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Professor Ravi Naidu

Global Innovation Chair and Director

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Remediation and Risks: a world without contamination

Professor Ravi Naidu is a global leader in contamination studies, studying agricultural and industrial impacts on the environment.

His research has led to the implementation of policy directives for governments and new technology to manage and remediate polluted groundwater and soil, both in Australia and abroad.

Ravi is also the Managing Director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination, Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), an independent organisation that performs research, develops technologies and provides policy guidance for assessing, cleaning up and preventing contamination of soil, water and air.  At the University of Newcastle, Ravi leads the Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), where he continues to implement his vision to safeguard the environment for future generations.

Shaping the world

As science speeds forward, Ravi acknowledges that public policy doesn't always keep up. With more than two decades working in the field of contaminants, including an esteemed chief investigator role with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Ravi has made extensive contributions to national and global paradigms of risk assessment and remediation of contaminated sites.

"I have spent a lot of time developing a consensus amongst industry, regulators, Environmental Protection Authorities and researchers relating to contaminants," Ravi points out.

"As well as to remediate sites, a lot of work is required on the policy front."

"When I began my career, there was no remediation industry; my work has led to an exponential increase in the number of people working in remediation," Ravi states humbly.

This industry is now worth $3 billion dollars annually and employs thousands of people.

A systems-based approach to risk

Focusing on two broad categories, Ravi's meticulous analyses investigate contaminants from agriculture and industry and their relationships with receptors.

"The receptor could be the environment, or human," Ravi says.

"My investigations look at the presence of contaminants in the environment, how they interact in the environment, and the route or path they take to receptors."

"Initially the focus of our work was on agriculture," Ravi observes.

"But many of the industrial activities over the past 50 years have led to significant contamination of the environment."

"Now the focus of our investigations – to a very large extent – is industrial contaminants and this is largely driven by the industries themselves."

Ravi's approach to this work has been to adopt whole-of-system inquiries to ensure the risks of contaminants are fully assessed and managed, whether they are in soil, groundwater or the urban environment.

"When assessing a contaminated site you assess the receptors, what the pathways to those receptors are, and what needs to be done to minimise exposure," Ravi confirms.

Ravi notes the importance of this, given the severe health effects of some contaminants such as asbestos, arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

The Professor's approach is seeing GCER develop a new model in conjunction with CRC CARE to quantify risk posed by on-site contaminants.

"Until recently, the predictive tool that has been used to assess risk - and which is still being used - is a database based on a lot of assumptions."

"Whenever you use assumptions, the output from the predictive tool can be quite conservative, and conservatism means you might end up remediating sites which do not require it."

"This new model will minimise uncertainties and save a lot of money for industries."

CRC CARE and GCER: caring and sharing knowledge

CRC CARE began in 1999 when Ravi initiated dialogue with industries and government departments dealing with contaminants.

"It took four years for industries to appreciate there was a need for a national Centre of Excellence to become a one-stop shop for contaminants."

The Centre, which brings together major companies, government departments and Environmental Protection Authorities, was established in 2005 by a competitive bid to the Commonwealth and is on track to become a Centre of Excellence beyond the year 2020.

In 2015, the University of Newcastle invited Ravi to be Global Innovation Chair and Director of GCER.

"GCER reaches organisations in Australia and beyond from a capacity-building perspective," Ravi notes.

This entails training students as well as developing solutions for complex contamination problems.

"CRC CARE and GCER are safeguarding a clean environment for future generations," Ravi attests.

"Satisfaction is knowing you have helped train people who are able to clean up the mess we have created and prevent future degradation of our environment."

Technology targeting toxins

Ravi has patented seven technologies to safeguard the environment and human health, including a product to remediate the toxic chemicals left behind by firefighting foams.

"No technology was available to help clean up wastewater and impacted soil, generated by firefighters when they train," Ravi declares.

"CRC CARE developed a new patented technology to fix this, utilising a naturally occurring material modified with a nontoxic chemical."

"This product can irreversibly and selectively capture toxic substances present in wastewater."

"Thus, the water that comes out is clean because of our filtration processes."

The technology is being scaled up for field applications with plants operating at a number of remediation sites.

Proactive Global Research

Working globally, CRC CARE's centre in China is enabling Ravi to collaborate with a number of scientists and engineers, to train locals to develop solutions for environmental contamination problems.

"We have developed a technology, named pooCARE, which helps convert piggery waste into biogas," Ravi laughs.

"We have a very strong network in the region and our vision is to extend our Centres to other countries."

"The only way to move forward is to build the capacity in these countries, particularly developing nations, to deal with contamination issues."

Related links

Ravi Naidu

Remediation and Risks: a world without contamination

Professor Ravi Naidu is a global leader in contamination studies, studying agricultural and industrial impacts on the environment.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Ravi Naidu is the Chief Executive Officer, Managing Director and Chief Scientist of the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE). Professor Naidu was also the Founding Director of the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR).

He has researched environmental contaminants, bioavailability, and remediation for over 25 years and has gained advanced leadership and management experience in environmental sustainability throughout this period. Professor Naidu has co-authored 440 refereed journal articles and seven patents, and co-edited 11 books and 66 book chapters in the field of soil and environmental sciences. He has also supervised over 35 PhD completions.  Of the seven patents that he has joint recognition for, two are now fully commercialized with remediation plants operating in Townsville, Perth and Adelaide treating contaminated waste water.  Remediation technology for the management and cleanup of soils contaminated with firefighting foam and chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated ground water are used as proprietary technology and used for remediation at a number of sites.

Professor Naidu's publications have been cited more than 14,800 times (Google Scholar and Google h index 57) and i10 index of 265.

Professor Naidu was instrumental in developing a network of scientists working on contamination – Soil Contamination Research Australasia Pacific (SCRAP), now titled the Australian Remediation Industry Cluster (ARIC). As part of this network he has independently raised funds for research and training in the Asia region. Over the last 10 years he has run more than 20 workshops, 5 international conferences and raised more than $170M cash (includes CRC CARE funding) for research in this region. The network has led to the establishment of similar groupings of people within the regional countries and now has over 4000 members across the region.

In recognition of his contribution to environmental research he was awarded a Gold Medal in environmental science in 1998 by Tamil Nadu Agricultural University (TNAU).  He is an elected Fellow of the Soil Science Societies of America (2000), New Zealand (2004) and Agronomy Society of America (2006). In 2012 he was chosen as a winner of the Soil Science Society of America's International Soil Science Award, and in 2013 was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is Chair of the International Committee on Bioavailability and Risk Assessment and was Chair of the Standards Australia Technical Committee on Sampling and Analyses of Contaminated Soils (1999-2007), Chair of the International Union of Soil Sciences Commission for Soil Degradation Control, Remediation and Reclamation (2002-10), President of the International Society on Trace Element Biogeochemistry (2005-07) and sitting member of the Victorian EPA Contaminated Sites Auditor panel. In recognition of his contributions to agricultural and allied sciences, he was awarded honorary DSc by Tamil Nadu Agricultural University in December 2013 and inaugural Banksia CEO award in the same year for his outstanding contribution to environmental sustainability research.

Research Expertise
Professor Naidu’s current research focuses on contaminated soil, water and potential impacts of contaminants on human health. Professor Naidu’s vision is to expand his current research on the environment to China and the Asia region through collaboration and the development of a Centre of Excellence an environmental risk assessment and remediation in China. The focus of such a Centre will be the development and worldwide marketing of environment technology. 

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Massey University - NZ
  • Master of Science, University of the South Pacific
  • Doctor of Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University Coimbatore

Keywords

  • Environmental Science
  • Soil Science

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Global Innovation Chair and Director University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 -  Editorial Board - Environment Technology Innovation Environment Technology Innovation
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Editorial Board - Journal of Soils and Sediments Journal of Soils and Sediments
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Editorial Board - Environment Geochemistry and Health Journal Environment Geochemistry and Health Journal
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Membership - Contaminated Site Steering Committee - BHP Billiton Iron Ore Division Contaminated Site Steering Committee - BHP Billiton Iron Ore Division
Australia
1/01/1996 -  Membership - Contaminated Sites Auditor Panel Member, EPA VIC Contaminated Sites Auditor Panel Member, EPA VIC
Australia
1/01/1996 -  Membership - Global Committee on Bioavailability and Risk Assessment Global Committee on Bioavailability and Risk Assessment
Australia
1/01/1995 -  Membership - Executive Committee, Environmental Geochemistry of Tropical Soils Executive Committee, Environmental Geochemistry of Tropical Soils
Australia
1/01/1994 -  Membership - International Committee on Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements International Committee on Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (12 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2008 Naidu R, Chemical Bioavailability in Terrestrial Environments, Elsevier Science Limited, Amsterdam, 809 (2008) [A3]
2008 Singh N, Sethunathan N, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chapter 5 Bioavailability of sorbed pesticides to bacteria: An overview (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32005-9
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chapter 11 Bioavailability and toxicity of contaminant mixtures to soil biota (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32011-4
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Wilson SC, Naidu R, Organic contaminant speciation and bioavailability in the terrestrial environment, Elsevier, Oxford, UK, 42 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32010-2
Citations Scopus - 3
2008 Naidu R, Chemical Bioavailability in Terrestrial Environments, Elsevier Science Limited, Amsterdam, 809 (2008) [A3]
2006 Naidu R, Managing Arsenic in the Environment From Soil to Human Health, Science Pub Incorporated, 656 (2006)
2005 Prasad MNV, Sajwan KS, Naidu R, Trace Elements in the Environment Biogeochemistry, Biotechnology, and Bioremediation, CRC Press, 744 (2005)
2003 Kamaludeen SPB, Megharaj M, Juhasz AL, Sethunathan N, Naidu R, Chromium-microorganism interactions in soils: Remediation implications, SPRINGER, 72 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/0-387-21728-2_4
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 61
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
1999 Naidu R, Naidu S, Jackson P, McLaren RG, Sumner ME, Application of capillary electrophoresis to anion speciation in soil water extracts, ACADEMIC PRESS INC, 20 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/S0065-2113(08)60912-8
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
1998 Smith E, Naidu R, Alston AM, Arsenic in the soil environment: A review, ACADEMIC PRESS INC, 47 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0065-2113(08)60504-0
Citations Scopus - 431Web of Science - 397
1995 Naidu R, Sumner ME, Rengasamy P, Australian Sodic Soils Distribution, Properties and Management, CSIRO Publishing, 351 (1995)
1995 Harter RD, Naidu R, Role of metal-organic complexation in metal sorption by soils, ACADEMIC PRESS INC, 45 (1995)
DOI 10.1016/S0065-2113(08)60541-6
Citations Scopus - 178Web of Science - 161
Show 9 more books

Chapter (33 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic: Southeast Asia', Encyclopedia of Soil Science, Third Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 161-167 (2017)
DOI 10.1081/E-ESS3-120053532
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Wijayawardena A, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Exposure, toxicity, health impacts, and bioavailability of heavy metal mixtures', Advances in Agronomy, Elsevier, London 175-234 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.03.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2016 Kuppusamy S, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ex-situ remediation technologies for environmental pollutants: A critical perspective', Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 117-192 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20013-2_2
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Kuppusamy S, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'In-situ remediation approaches for the management of contaminated sites: A comprehensive overview', Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 1-115 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20013-2_1
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Mandal S, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Wijesekara H, Naidu R, 'Application of Biochar Produced From Biowaste Materials for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Agriculture Production', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Academic Press, London 73-89 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00004-4
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Karunanithi R, Szogi A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Ok YS, Krishnamurthy S, Seshadri B, 'Phosphorus Recovery From Wastes', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands 687-705 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00027-5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Xu Y, Mandal S, Gleeson DB, et al., 'Functional Relationships of Soil Acidification, Liming, and Greenhouse Gas Flux', Advances in Agronomy, Elsevier, Amsterdam 1-71 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.05.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2015 Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Nutrient and Water Use Efficiency in Soil: The Influence of Geological Mineral Amendments', Nutrient Use Efficiency: From Basics to Advance, Springer, New Delhi, India 29-44 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/978-81-322-2169-2_3
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Impacts of Abattoir Waste-Water Irrigation on Soil Fertility and Productivity', Irrigation and Drainage - Sustainable Strategies and Systems, InTech, Rijeka, Croatia 55-75 (2015)
DOI 10.5772/59312
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2014 Naidu R, Bekele D, Birke V, 'Permeable Reactive Barriers: Cost-Effective and Sustainable Remediation of Groundwater', Permeable Reactive Barriers: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 1-24 (2014)
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Arsenic in Rice: Sources and Human Health Risk', Wheat and Rice in Disease Prevention and Health, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netheralnds 365-375 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-401716-0.00028-3
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2014 Chen ZX, Cheng Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Kaolin-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for removing cationic dye¿crystal violet in aqueous solution', Nanotechnology for Sustainable Development, Springer, New York 189-196 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-05041-6_15
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Naidu R, Bekele D, Birke V, 'Permeable Reactive Barriers: Cost-Effective and Sustainable Remediation of Groundwater', Permeable Reactive Barriers: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 1-24 (2014)
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2014 Bekele D, Ravi N, Volker B, Sreenivasulu C, 'Choosing the Best Design and Construction Technologies for Permeable Reactive Barriers', Permeable Reactive Barrier: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 41-62 (2014)
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Wang H, Sajwan K, 'Clean Coal Technology Combustion Products: Properties, Agricultural and Environmental Applications, and Risk Management', , ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC 309-370 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-407247-3.00006-8
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Thangarajan R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Greenhouse gas emission from wastewater irrigated soils', 225-236 (2012)

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater o... [more]

With increasing demand for world water supply, wastewater reuse is a great opportunity to meet the water need, especially for agricultural and industrial development. Wastewater originates from many sources and hence its composition differs from origin and treatment processes. Wastewater rich in organic matter acts as a soil conditioner, thereby enhancing soil health. Wastewater also acts as a source of nutrient input in agriculture which in turn can reduce, or even eliminate the need for commercial fertilisers. However, wastewater usage in agriculture poses several threats like eutrophication, salinity, toxic chemicals (heavy metal(loids), pesticides), pathogen contamination, and most notably, nutrient leaching, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. These threats affect public health, soil and ground water resources, environment, crop quality, ecological, and property values. Biological degradation of the organic matter present in wastewater is considered one of the anthropogenic sources of major GHGs (carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), and methane (CH 4 ). In this paper, an overview of various sources of wastewater, effects of wastewater application on GHG emission from soil, and the strategies to mitigate wastewater-induced GHG emission from soils is presented. © 2012 WIT Press.

DOI 10.2495/SI120191
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2011 Bolan N, Brennan R, Budianta D, Camberato J, Naidu R, Pan W, et al., 'Bioavailability of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Si, and Micronutrients', Handbook of Soil Sciences: Resource Management and Environmental Impacts, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 1-80 (2011)
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2011 Bolan NS, Park JH, Robinson B, Naidu R, Huh KY, 'PHYTOSTABILIZATION: A GREEN APPROACH TO CONTAMINANT CONTAINMENT', , ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC 145-204 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-385538-1.00004-4
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2010 Caceres T, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Sethunathan N, Naidu R, 'Fenamiphos and Related Organophosphorus Pesticides: Environmental Fate and Toxicology', , SPRINGER 117-162 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-5623-1_3
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Kopittke PM, Lombi E, Menzies NW, Naidu R, 'Principles of plant-based remediation of contaminated soils', Industrial Crops and Uses 446-469 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 3
2009 Haynes RJ, Murtaza G, Naidu R, 'INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS AND CONTAMINANTS OF BIOSOLIDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR LAND APPLICATION', , ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC 165-267 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/S0065-2113(09)04004-8
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 54
2008 Naidu R, Bolan NS, 'Chapter 2 Contaminant chemistry in soils: Key concepts and bioavailability', 9-37 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32002-3
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2008 Naidu R, Pollard SJT, Bolan NS, Owens G, Pruszinski AW, 'Chapter 4 Bioavailability: The underlying basis for risk-based land management', 53-72 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32004-7
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2008 Naidu R, Semple KT, Megharaj M, Juhasz AL, Bolan NS, Gupta SK, et al., 'Chapter 3 Bioavailability: Definition, assessment and implications for risk assessment', 39-51 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32003-5
Citations Scopus - 16
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2008 Bolan NS, Ko BG, Anderson CWN, Vogeler I, Mahimairaja S, Naidu R, 'Chapter 27 Manipulating bioavailability to manage remediation of metal-contaminated soils', 657-678 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32027-8
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2008 Fuentes B, de la Luz Mora M, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Chapter 16 Assessment of phosphorus bioavailability from organic wastes in soil', 363-411 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32016-3
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2008 Naidu R, Bolan NS, Megharaj M, Juhasz AL, Gupta SK, Clothier BE, Schulin R, 'Chapter 1 Chemical bioavailability in terrestrial environments', 1-6 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/S0166-2481(07)32001-1
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Singh J, Saggar S, Bolan N, Zaman M, 'The Role of inhibitors in the bioavailability and mitigation of nitrogen losses in grassland ecosystems', Chemical Bioavailability in Terrestrial Environments, Elsevier Science Limited, Amsterdam 329-362 (2008)
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2008 Bolan N, Rowarth J, de la Luz Mora M, Adriano D, Curtin D, 'Biological transformation and bioavailability of nutrient elements in acid soils as affected by liming', Chemical Bioavailability in Terrestrial Environments, Elsevier Science Limited, Amsterdam 413-446 (2008)
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2007 Gräfe M, Naidu R, 'Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils: An Overview', Biophysico-Chemical Processes of Heavy Metals and Metalloids in Soil Environments 565-605 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/9780470175484.ch14
Citations Scopus - 1
2007 Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Chemical Speciation and Bioavailability of Trace Metals', Biophysico-Chemical Processes of Heavy Metals and Metalloids in Soil Environments 417-466 (2007)
DOI 10.1002/9780470175484.ch11
Citations Scopus - 8
2006 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Adriano DC, 'Biotransformation of arsenic in soil and aquatic environments', Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Human Health, CSIRO PUBLISHING, Australia 433-454 (2006)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2005 Bolan N, Adriano DC, Naidu R, de la Luz Mora M, Mahimairaja S, 'Phosphorus-trace element interactions in soil-plant systems', Agriculture and the Environment, Soil Science Society of America, South Australia 384-412 (2005)
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
Show 30 more chapters

Journal article (597 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Yu L, Duan L, Naidu R, Semple KT, 'Abiotic factors controlling bioavailability and bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil: Putting together a bigger picture', Science of the Total Environment, 613-614 1140-1153 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The bioavailability and bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil underpin the risk assessment of contaminated land with these cont... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The bioavailability and bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil underpin the risk assessment of contaminated land with these contaminants. Despite a significant volume of research conducted in the past few decades, comprehensive understanding of the factors controlling the behaviour of soil PAHs and a set of descriptive soil parameters to explain variations in PAH bioavailability and bioaccessibility are still lacking. This review focuses on the role of source materials on bioavailability and bioaccessibility of soil PAHs, which is often overlooked, along with other abiotic factors including contaminant concentration and mixture, soil composition and properties, as well as environmental factors. It also takes into consideration the implications of different types of risk assessment (ecological and human health) on bioavailability and bioaccessibility of PAHs in soil. We recommend that future research should (1) account for the effects of source materials on bioavailability and bioaccessibility of soil PAHs; (2) adopt non-disruptive methods to analyse soil components controlling PAH sequestration; (3) integrate both natural organic matter (NOM) and xenobiotic organic matter (XOM) while evaluating the influences of soil organic matter (SOM) on the behaviour of PAHs; and (4) consider the dissimilar desorption scenarios in ecological risk assessment and human health risk assessment while assessing PAH bioavailability and bioaccessibility.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.025
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luchun Duan
2018 Qi F, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Yan Y, Ok YS, et al., 'Cadmium solubility and bioavailability in soils amended with acidic and neutral biochar', Science of the Total Environment, 610-611 1457-1466 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study was designed to investigate the effects of acidic and neutral biochars on solubility and bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) in soils with contrasting... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study was designed to investigate the effects of acidic and neutral biochars on solubility and bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) in soils with contrasting properties. Four Cd contaminated (50 mg/kg) soils (EN: Entisol, AL: Andisol, VE: Vertisol, IN: Inceptisol) were amended with 5% acidic wood shaving biochar (WS, pH = 3.25) and neutral chicken litter biochar (CL, pH = 7.00). Following a 140-day incubation, the solubility and bioavailability/bioaccessibility of cadmium (Cd) were assessed. Results showed that both biochars had no effect on reducing soluble (pore water) and bioavailable (CaCl 2 extractable) Cd for higher sorption capacity soils (AL, IN) while CL biochar reduced those in lower sorption capacity soils (EN, VE) by around 50%. Bioaccessibility of Cd to the human gastric phase (physiologically based extraction test (PBET) extractable) was not altered by the acidic WS biochar but reduced by neutral CL biochar by 18.8%, 29.7%, 18.0% and 8.82% for soil AL, EN, IN and VE, respectively. Both biochars reduced soluble Cd under acidic conditions (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) extractable) significantly in all soils. Pore water pH was the governing factor of Cd solubility among soils. The reduction of Cd solubility and bioavailability/bioaccessibility by CL biochar may be due to surface complexation while the reduced mobility of Cd under acidic conditions (TCLP) by both biochars may result from the redistribution of Cd to less bioavailable soil solid fractions. Hence, if only leaching mitigation of Cd under acidic conditions is required, application of low pH biochars (e.g., WS biochar) may be valuable.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.228
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan
2018 Wang Z, Tan X, Lu G, Liu Y, Naidu R, He W, 'Soil properties influence kinetics of soil acid phosphatase in response to arsenic toxicity', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 147 266-274 (2018)

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil phosphatase, which plays an important role in phosphorus cycling, is strongly inhibited by Arsenic (As). However, the inhibition mechanism in kinetics i... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil phosphatase, which plays an important role in phosphorus cycling, is strongly inhibited by Arsenic (As). However, the inhibition mechanism in kinetics is not adequately investigated. In this study, we investigated the kinetic characteristics of soil acid phosphatase (ACP) in 14 soils with varied properties, and also explored how kinetic properties of soil ACP changed with different spiked As concentrations. The results showed that the Michaelis constant (K m ) and maximum reaction velocity (V max ) values of soil ACP ranged from 1.18 to 3.77 mM and 0.025¿0.133 mM h -1 in uncontaminated soils. The kinetic parameters of soil ACP in different soils changed differently with As contamination. The K m remained unchanged and V max decreased with increase of As concentration in most acid and neutral soils, indicating a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism. However, in alkaline soils, the K m increased linearly and V max decreased with increase of As concentration, indicating a mixed inhibition mechanism that include competitive and noncompetitive. The competitive inhibition constant (K ic ) and noncompetitive inhibition constant (K iu ) varied among soils and ranged from 0.38 to 3.65 mM and 0.84¿7.43 mM respectively. The inhibitory effect of A s on soil ACP was mostly affected by soil organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Those factors influenced the combination of As with enzyme, which resulted in a difference of As toxicity to soil ACP. Catalytic efficiency (V max /K m ) of soil ACP was a sensitive kinetic parameter to assess the ecological risks of soil As contamination.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.08.050
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2017 Qi F, Kuppusamy S, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Ok YS, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon and its role in contaminant immobilization in soils', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 1-82 (2017)

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Pyrogenic carbon (PyC), including soil native PyC and engineered PyC (biochars), is increasingly being recognized for its potential role ... [more]

© 2017 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC Pyrogenic carbon (PyC), including soil native PyC and engineered PyC (biochars), is increasingly being recognized for its potential role as a low-cost immobilizer of contaminants in soils. Published reviews on the role of soil native PyC as a sorbent in soils have so far focused mainly on organic contaminants and paid little or no attenti on to inorganic contaminants. Further, a comprehensive review on the production of both natural PyC and engineered PyC (biochars), mechanisms involved, and factors influencing their role as soil contaminant immobilizer is so far not available. The objective of this review is thus to systematically summarize the sources, formation, and properties of PyC, including its quantification in soils, followed by their roles in the immobilization of both organic and inorganic contaminants in soils. Effectiveness of PyC on bioavailability, leaching, and degradation of soil contaminants was summarized. Notably, the mechanisms and factors (for the first time) influencing the immobilization processes for soil contaminants were also extensively elucidated. This review helps better understand and design PyC for soil contaminant immobilization.

