emphasis on bioremediation approaches. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 11
Total funding $3,030,312

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20184 grants / $1,747,659

Identify natural attenuation that occurs as vapours move through the ground to the surface$546,642

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Yanju Liu, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801038
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Co-disposal of hydrocarbon contaminated soils with mine waste material (spoils) on OSAs during construction$489,364

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Yanju Liu, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801033
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Investigating aging effect on natural attenuation of diesel constituents in contaminated soil$394,202

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801028
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Investigate the toxicity of PFAS and development of guidance in AFFF impacted area in WA$317,451

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Fangjie Qi, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Professor Megh Mallavarapu, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Prasath Annamalai
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801030
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20172 grants / $94,027

Finucane Island and Nelson Point vapour modelling and site assessment$61,200

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700831
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Remediation Action Plan for OFTG, Nelson Point$32,827

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Yanju Liu, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700832
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20164 grants / $907,191

Development of a risk based land management tool to assist decision making at derelict mine sites$354,000

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Dane Lamb, Dr Jianhua Du, Dr Liang Wang, Dr Peter Sanderson, Dr Morrow Dong, Dr Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Prasath Annamalai, Dr Balaji Seshadri, Mr Mohammed Kader

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

Enhanced In situ Bioremediation of TCE towards closure of Site 14, EDP Edinburgh $288,250

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700313
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Human Health Risk Assessment from Old Railway Sleepers - Port Hedland and Newman Mainline, WA$158,300

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Morrow Dong, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600616
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from the Former Rail Loop Ponds at Mount Whaleback – Laboratory Biopile Study$106,641

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600698
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20131 grants / $281,435

Pilot scale bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils at Mt Whaleback$281,435

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Euan Smith, Grant Mathieson, Thavamani Palanisami, Kavitha Ramadass, Mezbaul Bahar, Megharaj Mallavarapu, Prashant Srivastava, Ravi Naidu

Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Non-Wetting Soils: The Cause, Mechanism of Non-Wetting and Remediation PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 PhD Biochar and Nutrient Interactions in Soil PhD (Materials Science & Eng), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Degradation of Lignocellulose Waste by Using Bacterial Cellulases PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Arsenic, Antimony and Phosphorus Removal from Contaminated Waters Using Raw and Modified Biochars: Insights into Mechanism of Redox Transformation PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 25
Bangladesh 9
Japan 3
United Kingdom 2
China 1
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Dr Mezbaul Bahar

Position

Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER)
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email mezbaul.bahar@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8747

Office

Room 110
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan Campus
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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