DOI 10.1080/10643389.2017.1328918
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
2017 Chowdhury S, Thangarajan R, Bolan N, O'Reilly-Wapstra J, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Nitrification potential in the rhizosphere of Australian native vegetation', SOIL RESEARCH, 55 58-69 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/SR16116
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Singh S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation potential, surfactant production, metal resistance and enzymatic activity of two novel cellulose-degrading bacteria isolated from koala faeces', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 76 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12665-016-6337-3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2017 Nguyen TC, Loganathan P, Nguyen TV, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, Vigneswaran S, 'Adsorptive removal of five heavy metals from water using blast furnace slag and fly ash', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-9 (2017)

© 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany Heavy metals can be serious pollutants of natural water bodies causing health risks to humans and aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study... [more]

© 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany Heavy metals can be serious pollutants of natural water bodies causing health risks to humans and aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the removal of five heavy metals from water by adsorption onto an iron industry blast furnace slag waste (point of zero charge (PZC) pH 6.0; main constituents, Ca and Fe) and a coal industry fly ash waste (PZC 3.0; main constituents, Si and Al). Batch study revealed that rising pH increased the adsorption of all metals with an abrupt increase at pH 4.0¿7.0. The Langmuir adsorption maximum for fly ash at pH 6.5 was 3.4¿5.1 mg/g with the adsorption capacity for the metals being in the order Pb > Cu > Cd, Zn, Cr. The corresponding values for furnace slag were 4.3 to 5.2 mg/g, and the order of adsorption capacities was Pb, Cu, Cd > Cr > Zn. Fixed-bed column study on furnace slag/sand mixture (1:1 w/w) revealed that the adsorption capacities were generally less in the mixed metal system (1.1¿2.1 mg/g) than in the single metal system (3.4¿3.5 mg/g). The data for both systems fitted well to the Thomas model, with the adsorption capacity being the highest for Pb and Cu in the single metal system and Pb and Cd in the mixed metal system. Our study showed that fly ash and blast furnace slag are effective low-cost adsorbents for the simultaneous removal of Pb, Cu, Cd, Cr and Zn from water.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9610-4
2017 Subashchandrabose SR, Wang L, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Interactive effects of PAHs and heavy metal mixtures on oxidative stress in Chlorella sp MM3 as determined by artificial neural network and genetic algorithm', ALGAL RESEARCH-BIOMASS BIOFUELS AND BIOPRODUCTS, 21 203-212 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.algal.2016.11.018
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2017 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Transcriptome analysis of Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to benzo(a)pyrene', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 7 54-62 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.12.002
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Matheyarasu R, Sheshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Nutrient Budgeting as an Approach to Assess and Manage the Impacts of Long-Term Irrigation Using Abattoir Wastewater', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 228 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Disposal and management of abattoir wastewater have been a long-term concern in a high meat-consuming country like Australia. Land-b... [more]

© 2017, Springer International Publishing AG. Disposal and management of abattoir wastewater have been a long-term concern in a high meat-consuming country like Australia. Land-based application of wastewater is considered to be the most economically viable disposal method and is widely used by abattoirs. In this study, we assessed the effects of long-term abattoir wastewater irrigation on soil physical and chemical characteristics of calcareous soils. Soil samples were collected from 16 different locations with seven 5¿cm depths intervals down to 35¿cm. Soil properties including soil type, bulk density, moisture holding capacity, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), carbon (C) and micronutrients were measured. Soil characteristics were compared with non-irrigated soils. The study area receives annually about 327¿ML of wastewater with high concentration of N and P (186 and 30.4¿mg/L). Overall, the site retained 0.6¿t N/ha, 0.1¿t P/ha and 0.4¿t of K per hectare. Irrigation for over a decade onto the study site has caused a significant change in the soil fertility. Soil total N was increased by 82% compared to non-irrigated. Similarly, soil total P concentration was increased more than sixfold. The overall results showed that the abattoir wastewater irrigation to soil caused very significant changes in soil nutrient levels. These changes indicate need to recapture the surplus nutrient, in particular N, to avoid potential leaching and off-site effects.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-017-3542-y
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2017 Thavamani P, Samkumar RA, Satheesh V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ramadass K, Naidu R, et al., 'Microbes from mined sites: Harnessing their potential for reclamation of derelict mine sites', Environmental Pollution, 230 495-505 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.056
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Karunanithi R, Sik Ok Y, Dharmarajan R, Ahmad M, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Sorption, kinetics and thermodynamics of phosphate sorption onto soybean stover derived biochar', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 113-125 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.002
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Raja Dharmarajan, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Du J, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Synthesis of porous bentonite organoclay granule and its adsorption of tributyltin', Applied Clay Science, 148 131-137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2017.07.033
Co-authors Jianhua Du
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecotoxicity of measured concentrations of soil-applied diesel: Effects on earthworm survival, dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification activities', Applied Soil Ecology, 119 1-7 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diese... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diesel towards earthworms always relied on growth inhibition endpoint (EC 50 ) values that were determined based on the spiked concentrations (nominal), ignoring the substantial portion of hydrocarbons volatilized from soil. In the present study we used, for the first time, the measured concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil-applied diesel to assess earthworm (Eisenia fetida) survival, and the activities of dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification as indicators of soil health. The mortality endpoint (LC 50 ) value for initially measured concentrations after exposure of earthworms to diesel for 28¿days was 916¿±¿10¿mg TPHs kg -1 soil which was equivalent to the nominal (initially added) concentration of 1426¿±¿19¿mg TPHs kg -1 soil. Morphological abnormalities such as clitella swelling and curling were noticed when the measured concentrations of diesel were more than 971¿mg¿kg -1 soil. Significant increases in activities of soil dehydrogenase (38¿58%) as well as urease were observed in the diesel-applied soil. Presence of earthworms further enhanced the activities of these soil enzymes. Nitrification was sensitive to application of diesel to soil, and it was inhibited in a dose-related manner even in the presence of earthworms. The differential response of the toxicity criteria to diesel-contaminated soil observed in the present study clearly warrants more studies involving several soil health parameters to arrive at a generalization of ecotoxicity of an environmental pollutant.

DOI 10.1016/j.apsoil.2017.05.017
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Soil and brownfield bioremediation', Microbial Biotechnology, 10 1244-1249 (2017)

© 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology. Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons, persist... [more]

© 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology. Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons, persistent organic pollutants, halogenated organic chemicals and toxic metal(loid)s is a serious global problem affecting the human and ecological health. Over the past half-century, the technological and industrial advancements have led to the creation of a large number of brownfields, most of these located in the centre of dense cities all over the world. Restoring these sites and regeneration of urban areas in a sustainable way for beneficial uses is a key priority for all industrialized nations. Bioremediation is considered a safe economical, efficient and sustainable technology for restoring the contaminated sites. This brief review presents an overview of bioremediation technologies in the context of sustainability, their applications and limitations in the reclamation of contaminated sites with an emphasis on brownfields. Also, the use of integrated approaches using the combination of chemical oxidation and bioremediation for persistent organic pollutants is discussed.

DOI 10.1111/1751-7915.12840
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Naidu R, Bolan NS, et al., 'Sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', Environment International, 108 103-118 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The last few decades have seen the rise of alternative medical approaches including the use of herbal supplements, natural products, and traditional medicines... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The last few decades have seen the rise of alternative medical approaches including the use of herbal supplements, natural products, and traditional medicines, which are collectively known as ¿Complementary medicines¿. However, there are increasing concerns on the safety and health benefits of these medicines. One of the main hazards with the use of complementary medicines is the presence of heavy metal(loid)s such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg). This review deals with the characteristics of complementary medicines in terms of heavy metal(loid)s sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and human risk assessment. The heavy metal(loid)s in these medicines are derived from uptake by medicinal plants, cross-contamination during processing, and therapeutic input of metal(loid)s. This paper discusses the distribution of heavy metal(loid)s in these medicines, in terms of their nature, concentration, and speciation. The importance of determining bioavailability towards human health risk assessment was emphasized by the need to estimate daily intake of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines. The review ends with selected case studies of heavy metal(loid) toxicity from complementary medicines with specific reference to As, Cd, Pb, and Hg. The future research opportunities mentioned in the conclusion of review will help researchers to explore new avenues, methodologies, and approaches to the issue of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines, thereby generating new regulations and proposing fresh approach towards safe use of these medicines.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.08.005
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Basak BB, Sarkar B, Biswas DR, Sarkar S, Sanderson P, Naidu R, 'Bio-Intervention of Naturally Occurring Silicate Minerals for Alternative Source of Potassium: Challenges and Opportunities 115-145 (2017)

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil needs simultaneous replenishment of various nutrients to maintain its inherent fertility status under extensive cropping systems. Replenishing soil nutr... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Soil needs simultaneous replenishment of various nutrients to maintain its inherent fertility status under extensive cropping systems. Replenishing soil nutrients with commercial fertilizer is costly. Among various fertilizers, deposits of potassium (K) ore suitable for the production of commercial K fertilizer (KCl) are distributed in few northern hemisphere countries (Canada, Russia, Belarus, and Germany) which control more than 70% of the world's potash market. Naturally occurring minerals, particularly silicate minerals, could be used as a source of K, but not as satisfactorily as commercial K fertilizers. In this context, bio-intervention (in combination with microorganisms and/or composting) of silicate minerals has been found quite promising to improve plant K availability and assimilation. This is an energy efficient and environmentally friendly approach. Here we present a critical review of existing literature on direct application of silicate minerals as a source of K for plant nutrition as well as soil fertility enhancement by underpinning the bio-intervention strategies and related K solubilization mechanisms. An advancement of knowledge in this field will not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex natural processes of soil K fertility, but also help to develop a new approach to utilize natural mineral resources for sustainable and environmental friendly agricultural practices.

DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2016.10.016
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Sanderson
2017 Cheng Y, Wang L, Faustorilla V, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Integrated electrochemical treatment systems for facilitating the bioremediation of oil spill contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 175 294-299 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.02.079
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Bacterial mineralization of phenanthrene on thermally activated palygorskite: A C-14 radiotracer study', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 579 709-717 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.037
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Effect of irrigation and genotypes towards reduction in arsenic load in rice', Science of the Total Environment, 609 311-318 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) bioaccumulation in rice grains has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many other parts of the world. Suitable rice genotypes a... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) bioaccumulation in rice grains has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many other parts of the world. Suitable rice genotypes along with proper water management practice regulating As levels in rice plants must be chosen and implemented. A field study was conducted to investigate the effect of continuous flooding (CF) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) irrigation on the bioaccumulation of As in ten rice cultivars at three locations having different levels of soil As and irrigation water As. Results showed that As concentration in different parts of rice plants varied significantly (P¿ < ¿0.0001) with rice genotypes and irrigation practices in the three study locations. Lower levels of As in rice were found in AWD irrigation practice compared to CF irrigation practice. Higher grain As bioaccumulation was detected in plants in areas of high soil As in combination with CF irrigation practice. Our data show that use of AWD irrigation practice with suitable genotypes led to 17 to 35% reduction in grain As level, as well as 7 to 38% increase in grain yield. Overall, this study advances our understanding that, for moderate to high levels of As contaminatio n, the Binadhan-5, Binadhan-6, Binadhan-8, Binadhan-10 and BRRI dhan47 varieties were quite promising to mitigate As induced human health risk.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.111
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2017 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Andrews S, Venter H, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Bio-augmentation and nutrient amendment decrease concentration of mercury in contaminated soil', Science of the Total Environment, 576 303-309 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.083
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Naidu R, Sanderson P, 'Novel risk-based approaches to derelict mine management', Journal of Health, Safety and Environment, 33 (2017)
Co-authors Peter Sanderson
2017 Biswas B, Chakraborty A, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Structural changes in smectite due to interaction with a biosurfactant-producing bacterium Pseudoxanthomonas kaohsiungensis', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 136 51-57 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.11.008
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Mahbub KR, Bahar MM, Labbate M, Krishnan K, Andrews S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Bioremediation of mercury: not properly exploited in contaminated soils!', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 101 963-976 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-8079-2
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A C-14-tracer study', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 223 255-265 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.022
2017 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Lesniewski P, Chen Z, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Novel recalibration methodologies for ion-selective electrode arrays in the multi-ion interference scenario', Journal of Chemometrics, 31 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cem.2870
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2017 Faustorilla MV, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Australian Groundwater Through the Improvised Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detection Technique', JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHIC SCIENCE, 55 775-783 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/chromsci/bmx038
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2017 Qi F, Dong Z, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Ok YS, et al., 'Effects of acidic and neutral biochars on properties and cadmium retention of soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 180 564-573 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.014
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb, Morrow Dong
2017 Yan K, Dong Z, Wijayawardena MAA, Liu Y, Naidu R, Semple K, 'Measurement of soil lead bioavailability and influence of soil types and properties: A review', CHEMOSPHERE, 184 27-42 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.143
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Morrow Dong
2017 Qi F, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Dong Z, Yan Y, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 586 849-857 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.064
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Morrow Dong, Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan
2017 Dong Z, Bahar MM, Jit J, Kennedy B, Priestly B, Ng J, et al., 'Issues raised by the reference doses for perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 105 86-94 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.05.006
Co-authors Mezbaul Bahar, Morrow Dong, Yanju Liu, Luchun Duan, Dane Lamb
2017 Kuppusamy S, Venkateswarlu K, Thavamani P, Lee YB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Quercus robur acorn peel as a novel coagulating adsorbent for cationic dye removal from aquatic ecosystems', ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, 101 3-8 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2017.01.014
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2017 Liu Y, Bello O, Rahman MM, Dong Z, Islam S, Naidu R, 'Investigating the relationship between lead speciation and bioaccessibility of mining impacted soils and dusts', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 24 17056-17067 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9250-8
Co-authors Morrow Dong, Mahmud Rahman, Yanju Liu
2017 Mahbub K, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Development of a whole cell biosensor for the detection of inorganic mercury', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 64-70 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Electrochemical Detection of Thioether-Based Fluorosurfactants in Aqueous Film-Forming Foam (AFFF)', Electroanalysis, 29 1095-1102 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/elan.201600724
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Electrochemical Studies on Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) Upon Exposure to Anionic Surfactants: PFOA, PFOS, SDS and SDBS', Electroanalysis, 29 2155-2160 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/elan.201700108
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Kalaruban M, Loganathan P, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, Vigneswaran S, 'Enhanced removal of nitrate in an integrated electrochemical-adsorption system', Separation and Purification Technology, 189 260-266 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The electrochemical (EC) method of removing pollutants in water is a widely used process in water and wastewater treatment. An EC-adsorption integrated syste... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The electrochemical (EC) method of removing pollutants in water is a widely used process in water and wastewater treatment. An EC-adsorption integrated system was investigated to test whether the simultaneous removal of nitrate by the two processes would be better than removal utilising the individual EC and adsorption methods. In the integrated system, an adsorbent (ion exchange resin - Dowex 21k XLT) was placed inside a stainless steel box that served as an anode with a Cu plate as cathode. In an experiment using 2 L nitrate solution containing 20 mg N/L and 2 g adsorbent the rate of nitrate removal in the integrated system was initially fast with 35% removed in 30 min, though slowing down later. The rate of removal increased with increasing current, voltage and pH up to 7 but decreased as the distance between the electrodes also increased. The optimum nitrate removal of 67% was obtained at pH 7, 1 A, and 31 V for a distance of 1 cm between the electrodes after 180 min. The amount of nitrate removed fell when sulphate was present in the integrated system due to sulphate competing with nitrate for adsorption. Concentration of ammonium produced by nitrate reduction in the EC system was reduced in the presence of adsorbent. Nitrate removal in the integrated system is approximately equal to the sum of the removals in the two individual processes.

DOI 10.1016/j.seppur.2017.08.010
2017 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Application of a biodegradable chelate to enhance subsequent chemical stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils', JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS, 17 1696-1705 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11368-016-1608-x
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2017 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Electrochemical switch on-off response of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) upon exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)', JOURNAL OF ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 785 249-254 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jelechem.2016.12.040
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Rahman MA, Naidu R, 'Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based diets: Health risk assessment', Food Control, 82 196-202 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Total and inorganic arsenic (As) content in rice and rice-based diets (n = 59) obtained from supermarkets in South Australia were studied to investigate the c... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Total and inorganic arsenic (As) content in rice and rice-based diets (n = 59) obtained from supermarkets in South Australia were studied to investigate the contamination levels and whether consumption of these products pose potential health risks to young children and adults. Results show that of the 59 rice-based products, 31 (53%) exceeded the EU recommended value (100 µg/kg) of As for young children and 13 (22%) samples had higher than maximum level of 200 µg/kg recommended for adults. Arsenic content varies as rice crackers > baby rice > rice cakes > puffed rice > other rice-based snacks > ready-to-eat rice. Of the 6 categories of rice-based products, except ready-to-eat rice, all others exceeded the EU recommended value for young children. Even manufacture recommended servings deliver significant amounts (0.56¿6.87 µg) of inorganic As. These amounts are within the range of BMDL 01 values indicated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which means the risk cannot be avoided for young children and adults considering the levels of total and inorganic As in rice-based products.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodcont.2017.06.030
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2017 Singh G, Lakhi KS, Kim IY, Kim S, Srivastava P, Naidu R, Vinu A, 'Highly Efficient Method for the Synthesis of Activated Mesoporous Biocarbons with Extremely High Surface Area for High-Pressure CO2 Adsorption.', ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 9 29782-29793 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.7b08797
2017 Khandaker Rayhan Mahbub, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Mercury remediation potential of a mercury resistant strain Sphingopyxis sp. SE2 isolated from contaminated soil', Journal of Environmental Sciences, 51 128-137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jes.2016.06.032
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Khandaker Rayhan Mahbub, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury toxicity to Eisenia fetida in three different soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 24 1261-1269 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7869-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Singh G, Kim IY, Lakhi KS, Srivastava P, Naidu R, Vinu A, 'Single step synthesis of activated bio-carbons with a high surface area and their excellent CO2 adsorption capacity', CARBON, 116 448-455 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.carbon.2017.02.015
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Chowdhury S, Seshadri B, Naidu R, Ok YS, 'Comparative analysis of speciation and bioaccessibility of arsenic in rice grains and complementary medicines', CHEMOSPHERE, 182 433-440 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.126
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Geographical variation and age-related dietary exposure to arsenic in rice from Bangladesh', Science of the Total Environment, 601-602 122-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. An extensive number (965) of rice samples collected by household survey from 73 upazilas (i.e. sub-districts) in Bangladesh was analyzed to determine regiona... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. An extensive number (965) of rice samples collected by household survey from 73 upazilas (i.e. sub-districts) in Bangladesh was analyzed to determine regional variation, distribution and associated health risks from arsenic (As). No previous study had conducted a study examining such a large number of rice samples. The mean and median concentrations of total As were 126¿µg/kg and 107¿µg/kg, respectively, ranging from between 3 and 680¿µg/kg. Importantly, total As levels of aromatic rice were significantly lower (average 58¿µg/kg) than non-aromatic rice (average 150¿µg/kg) and also varied with rice grain size. The variation in As content was dominated by the location (47% among the upazilas, 71% among districts) and rice variety (14%). Inorganic As content in rice grain ranged between 11 and 502¿µg/kg (n¿=¿162) with the highest fraction being 98.6%. The daily intake of inorganic As from rice ranged between 0.38 and 1.92¿µg/kg BW in different districts. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for individuals due to the consumption of rice varied between 0.57¿×¿10 -¿3 to 2.88¿×¿10 -¿3 in different districts, and 0.54¿×¿10 -¿3 to 2.12¿×¿10 -¿3 in different varieties, higher than the US EPA thresho ld. The 2¿10 age group experiences higher carcinogenic risks than others and females are more susceptible than males.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.184
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of diesel water accommodated fraction toward microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella sp MM3', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 142 538-543 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.04.052
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Andrews S, Megharaj M, 'Mercury toxicity to terrestrial biota', ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS, 74 451-462 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecolind.2016.12.004
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Subashchandrabose SR, Logeshwaran P, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Pyrene degradation by Chlorella sp MM3 in liquid medium and soil slurry: Possible role of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase in pyrene biodegradation', ALGAL RESEARCH-BIOMASS BIOFUELS AND BIOPRODUCTS, 23 223-232 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.algal.2017.02.010
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2017 Umeh AC, Duan L, Naidu R, Semple KT, 'Residual hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil: Are they a barrier to risk-based approaches for managing contaminated land?', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 98 18-34 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.09.025
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Anthony Umeh Uon
2017 Mandal S, Sarkar B, Bolan N, Ok YS, Naidu R, 'Enhancement of chromate reduction in soils by surface modified biochar', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 186 277-284 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.05.034
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Qi F, Yan Y, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Liu Y, et al., 'Thermal stability of biochar and its effects on cadmium sorption capacity.', Bioresour Technol, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2017.07.033
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Yanju Liu, Scott Donne, Dane Lamb
2017 Usese A, Chukwu OL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Islam S, Oyewo EO, 'Concentrations of arsenic in water and fish in a tropical open lagoon, Southwest-Nigeria: Health risk assessment', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 164-171 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in water, muscle tissue of four demersal fish species (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, Mugil cephalus, Li... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in water, muscle tissue of four demersal fish species (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, Mugil cephalus, Liza falcipinnis and Bathygobious soporator) and whole tissues of periwinkle (Tympanotonus fuscatus) in Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria. The observed mean total As concentration in water (1.29µgl -1 ) during the wet and dry seasons did not exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value of 10µgl -1 . Among the examined biota, Tympanotonus fuscatus recorded higher As levels (2.31±0.24mgkg -1 ) and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus recorded the least As content (0.67±0.08mgkg -1 ). A significant positive correlation (p < 0.05) was observed between As concentrations in fish muscles and water during the dry and wet seasons. The health risks associated with human consumption of fish estimated using Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) were lower than the USEPA guideline value of 1 for all fish species examined except in populations that consume larger amounts of fish. However, higher THQ values ( > 2) were obtained for Tympanotonus fuscatus, suggesting the potential for non-carcinogenic health outcomes in adults after a prolonged period of consumption. This calls for continuous monitoring and enforcement of regulations to ensure safety of fishery resources from Lagos Lagoon.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.005
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2017 Faustorilla V, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Improved method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater and soil samples at trace levels employing GC-MSD technique', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 8 218-232 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.07.003
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2017 Faustorilla MV, Dharmarajan R, chen Z, naidu R, 'Clean-up of the solid liquid extraction using certified reference material for soil TPH by GC-FID', Journal of Research Analytica, 3 81-87 (2017)
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2017 Biswas B, Sarkar B, McClure S, Naidu R, 'Modified osmium tracer technique enables precise microscopic delineation of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in clay aggregates', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 7 12-20 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Clay minerals can support bacterial proliferation, induce the formation of clay¿bacterial aggregates, and finally a clay-based biofilm. However, how these a... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Clay minerals can support bacterial proliferation, induce the formation of clay¿bacterial aggregates, and finally a clay-based biofilm. However, how these abiotic and biotic entities interact in a microhabitat is not fully understood. Visualization of the clay¿bacterial micro-aggregate under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and profiling the associated elemental signature through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) can potentially unravel the mechanisms of a complex clay¿bacterial interaction. Osmium (Os) was used previously to enhance the visualization of microbial substances, but the delineation of bacterial cells from clay particles in a micro-aggregate was not tried before. In this study, bacterial cells in a clay¿bacterial aggregate (Burkholderia sartisoli with montmorillonite and kaolinite) were specifically stained with osmium (Os) which served as the EDS tracer of the biotic component of the interaction. Simultaneously silicon (Si) provided the signature of the clay minerals. X-ray elemental profiling (line and field mapping) successfully delineated the individual components of the clay¿bacterial aggregate. Thus, this study presented a simple Os-based SEM-EDS technique which could facilitate the microanalysis of bacterial microhabitat within a complex environmental substrate.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.11.002
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Evaluation of relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure for an assessment of lead bioavailability in mixed metal contaminated soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 7 229-238 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 1... [more]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 12 months under laboratory conditions. Zn was added to the soils (7500 mgZn/kg soil) and aged for a further two weeks. In vivo studies were conducted using juvenile swine as a surrogate model for young children. Two compartment pharmacokinetic models were used to analyze the biological response produced by Pb oral solution and spiked soils. Absolute and relative bioavailability of Pb in soils (oral dose of 100 µ g Pb/kg body weight/day) were estimated by comparing them with intravenously administered soluble Pb salt (25 µ g Pb/kg/day) and orally administered the same Pb salt [Pb acetate =(CH 3 COO) 2 Pb·3H 2 O] administered to 3 juvenile pigs per treatment. Lead bioaccessibility was calculated using the in vitro RBALP (i.e. relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure) method. The in vitro results of RBALP were compared to in vivo relative Pb bioavailability to ascertain whether the changes in bioaccessibility correlated with the in vivo data. Although the in vivo Pb relative bioavailability (RB) in all soils except in MLA (Mount Lofty Acidic) revealed an increase (18%¿159%) in the presence of Zn, the in vitro RBALP bioaccessibility results indicated otherwise (1%¿38% decrease). In vivo RB of Pb in MLA declined by 37% in the presence of Zn. However, the RBALP in vitro bioaccessible Pb did not correlate with the relative bioavailabilities of Pb in the juvenile swine dosing experiment. Caution is therefore needed when predicting Pb bioavailability/bioaccessibility in the presence of metal mixtures. The literature contains much information on the correlation of metal and metalloid bioaccessibility with their bioavailability. There is, however, a paucity of studies investigating the effects of other metals on Pb and their IVIVC (in vitro and in vivo correlations). The current study addresses this knowledge gap by assessing in vivoand in vitro bioavailability of Pb in the presence of Zn.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.02.007
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2017 Usese A, Chukwu OL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Islam S, Oyewo EO, 'Enrichment, contamination and geo-accumulation factors for assessing arsenic contamination in sediment of a Tropical Open Lagoon, Southwest Nigeria', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 126-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The presence of toxic heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic environments constitutes a major risk and there is an urgent need for continuous monitoring of s... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The presence of toxic heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic environments constitutes a major risk and there is an urgent need for continuous monitoring of such pollutants. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in surface sediments from 15 locations on the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria during the wet and dry seasons to determine the degree of contamination. The results showed that the mean total As concentration in sediment (2.44 mg kg -1 dry weight) did not exceed the Canadian Interim Sediment Quality Guideline (CISQG) value of 7.24 mg kg -1 dry weight during the wet and dry seasons. Based on the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and ecological risk assessment using the enrichment factor (EF), contamination factor (CF) and geo-accumulation index (I geo ), the study's results indicate two things: firstly, low to moderate and significant levels of enrichment from As; and secondly, low to moderate degree of contamination in Lagos Lagoon during the study period.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.006
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2017 Rusmin R, Sarkar B, Tsuzuki T, Kawashima N, Naidu R, 'Removal of lead from aqueous solution using superparamagnetic palygorskite nanocomposite: Material characterization and regeneration studies', Chemosphere, 186 1006-1015 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd A palygorskite-iron oxide nanocomposite (Pal-IO) was synthesized in situ by embedding magnetite into the palygorskite structure through co-precipitation metho... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd A palygorskite-iron oxide nanocomposite (Pal-IO) was synthesized in situ by embedding magnetite into the palygorskite structure through co-precipitation method. The physico-chemical characteristics of Pal-IO and their pristine components were examined through various spectroscopic and micro-analytical techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of Pal-IO in removing Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The surface morphology, magnetic recyclability and adsorption efficiency of regenerated Pal-IO using desorbing agents HCl (Pal-IO-HCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-Na 2 ) (Pal-IO-EDTA) were compared. The nanocomposite showed a superparamagnetic property (magnetic susceptibility: 20.2 emu g -1 ) with higher specific surface area (99.8 m 2 g -1 ) than the pristine palygorskite (49.4 m 2 g -1 ) and iron oxide (72.6 m 2 g -1 ). Pal-IO showed a maximum Pb(II) adsorption capacity of 26.6 mg g -1 (experimental condition: 5 g L -1 adsorbent loading, 150 agitations min -1 , initial Pb(II) concentration from 20 to 500 mg L -1 , at 25 °C) with easy separation of the spent adsorbent. The adsorption data best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model (R 2 = 0.9995) and pseudo-second order kinetic model (R 2 = 0.9945). Pb(II) desorption using EDTA as the complexing agent produced no disaggregation of Pal-IO crystal bundles, and was able to preserve the composite's magnetic recyclability. Pal-IO-EDTA exhibited almost 64% removal capacity after three cycles of regeneration and preserved the nanocomposite's structural integrity and magnetic properties (15.6 emu g -1 ). The nanocomposite holds advantages as a sustainable material (easily separable and recyclable) for potential application in purifying heavy metal contaminated wastewaters.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.036
2017 Kader M, Lamb DT, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Zinc-arsenic interactions in soil: Solubility, toxicity and uptake', Chemosphere, 187 357-367 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Arsenic (As) and zinc (Zn) are common co-contaminants in mining impacted soils. Their interaction on solubility and toxicity when present concurrently is not ... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Arsenic (As) and zinc (Zn) are common co-contaminants in mining impacted soils. Their interaction on solubility and toxicity when present concurrently is not well understood in natural systems. The aim of this study was to observe their interaction in solubility (soil-solution), bioaccumulation (shoot uptake) and toxicity to cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) conducting 4 weeks pot study in 5 different soils spiked with As (0, 2, 4, 8 to 1024 mg kg -1 ) individually and with Zn at two phytotoxic doses. The As pore-water concentration was significantly reduced (df = 289, Adjusted R 2 = 0.84, p < 0.01) in the presence of Zn in the whole dataset, whereas Zn and Zn 2+ activity in pore-water was reduced significantly only in the two alkaline soils. This outcome may be due to adsorption/surface precipitation or tertiary bridging complexation. No homogenous precipitation of zinc arsenate could be established using electron microscopy, XRD or even equilibrium calculations. For bioaccumulation phase, no significant effect of Zn on As uptake was observed except acidic MG soil whereas, Zn uptake was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by As in whole dataset. However, an additive response was observed mostly except acidic MG soil. The synergistic response (more than additive) was predominant in this soil for a wide range of inhibition concentration (0¿80%) at both Zn EC10 and EC50 levels. Since additive response is mostly considered in risk assessment for mixtures, precautions should be implemented for assessment of toxicity for As-Zn mixture in acidic soil due to their synergistic response in some soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.093
Co-authors Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2017 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Processes (EAOP) to degrade per- and polyflluoroalkyl substances (PFASs)', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED OXIDATION TECHNOLOGIES, 20 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/jaots-2017-0014
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Remediation approaches for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils: Technological constraints, emerging trends and future directions', CHEMOSPHERE, 168 944-968 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.10.115
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2017 Mahbub KR, Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 101 2163-2175 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00253-016-7965-y
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Fang C, Dharmarajan R, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Gold nanoparticle-based optical sensors for selected anionic contaminants', Trends in Analytical Chemistry, 86 143-154 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.trac.2016.10.008
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu, Raja Dharmarajan
2017 Mahbub KR, Kader M, Krishnan K, Labbate M, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Toxicity of Inorganic Mercury to Native Australian Grass Grown in Three Different Soils', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 98 850-855 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00128-017-2096-4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Duan L, Islam MR, Kuchel T, Naidu R, 'Variation in arsenic bioavailability in rice genotypes using swine model: An animal study', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 599 324-331 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.215
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Mahmud Rahman
2016 Mahbub K, Krishnan, Mallavarapu, Naidu, 'Mercury Inhibits Soil Enzyme Activity in a Lower Concentration than the Guideline Value', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 96 76-82 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00128-015-1664-8
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Venkidusamy K, Megharaj M, Marzorati M, Lockington R, Naidu R, 'Enhanced removal of petroleum hydrocarbons using a bioelectrochemical remediation system with pre-cultured anodes', Science of the Total Environment, 539 61-69 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Bioelectrochemical remediation (BER) systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently emerged as a green technology for the effective remediation of... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Bioelectrochemical remediation (BER) systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently emerged as a green technology for the effective remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants (PH) coupled with simultaneous energy recovery. Recent research has shown that biofilms previously enriched for substrate degrading bacteria resulted in excellent performance in terms of substrate removal and electricity generation but the effects on hydrocarbon contaminant degradation were not examined. Here we investigate the differences between enriched biofilm anodes and freshly inoculated new anodes in diesel fed single chamber mediatorless microbial fuel cells (DMFC) using various techniques for the enhancement of PH contaminant remediation with concomitant electricity generation. An anodophilic microbial consortium previously selected for over a year through continuous culturing with a diesel concentration of about 800mgl < sup > -1 < /sup > and which now showed complete removal of this concentration of diesel within 30days was compared to that of a freshly inoculated new anode MFC (showing 83.4% removal of diesel) with a simultaneous power generation of 90.81mW/m < sup > 2 < /sup > and 15.04mW/m < sup > 2 < /sup > respectively. The behaviour of pre-cultured anodes at a higher concentration of PH (8000mgl < sup > -1 < /sup > ) was also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy observ ation revealed a thick biofilm covering the pre-cultured anodic electrode but not the anode from the freshly inoculated MFC. High resolution imaging showed the presence of thin 60nm diametre pilus-like projections emanating from the cells. Anodic microbial community profiling confirmed that the selection for diesel degrading exoelectrogenic bacteria had occurred. Identification of a biodegradative gene (alkB) provided strong evidence of the catabolic pathway used for diesel degradation in the DMFCs.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.098
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Naidu R, Arias V, Liu Y, Jit J, 'Emerging contaminants in the environment: Risk-based analysis for better management', Chemosphere, 154 350-357 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.03.068
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Victor Arias
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Chen Z, Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Toxicity and bioaccumulation of iron in soil microalgae', Journal of Applied Phycology, 28 2767-2776 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Microalgae are extensively used in the remediation of heavy metals like iron. However, factors like toxicity, bioavailability a... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Microalgae are extensively used in the remediation of heavy metals like iron. However, factors like toxicity, bioavailability and iron speciation play a major role in its removal by microalgae. Thus, in this study, toxicity of three different iron salts (FeSO 4 , FeCl 3 and Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ) was evaluated towards three soil microalgal isolates, Chlorella sp. MM3, Chlamydomonas sp. MM7 and Chlorococcum sp. MM11. Interestingly, all the three iron salts gave different EC50 concentrations; however, ferric nitrate was found to be significantly more toxic followed by ferrous sulphate and ferric chloride. The EC 50 analysis revealed that Chlorella sp. was significantly resistant to iron compared to other microalgae. However, almost 900¿µg¿g -1 iron was accumulated by Chlamydomonas sp. grown with 12¿mg¿L -1 ferric nitrate as an iron source when compared to other algae and iron salts. The time-course bioaccumulation confirmed that all the three microalgae adsorb the ferric salts such as ferric nitrate and ferric chloride more rapidly than ferrous salt, whereas intracellular accumulation was found to be rapid for ferrous salts. However, the amount of iron accumulated or adsorbed by algae, irrespective of species, from ferrous sulphate medium is comparatively lower than ferric chloride and ferric nitrate medium. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis shows that the oxygen atom and P = O group of polysaccharides present in the cell wall of algae played a major role in the bioaccumulation of iron ions by algae.

DOI 10.1007/s10811-016-0837-0
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Mandal A, Naidu R, 'Specific adsorption of cadmium on surface-engineered biocompatible organoclay under metal-phenanthrene mixed-contamination', WATER RESEARCH, 104 119-127 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2016.08.009
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2016 Luo F, Yang D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Characterization of bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles by grape leaf aqueous extract and identification of active biomolecules involved in the synthesis', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 562 526-532 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.060
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Saint C, Aryal R, Thavamani P, Venkateswarlu K, et al., 'Metal bioavailability to Eisenia fetida through copper mine dwelling animal and plant litter, a new challenge on contaminated environment remediation', INTERNATIONAL BIODETERIORATION & BIODEGRADATION, 113 208-216 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2016.03.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Oak (Quercus robur) Acorn Peel as a Low-Cost Adsorbent for Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Aquatic Ecosystems and Industrial Effluents', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 227 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Springer International Publishing. The efficiency of low-cost, abundantly available local forestry waste, oak (Quercus robur) acorn peel (OP), to remove toxic Cr(VI) from ... [more]

© 2016 Springer International Publishing. The efficiency of low-cost, abundantly available local forestry waste, oak (Quercus robur) acorn peel (OP), to remove toxic Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions was studied in a batch system as a function of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, and pH. In an equilibrium time of 420 min, the maximum Cr removal by OP at pH 2 and 10 was 100 and 97 %, respectively. The sorption data fitted well with Langmuir adsorption model. Evaluation using Langmuir expression presented a monolayer sorption capacity of 47.39 mg g -1 with an equilibrium sorbent dose of 5 g L -1 and pH 7. Uptake of Cr by OP was described by pseudo-second-order chemisorption model. ICP-OES, LC-ICPMS analysis of the aqueous and solid phases revealed that the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal is by 'integrated adsorption and reduction' mechanism. ESEM-EDX and XRD analysis of OP before and after adsorption also confirmed that both adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr 3+ forms followed by complexation onto the adsorbent surface contributed to the removal of Cr(VI). Consistent with batch studies, OP effectively removed ( > 95 %) Cr from the real water samples collected from lake and sea. The results of this study illustrate that OP could be an economical, green, and effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from natural aquatic ecosystems and industrial effluents.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-016-2760-z
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation potential of a highly mercury resistant bacterial strain Sphingobium SA2 isolated from contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 144 330-337 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A mercury resistant bacterial strain, SA2, was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate showed 99% sequence s... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A mercury resistant bacterial strain, SA2, was isolated from soil contaminated with mercury. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate showed 99% sequence similarity to the genera Sphingobium and Sphingomonas of a-proteobacteria group. However, the isolate formed a distinct phyletic line with the genus Sphingobium suggesting the strain belongs to Sphingobium sp. Toxicity studies indicated resistance to high levels of mercury with estimated EC 50 values 4.5 mg L -1 and 44.15 mg L -1 and MIC values 5.1 mg L -1 and 48.48 mg L -1 in minimal and rich media, respectively. The strain SA2 was able to volatilize mercury by producing mercuric reductase enzyme which makes it potential candidate for remediating mercury. ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of Hg supplemented culture solutions confirmed that almost 79% mercury in the culture suspension was volatilized in 6 h. A very small amount of mercury was observed to accumulate in cell pellets which was also evident according to ESEM-EDX analysis. The mercuric reductase gene merA was amplified and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence demonstrated sequence homology with a-proteobacteria and Ascomycota group.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.08.061
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Dong Z, Yan K, Liu Y, Naidu R, Duan L, Wijayawardena A, et al., 'A meta-analysis to correlate lead bioavailability and bioaccessibility and predict lead bioavailability', Environment International, 92-93 139-145 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.04.009
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Yanju Liu, Morrow Dong, Luchun Duan
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial diversity in soils contaminated long-term with PAHs and heavy metals: Implications to bioremediation', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 317 169-179 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.. Diversity, distribution and composition of bacterial community of soils contaminated long-term with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy m... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.. Diversity, distribution and composition of bacterial community of soils contaminated long-term with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals were explored for the first time following 454 pyrosequencing. Strikingly, the complete picture of the Gram positive (+ve) and Gram negative (-ve) bacterial profile obtained in our study illustrates novel postulates that include: (1) Metal-tolerant and PAH-degrading Gram -ves belonging to the class Alphaproteobacteria persist relatively more in the real contaminated sites compared to Gram +ves, (2) Gram +ves are not always resistant to heavy metal toxicity, (3) Stenotrophomonas followed by Burkholderia and Pseudomonas are the dominant genera of PAH degraders with high metabolic activity in long-term contaminated soils, (4) Actinobacteria is the predominant group among the Gram +ves in soils contaminated with high molecular weight PAHs that co-exist with toxic heavy metals like Pb, Cu and Zn, (5) Microbial communities are nutrient-driven in natural environments and (6) Catabolically potential Gram +/-ves with diverse applicability to remediate the real contaminated sites evolve eventually in the historically-polluted soils. Thus, the most promising indigenous Gram +/-ve strains from the long-term contaminated sites with increased catabolic potential, enzymatic activity and metal tolerance need to be harnessed for mixed contaminant cleanups.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.05.066
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Gene expression profile changes in Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to PFOA', Ecotoxicology, 25 759-769 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Eisenia fetida is a terrestrial organism, which can be used to diagnose sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA by using molecular bio... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Eisenia fetida is a terrestrial organism, which can be used to diagnose sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA by using molecular biomarkers. In order to identify potential molecular biomarkers, we have exposed E.¿fetida to 10¿mg/kg of PFOA in soil for 8¿months. The mRNA isolation, sequencing, transcriptome assembly followed by differential gene expression studies have revealed that genes that are involved in apoptotic process, reproduction, calcium signalling, neuronal development and lipid metabolism are predominantly affected. Highly specific genes that are altered by PFOA can be further validated and used as biomarker to detect sub-lethal concentrations of PFOA in the soil.

DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1634-x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Kannan Krishnan
2016 Dong Z, Liu CX, Liu Y, Yan K, Semple KT, Naidu R, 'Using publicly available data, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model and Bayesian simulation to improve arsenic non-cancer dose-response', Environment International, 92-93 239-246 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Publicly available data can potentially examine the relationship between environmental exposure and public health, however, it has not yet been widely applie... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Publicly available data can potentially examine the relationship between environmental exposure and public health, however, it has not yet been widely applied. Arsenic is of environmental concern, and previous studies mathematically parameterized exposure duration to create a link between duration of exposure and increase in risk. However, since the dose metric emerging from exposure duration is not a linear or explicit variable, it is difficult to address the effects of exposure duration simply by using mathematical functions. To relate cumulative dose metric to public health requires a lifetime physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, yet this model is not available at a population level. In this study, the data from the U.S. total diet study (TDS, 2006-2011) was employed to assess exposure: daily dietary intakes for total arsenic (tAs) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) were estimated to be 0.15 and 0.028 µg/kg/day, respectively. Meanwhile, using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2011-2012) data, the fraction of urinary As(III) levels (geometric mean: 0.31 µg/L) in tAs (geometric mean: 7.75 µg/L) was firstly reported to be approximately 4%. Together with Bayesian technique, the assessed exposure and urinary As(III) concentration were input to successfully optimize a lifetime population PBPK model. Finally, this optimized PBPK model was used to derive an oral reference dose (Rfd) of 0.8 µg/kg/day for iAs exposure. Our study also suggests the previous approach (by using mathematical functions to account for exposure duration) may result in a conservative Rfd estimation.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.03.035
Co-authors Morrow Dong, Yanju Liu
2016 Kumar M, Rahman MM, Ramanathan AL, Naidu R, 'Arsenic and other elements in drinking water and dietary components from the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India: Health risk index', Science of the Total Environment, 539 125-134 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigates the level of contamination and health risk assessment for arsenic (As) and other elements in drinking water, vegetables and other fo... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigates the level of contamination and health risk assessment for arsenic (As) and other elements in drinking water, vegetables and other food components in two blocks (Mohiuddinagar and Mohanpur) from the Samastipur district, Bihar, India. Groundwater (80%) samples exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value (10. µg/L) of As while Mn exceeded the previous WHO limit of 400. µg/L in 28% samples. The estimated daily intake of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn from drinking water and food components were 169, 19, 26, 882, 4645, 14582, 474, 1449 and 12,955. µg, respectively (estimated exposure 3.70, 0.41, 0.57, 19.61, 103.22, 324.05, 10.53, 32.21 and 287.90. µg per kg bw, respectively). Twelve of 15 cooked rice contained high As concentration comp ared to uncooked rice. Water contributes (67%) considerable As to daily exposure followed by rice and vegetables. Whereas food is the major contributor of other elements to the dietary exposure. Correlation and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated natural source for As but for other elements, presence of diffused anthropogenic activities were responsible. The chronic daily intake (CDI) and health risk index (HRI) were also estimated from the generated data. The HRI were > . 1 for As in drinking water, vegetables and rice, for Mn in drinking water, vegetables, rice and wheat, for Pb in rice and wheat indicated the potential health risk to the local population. An assessment of As and other elements of other food components should be conducted to understand the actual health hazards caused by ingestion of food in people residing in the middle Gangetic plain.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.039
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Bolan S, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Palanisami T, et al., 'Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines', Science of the Total Environment, 539 304-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine t... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and exten ded x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.124
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Thava Palanisami, Morrow Dong
2016 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multiwall carbon nanotubes increase the microbial community in crude oil contaminated fresh water sediments', Science of the Total Environment, 539 370-380 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Since crude oil contamination is one of the biggest environmental concerns, its removal from contaminated sites is of interest for both researchers and indus... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Since crude oil contamination is one of the biggest environmental concerns, its removal from contaminated sites is of interest for both researchers and industries. In situ bioremediation is a promising technique for decreasing or even eliminating crude oil and hydrocarbon contamination. However, since these compounds are potentially toxic for many microorganisms, high loads of contamination can inhibit the microbial community and therefore reduce the removal rate. Therefore, any strategy with the ability to increase the microbial population in such circumstances can be of promise in improving the remediation process. In this study, multiwall carbon nanotubes were employed to support microbial growth in sediments contaminated with crude oil. Following spiking of fresh water sediments with different concentrations of crude oil alone and in a mixture with carbon nanotubes for 30. days, the microbial profiles in these sediments were obtained using FLX-pyrosequencing. Next, the ratios of each member of the microbial population in these sediments were compared with those values in the untreated control sediment. This study showed that combination of crude oil and carbon nanotubes can increase the diversity of the total microbial population. Furthermore, these treatments could increase the ratios of several microorganisms that are known to be effective in the degradation of hydrocarbons.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.09.031
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Yirsaw BD, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Effect of zero valent iron nanoparticles to Eisenia fetida in three soil types', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 9822-9831 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. In this study, the influence of soil types on the effect of the commercial form of C-nZVI on tissue concentrations, cellular component,... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. In this study, the influence of soil types on the effect of the commercial form of C-nZVI on tissue concentrations, cellular component, reproduction outcome in Eisenia fetida, and the soil health was investigated. C-nZVI at concentration level of 3¿g¿kg -1 soil showed no effect on the survival of E. fetida in the three soil types. However, varying effects such as concentration-dependent increase in tissue iron concentration, lipid peroxidation, and damage to DNA molecules by C-nZVI were observed. C-nZVI at an exposure concentration of 60¿mg¿kg -1 soil induced oxidative stress in E. fetida. Tissue Fe concentration appeared correlated to the DNA damage. Oxidative stress and DNA damage may explain the toxicity mechanisms of nZVI to E. fetida. [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-6193-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Aryal R, Naidu R, 'Screening of metal uptake by plant colonizers growing on abandoned copper mine in Kapunda, South Australia', International Journal of Phytoremediation, 18 399-405 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, © Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC.Systematic site survey for sample collection and analysis was conducted at a derelict copper (Cu) mine at Kapunda, South Australia. Cu ... [more]

© 2016, © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.Systematic site survey for sample collection and analysis was conducted at a derelict copper (Cu) mine at Kapunda, South Australia. Cu concentrations in the soils at this former mine ranged from 65¿10107¿mg kg-1. The pH and EC varied widely in the 3.9¿8.4 and 152¿7311¿µS ranges, respectively. Nine plant species growing over the copper mine site were selected to screen for metal uptake to determine their suitability for phytoremediation. The Australian native tree species Eucalyptus camaldulensis indicated enrichment factor (EF) of 2.17, 1.89, and 1.30 for Cu, Zn, and Pb, respectively, suggesting that this species of tree can accumulate these metals to some degree. The stress-resistant exotic olive, Olea europaea exhibited EF of = 0.01 for Cu, Cd, and Pb, and 0.29 for Zn, which is characteristic of an excluder plant. Acacia pycnantha, the Australian pioneer legume species with EF 0.03, 0.80, 0.32, and 0.01 for Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb, respectively, emerged as another strong metal excluder and consequently as an ideal metal stabilizer.

DOI 10.1080/15226514.2015.1109599
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Abbasian F, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Lockington R, Ramadass K, 'Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis', Biotechnology Progress, 32 638-648 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation... [more]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identificati on of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638¿648, 2016.

DOI 10.1002/btpr.2249
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Luo F, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneous removal of trichloroethylene and hexavalent chromium by green synthesized agarose-Fe nanoparticles hydrogel', Chemical Engineering Journal, 294 290-297 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The development of highly efficient, eco-friendly and cost-effective remediation technology to remove mixed contaminants is now in progress. Here, agarose-Fe... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The development of highly efficient, eco-friendly and cost-effective remediation technology to remove mixed contaminants is now in progress. Here, agarose-Fe nanoparticles (NPs) hydrogel were produced via two green steps to remove mixed contaminants, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). Approx. 84.9% of Cr(VI) and 93.8% of TCE were simultaneously removed over 24 h in their co-existing solution, while 94.1% of Cr(VI) and 97.2% of TCE were separately removed by agarose-Fe NPs hydrogel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) suggested that the macroporosity of agarose-Fe NPs hydrogel facilitated the mass transfer between agarose-Fe NPs hydrogels and mixed contaminants, and that Fe NPs were uniformly immobilized into the hydrogel. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) provided evidence supporting the co-removal mechanism. XPS result indicated that: (1) chemical reduction played a role in the removal of both Cr(VI) and TCE; and (2) iron oxides and Fe(III)-Cr(III) complexes might be formed after reaction. FTIR result showed that some functional groups were involved in the removal process. Moreover, the presence of iron oxides were confirmed by FTIR. Both SEM and XPS results verified that encapsulation could describe such immobilization of Fe NPs using agarose. Finally, the kinetics study supported the removal mechanism. Such encapsulation of Fe NPs via a green strategy is simple, quick, and cost-effective, making in situ remediation of mixed contaminants more favorable.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2016.03.005
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Bello O, Naidu R, Rahman MM, Liu Y, Dong Z, 'Lead concentration in the blood of the general population living near a lead-zinc mine site, Nigeria: Exposure pathways', Science of the Total Environment, 542 908-914 (2016) [C1]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. yea... [more]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. years of age and adults (above 18. years) from the Adudu community living near a lead-zinc mine in Nasawara, Nigeria. The average and median blood Pb levels in children and adults were 2.1 and 1.3 µg/dL, 3.1 and 1.8 µg/dL, respectively. However, Pb in 14% of adults' blood exceeded 5. µg/dL, which is the recommended threshold blood Pb concentration in adults as established by the Centers for Dis ease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore 68% of adults' blood exceeded blood Pb action level of 2 µg/dL. For children, 11.4% and 31% of the blood samples exceeded 5 µg/dL and 2 µg/dL, respectively, while no safe blood Pb level in children has been recommended. In Nasawara, a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed between the various age groups in children with 2-4 years old having the highest levels and 6. year old children having the lowest Pb levels. Although this study did not detect elevated levels of Pb in children's blood in regions such as Zamfara, Nigeria and Kabwe, Zambia, a high percentage of samples exceeded 2 µg/dL. Soils, floor dusts, water and crops also reveal that Pb contamination in the study area could potentially be the major cause of blood Pb in the community exposed to mining. This study also observed a significant correlation between water Pb levels of adults and blood Pb levels, suggesting that water is the major exposure pathway. This analysis highlights the need to properly manage mining activities so that the health of communities living in the vicinity of a Pb-Zn mine is not compromised.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.10.143
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Morrow Dong, Mahmud Rahman
2016 Venkateswarlu K, Nirola R, Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Abandoned metalliferous mines: ecological impacts and potential approaches for reclamation', Reviews in Environmental Science and Biotechnology, 15 327-354 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The lack of awareness for timely management of the environment surrounding a metal mine site results in several adverse consequ... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The lack of awareness for timely management of the environment surrounding a metal mine site results in several adverse consequences such as rampant business losses, abandoning the bread-earning mining industry, domestic instability and rise in ghost towns, increased environmental pollution, and indirect long-term impacts on the ecosystem. Although several abandoned mine lands (AMLs) exist globally, information on these derelict mines has not been consolidated in the literature. We present here the state-of-the-art on AMLs in major mining countries with emphasis on their impact towards soil health and biodiversity, remediation methods, and laws governing management of mined sites. While reclamation of metalliferous mines by phytoremediation is still a suitable option, there exist several limitations for its implementation. However, many issues of phytoremediation at the derelict mines can be resolved following phytostabilization, a technology that is effective also at the modern operational mine sites. The use of transgenic plant species in phytoremediation of metals in contaminated sites is also gaining momentum. In any case, monitoring and efficacy testing for bioremediation of mined sites is essential. The approaches for reclamation of metalliferous mines such as environmental awareness, effective planning and assessment of pre- and post-mining activities, implementation of regulations, and a safe and good use of phytostabilizers among the native plants for revegetation and ecological restoration are discussed in detail in the present review. We also suggest the use of microbially-enhanced phytoremediation and nanotechnology for efficient reclamation of AMLs, and identify future work warranted in this area of research. Further, we believe that the integration of science of remediation with mining policies and regulations is a reliable option which when executed can virtually balance economic development and environmental destruction for safer future.

DOI 10.1007/s11157-016-9398-6
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in growth medium and groundwater using a novel arsenite-oxidizing diazotrophic bacterium isolated from soil', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 106 178-182 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. An arsenic hyper-tolerant diazotrophic bacterium was isolated from a heavy metal contaminated soil. The pure isolate MM-17 was identified as Azospirillum sp.... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. An arsenic hyper-tolerant diazotrophic bacterium was isolated from a heavy metal contaminated soil. The pure isolate MM-17 was identified as Azospirillum sp. based on phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA. The strain oxidized 100 µM As(III) to As(V) in both culture media (minimal salts) and real groundwater within 8 and 10 h, respectively. The oxidation of As(III) by this strain was observed within the pH range 5-10 with the best performance at pH 7-8. As(III) oxidation was found to be independent of cell growth which implies the oxidation enzymes are constitutively expressed. The whole cell kinetic study highlighted a lower value of kinetic constant, K s as 32.9 µM As(III), which indicates that the strain MM-17 has greater affinity for As(III). The gene sequence of the large subunit of arsenite oxidase of MM-17 showed 99 and 72% similarity to the large subunit of arsenite oxidase of Stenotrophomonas sp. MM-7 and Sinorhizobium sp. M14, respectively. Sphaeroplasts experiments suggest that arsenite oxidase is a membrane associated protein in MM-17.

DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.10.019
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2016 Rusmin R, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Churchman J, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Structural, electrokinetic and surface properties of activated palygorskite for environmental application', Applied Clay Science, 134 95-102 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Unlike smectite, the surface characteristics of palygorskite remain underexplored for its potential application in environmental remediation. In this study, ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Unlike smectite, the surface characteristics of palygorskite remain underexplored for its potential application in environmental remediation. In this study, palygorskite from Western Australia was activated through thermal (300 °C for 4 h), acid (4 M HCl for 2 h at 70 °C) and acid-thermal (acid treatment followed by heating at 300 °C for 4 h) treatments, and the structural and physico-chemical characteristics were examined against the raw clay mineral. The influence of activation was systematically investigated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements and solid state 27 Al Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. The XRD patterns indicated preservation of the crystalline structure of palygorskite following all the treatments. These findings were supported by the Al (IV) and Al (VI) coordination peaks (chemical shift ~ 55 and 2.9 ppm, respectively) which were unaltered in the 27 Al MAS NMR spectra of the samples. The acid-thermal activated palygorskite exhibited the highest specific surface area (152.7 m 2 g - 1 ) and pore volume (0.2137 cm 3 g - 1 ) which respectively were 3-fold and 69% greater than the raw palygorskite. The potentiometric titration analyses highlighted the possible role of Al derivatives towards development of the surface charge of the activated palygorskites. Electrokinetic studies described the stability of the activated products (zeta potential values ranging from - 5 mV to - 32 mV) at different electrolyte (NaNO 3 ) concentrations. Combined acid-thermal activated palygorskite displayed a stronger specific adsorption of multivalent cations, and held a direct relevance to environmental remediation. Findings of this study will assist in the development of palygorskite-based adsorbents for heavy metal contaminants remediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.07.012
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Wang L, Choppala G, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 50 13062-13069 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b03195
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2016 Perelomov L, Sarkar B, Rahman MM, Goryacheva A, Naidu R, 'Uptake of lead by Na-exchanged and Al-pillared bentonite in the presence of organic acids with different functional groups', Applied Clay Science, 119 417-423 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigated the uptake of lead (Pb) ions by Na-rich bentonite (Na-bentonite) and Al-pillared bentonite (Al-bentonite) in the presence or absence... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigated the uptake of lead (Pb) ions by Na-rich bentonite (Na-bentonite) and Al-pillared bentonite (Al-bentonite) in the presence or absence of organic acids containing different functional groups. Na-bentonite was an effective adsorbent for Pb 2+ ions. The element was taken up by the mineral through ion exchange mechanism; and the formation of a lead carbonate hydroxide (hydrocerussite) also occurred. Al-bentonite adsorbed a smaller amount of Pb than Na-bentonite. XRD data indicated that the totality of clay interlayers was occupied by the pillaring agent that led to decrease in Pb uptake. The amount of Pb taken up by Na-bentonite decreased with increasing concentration of citric acid both when Pb and organic acid were added together as a mixture, and when citric acid was added 2 h before the metal ions. Possible reasons for this were the formation of Pb-citrate complexes which had less affinity to Na-bentonite, and also hydrocerussite dissolution at acidic pH. Citric acid, however, did not change Pb uptake by Al-bentonite. Addition of lysine together with Pb did not have any effect on Pb uptake by Na-bentonite and Al-bentonite, which indicated occupation of different adsorption sites by Pb and lysine compared to citrate. However, lysine addition at 1:1 ratio 2 h before Pb decreased the metal uptake, which again may be explained by the effect of lysine in hydrocerussite dissolution. Uptake of Pb in the presence of lysine was also higher when using Na-bentonite compared to Al-bentonite.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2015.11.004
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Influence of soil properties on vapor-phase sorption of trichloroethylene', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 306 34-40 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Current practices in health risk assessment from vapor intrusion (VI) using mathematical models are based on assumptions that the subsurface sorption equilib... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Current practices in health risk assessment from vapor intrusion (VI) using mathematical models are based on assumptions that the subsurface sorption equilibrium is attained. The time required for sorption to reach near-steady-state conditions at sites may take months or years to achieve. This study investigated the vapor phase attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in five soils varying widely in clay and organic matter content using repacked columns. The primary indicators of TCE sorption were vapor retardation rate (R t ), the time required for the TCE vapor to pass through the soil column, and specific volume of retention (V R ), and total volume of TCE retained in soil. Results show TCE vapor retardation is mainly due to the rapid partitioning of the compound to SOM. However, the specific volume of retention of clayey soils with secondary mineral particles was higher. Linear regression analyses of the SOM and clay fraction with V R show that a unit increase in clay fraction results in higher sorption of TCE (V R ) than the SOM. However, partitioning of TCE vapor was not consistent with the samples' surface areas but was mainly a function of the type of secondary minerals present in soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.12.002
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2016 Weng X, Jin X, Lin J, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Removal of mixed contaminants Cr(VI) and Cu(II) by green synthesized iron based nanoparticles', Ecological Engineering, 97 32-39 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. In this study, iron based nanoparticles (Fe NPs) synthesized by eucalyptus leaf extracts was used to remove mixed Cr(VI) and Cu(II), where the efficiency was... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. In this study, iron based nanoparticles (Fe NPs) synthesized by eucalyptus leaf extracts was used to remove mixed Cr(VI) and Cu(II), where the efficiency was 58.9% and 33.0%, respectively. In contrast, only 20.2% of Cr(VI) and 11.8% of Cu(II) were removed by adsorption using eucalyptus leaf extracts. In addition, the removal mechanism for mixed Cr(VI) and Cu(II) based on both adsorption and reduction by Fe NPs was confirmed by various characterization techniques, including the formations of Fe NPs, iron oxides and capping layer. Furthermore, the kinetics suggested that firstly, their sorption followed the pseudo second-order model well; and secondly, reduction of Cr(VI) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-first-order model well. Finally, Fe NPs not only removed Cr(VI) and Cu(II), but also Pb(II) and Zn(II) in electroplating wastewater. This provides a new insights into the removal of metal ions using green Fe NPs with a low cost and environmentally friendly remediation strategy.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2016.08.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2016 Nuruzzaman M, Rahman MM, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Nanoencapsulation, Nano-guard for Pesticides: A New Window for Safe Application', JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 64 1447-1483 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05214
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Yanju Liu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaugmentation with Novel Microbial Formula vs. Natural Attenuation of a Long-Term Mixed Contaminated Soil - Treatability Studies in Solid- and Slurry-Phase Microcosms', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 227 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Treatability studies in real contaminated soils are essential to predict the feasibility of microbial consortium augmentatio... [more]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Treatability studies in real contaminated soils are essential to predict the feasibility of microbial consortium augmentation for field-scale bioremediation of contaminated sites. In this study, the biodegradation of a mixture of seven PAHs in a manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil contaminated with 3967 mg kg -1 of total PAHs using novel acid-, metal-tolerant, N-fixing, P-solubilizing, and biosurfactant-producing LMW and HMW PAH-degrading bacterial combinations as inoculums was compared in slurry- and solid-phase microcosms over natural attenuation. Bioaugmentation of 5 % of bacterial consortia A and N in slurry- and solid-phase systems enhanced 4.6-5.7 and 9.3-10.7 % of total PAH degradation, respectively, over natural attenuation. Occurrence of 62.7-88 % of PAH biodegradation during natural attenuation in soil and slurry illustrated the accelerated rate of intrinsic metabolic activity of the autochthonous microbial community in the selected MGP soil. Monitoring of the total microbial activity and population of PAH degraders revealed that the observed biodegradation trend in MGP soil resulted from microbial mineralization. In the slurry, higher biodegradation rate constant (k) and lower half-life values (t 1/2 ) was observed during bioaugmentation with consortium N, highlighting the use of bioaugmentation in bioslurries/bioreactor to achieve rapid and efficient bioremediation compared to that of a static solid system. In general, natural attenuation was on par with bioaugmentation. Hence, depending on the type of soil, natural attenuation might outweigh bioaugmentation and a careful investigation using laboratory treatability studies are highly recommended before the upscale of a developed bioremediation strategy to field level.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-015-2709-7
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Luo F, Yang D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'One-step green synthesis of bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles used to degrade Orange II', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 303 145-153 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. To reduce cost and enhance reactivity, bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were firstly synthesized using grape leaf aqueous extract to remove Orange II. Gr... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. To reduce cost and enhance reactivity, bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were firstly synthesized using grape leaf aqueous extract to remove Orange II. Green synthesized bimetallic Fe/Pd NPs (98.0%) demonstrated a far higher ability to remove Orange II in 12h compared to Fe NPs (16.0%). Meanwhile, all precursors, e.g., grape leaf extract, Fe 2+ and Pd 2+ , had no obvious effect on removing Orange II since less than 2.0% was removed. Kinetics study revealed that the removal rate fitted well to the pseudo-first-order reduction and pseudo-second-order adsorption model, meaning that removing Orange II via Fe/Pd NPs involved both adsorption and catalytic reduction. The remarkable stability of Fe/Pd NPs showed the potential application for removing azo dyes. Furthermore, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the changes in Fe/Pd NPs before and after reaction with Orange II. High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrum (HPLC-MS) identified the degraded products in the removal of Orange II, and finally a removal mechanism was proposed. This one-step strategy using grape leaf aqueous extract to synthesize Fe/Pd NPs is simple, cost-effective and environmentally benign, making possible the large-scale production of Fe/Pd NPs for field remediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.10.034
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2016 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'A Review on the Genetics of Aliphatic and Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation', APPLIED BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 178 224-250 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12010-015-1881-y
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Nirola R, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Assessment of antioxidant activity, minerals, phenols and flavonoid contents of common plant/tree waste extracts', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 83 630-634 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.12.060
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Wong M-H, Ok Y-S, Naidu R, 'Biological-waste as resource, with a focus on food waste PREFACE', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 7071-7073 (2016)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-6078-6
2016 Gao Y, Wang F, Wu Y, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Comparison of degradation mechanisms of microcystin-LR using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and bimetallic Fe/Ni and Fe/Pd nanoparticles', Chemical Engineering Journal, 285 459-466 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) as a drinking water contaminant was degraded using iron-based nanoparticles such as nZVI, Fe/Ni and Fe/Pd. Batch experiments showed th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) as a drinking water contaminant was degraded using iron-based nanoparticles such as nZVI, Fe/Ni and Fe/Pd. Batch experiments showed that 28.0% of MC-LR with the initial concentration of 5mgL -1 was removed using nZVI, while more than 90% of MC-LR was removed using either bimetallic Fe/Ni or Fe/Pd after degrading for 120min. In addition, the results indicated that Fe 0 was oxided to iron oxide or hydroxide after reacting with MC-LR, while Ni or Pd acted as the catalysis to prevent Fe 0 corrosion and generating hydrogen via water reduction. Degradation of MC-LR by iron-based nanoparticles fitted well to the pseudo-first order kinetic model and the degradation was a diffusion-controlled reaction with low activation energies (8-21kJmol -1 ). Finally, the degradation mechanisms of MC-LR using iron-based nanoparticles were proposed according to the LC-MS analysis. In nZVI case, when the MC-LR was quickly adsorbed on nanoparticles, electron transfer and H 2 generated from iron corrosion were generated and broke down the Adda composition of MC-LR. Based on corrosion in the Fe 0 -H 2 O system, bimetallic Fe/Ni and Fe/Pd further utilized the abundant hydrogen radical decomposed from H 2 under the catalysis of Ni or Pd, and destroyed the Adda to form small molecules.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2015.09.078
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2016 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of fluorosurfactants in firefighting foams', RSC Advances, 6 11140-11145 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. We demonstrated SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) detection of fluorosurfactants (FSs), which are commonly formulated in aqueous fir... [more]

© 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. We demonstrated SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) detection of fluorosurfactants (FSs), which are commonly formulated in aqueous firefighting foams (AFFFs), by increasing their loading affinity and boosting their Raman activity. In order to increase FS's loading affinity, we introduced a cationic dye (ethyl violet or methyl blue) into the aqueous incubation solution to co-precipitate the FS onto the SERS substrate surface by forming an immiscible ion-pair (dye-FS). In the meantime, the Raman signal intensity was boosted due to the much higher Raman activity of the dye than that of FS. We compared two kinds of SERS substrate, patterned silver (Ag) surface and graphene oxide (GO) membrane, and noted the former (dye-FS-Ag) enhanced the Raman signal whilst the latter (dye-FS-GO) increased the loading affinity of the ion-pair due to the hydrophobic surface. We thus introduced silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into the incubation solution (as well as dye) to co-precipitate FS onto the GO surface via an assembly of dye-FS-AgNP-GO. Using this assembly, we successfully detected FSs including pentadecafluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (6:2FTS), with a limit-of-detection (LOD) of ~50 ppb (~120 nM) for PFOA.

DOI 10.1039/c5ra26114g
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Cheng Fang
2016 Ramadass K, Palanisami T, Smith E, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Earthworm Comet Assay for Assessing the Risk of Weathered Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils: Need to Look Further than Target Contaminants', Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 71 561-571 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00244-016-0318-0
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Sensitivity and Antioxidant Response of Chlorella sp. MM3 to Used Engine Oil and Its Water Accommodated Fraction', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 97 71-77 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) ... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) to determine growth inhibition and response of antioxidant enzymes. Oil type and oil concentration greatly affected the microalgal growth. Used oil at 0.04¿% (0.4¿g L -1 ) resulted in 50¿% inhibition in algal growth, measured in terms of chlorophyll-a, while the corresponding concentration of unused oil was nontoxic. Similarly, used oil WAF showed significant toxicity to the algal growth at 10¿% level, whereas WAF from unused oil was nontoxic even at 100¿% concentration. Peroxidase enzyme in the microalga significantly increased with used oil at concentrations above 0.04¿g L -1 whereas the induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase was apparent only at 0.06¿g L -1 . Activities of the antioxidant enzymes increased significantly when the microalga was exposed to 75 and 100¿% WAF obtained from used oil. The used oil toxicity on microalga could be due to the presence of toxic soluble mono- and polyaromatic compounds, heavy metals, and other compounds attained by the oil during its use in the motor engines.

DOI 10.1007/s00128-016-1817-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ganeshkumar V, Thavamani P, Chen Z, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Cultivation of Chlorella on brewery wastewater and nano-particle biosynthesis by its biomass', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 211 698-703 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2016.03.154
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2016 Liu Y, Naidu R, Ming H, Dharmarajan R, Du J, 'Effects of thermal treatments on the characterisation and utilisation of red mud with sawdust additive', Waste Management and Research, 34 518-526 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0734242X16634197
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Raja Dharmarajan, Jianhua Du
2016 Zhu C, Dong X, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Adsorption of aqueous Pb(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) ions by amorphous tin(VI) hydrogen phosphate: an excellent inorganic adsorbent', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 13 1257-1268 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Amorphous tin(VI) hydrogen phosphate (ATHP) was synthesized using the liquid phase precipitation method and served as an adsorbent to remov... [more]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Amorphous tin(VI) hydrogen phosphate (ATHP) was synthesized using the liquid phase precipitation method and served as an adsorbent to remove Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. The ATHP was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption¿desorption techniques. Adsorption properties were evaluated as a function of pH, reaction time, concentration of reactants, and salinity. Their equilibrium adsorption data were modeled using Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin¿Kaganer¿Radushkevich isotherms, respectively. The results revealed that adsorption equilibrium reached within 180¿min. ATHP indicated good adsorption even below the pH ZPC , and best adsorption at pH 5 for Pb(II) and Cu(II) and at pH 5.5 for Zn(II) was observed. Equilibrium data fitted better to the Langmuir model for Pb(II) and Cu(II) and fitted better to the Freundlich model for Zn(II). The saturated adsorption capacities deduced from the Langmuir model were 2.425, 1.801, and 0.600¿mmol/g for Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II), respectively, indicating an adsorption affinity order of Cu¿ > ¿Pb¿ > ¿Zn. There is a negative correlation between the concentration of NaCl and adsorption capacity of ATHP, yet ATHP still exhibited excellent adsorption having an adsorption capacity of 19.35, 15.16, 6.425¿mg/g when the concentration of NaCl was 0.6¿mol/L. The free energy (E) was 12.33, 10.70, and 14.74¿kJ/mol for Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II), respectively. An adsorption mechanism based on ion exchange between heavy metal ions and H + in the ATHP is proposed. Furthermore, the used ATHP was regenerated by HCl solution and the adsorbent was used repeatedly.

DOI 10.1007/s13762-016-0964-9
2016 Panneerselvan L, Sivaram AK, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of cyto- and genotoxic effects of Class B firefighting foam products: Tridol-S 3% AFFF and Tridol-S 6% AFFF to Allium cepa', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 6 185-194 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Worldwide a multitude of firefighting compounds are currently used for the mitigation and protection of man-made structures and forests alike from fire damages. Among the ... [more]

© 2016 Worldwide a multitude of firefighting compounds are currently used for the mitigation and protection of man-made structures and forests alike from fire damages. Among the class of firefighting agents, Class B firefighting foams are generally used to control fires generated from hydrocarbon liquids. In the present study, we assessed the cyto- and genotoxicity of two widely used class B firefighting foam concentrates, Tridol-S 3% and Tridol-S 6% to Alliumcepa through chromosomal aberration and comet assay using root meristem cells. A. cepa root tips were exposed to Tridol-S 3% and Tridol-S 6% with six different concentrations (0%, 0.005%, 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03%, 0.04% and 0.05%) for 24 h. Cytogenetic effect endpoints such as mitotic index, and chromosomal aberrations were observed. Chromosomal aberrations in the control (untreated onion root tips) was negligible with the mitotic index (MI) value of 79.6%, while the MI significantly decreased in all the test concentrations of firefighting compounds. Genotoxicity assessment through comet assay also revealed that both the products were genotoxic with a significant increase in per cent tail DNA and olive tail moment. Among the test compounds, Tridol-S 3% was more toxic than Tridol-S 6%. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the cyto- and genotoxic effects of class B firefighting foams to A. cepa root meristem cells. This study also suggests that the toxicological studies using A. cepa root meristem cells can be employed for evaluating the toxicological impacts of firefighting foams in the environment.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.10.003
Co-authors Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Faustorilla MV, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Solid phase extraction and fractionation of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by GC-MSD/FID techniques', Journal of Chromatography and Separation Techniques, 7 87-87 (2016)
DOI 10.4172/2157-7064.C1.020
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Raja Dharmarajan
2016 Mahbub KR, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Mercury resistance and volatilization by Pseudoxanthomonas sp. SE1 isolated from soil', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 6 94-104 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. A mercury resistant bacterial strain SE1 isolated from contaminated soil was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas based on 16s rRNA sequencing. The Hg resistance ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. A mercury resistant bacterial strain SE1 isolated from contaminated soil was identified as Pseudoxanthomonas based on 16s rRNA sequencing. The Hg resistance was examined in both nutrient-rich media as well as low nutrient media and expressed as EC 50 and MIC values. Estimated EC 50 and MIC values in nutrient-rich media and low nutrient media had the following respective recordings ¿ 22.6 mg L -1 ; 23.1 mg L -1 and 1.4 mg L -1 and 1.7 mg L -1 . The isolate was able to volatilize inorganic mercury demonstrated by a modified photographic film experiment and subsequently revealed its ability to remove mercury from the solution. The ICP-QQQ-MS analysis of SE1 inoculated solution showed almost 60% of 1.5 mg L -1 mercury was volatilized in 6 h and almost 40% were accumulated in cell pellets. The mercuric reductase gene merA was identified in the genome of isolate SE1 and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of merA gene indicated a sequence homology with different organisms from the alpha proteobacteria group and eukaryotic fungi. merA encoded enzyme mercuric reductase activity was evident in the crude protein of the isolate. The isolate's ability to resist Hg, it's Hg volatilization potential and the presence of merA gene and mercuric reductase enzyme demonstrates the potential application of this strain in mercury bioremediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.08.001
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Isolation and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degrading, pH tolerant, N-fixing and P-solubilizing novel bacteria from manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 6 204-219 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Dearth of high molecular weight contaminant degradation, pH tolerance and growth limiting nutrient assimilation potentials of the selected microorganisms are... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Dearth of high molecular weight contaminant degradation, pH tolerance and growth limiting nutrient assimilation potentials of the selected microorganisms are some of the prime factors reasonable for the failures in field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils. Hence an effort was made in this study for the first time to identify HMW PAHs degrading, N-fixing and P-solubilizing bacteria with pH tolerance from long-term manufactured gas plant site soils. Four distinct strains that could degrade both LMW and HMW PAHs were identified. Among the isolates, Stenotrophomonas (MTS-2) followed by Citrobacter (MTS-3) and Pseudomonas (MTS-1) were furthermost effective in the degradation of HMW PAHs either as individual or in the presence of co-substrate (LMW PAHs). MTS-1, 2 and 3 (co)degraded model LMW PAHs, Phe (100% of 150 mg L -1 ) and HMW PAHs Pyr (100% of 150 mg L -1 ) or BaP (90¿100% of 50 mg L -1 ) in 3, 12¿15 and 30 days, respectively and recorded the least half-life time (t 1/2 ) and highest biodegradation rate constants (k). One of the significant findings is the diazotrophic P-solubilization ability, acid and alkali tolerance (optimum pH=5.0¿8.0) of the HMW PAHs degrading Pseudomonas strain MTS-1. Stenotrophomonas (MTS-2) was also found to be superior as it could solubilize P and tolerate acidic condition (optimum pH=5.0¿7.5) during HMW PAHs degradation. Further, our study is the first evidence of diazotrophic P solubilization potential of Agrobacterium (MTS-4) and P-solubilizing capacity of Citrobacter (MTS-3) during bioremediation. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the promising use of the newly identified PAH degraders, notably MTS-1, 2 and 3 either as individuals or as consortia as an excellent candidate in the bioremediation or phytoremediation of PAHs contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.04.006
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Yan K, Dong Z, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Quantifying statistical relationships between commonly used in vitro models for estimating lead bioaccessibility', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 6873-6882 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioaccessibility to assess potential risks resulting from exposure to Pb-contaminated soils is commonly estimated using various in vitr... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioaccessibility to assess potential risks resulting from exposure to Pb-contaminated soils is commonly estimated using various in vitro methods. However, existing in vitro methods yield different results depending on the composition of the extractant as well as the contaminated soils. For this reason, the relationships between the five commonly used in vitro methods, the Relative Bioavailability Leaching Procedure (RBALP), the unified BioAccessibility Research Group Europe (BARGE) method (UBM), the Solubility Bioaccessibility Research Consortium assay (SBRC), a Physiologically Based Extraction Test (PBET), and the in vitro Digestion Model (RIVM) were quantified statistically using 10 soils from long-term Pb-contaminated mining and smelter sites located in Western Australia and South Australia. For all 10 soils, the measured Pb bioaccessibility regarding all in vitro methods varied from 1.9 to 106¿% for gastric phase, which is higher than that for intestinal phase: 0.2 ~ 78.6¿%. The variations in Pb bioaccessibility depend on the in vitro models being used, suggesting that the method chosen for bioaccessibility assessment must be validated against in vivo studies prior to use for predicting risk. Regression studies between RBALP and SRBC, RBALP and RIVM (0.06) (0.06¿g of soil in each tube, S:L ratios for gastric phase and intestinal phase are 1:375 and 1:958, respectively) showed that Pb bioaccessibility based on the three methods were comparable. Meanwhile, the slopes between RBALP and UBM, RBALP and RIVM (0.6) (0.6¿g soil in each tube, S:L ratios for gastric phase and intestinal phase are 1:37.5 and 1:96, respectively) were 1.21 and 1.02, respectively. The findings presented in this study could help standardize in vitro bioaccessibility measurements and provide a scientific basis for further relating Pb bioavailability and soil properties.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5947-8
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Morrow Dong
2016 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Wijesekara H, Kunhikrishnan A, Thangarajan R, Qi F, et al., 'Phosphorus-cadmium interactions in paddy soils', Geoderma, 270 43-59 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricult... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Regular application of phosphate (P) fertilisers has been identified as the main source of heavy metal(loid) contamination including cadmium (Cd) in agricultural soils. Some of these P fertilisers that act as a source of Cd contamination of soils have also been found to act as a sink for the immobilisation of this metal(loid). In paddy soils, redox reactions play an important role in the (im)mobilisation of nutrients and heavy metal(loid)s, as a result of flooding of the rice plains. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of P compounds in the immobilisation of metals in contaminated soils, there has been no comprehensive review on the mechanisms involved in the P-induced (im)mobilisation of Cd in paddy soils. There are a number of factors that influences P induced Cd (im)mobilisation in paddy soils that include pH, redox reactions, liming effect, rhizosphere acidification and root iron plaques. Following a brief overview of the reactions of Cd and common P compounds that are used as fertiliser in soils, the review focuses on the above mentioned mechanisms for the (im)mobilisation of Cd by P compounds in paddy soils. The role of iron plaques on Cd status in soil and rice plants is also discussed followed by a summary and future research needs.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.11.029
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Chekli L, Bayatsarmadi B, Sekine R, Sarkar B, Shen AM, Scheckel KG, et al., 'Analytical characterisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron: A methodological review', Analytica Chimica Acta, 903 13-35 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.aca.2015.10.040
Citations Scopus - 12
2016 Cheng Q, Hu Z, Naidu R, Xiao B, 'The performance and validation of an underground river reactor using compost energy as heat source', Ecological Engineering, 87 98-101 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2015.11.038
2016 Liu C, Subashchandrabose S, Ming H, Xiao B, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Phycoremediation of dairy and winery wastewater using Diplosphaera sp. MM1', Journal of Applied Phycology, 28 3331-3341 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. A new green microalgal species was isolated, identified and investigated for its biomass production and nutrient removal effici... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. A new green microalgal species was isolated, identified and investigated for its biomass production and nutrient removal efficiency in dairy and winery wastewater in this study. The 18S rRNA-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that this new strain is a Diplosphaera sp. and was designated strain MM1. The growth of this strain was evaluated in different diluted dairy and winery wastewaters. The highest algal biomass production (up to 2.3¿g¿L -1 ) was obtained in dairy wastewater (D3; dairy wastewater 1:2 deionised water) after 14¿days of culture. However, for winery wastewater, the highest algal biomass production (up to 1.46¿g¿L -1 ) was obtained in wastewater combination W2 (winery wastewater 1:1 deionised water) after 14¿days of culture. Turbid dairy wastewater with high concentration of nitrogen and phosphorous slowed down the initial growth of the alga. However, at the end of day 14, biomass production was nearly twofold higher than that of winery wastewater. The findings from both types of wastewater suggest that Diplosphaera sp. MM1 has potential for its application in generating biomass with simultaneous remediation of nutrient-rich wastewater.

DOI 10.1007/s10811-016-0894-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils', Journal of Environmental Management, 170 123-130 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions.The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment.The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant.Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in phosphate treated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.01.017
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2016 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Identification of a new operon involved in desulfurization of dibenzothiophenes using a metagenomic study and cloning and functional analysis of the genes', Enzyme and Microbial Technology, 87-88 24-28 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. The presence of sulphur-substituted hydrocarbons in fossil fuels are one of main reasons for the release of sulfur oxides into the environment. Dibenzothioph... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. The presence of sulphur-substituted hydrocarbons in fossil fuels are one of main reasons for the release of sulfur oxides into the environment. Dibenzothiophenes (DBT) are organic sulfur-containing molecules in crude oil, which have the potential for biological oxidation, with the sulphur being removed through an enzymatic cleavage of the C. S bonds. Therefore, finding new strains that can desulfurize this compound has recently become a point of interest. In this study, three new genes involved in the bacterial desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene, which were sequenced in the course of a metagenomic study, were isolated by PCR amplification in the laboratory. The activities of these genes were then analysed following insertion into an expression vector and cloning in Escherichia coli DH5a cells. Based on the results, all three genes were actively expressed and their products could act on their corresponding substrates.

DOI 10.1016/j.enzmictec.2016.02.009
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Potential of Melaleuca diosmifolia leaf as a low-cost adsorbent for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated water bodies', Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 100 173-182 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. The present study describes for the first time the utilization of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia, fallen off from the plant, t... [more]

© 2016 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. The present study describes for the first time the utilization of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia, fallen off from the plant, to detoxify and remove hexavalent chromium or Cr(VI) from aqueous systems. Initial characterization by gas chromatography revealed that the selected biomaterial is one of the natural sources of eucalyptol. It constituted high concentrations of reducing compounds (iron, phenols and flavonoids). Batch studies revealed that the biosorbent (5 g L -1 ) was able to remove 97-99.9% of 250 mg L -1 Cr(VI) at wide-ranging pH (2-10) and temperature (24-48 °C). Adsorption kinetics was well described using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, while the equilibrium adsorption data were interpreted in terms of the Langmuir isotherm model. The monolayer adsorption capacity was 62.5 mg g -1 . Both inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and liquid chromatography analyses of the aqueous and solid phases revealed that the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal was 'adsorption-coupled reduction'. Scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses of the biosorbent before and after adsorption also confirmed that both adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) followed by complexation onto functional groups of the active surface contributed to the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The selected biomaterial effectively (99.9%) removed Cr(VI) in lake and sea water samples, highlighting its potential for remediating Cr(VI) in real environmental conditions.

DOI 10.1016/j.psep.2016.01.009
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Influence of thermally modified palygorskite on the viability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria', Applied Clay Science, 134 153-160 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Thermal activation of palygorskite is considered as a simple and cost-effective method for modifying its structural and surface properties, which can be cong... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Thermal activation of palygorskite is considered as a simple and cost-effective method for modifying its structural and surface properties, which can be congenial for the adsorptive removal of environmental contaminants. However, for a more efficient removal of organic contaminants like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), clay-microbial synergy combining both adsorption and biodegradation is an emerging strategy. In this study, we investigated the compatibility of heat treated palygorskite products (100¿900 °C) with a PAH-degrading soil bacterium Burkholderia sartisoli. The mineralogical and physico-chemical properties were characterised in detail, and the bacterial adhesion to the substrate and their growth were observed in relation to these properties. The major variation in the cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area, water content and the elemental dissolution in the aqueous medium occurred in the palygorskite products heated at extreme temperature (700¿900 °C). These changes significantly influenced the bacterial growth and attachment. The maximum viability was imparted by the palygorskite product obtained at 400 °C. Dissolution of Al from products heated above 500 °C also posed inhibitory effect on bacterial growth in the aqueous media. This study provided valuable information about the mechanisms of bacterial viability as affected by modified clay minerals, which is important for developing a novel clay-modulated-bioremediation technology.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.07.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2016 Kumar M, Ramanathan AL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Concentrations of inorganic arsenic in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments from the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India', Science of the Total Environment, 573 1103-1114 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Concentrations of inorganic forms [arsenite, As(III) and arsenate, As(V) of arsenic (As) present in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Concentrations of inorganic forms [arsenite, As(III) and arsenate, As(V) of arsenic (As) present in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments located in the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India were determined. Approximately 73% of the groundwater samples (n¿=¿19) show As(III) as the dominant species while 27% reveals As(V) was the dominant species. The concentration of As(III) in agricultural soil samples varies from not detectable to 40¿µg/kg and As(V) was observed as the major species (ranging from 1050 to 6835¿µg/kg) while the total As concentration varied from 3528 to 14,690¿µg/kg. Total extracted concentration of As was higher in the subsurface sediments (range 9119¿20,056¿µg/kg in Methrapur and 4788¿19,681¿µg/kg in Harail Chapar) than the agricultural soil, indicating the subsurface sediment as a source of As. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) revealed the presence of hematite and goethite throughout the vertical section below while magnetite was observed only in the upper oxidized layer at Methrapur and Harail Chapar. Alteration of Fe-oxides and presence of fibrous goethite indicating presence of diagenetic sediment. Siderite plays a crucial role as sinks to the As in subsurface sediments. The study also concluded that decomposition of organic matter present in dark and grey sections promote the redox conditions and trigger mobilization of As into groundwater.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.08.109
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Arsenic accumulation in rice: Consequences of rice genotypes and management practices to reduce human health risk', Environment International, 96 139-155 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Rice is an essential staple food and feeds over half of the world&apos;s population. Consumption of rice has increased from limited intake in Western countrie... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Rice is an essential staple food and feeds over half of the world's population. Consumption of rice has increased from limited intake in Western countries some 50¿years ago to major dietary intake now. Rice consumption represents a major route for inorganic arsenic (As) exposure in many countries, especially for people with a large proportion of rice in their daily diet as much as 60%. Rice plants are more efficient in assimilating As into its grains than other cereal crops and the accumulation may also adversely affect the quality of rice and their nutrition. Rice is generally grown as a lowland crop in flooded soils under reducing conditions. Under these conditions the bioavailability of As is greatly enhanced leading to excessive As bioaccumulation compared to that under oxidizing upland conditions. Inorganic As species are carcinogenic to humans and even at low levels in the diet pose a considerable risk to humans. There is a substantial genetic variation among the rice genotypes in grain-As accumulation as well as speciation. Identifying the extent of genetic variation in grain-As concentration and speciation of As compounds are crucial to determining the rice varieties which accumulate low inorganic As. Varietal selection, irrigation water management, use of fertilizer and soil amendments, cooking practices etc. play a vital role in reducing As exposure from rice grains. In the meantime assessing the bioavailability of As from rice is crucial to understanding human health exposure and reducing the risk.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.09.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Prasath Annamalai
2016 Abbasi S, Lamb DT, Palanisami T, Kader M, Matanitobua V, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaccessibility of barium from barite contaminated soils based on gastric phase in vitro data and plant uptake', Chemosphere, 144 1421-1427 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contam... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contaminated soils using the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) methodology. The existence of barite in plant tissue and the possibility of 'biomineralised' zones was also investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Soils with low barium (Ba) concentrations showed a higher proportion of Ba extractability than barite rich samples. Barium uptake to spinach from soil was different between short term spiking studies and field weathered soils. Furthermore, Ba crystals were not evident in spinach tissue or acid digest solutions grown in barium nitrate spiked soils despite high accumulation. Barite was found in the plant digest solutions from barite contaminated soils only. Results indicate that under the conservative assumptions made, a child would need to consume extreme quantities of soil over an extended period to cause chronic health problems.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.10.031
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami, Dane Lamb
2016 Mandal S, Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Sarkar B, Khan N, Ok YS, Naidu R, 'Biochar-induced concomitant decrease in ammonia volatilization and increase in nitrogen use efficiency by wheat', CHEMOSPHERE, 142 120-127 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.04.086
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Xia Q, Peng C, Lamb D, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Ng JC, 'Bioaccessibility of arsenic and cadmium assessed for in vitro bioaccessibility in spiked soils and their interaction during the Unified BARGE Method (UBM) extraction', Chemosphere, 147 444-450 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Recent decades have seen a growing popularity of in vitro bioaccessibility being utilised as a screening tool in human health risk assessment. However the ex... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Recent decades have seen a growing popularity of in vitro bioaccessibility being utilised as a screening tool in human health risk assessment. However the existin g bioaccessibility studies only focus on single contaminant. Considering human are likely to ingest multi-contaminants, these contaminants could interact within human gastrointestinal tract which may lead to an increase or decrease in bioaccessibility. In this study, seven different types of soil were spiked with arsenic (As) or cadmium (Cd) and aged for one year. The effects of soil properties on the bioaccessibility were examined. Moreover, the interaction between As and Cd in simulated human digestive system was studied by mixing As-spiked soil with Cd-spiked soil of the same type during bioaccessibility test. Results shows the bioaccessibility of As ranged from 40 ± 2.8 to 95 ± 1.3% in the gastric phase and 16 ± 2.0 to 96 ± 0.8% in the intestinal phase whilst a significant difference was observed between Cd gastric bioaccessibility (72 ± 4.3 to 99 ± 0.8%) and intestinal bioaccessibility (6.2 ± 0.3 to 45 ± 2.7%). Organic carbon, iron oxide and aluminium oxide were key parameters influencing the bioaccessibility of As (gastric and intestinal phases) and Cd (intestinal phase). No interactions between As and Cd during bioaccessibility test were observed in any soils, which indicates As and Cd may age independently and did not interact while being solubilised during bioaccessibility test. Thus additive effect may be proposed when estimating the bioaccessibility of mixtures of independently-aged As and Cd in soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.12.091
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2016 Laghari M, Naidu R, Xiao B, Hu Z, Mirjat MS, Hu M, et al., 'Recent developments in biochar as an effective tool for agricultural soil management: a review', JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, 96 4840-4849 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.7753
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2016 Sarkar B, Neumann A, Naidu R, 'Clay and fine particle-based materials for environmental technologies and clean up', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 134 69-70 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.10.026
2016 Ramakrishnan P, Nagarajan S, Thiruvenkatam V, Palanisami T, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, Rajendran S, 'Cation doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles enhance strontium adsorption from aqueous system: A comparative study with and without calcination', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 134 136-144 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.09.022
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Chekli L, Brunetti G, Marzouk ER, Maoz-Shen A, Smith E, Naidu R, et al., 'Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 216 636-645 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.06.025
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2016 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Assessment of nitrogen losses through nitrous oxide from abattoir wastewater-irrigated soils', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 22633-22646 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7438-y
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Prasath A, Panneerselvan L, Provatas A, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Genotoxicity assessment of acute exposure of 2, 4-dinitroanisole, its metabolites and 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene to Daphnia carinata', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 1873-1879 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1709-8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Prasath Annamalai, Logeshwaran Panneerselvan
2016 Wijayawardena AMA, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaccumulation and toxicity of lead, influenced by edaphic factors: using earthworms to study the effect of Pb on ecological health', Journal of Soils and Sediments, 17 1064-1072 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11368-016-1605-0
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Wang L, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting copper phytotoxicity based on pore-water pCu', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 481-490 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-015-1605-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2016 Xia Q, Peng C, Lamb D, Kader M, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, Ng JC, 'Effects of arsenic and cadmium on bioaccessibility of lead in spiked soils assessed by Unified BARGE Method', CHEMOSPHERE, 154 343-349 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.03.133
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Mahbub KR, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting plant uptake and toxicity of lead (Pb) in long-term contaminated soils from derived transfer functions', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 15460-15470 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-6696-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Bolan S, Seshadri B, Talley NJ, Naidu R, 'Bio-banking gut microbiome samples', EMBO REPORTS, 17 929-930 (2016)
DOI 10.15252/embr.201642572
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicholas Talley, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Transcriptome analysis of Eisenia fetida chronically exposed to benzo(a)pyrene', Environmental Technology & Innovation, (2016)
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 España VAA, Sarkar B, Biswas B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Environmental applications of thermally modified and acid activated clay minerals: Current status of the art', Environmental Technology and Innovation, (2016)

© 2016. Adsorption has been the most common technology used for water and wastewater treatment for a number of reasons including simplicity, flexibility in design, high efficienc... [more]

© 2016. Adsorption has been the most common technology used for water and wastewater treatment for a number of reasons including simplicity, flexibility in design, high efficiency and cost effectiveness. Although it has been a proven technology for removal of contaminants including heavy metals, it has a major limitation to its application, which is the cost of the adsorbent. In this context, natural clay minerals are considered as low cost materials because they are abundant and can be easily modified to improve their surface properties (e.g., surface area, charge) and consequently increase the adsorption capacity and a wide range of other applicabilities. The two most common modification methods of clay minerals are thermal modification and acid activation. The aim of this paper is to critically review the current status of thermally modified and acid activated clay minerals for environmental applications. It will evaluate the adsorption efficiencies and conditions for removal of contaminants and identify the existing data gaps to widespread commercial uptake of the technology.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.11.005
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Victor Arias
2016 Matheyarasu R, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Abattoir Wastewater Irrigation Increases the Availability of Nutrients and Influences on Plant Growth and Development', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 227 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, The Author(s). This study evaluated the effects of abattoir wastewater irrigation on plant growth and development. The soils used in this study were collected from Primo ... [more]

© 2016, The Author(s). This study evaluated the effects of abattoir wastewater irrigation on plant growth and development. The soils used in this study were collected from Primo Smallgoods Abattoir (Port Wakefield, South Australia) at different sites such as currently irrigated (CI), currently not irrigated (CNI) and soil outside the irrigation area as control (CTRL). A completely randomised block design was employed for the plant growth experiment, where four crops (Pennisetum purpureum, Medicago sativa, Sinapis alba and Helianthus annuus) were grown separately on three different soils (CI, CNI and CTRL) in plastic pots. Two types of water (tap water and wastewater) and two loadings were applied throughout the planting period based on the field capacity (FC 100 and 150¿%). The overall dry matter yield was compared between the soils and treatments. Under wastewater irrigation, among the four species grown in the CI soil, P. purpureum (171¿g) and H. annuus (151¿g) showed high biomass yields, followed by S. alba (115¿g) and M. sativa (31¿g). The plants grown under tap water showed about 70¿% lower yields compared to the abattoir wastewater irrigation (AWW). Similar trends in the biomass yields were observed for CNI and CTRL soils under the two water treatments, with the biomass yields in the following order CI > CNI > CTRL soils. The results confirm the beneficial effects of AWW at the greenhouse level. However, a proper cropping pattern and wastewater irrigation management plan is essential to utilise the nutrients available in the wastewater-irrigated land treatment sites. The increase in fertility is evident from the effects of wastewater on biomass growth and also the abundance of nutrients accumulated in plants. A mass balance calculation on the applied, residual and the plant-accumulated nutrients over a few cropping periods will help us in understanding the nutrient cycling processes involved in the abattoir-irrigated land treatment sites, which will serve as an effective tool for the environmental management.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-016-2947-3
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Kinetics of PAH degradation by a new acid-metal-tolerant Trabulsiella isolated from the MGP site soil and identification of its potential to fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphorous', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 307 99-107 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.12.068
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Faustorilla M, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Solid phase extraction and fractionation of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by GC-MSD/FID techniques', Journal of Chromatography and Separation Techniques, 7 87-87 (2016)
DOI 10.4172/2157-7064.C1.020
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2016 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Soil bacterial strains with heavy metal resistance and high potential in degrading diesel oil and n-alkanes', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 13 2863-2874 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil ... [more]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil and identified. Strains of Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas putida TPHK-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TPHK-4, were more efficient in degrading high concentrations of the hydrocarbons than the other two strains, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia TPHK-2 and Acenitobacter sp. TPHK-3. P. putida TPHK-1 exhibited tolerance to very high concentrations of heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, zinc and copper. The innate ability of P. putida TPHK-1, as evidenced by the amplified genes alkB1 and alkB2 that encode alkane hydroxylases, and cat12o and cat23o coding for catechol dioxygenase, in degrading diesel oil in the presence of heavy metals is far greater than that of the strains reported in the literature. Heavy metal tolerance coupled with rapid degradation of hydrocarbons, even at high concentrations, suggests that P. putida TPHK-1 has a great potential in remediating soils contaminated with mixtures of hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

DOI 10.1007/s13762-016-1113-1
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Liu E, Sarkar B, Wang L, Naidu R, 'Copper-complexed clay/poly-acrylic acid composites: Extremely efficient adsorbents of ammonia gas', Applied Clay Science, 121-122 154-161 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Work reported in this manuscript takes into consideration the possible use of NH 3 gas by terrorists and the potential for an effective and rapid removal of... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Work reported in this manuscript takes into consideration the possible use of NH 3 gas by terrorists and the potential for an effective and rapid removal of such toxic substance from air using a modified clay material. In this study, a series of clay/polymer composites were synthesised for ammonia gas (NH 3 ) adsorption. The adsorbents were prepared by polymerisation of acrylic acid with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as cross-linker in the presence of a large amount of highly dispersed clay nanoparticles, followed by interaction with copper ions (Cu 2+ ). Two kinds of clays were used. One was an acid-treated bentonite that had a specific surface area (SSA) of 395 m 2 /g and the other was natural palygorskite with a SSA of 87 m 2 /g. The materials were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The materials' ability to remove NH 3 was investigated using NH 3 breakthrough dynamic test while the strength of NH 3 retention was characterised by Thermogravimetric Analysis ( TGA) coupled with FTIR. The results indicate that clay/poly-acrylic acid composites are highly efficient adsorbents of NH 3 after binding with Cu 2+ . Trapping NH 3 on such adsorbents can lead to colour change and this makes it possible to predict the lifetime of the adsorption bed visually. In addition, the result of NH 3 release from the material following adsorption showed that majority of the adsorbed NH 3 desorbed at temperature above 180°C. The clay/polymer composites can potentially be used in air filters. They may provide an effective and cheap way for removing NH 3 from contaminated air.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2015.12.012
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Liang Wang
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation potential of a new acid tolerant, diazotrophic P-solubilizing and heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. MTS-7 isolated from long-term mixed contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 162 31-39 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both L... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both LMW and HMW PAHs with added unique traits of acid and alkali tolerance, heavy metal tolerance, self-nutrient assimilation by N fixation and P solubilization. This strain completely degraded the model 3 (150¿mg¿L -1 Phe), 4 (150¿mg¿L -1 Pyr) and 5 (50¿mg¿L -1 BaP) ring PAHs in 4, 20 and 30 days, respectively. It could mineralize 90¿100% of PAHs (200¿mg¿L -1 of Phe and Pyr) within 15 days across pH ranging from 5 to 8 and even in the presence of toxic metal contaminations. During biodegradation, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 (Cu 2+ ) and 3 (Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ ) mg L -1 of the potentially bioavailable metal ions and over 17¿mg¿L -1 metal levels was lethal for the microbe. Further, it could fix 217¿274¿µg¿mL -1 of N and solubilize 79¿135¿µg¿mL -1 of P while PAHs degradation. MTS-7 as a superior candidate could be thus used in the enhanced bioaugmentation and/or phytoremediation of long-term mixed contaminated sites.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.07.052
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Fang C, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Potentiometric detection of AFFFs based on MIP', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 5 52-59 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.12.003
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Cheng Fang
2016 Yirsaw BD, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Reduction of hexavalent chromium by green synthesized nano zero valent iron and process optimization using response surface methodology', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 5 136-147 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.01.005
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 He W, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid towards earthworm and enzymatic activities in soil', Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 188 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread persistent organic contaminant in the environment that has recently raised mu... [more]

© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread persistent organic contaminant in the environment that has recently raised much of regulatory and public concern. Therefore, assessment of its ecological risk is a top priority research. Hence, this study investigated the toxicity of PFOA to beneficial microbial processes in the soil such as activities of dehydrogenase, urease and potential nitrification in addition to earthworm survival, weight loss and PFOA bioaccumulation in two contrasting soils. In general, PFOA caused inhibition of all the measured microbial processes in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibition was higher in Williamtown (WT) soil than Edinburgh (EB) soil. Thus, WT soil being sandy in nature with low clay content showed higher PFOA bioavailability and hence showed higher toxicity. There was no mortality in earthworms exposed up to 100¿mg PFOA/kilogram soil in both the soils; however, there was a significant weight loss from 25¿mg/kg onwards. This study clearly demonstrates that soil contamination of PFOA can lead to adverse effects on soil health.

DOI 10.1007/s10661-016-5416-y
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'The Biodiversity Changes in the Microbial Population of Soils Contaminated with Crude Oil', Current Microbiology, 72 663-670 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Crude oil spills resulting from excavation, transportation and downstream processes can cause intensive damage to living organis... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Crude oil spills resulting from excavation, transportation and downstream processes can cause intensive damage to living organisms and result in changes in the microbial population of that environment. In this study, we used a pyrosequencing analysis to investigate changes in the microbial population of soils contaminated with crude oil. Crude oil contamination in soil resulted in the creation of a more homogenous population of microorganisms dominated by members of the Actinomycetales, Clostridiales and Bacillales (all belonging to Gram-positive bacteria) as well as Flavobacteriales, Pseudomonadales, Burkholderiales, Rhizobiales and Sphingomonadales (all belonging to Gram-negative bacteria). These changes in the biodiversity decreased the ratios of chemoheterotrophic bacteria at higher concentrations of crude oil contamination, with these being replaced by photoheterotrophic bacteria, mainly Rhodospirillales. Several of the dominant microbial orders in the crude oil contaminated soils are able to degrade crude oil hydrocarbons and therefore are potentially useful for remediation of crude oil in contaminated sites.

DOI 10.1007/s00284-016-1001-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mandal S, Sarkar B, Bolan N, Novak J, Ok YS, Van Zwieten L, et al., 'Designing advanced biochar products for maximizing greenhouse gas mitigation potential', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 46 1367-1401 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural operations continue to increase. Carbon (C)-enriched char materials like biochar have b... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural operations continue to increase. Carbon (C)-enriched char materials like biochar have been described as a mitigation strategy. Utilization of biochar material as a soil amendment has been demonstrated to provide potentially greater soil GHG suppression due to its interactions in the soil system. However, these effects are variable and the duration of the impact remains uncertain. Various (nano)materials can be used to modify chars to obtain surface functionality to mitigate GHG emissions. This review critically focusses on the innovative methodologies for improving char efficiency, underpinning GHG mitigation and C sequestration.

DOI 10.1080/10643389.2016.1239975
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Duan L, Naidu R, Liu Y, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Herde P, et al., 'Comparison of oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene in soils using rat and swine and the implications for human health risk assessment', Environment International, 94 95-102 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: There are many uncertainties concerning variations in benzo[a]pyrene (B[a] P) soil guidelines protecting human health based on carcinogenic data ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Background: There are many uncertainties concerning variations in benzo[a]pyrene (B[a] P) soil guidelines protecting human health based on carcinogenic data obtained in animal studies. Although swine is recognised as being much more representative of the human child in terms of body size, gut physiology and genetic profile the rat/mice model is commonly used in practice. Objectives: We compare B[a]P bioavailability using a rat model to that estimated in a swine model, to investigate the correlation between these two animal models. This may help reduce uncertainty in applying bioavailability to human health risk assessment. Methods: Twelve spiked soil samples and a spiked silica sand (reference material) were dosed to rats in parallel with a swine study. B[a] P bioavailability was estimated by the area under the plasma B[a]P concentration-time curve (AUC) and faecal excretion as well in the rats. Direct comparison between the two animal models was made for: firstly, relative bioavailability (RB) using AUC assay; and secondly, the two assays in the rat model. Results: Both AUC and faecal excretion assays showed linear dose-response for the reference material. However, absolute bioavailability was significantly higher when using faecal excretion assay (p < 0.001). In aged soils faecal excretion estimated based on solvent extraction was not accurate due to the form of non-extractable fraction through ageing. A significant correlation existed between the two models using RB for soil samples (RB rat = 0.26RB swine + 17.3, R 2 = 0.70, p < 0.001), despite the regression slope coefficient revealing that the rat model would underestimate RB by about one quarter compared to using swine. Conclusions: In the comparison employed in this study, an interspecies difference of four in RB using AUC assay was identified between the rat and swine models regarding pharmacokinetic differences, which supported the body weight scaling method recommended by US EPA. Future research should focus on the carcinogenic competency (pharmacodynamics) used in experiment animals and humans.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.04.041
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Megh Mallavarapu, Morrow Dong, Luchun Duan
2016 Wang L, Fang C, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'A practical way to make solid-state reference electrodes', Journal of Bioanalytical Techniques, 1 1-5 (2016)
DOI 10.16966/jbt.101
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang, Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mandal A, Biswas B, Sarkar B, Patra AK, Naidu R, 'Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination', Science of the Total Environment, 550 611-618 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modi... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L -1 metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd a t higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L -1 ), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72-78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP-bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.164
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Aryal R, Correll R, Naidu R, 'Assessment of metal toxicity and bioavailability in metallophyte leaf litters and metalliferous soils using Eisenia fetida in a microcosm study', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 129 264-272 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. The leaf litters of tree species, Acacia pycnantha (Ap) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (Ec), predominantly growing at an abandoned copper (Cu) mine and mine so... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. The leaf litters of tree species, Acacia pycnantha (Ap) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (Ec), predominantly growing at an abandoned copper (Cu) mine and mine soils including controls, were assessed for determining the metal toxicity and bioavailability using earthworm species Eisenia fetida, in a microcosm. Significant reduction in body weight as well as mortality were observed when the worms were introduced into mine soil or its combination with mine Ap litter. Virtually, there were no juveniles when the worms were fed on substratum that contained mine soil or mine leaf litter. The extent of bioaccumulation was dependent on water-soluble fraction of a metal in soil. The accumulation of cadmium, lead and copper in worm tissue was significantly more in treatments that received mine soil with or without mine leaf litter. However, the tissue concentration of zinc did not differ much in earthworms irrespective of its exposure to control or contaminated samples. Mine leaf litter from Ec, a known Cu hyperaccumulator, was more hospitable to earthworm survival and juvenile than that of Ap litter. Validation of the data on bioaccumulation of metals indicated that the mine leaf litter significantly contributed to metal bioavailability. However, it was primarily the metal concentration in mine soil that was responsible for earthworm toxicity and bioavailability. Our data also indicate that detrivores like earthworm is greatly responsible for heavy metal transfer from mines into the ecosystem.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2016.03.034
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Chen Y, Yu B, Lin J, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB) of diesel oil using immobilized Acinetobacter venetianus on porous material', Chemical Engineering Journal, 289 463-470 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. This paper investigated modified bamboo charcoal (MBC) as a cheap, abundant and alternative cell immobilization matrix for biodegrading diesel oil. The immob... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. This paper investigated modified bamboo charcoal (MBC) as a cheap, abundant and alternative cell immobilization matrix for biodegrading diesel oil. The immobilized microorganism's degradation capacity was compared to its free form counterparts, namely planktonic and immobilized bacteria which degraded relatively high amounts of diesel oil ( > 80%). Acinetobacter venetianus immobilized on MBC demonstrated superior efficiency in degrading diesel oil (94%) compared to planktonic cells culture (82%) over a 3-day period. Moreover, the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation of diesel oil using these immobilized cells fitted well to the pseudo second order (R 2 > 0.99). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that through absorption, cells attached well to the cavum of MBC stalk cells. Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) revealed that a large number of bands at 1300-1500 cm - 1 existed, demonstrating that the diesel oil was degraded and new bands were formed. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrum (GC-MS) analysis indicated the immobilized cells could degrade diesel oil into esters and aldehydes. Results justified the applicability of MBC as the carrier matrix for immobilizing microorganisms in removing diesel oil compounds from industrial wastewater.

DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2016.01.010
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2016 Liu E, Sarkar B, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Decontamination of chlorine gas by organic amine modified copper-exchanged zeolite', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 225 450-455 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Removal of chlorine gas (Cl 2 ) from air is of critical requirement in order to address point-source emissions possibly during a terrori... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Removal of chlorine gas (Cl 2 ) from air is of critical requirement in order to address point-source emissions possibly during a terrorist attack or an industrial accident resulting in Cl 2 contamination of the atmosphere. In this work, copper (Cu) exchanged zeolite Y (CuY) was functionalised with triethylenediamine (TEDA) and the capacity to remove Cl 2 was evaluated. The materials were characterised by nitrogen (N 2 ) adsorption-desorption studies, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The materials' ability to remove Cl 2 was investigated via a dynamic breakthrough test. Copper exchanged zeolite displayed a low adsorption of Cl 2 in spite of its large surface area. However, Cl 2 removal greatly improved following functionalisation with TEDA. XPS analysis revealed that Cl 2 was removed via a catalytic hydrolysis reaction where adsorbed water vapour transformed Cl 2 into Cl - which could be further trapped in the zeolite structural framework. Moisture could increase the Cl 2 removal capacity, but the competition for adsorption between water and chlorine molecules was also observed. The spent adsorbent after exposure to Cl 2 could be easily recycled with an excessive water vapour treatment. The reusability was also investigated and the adsorbent could be used for more than five times. This material can potentially be used in air filters. It may provide an efficient way for decontaminating Cl 2 during a terrorist attack or an industrial accident.

DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2016.01.023
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2016 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Influence of phosphate on toxicity and bioaccumulation of arsenic in a soil isolate of microalga Chlorella sp.', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 2663-2668 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were in... [more]

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels. The results indicated that arsenate was highly toxic than arsenite to the alga, and the phosphate limitation in growth media greatly enhanced arsenate toxicity. The uptake of arsenate in algal cells was more than that of arsenite, and the predominant species in the growth media was arsenate after 8¿days of exposure to arsenite or arsenate, indicating arsenite oxidation by this microalga. Arsenate reduction was also observed when the alga was incubated in a phosphate-limiting growth medium. Similar to the process of biotransformation, the alga accumulated more arsenic when it was exposed to arsenate and preferably more in a phosphate-limiting condition. Although phosphate significantly influences the biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenic, the oxidizing ability and higher accumulation capacity of this alga have great potential for its application in arsenic bioremediation.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-5510-7
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2016 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Chen Z, Lesniewski P, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneously determining multi-metal ions using an Ion Selective Electrode array system', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 6 165-176 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.10.001
Co-authors Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb, Zuliang Chen
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Ming H, Wang L, Abbasi S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Predicting plant uptake of cadmium: validated with long-term contaminated soils', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 25 1563-1574 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10646-016-1712-0
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Liang Wang, Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Agronomic and remedial benefits and risks of applying biochar to soil: Current knowledge and future research directions', Environment International, 87 1-12 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. &apos;Biochar&apos; represents an emerging technology that is increasingly being recognized for its potential role in carbon sequestration, reducing greenhou... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. 'Biochar' represents an emerging technology that is increasingly being recognized for its potential role in carbon sequestration, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, waste management, renewable energy, soil improvement, crop productivity enhancement and environmental remediation. Published reviews have so far focused mainly on the above listed agronomic and environmental benefits of applying biochar, yet paid little or no attention to its harmful effects on the ecological system. This review highlights a balanced overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the pyrolysis process of biochar production, end-product quality and the benefits versus drawbacks of biochar on: (a) soil geochemistry and albedo, (b) microflora and fauna, (c) agrochemicals, (d) greenhouse gas efflux, (e) nutrients, (f) crop yield, and (g) contaminants (organic and inorganic). Future research should focus more on the unintended long-term consequences of biochar on biological organisms and their processes in the soil.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.10.018
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Kader M, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Sorption parameters as a predictor of arsenic phytotoxicity in Australian soils', Geoderma, 265 103-110 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) is a mobile and ecotoxic metalloid that is of serious concern to the environment. In this study, As phytotoxicity was studied using a dose-respo... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) is a mobile and ecotoxic metalloid that is of serious concern to the environment. In this study, As phytotoxicity was studied using a dose-response approach for seven contrasting soils considering 3 end-points (shoot biomass, root elongation and chlorophyll content) and focusing on predictors of toxicity. Root elongation study was carried out for 4days using both Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) and shoot end-points with a 4week a pot study using cucumber only. Root elongation of cucumber was a substantially less sensitive indicator to As than data from the 4weeks pot study. Effective concentrations (50%)(EC 50 ) from cucumber root elongation studies were overall 1.6 times higher than the 4week shoot data. Cucumber was however considerably more sensitive to wheat. Given the large discrepancy in phytotoxicity end points for 7 soils, root elongation data for ecotoxicological assessment should be treated with some caution. Arsenic phytotoxicity was strongly related to the sorption constants of each of the seven soils in our study. Both root elongation and shoot data were related strongly to Freundlich partitioning constants (K f ) (L/kg). Wheat and cucumber root elongation had R 2 values 0.90 and 0.91 respectively, while cucumber shoot data was 0.79. The K f values were related to soil pH and also EC 50 data and, thus, shows that As phytotoxicity in our study was primarily controlled by sorption reactions. The rate of As bioaccumulation to cucumber shoots depended heavily on the soil under consideration. Chlorophyll and carotenoid content of cucumber shoots increased with As content in 3 soils and decreased in other soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.11.019
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2016 Ma C, Ming H, Lin C, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Phytoextraction of heavy metal from tailing waste using Napier grass', Catena, 136 74-83 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.catena.2015.08.001
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2016 Jin X, Zheng M, Sarkar B, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Characterization of bentonite modified with humic acid for the removal of Cu (II) and 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solution', Applied Clay Science, 134 89-94 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. This study examines the modification of bentonite with humic acid (HAB) as a novel sorbent for simultaneous removal of Cu(II) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. This study examines the modification of bentonite with humic acid (HAB) as a novel sorbent for simultaneous removal of Cu(II) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were conducted employing either single sorption or simultaneous sorption of Cu(II) and 2,4-DCP. Results indicated that the sorption of either Cu(II) or 2,4-DCP onto HAB was little influenced by the presence of the other contaminant. The amount of sorption was 22.40 mg g - 1 and 14.23 mg g - 1 for Cu(II) and 2,4-DCP, respectively at 30 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that HA was immobilized on the surface of bentonite. Energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis indicated that Cu(II) was sorbed onto HAB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis demonstrated that the crystalline structure of bentonite did not change after being modified with HA. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed that new bonds and band intensity emerged after the sorption of Cu(II) and 2,4-DCP onto the HAB. These suggest that simultaneous sorption of 2,4-DCP and Cu(II) onto HAB could occur through: firstly, a mechanism that partitions between 2,4-DCP and HA; and secondly, the ion-exchange mechanism between Cu(II) and bentonite.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.09.036
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2016 Ming H, Naidu R, Sarkar B, Lamb DT, Liu Y, Megharaj M, Sparks D, 'Competitive sorption of cadmium and zinc in contrasting soils', Geoderma, 268 60-68 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The sorption behavior of cadmium (Cd(II)) and zinc (Zn(II)) on two virgin soils with different pH levels was studied using single metal and competitive dual ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. The sorption behavior of cadmium (Cd(II)) and zinc (Zn(II)) on two virgin soils with different pH levels was studied using single metal and competitive dual metal systems. In the single metal system, Zn exhibited a greater affinity for the alkaline soil, as indicated by the Langmuir constant (K L = 8.85 L/kg) compared with Cd (K L = 1.79 L/kg). However, much less sorption of both Zn (K L = 0.19 L/kg) and Cd (K L = 0.07 L/kg) was observed in the acidic soil. The competitive sorption data were modeled using two-metal Freundlich and Langmuir functions. The competition for metal sorption occurred in the alkaline soil only at a higher concentration of the competing metals, whereas the effect was significant even at lower concentrations in the acidic soil. The cumulative amount of both metals sorbed in the soil was similar to that of single metal systems in the studied concentration range, demonstrating that the number of sites available for sorption remained constant irrespective of the competition. This study indicated that Cd might be more mobile in a mixed-metal system than in a single-metal scenario and thus poses a serious ecotoxicological threat. This study is important for assessing the risks and developing management strategies for multiple heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.01.021
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Yanju Liu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by novel bacterial consortia tolerant to diverse physical settings - Assessments in liquid- and slurry-phase systems', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 108 149-157 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils have proved to be difficult and challenging due to inhibited growth of PAH degrading microbes. In this ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils have proved to be difficult and challenging due to inhibited growth of PAH degrading microbes. In this study, for the first time mixed bacterial cultures designated as consortia-A and N were developed using elite metal or acid tolerant, N-fixing, P-solubilizing and biosurfactant producing PAH degraders enriched from manufactured gas plant sites. The two consortia could degrade both LMW and HMW PAHs. Kinetic studies of PAH degradation by the consortia showed the highest biodegradation rate constants (k = 0.027-0.61 day -1 ) and lowest half-life time (t 1/2 = 1-26 days) values reported to date in liquid cultures and highlighted the use of consortium-A for the remediation of acidic soils due to its tolerance up to pH 5. Furthermore, bioaugmentation of these consortia has proven to be effective in degradation of LMW ( > 95%) and HMW (90%) PAHs from spiked soil slurries. Amendment of consortia-A and N exhibited 10.7 and 44.3% more total PAHs degradation, respectively than natural attenuation in 60 days even from the real long-term mixed contaminated soils. Thus the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of these novel bacterial consortia, particularly consortium-N for use in field-scale bioremediation of PAHs in long-term mixed contaminated neutral soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.12.013
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Potential of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel, non-conventional and low-cost coagulating adsorbent for removing both cationic and anionic dyes', Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 37 198-207 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Korean Society of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.The potential of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel biosorbent for removing three cationic dyes, me... [more]

© 2016 The Korean Society of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.The potential of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel biosorbent for removing three cationic dyes, methylene blue (MB), acridine orange (AO) and malachite green (MG), and an anionic dye, eriochrome black T (EB) was evaluated in a batch adsorption process. Notably, the biosorbent removed 77-99% of both cationic and anionic dyes in a wide ranging pH of 2-10, and the reactions were endothermic. The dye adsorption equilibria were rapidly attained within 3 h. The monolayer adsorption capacity of the sorbent added at 5 g L-1 was 119.05, 126.8, 116.28 and 94.34 mg g-1 for MB, AO, MG and EB, respectively. The water extract obtained from the plant material induced fast decolourization of both categories of dyes followed by gradual flocculation, indicating its potential as a natural coagulant. Gas chromatographic analysis also indicated that the main electrostatic attraction between 1,8-cineole, 1-p-methene-8-thiol and furfural compounds of the biomaterial, and dye molecules resulted in the formation of initial supramolecular complexes which further progressed into strong aggregates, leading to precipitation of dye-biomaterial complexes. Subsequently, the overall complex mechanism of dye removal was confirmed to be a combined process of adsorption and coagulation. Consistent with the batch studies, using selected plant material in real environmental water samples also resulted in effective dye removal, highlighting its potential for use in wastewater treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jiec.2016.03.021
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Naidu R, Jit J, Arias V, Kennedy B, 'Emerging contaminant uncertainties and policy: The chicken or the egg conundrum', Chemosphere, 154 385-390 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.03.110
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Victor Arias
2015 Ortega-Calvo J-J, Harmsen J, Parsons JR, Semple KT, Aitken MD, Ajao C, et al., 'From Bioavailability Science to Regulation of Organic Chemicals', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 49 10255-10264 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b02412
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 29
2015 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Rusmin R, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction', Environment International, 85 168-181 (2015) [C1]

© 2015. Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advan... [more]

© 2015. Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.017
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
2015 Sarkar B, Liu E, McClure S, Sundaramurthy J, Srinivasan M, Naidu R, 'Biomass derived palygorskite-carbon nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterisation and affinity to dye compounds', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 114 617-626 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2015.07.001
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
2015 Wu Y, Zeng S, Wang F, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Heterogeneous Fenton-like oxidation of malachite green by iron-based nanoparticles synthesized by tea extract as a catalyst', Separation and Purification Technology, 154 161-167 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. The green synthesis of functional iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) by tea extracts was used as a catalyst for the Fenton-like oxidation of ma... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. The green synthesis of functional iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) by tea extracts was used as a catalyst for the Fenton-like oxidation of malachite green (MG), where more than 85% of MG was removed. The new findings are that the removal of MG by Fe NPs was based on the adsorption of MG onto iron oxide and degradation of MG by iron nanoparticles. This was confirmed by adsorption and degradation kinetics, indicating that: firstly, the adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-first-order model; and secondly, degradation kinetics fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model. Morphology, size and changes in the Fe NPs surface were characterized using SEM, XRD, and FTIR techniques, showing that Fe < inf > 2 < /inf > O < inf > 3 < /inf > and Fe < inf > 3 < /inf > O < inf > 4 < /inf > was formed and green tea extract contained a high concentration of caffeine/polyphenols. It acted as both reducing and capping agents in the synthesis of Fe NPs. To further confirm the removal mechanism of MG by the functional Fe NPs, the degraded products were identified by FTIR and GC-MS analysis. Finally the mechanism of Fenton-like oxidation of MG based on both adsorption and degradation was proposed.

DOI 10.1016/j.seppur.2015.09.022
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Naidu R, Wong MH, Nathanail P, 'Bioavailability¿the underlying basis for risk-based land management', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8775-8778 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-015-4295-z
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
2015 Venkidusamy K, Megharaj M, Schröder U, Karouta F, Mohan SV, Naidu R, 'Electron transport through electrically conductive nanofilaments in Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain RP2', RSC Advances, 5 100790-100798 (2015) [C1]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Electronic dialogue between proteins is expected to be a key component of charge transport at the microbe-mineral interface (MMI) and requi... [more]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Electronic dialogue between proteins is expected to be a key component of charge transport at the microbe-mineral interface (MMI) and requires complex structures. Microbial nanofilaments are one such structure produced in energetically engineered environments. These nanostructures consist of natural protein electronic conduits which can target the microbe-mineral interface and facilitate charge transport over a distance. Nanofilaments are phylogenetically diverse inducible extracellular appendages, and have the potential to serve as organic electronic conductors. However, recent investigations on such microbial nanofilaments have been confined to a few bacterial genera such as Geobacter, Shewanella and Synechocystis. Here, we report the evidence for longitudinal electron transport through inducible nanofilaments produced by another genus, the metabolically versatile photosynthetic, iron(iii) respiring bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain RP2, in photic, iron(iii) oxide-rich environments. In contrast, chemosynthetic dark-grown anoxic cells are weak in their ability to reduce ferric-oxide and no longer produce extracellular structures. Independent evaluation techniques illustrate the induction of extracellular filaments and their electrical properties. Scanning probe and nanofabricated electrode measurements provide conclusive evidence for the occurrence of direct charge transfer along the length and radius of nanofilaments from strain RP2. These findings not only expand our knowledge of the range of bacteria known to produce nanofilaments but also provide further research opportunities in the field of bionanotechnology, sustainable remediation (bioelectrochemical remediation systems) in contaminated sites (petroleum hydrocarbons) and MMI process at photic environments.

DOI 10.1039/c5ra08742b
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation potential of natural polyphenol rich green wastes: A review of current research and recommendations for future directions', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 4 17-28 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. &apos;Green waste&apos; (food, agro-industrial and forest residues) is a renowned valuable resource of polyphenols. Natural polyphenols are relatively effici... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. 'Green waste' (food, agro-industrial and forest residues) is a renowned valuable resource of polyphenols. Natural polyphenols are relatively efficient in the clean-up of environmental pollutants based on their unique traits of chelation, adsorption, reduction, complexation, nutrient cycling, antibacterial effects and plant growth promotion. These significant traits have found emerging applications in the removal of heavy metals, pathogenic bacteria and dyes from contaminated soil and water through existing bioremedial techniques such as biosorption, phytoextraction and coagulation. Increasingly, polyphenol-rich natural extracts harnessed for green nanoparticle synthesis (production of particles between 1 and 100 nm in size using biological entities such as microorganisms or plant biomass) have found promising use as a remedial agent in the detoxification of toxic pollutants. However, current bioremediation approaches do not sufficiently exploit natural polyphenols, which are abundantly available and are non-toxic. This review examines the extent of natural polyphenol availability in green waste, and provides a critical view on the existing remedial options, knowledge gaps and hence scope for future research. It highlights the use of natural polyphenol-rich green wastes as nanofertilizers, bioamendments, biofilters and bacteriostats. Field application strategies such as microbe-assisted phytoremediation, bioaugmention and biostimulation are also emphasized, showing the multifunctional biotechnological potentials offered by natural polyphenols.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.04.001
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and oxidative stress induced by used and unused motor oil on freshwater microalga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 22 8890-8901 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3403-9
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Thavamani P, Smith E, Kavitha R, Mathieson G, Megharaj M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Risk based land management requires focus beyond the target contaminants-A case study involving weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 4 98-109 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Irrespective of the nature of contamination, the use of total contaminant loading as a measure of risk together with conservative policy guidance is proving ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Irrespective of the nature of contamination, the use of total contaminant loading as a measure of risk together with conservative policy guidance is proving major stumbling block towards remediation of contaminated sites. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of risk based approach to manage contaminated sites at field scale. This study recognizes the presence of weathered hydrocarbon compounds in long-term total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contaminated soils and that such compounds may not pose risk to local receptors. A multispecies ecotoxicological assessment was used to determine the potential risk from weathered hydrocarbons to the surrounding environment. The ecotoxicity of soil residual TPHs was evaluated using earthworm, water-flea, two native and two non-native Australian plants, and soil microbial activity. Plant germination was 100% in all soils but post germination, seedlings except Ryegrass failed to establish. Earthworm toxicity studies found that there was a negative impact on earthworm reproduction and mortality. Further investigation of the poor plant growth and earthworm mortality revealed that it was due to the elevated salinity that developed due to surface evaporation of the saturated calcium sulphate and not residual soil TPHs. Toxicity assessment of the soil leachate on the aquatic environment showed no effect on the survival of water-flea even though the TPH concentrations in the first year leachate were as high as 1.6 mg TPH L -1 . The study concluded that the residual TPHs in soils had little impact on a range of environmental receptors. Assessment of the residual TPH ecotoxicity was complicated by the elevated salinity of stockpile soils which impacted on the earthworm and phytotoxicity assessments. Therefore results of this study suggest that it is paramount to focus beyond target contaminants while implementing risk-based management approach. Indicators for risk based assessment are considered critical for regulatory decision making. The results of this study provide a valuable input in to the risk based management of contaminated sites.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.04.005
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Azizur Rahman M, Hogan B, Duncan E, Doyle C, Rahman MM, Nguyen TV, et al., 'Ecotoxicological Effects of an Arsenic Remediation Method on Three Freshwater Organisms - Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35 and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 226 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Chemical methods have been used for the remediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated water; however, ecological consequences of ... [more]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Chemical methods have been used for the remediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated water; however, ecological consequences of these methods have not been properly addressed. The present study evaluated the effects of the Fe-oxide-coated sand (IOCS) remediation method on As toxicity to freshwater organisms (Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35, and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia). The As removal efficiency by IOCS decreased substantially with time. The IOCS remediation method was less effective at suppressing the toxicity of As V than As III to L. disperma but was highly effective in reducing both the As III and As V toxicity to C. cf. dubia. The growth of Chlorella sp. was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in remediated and pre-remediated water than in controls (non-As-contaminated filtered Colo River water) for As III , while the opposite was observed for As V , indicating that As V is more toxic than As III to this microalga. Although the IOCS can efficiently remove As from contaminated water, residual As and other constituents (e.g. Fe, nitrate) in the remediated water had a significant effect on freshwater organisms.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-015-2668-z
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2015 Naidu R, Channey R, McConnell S, Johnston N, Semple KT, McGrath S, et al., 'Towards bioavailability-based soil criteria: past, present and future perspectives', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8779-8785 (2015)

© 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framewor... [more]

© 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated sites is similar, and the decisions are based on threshold contaminant concentration. The uncertainty in the definition and measurement of bioavailability had limited its application to environment risk assessment and remediation. Last ten years have seen major developments in bioavailability research and acceptance. The use of bioavailability in the decision making process as one of the key variables has led to a gradual shift towards a more sophisticated risk-based approach. Now a days, many decision makers and regulatory organisations ¿more readily accept¿ this concept. Bioavailability should be the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated sites that pose risk to environmental and human health. This paper summarises the potential application of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility to the assessment of sites affected by different contaminants, and the potential for this to be the underlying basis for sustainable risk assessment and remediation in Europe, North America and Australia over the coming decade.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1617-x
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Thava Palanisami
2015 Duan L, Naidu R, Liu Y, Palanisami T, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Semple KT, 'Effect of ageing on benzo[a]pyrene extractability in contrasting soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 296 175-184 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.04.050
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Luchun Duan, Morrow Dong, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Huang L, Luo F, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Green synthesized conditions impacting on the reactivity of Fe NPs for the degradation of malachite green', SPECTROCHIMICA ACTA PART A-MOLECULAR AND BIOMOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY, 137 154-159 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.saa.2014.08.116
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Luo F, Yang D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'The mechanism for degrading Orange II based on adsorption and reduction by ion-based nanoparticles synthesized by grape leaf extract', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 296 37-45 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.04.027
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Kuang Y, Du J, Zhou R, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Calcium alginate encapsulated Ni/Fe nanoparticles beads for simultaneous removal of Cu (II) and monochlorobenzene', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 447 85-91 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2015.01.080
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Jianhua Du, Zuliang Chen
2015 Li R, Gao Y, Jin X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Fenton-like oxidation of 2,4-DCP in aqueous solution using iron-based nanoparticles as the heterogeneous catalyst', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 438 87-93 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2014.09.082
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Li R, Jin X, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol using iron-based nanoparticles and persulfate system', Chemical Engineering Journal, 264 587-594 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2014.11.128
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecological implications of motor oil pollution: Earthworm survival and soil health', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 85 72-81 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2015.02.026
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Rahman MM, Dong Z, Naidu R, 'Concentrations of arsenic and other elements in groundwater of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India: Potential cancer risk', Chemosphere, 139 54-64 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.05.051
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Morrow Dong
2015 Jiang C, Xu X, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Inhibition or promotion of biodegradation of nitrate by Paracoccus sp. in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron', Science of the Total Environment, 530-531 241-246 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.044
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Karunanithi R, Szogi AA, Bolan N, Naidu R, Loganathan P, Hunt PG, et al., 'Phosphorus recovery and reuse from waste streams', Advances in Agronomy, 131 173-250 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2014.12.005
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Rusmin R, Sarkar B, Liu Y, McClure S, Naidu R, 'Structural evolution of chitosan-palygorskite composites and removal of aqueous lead by composite beads', Applied Surface Science, 353 363-375 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.apsusc.2015.06.124
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2015 Donner E, Scheckel K, Sekine R, Popelka-Filcoff RS, Bennett JW, Brunetti G, et al., 'Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing', Environmental Pollution, 205 78-86 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.05.017
Citations Scopus - 9
2015 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'A Comprehensive Review of Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Biodegradation by Bacteria', Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 176 670-699 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12010-015-1603-5
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Biswas B, Sarkar B, Mandal A, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal-immobilizing organoclay facilitates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in mixed-contaminated soil', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 298 129-137 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.05.009
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2015 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Lim JE, Ok YS, 'Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 299 395-403 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.06.056
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2015 Zhuang Z, Wang F, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Biosynthesis of Pd-Au alloys on carbon fiber paper: Towards an eco-friendly solution for catalysts fabrication', Journal of Power Sources, 291 132-137 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2015.05.023
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2015 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Chlorococcum sp. MM11¿a novel phyco-nanofactory for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles', Journal of Applied Phycology, 27 1861-1869 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s10811-014-0492-2
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Thava Palanisami, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8942-8956 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1918-0
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2015 Krishnamurti GSR, Subashchandrabose SR, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Assessment of bioavailability of heavy metal pollutants using soil isolates of Chlorella sp.', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8826-8832 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1799-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Surapaneni A, 'Effects of temperature and amendments on nitrogen mineralization in selected Australian soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8843-8854 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-2191-y
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2015 Duan L, Naidu R, Thavamani P, Meaklim J, Megharaj M, 'Managing long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soils: a risk-based approach', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8927-8941 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-2270-0
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Das P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Perfluorooctane sulfonate release pattern from soils of fire training areas in Australia and its bioaccumulation potential in the earthworm Eisenia fetida', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8902-8910 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1782-y
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Metal-tolerant PAH-degrading bacteria: development of suitable test medium and effect of cadmium and its availability on PAH biodegradation', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8957-8968 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1850-3
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Subashchandrabose SR, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Interaction effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals on a soil microalga, Chlorococcum sp. MM11', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8876-8889 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1679-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Smith E, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in arid environments: Evaluation of bioslurry and biopiling techniques', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 101 56-65 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.03.029
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Yirsaw BD, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Environmental application and ecological significance of nano-zero valent iron', Journal of Environmental Sciences (China), 44 88-98 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jes.2015.07.016
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Zheng X, Han B, Thavamani P, Duan L, Naidu R, 'Composition, source identification and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of the Subei Grand Canal, China', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 74 2669-2677 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12665-015-4287-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Luchun Duan
2015 Lin J, Gan L, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of tetradecane using Acinetobacter venetianus immobilized on bagasse', Biochemical Engineering Journal, 100 76-82 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bej.2015.04.014
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2015 Nguyen TC, Loganathan P, Nguyen TV, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Simultaneous adsorption of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn by an iron-coated Australian zeolite in batch and fixed-bed column studies', Chemical Engineering Journal, 270 393-404 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2015.02.047
Citations Scopus - 54
2015 Ramadass K, Smith E, Palanisami T, Mathieson G, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of constraints in bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated arid soils through microcosm biopile study', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 12 3597-3612 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s13762-015-0793-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Pal R, Megharaj M, Kirkbride KP, Naidu R, 'Adsorption and desorption characteristics of methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, and pseudoephedrine in soils', Environmental science and pollution research international, 22 8855-8865 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-2940-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Influence of ageing on lead bioavailability in soils: a swine study', Environmental science and pollution research international, 22 8979-8988 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3577-1
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Thava Palanisami, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Nguyen TC, Loganathan P, Nguyen TV, Pham TTN, Kandasamy J, Wu M, et al., 'Trace elements in road-deposited and waterbed sediments in Kogarah Bay, Sydney: Enrichment, sources and fractionation', Soil Research, 53 401-411 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 CSIRO. Trace elements (TEs) in road-deposited sediments (RDS) can be transported by stormwater to neighbouring water bodies to cause aquatic pollution. A study was conduct... [more]

© 2015 CSIRO. Trace elements (TEs) in road-deposited sediments (RDS) can be transported by stormwater to neighbouring water bodies to cause aquatic pollution. A study was conducted in Kogarah Bay, Sydney, Australia, to assess the possible sources and potential mobility of TEs in RDS and the contribution to the TE load to the adjacent waterbed sediments in canals and the bay. Of the 11 TEs analysed, pseudo-total concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), and antimony (Sb) were greatly enriched in RDS over baseline soils (top 10cm depth) collected in bushlands. All TE concentrations in waterbed sediments (top 10cm depth) were similar to those in baseline soils but lower than in RDS. Correlation and principal component analyses revealed that Zn, Cu, Cr and Sb were related to each other in RDS, and probably originated from tyres and brake linings. Vanadium occurred in another component, likely to have originated mainly from road asphalt. Pseudo-total and mobile-fraction (0.1m acetic acid, pH 2.85 extraction) TE concentrations in RDS were: iron > manganese, Zn > Cu, lead > Cr, nickel, V, Sb, cadmium. The potential ecological TE risk was low to medium in RDS but low in baseline soils and waterbed sediments.

DOI 10.1071/SR14163
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Using soil properties to predict in vivo bioavailability of lead in soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 138 422-428 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.06.073
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Thava Palanisami
2015 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Rhizosphere-induced heavy metal(Loid) transformation in relation to bioavailability and remediation', Journal of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, 15 524-548 (2015)
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2015 Fang C, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Chemical oxidization of some AFFFs leads to the formation of 6:2FTS and 8:2FTS', Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 34 2625-2628 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 SETAC. The present study tested some aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) products for the presence of or the potential to form 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (6:2FT... [more]

© 2015 SETAC. The present study tested some aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) products for the presence of or the potential to form 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (6:2FTS) and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecane sulfonic acid (8:2FTS). The results demonstrated the appearance of significant levels of 6:2FTS and 8:2FTS after the oxidization of those AFFFs. The authors concluded that fluorotelomer skeletons exist but are derived from those formulations of AFFFs.

DOI 10.1002/etc.3115
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Cheng Fang
2015 Dong Z, Liu Y, Duan L, Bekele D, Naidu R, 'Uncertainties in human health risk assessment of environmental contaminants: A review and perspective', Environment International, 85 120-132 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Addressing uncertainties in human health risk assessment is a critical issue when evaluating the effects of contaminants on public health. A range of uncerta... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Addressing uncertainties in human health risk assessment is a critical issue when evaluating the effects of contaminants on public health. A range of uncertainties exist through the source-to-outcome continuum, including exposure assessment, hazard and risk characterisation. While various strategies have been applied to characterising uncertainty, classical approaches largely rely on how to maximise the available resources. Expert judgement, defaults and tools for characterising quantitative uncertainty attempt to fill the gap between data and regulation requirements. The experiences of researching 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) illustrated uncertainty sources and how to maximise available information to determine uncertainties, and thereby provide an 'adequate' protection to contaminant exposure. As regulatory requirements and recurring issues increase, the assessment of complex scenarios involving a large number of chemicals requires more sophisticated tools. Recent advances in exposure and toxicology science provide a large data set for environmental contaminants and public health. In particular, biomonitoring information, in vitro data streams and computational toxicology are the crucial factors in the NexGen risk assessment, as well as uncertainties minimisation. Although in this review we cannot yet predict how the exposure science and modern toxicology will develop in the long-term, current techniques from emerging science can be integrated to improve decision-making.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.008
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Dawit Bekele, Morrow Dong, Yanju Liu
2015 Arias Espana VA, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Treatment technologies for aqueous perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA): A critical review with an emphasis on field testing', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 4 168-181 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.06.001
Citations Scopus - 10
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Victor Arias
2015 Singh S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multifarious activities of cellulose degrading bacteria from Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces.', Journal of animal science and technology, 57 23 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40781-015-0056-2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'The integration of sequencing and bioinformatics in metagenomics', REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND BIO-TECHNOLOGY, 14 357-383 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11157-015-9365-7
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Dong Z, et al., 'Unraveling health risk and speciation of arsenic from groundwater in rural areas of Punjab, Pakistan', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12 12371-12390 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality paramet... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality parameters for unraveling the health risk of As from drinking water to humans. Groundwater samples (n = 62) were collected from three previously unexplored rural areas (Chichawatni, Vehari, Rahim Yar Khan) of Punjab in Pakistan. The mean and median As concentrations in groundwater were 37.9 and 12.7 µg¿L -1 (range = 1.5¿201 µg¿L -1 ). Fifty three percent groundwater samples showed higher As value than WHO safe limit of 10 µg¿L -1 . Speciation of As in groundwater samples (n = 13) showed the presence of inorganic As only; arsenite (As(III)) constituted 13%¿67% of total As and arsenate (As(V)) ranged from 33% to 100%. For As health risk assessment, the hazard quotient and cancer risk values were 11¿18 and 46¿600 times higher than the recommended values of US-EPA (i.e., 1.00 and 10 -6 , respectively). In addition to As, various water quality parameters (e.g., electrical conductivity, Na, Ca, Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , Fe, Mn, Pb) also enhanced the health risk. The results show that consumption of As-contaminated groundwater poses an emerging health threat to the communities in the study area, and hence needs urgent remedial and management measures.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph121012371
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Morrow Dong
2015 Li S-W, Li J, Li H-B, Naidu R, Ma LQ, 'Arsenic bioaccessibility in contaminated soils: Coupling in vitro assays with sequential and HNO3 extraction', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 295 145-152 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.04.011
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
2015 Wang L, Yang D, Lamb D, Chen Z, Lesniewsk PJ, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Application of mathematical models and genetic algorithm to simulate the response characteristics of an ion selective electrode array for system recalibration', Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 144 24-30 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemolab.2015.03.007
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang, Dane Lamb
2015 Kader M, Lamb DT, Correll R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-water chemistry explains zinc phytotoxicity in soil', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 122 252-259 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Zinc (Zn) is a widespread soil contaminant arising from a numerous anthropogenic sources. However, adequately predicting toxicity of Zn to ecological recepto... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Zinc (Zn) is a widespread soil contaminant arising from a numerous anthropogenic sources. However, adequately predicting toxicity of Zn to ecological receptors remains difficult due to the complexity of soil characteristics. In this study, we examined solid-solution partitioning using pore-water data and toxicity of Zn to cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) in spiked soils. Pore-water effective concentration (ECx, x=10%, 20% and 50% reduction) values were negatively related to pH, indicating lower Zn pore water concentration were needed to cause phytotoxicity at high pH soils. Total dissolved zinc (Zn < inf > pw < /inf > ) and free zinc (Zn < sup > 2+ < /sup > ) in soil-pore water successfully described 78% and 80.3% of the variation in relative growth (%) in the full dataset. When the complete data set was used (10 soils), the estimated EC50 < inf > pw < /inf > was 450 and 79.2µM for Zn < inf > pw < /inf > and Zn < sup > 2+ < /sup > , respectively. Total added Zn, soil pore water pH (pH < inf > pw < /inf > ) and dissolve organic carbon (DOC) were the best predictors of Zn < inf > pw < /inf > and Zn < sup > 2+ < /sup > in pore-water. The EC10 (total loading) values ranged from 179 to 5214mg/kg, depending on soil type. Only pH measurements in soil were related to ECx total Zn data. The strongest relationship to ECx overall was pH < inf > ca < /inf > , although pH < inf > w < /inf > and pH < inf > pw < /inf > were in general related to Zn ECx. Similarly, when a solution-only model was used to predict Zn in shoot, DOC was negatively related to Zn in shoot, indicating a reduction in uptake/ translocation of Zn from solution with increasing DOC.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.08.004
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Mukkata K, Kantachote D, Wittayaweerasak B, Techkarnjanaruk S, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Distribution of Mercury in Shrimp Ponds and Volatilization of Hg by Isolated Resistant Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 226 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-015-2418-2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Yu B, Jin X, Kuang Y, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'An integrated biodegradation and nano-oxidation used for the remediation of naphthalene from aqueous solution', CHEMOSPHERE, 141 205-211 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.07.050
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Poorvisha R, Suriyaraj SP, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Bhattacharyya A, Selvakumar R, 'Synthesis and characterisation of 3-dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures using a thermoplastic polyurethane nanofiber sacrificial template', RSC Advances, 5 97773-97780 (2015) [C1]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. In this study, we report a facile synthesis of shape controlled three dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures (HAp) using a sacrificial t... [more]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. In this study, we report a facile synthesis of shape controlled three dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures (HAp) using a sacrificial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofiber template. The TPU nanofibers synthesised using an electrospinning process were used as a template during the HAp synthesis through a precipitation process. Various HAp morphologies including distinctly placed cylindrically porous HAp architecture, coral reef like, tightly packed fibrous sheet like and nanofiber like were synthesised using the TPU nanofiber template. All the synthesised HAp were characterized using appropriate techniques like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) attached with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, pore arrangement and the particle size of the HAp varied significantly with varying dimensions of the template and the template available per unit area of HAp. Hence, we have achieved four different 3D HAp morphologies using a single type of TPU nanofiber template. The TPU templated HAp nanostructures were more biodegradable than the control HAp.

DOI 10.1039/c5ra18593a
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Wang L, Liu E, Cheng Y, Bekele DN, Lamb D, Chen Z, et al., 'Novel methodologies for automatically and simultaneously determining BTEX components using FTIR spectra', Talanta, 144 1104-1110 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study introduced a patented novel methodological system for automatically analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) spectrum data locat... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. This study introduced a patented novel methodological system for automatically analysis of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) spectrum data located at 'fingerprint' region (wavenumber 670-800 cm < sup > -1 < /sup > ), to simultaneously determinate multiple petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs) in real mixture samples. This system includes: an object oriented baseline correction; Band decomposition (curve fitting) method with mathematical optimization; and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for determination, which is suitable for the characteristics of this IR regions, where the spectra are normally with low signal to noise ratio and high density of peaks. BTEX components are potentially lethal carcinogens and contained in many petroleum products. As a case study, six BTEX components were determinate automatically and simultaneously in mixture vapor samples. The robustness of the BTEX determination was validated using real petroleum samples, and the prediction results were compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2015.07.044
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Dawit Bekele, Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang
2015 Wang L, Yang D, Fang C, Chen Z, Lesniewski PJ, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Application of neural networks with novel independent component analysis methodologies to a Prussian blue modified glassy carbon electrode array', Talanta, 131 395-403 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2014.08.010
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Liang Wang, Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2015 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'A pyrosequencing-based analysis of microbial diversity governed by ecological conditions in the Winogradsky column', WORLD JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY, 31 1115-1126 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11274-015-1861-y
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Arias E VA, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Identification of the source of PFOS and PFOA contamination at a military air base site', Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 187 4111-4111 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10661-014-4111-0
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Victor Arias
2015 Lin J, Weng X, Jin X, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Chen Z, 'Reactivity of iron-based nanoparticles by green synthesis under various atmospheres and their removal mechanism of methylene blue', RSC ADVANCES, 5 70874-70882 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c5ra10629j
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Selvakumar R, Seethalakshmi N, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Recent advances in the synthesis of inorganic nano/microstructures using microbial biotemplates and their applications', RSC ADVANCES, 4 52156-52169 (2014)
DOI 10.1039/c4ra07903e
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2014 Gan L, Cheng Y, Palanisami T, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pathways of reductive degradation of crystal violet in wastewater using free-strain Burkholderia vietnamiensis C09V', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 21 10339-10348 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3037-y
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Reichman SM, Lim RP, Naidu R, 'Arsenic speciation in australian-grown and imported rice on sale in Australia: Implications for human health risk', Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62 6016-6024 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jf501077w
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2014 Kopittke PM, Wang P, Menzies NW, Naidu R, Kinraide TB, 'A web-accessible computer program for calculating electrical potentials and ion activities at cell-membrane surfaces', Plant and Soil, 375 35-46 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11104-013-1948-x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2014 Lin C, Gan L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of naphthalene using a functional biomaterial based on immobilized Bacillus fusiformis (BFN)', Biochemical Engineering Journal, 90 1-7 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bej.2014.05.003
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Cai X, Gao Y, Sun Q, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Removal of co-contaminants Cu (II) and nitrate from aqueous solution using kaolin-Fe/Ni nanoparticles', Chemical Engineering Journal, 244 19-26 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2014.01.040
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Wang F, Gao Y, Sun Q, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Degradation of microcystin-LR using functional clay supported bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles based on adsorption and reduction', Chemical Engineering Journal, 255 55-62 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2014.06.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Zha S, Cheng Y, Gao Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Nanoscale zero-valent iron as a catalyst for heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of amoxicillin', Chemical Engineering Journal, 255 141-148 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2014.06.057
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Jin X, Chen Z, Wang T, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneous removal of co-contaminants: acid brilliant violet and Cu
DOI 10.1007/s11051-014-2657-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Etschmann BE, Donner E, Brugger J, Howard DL, De Jonge MD, Paterson D, et al., 'Speciation mapping of environmental samples using XANES imaging', Environmental Chemistry, 11 341-350 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/EN13189
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2014 Bhattacharya P, Naidu R, Polya DA, Mukherjee A, Bundschuh J, Charlet L, 'Arsenic in hydrological processes-Sources, speciation, bioavailability and management', JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, 518 279-283 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2014.09.017
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014 Shi L, Du J, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Functional kaolinite supported Fe/Ni nanoparticles for simultaneous catalytic remediation of mixed contaminants (lead and nitrate) from wastewater', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 428 302-307 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2014.04.059
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu, Jianhua Du
2014 Weng X, Sun Q, Lin S, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Enhancement of catalytic degradation of amoxicillin in aqueous solution using clay supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles', Chemosphere, 103 80-85 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.11.033
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Liu Y, Li S, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp.', Chemosphere, 108 426-432 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.02.045
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Wang T, Jin X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Green synthesis of Fe nanoparticles using eucalyptus leaf extracts for treatment of eutrophic wastewater', Science of the Total Environment, 466-467 210-213 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.07.022
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 60
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Duan L, Palanisami T, Liu Y, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Kuchel T, et al., 'Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model', Environment International, 70 192-202 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2014.05.017
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Thava Palanisami, Luchun Duan, Megh Mallavarapu, Morrow Dong
2014 Kiddee P, Naidu R, Wong MH, Hearn L, Muller JF, 'Field investigation of the quality of fresh and aged leachates from selected landfills receiving e-waste in an arid climate', Waste Management, 34 2292-2304 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wasman.2014.06.018
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2014 Wang T, Lin J, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Green synthesized iron nanoparticles by green tea and eucalyptus leaves extracts used for removal of nitrate in aqueous solution', Journal of Cleaner Production, 83 413-419 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2014.07.006
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Luo F, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biomolecules in grape leaf extract involved in one-step synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles', RSC Advances, 4 53467-53474 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c4ra08808e
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Lamb DT, Venkatraman K, Bolan N, Ashwath N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Phytocapping: An alternative technology for the sustainable management of landfill sites', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 44 561-637 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2012.728823
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
2014 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Influence of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion', Atmospheric Environment, 88 14-22 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.01.053
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Reichman SM, Lim RP, Naidu R, 'Heavy metals in Australian grown and imported rice and vegetables on sale in Australia: Health hazard', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 100 53-60 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.11.024
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2014 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 100 201-208 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.11.003
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan
2014 Thuy CN, Loganathan P, Tien VN, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Slee D, et al., 'Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in road-deposited sediments, water sediments, and soils in Sydney, Australia: Comparisons of concentration distribution, sources and potential toxicity', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 104 339-348 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.03.010
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
2014 Zhou F, Cheng Y, Gan L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Burkholderia vietnamiensis C09V as the functional biomaterial used to remove crystal violet and Cu(II)', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 105 1-6 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.03.028
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Rahman MA, Hogan B, Duncan E, Doyle C, Krassoi R, Rahman MM, et al., 'Toxicity of arsenic species to three freshwater organisms and biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by freshwater phytoplankton (Chlorella sp CE-35)', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 106 126-135 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.03.004
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2014 Lin Y, Chen Z, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Decoloration of acid violet red B by bentonite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron: Reactivity, Characterization, kinetics and reaction pathway', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 93-94 56-61 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2014.02.020
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Effect of coal combustion products in reducing soluble phosphorus in soil II: Leaching study', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 225 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1777-9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Seshadri B, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Effect of industrial waste products on phosphorus mobilisation and biomass production in abattoir wastewater irrigated soil', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 21 10013-10021 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3030-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Weng X, Chen Z, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Clay supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles used for reductive degradation of amoxicillin in aqueous solution: Characterization and kinetics', COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS, 443 404-409 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.colsurfa.2013.11.047
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Liu X, Wang F, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of Direct Black G in dye effluent using functional kaolin-supported nanoscale zero iron', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 21 1936-1943 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-2099-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Hidden values in bauxite residue (red mud): Recovery of metals', WASTE MANAGEMENT, 34 2662-2673 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.wasman.2014.09.003
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2014 Wang T, Jin X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneous removal of Pb(II) and Cr(III) by magnetite nanoparticles using various synthesis conditions', JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY, 20 3543-3549 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jiec.2013.12.047
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Du J, Chadalavada S, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Environmental remediation techniques of tributyltin contamination in soil and water: A review', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 235 141-150 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2013.09.044
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jianhua Du, Zuliang Chen
2014 Huang L, Weng X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles using oolong tea extract for the degradation of malachite green', SPECTROCHIMICA ACTA PART A-MOLECULAR AND BIOMOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY, 117 801-804 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.saa.2013.09.054
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2014 Huang L, Weng X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Green synthesis of iron nanoparticles by various tea extracts: Comparative study of the reactivity', SPECTROCHIMICA ACTA PART A-MOLECULAR AND BIOMOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY, 130 295-301 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.saa.2014.04.037
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Yang D, Wang L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Voltammetric Determination of Lead (II) and Cadmium (II) Using a Bismuth Film Electrode Modified with Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles', Electrochimica Acta, 132 223-229 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.electacta.2014.03.147
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu, Liang Wang
2014 Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Gratton E, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Potential of fluorescence imaging techniques to monitor mutagenic PAH uptake by microalga', Environmental Science and Technology, 48 9152-9160 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es500387v
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2014 Yang D, Wang L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of traces of Pb(II) and Cd(II) using a glassy carbon electrode modified with bismuth nanoparticles', Microchimica Acta, 181 1199-1206 (2014)
DOI 10.1007/s00604-014-1235-4
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang
2014 Mayilswami S, Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Chronic PFOS exposure alters the expression of neuronal development-related human homologues in Eisenia fetida', Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 110 288-297 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.09.017
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Wang L, Yang D, Chen Z, Lesniewski PJ, Naidu R, 'Application of neural networks with novel independent component analysis methodologies for the simultaneous determination of cadmium, copper, and lead using an ISE array', Journal of Chemometrics, 28 491-498 (2014)
DOI 10.1002/cem.2599
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Liang Wang, Zuliang Chen
2014 Yang D, Wang L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Determination of Trace Lead and Cadmium in Water Samples by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry with a Nafion-Ionic Liquid-Coated Bismuth Film Electrode', Electroanalysis, 26 639-647 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/elan.201300622
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Lamb DT, Matanitobua VP, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of Barium to Plants and Invertebrates in Soils Contaminated by Barite', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 47 4670-4676 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es302053d
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami, Dane Lamb
2013 Sarkar B, Naidu R, Krishnamurti GSR, Megharaj M, 'Manganese(II)-Catalyzed and Clay-Minerals-Mediated Reduction of Chromium(VI) by Citrate', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 47 13629-13636 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es401568k
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Donner E, Brunetti G, Zarcinas B, Harris P, Tavakkoli E, Naidu R, Lombi E, 'Effects of Chemical Amendments on the Lability and Speciation of Metals in Anaerobically Digested Biosolids', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 47 11157-11165 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es400805j
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2013 Liu Y, Naidu R, Ming H, 'Surface electrochemical properties of red mud (bauxite residue): Zeta potential and surface charge density', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 394 451-457 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2012.11.052
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2013 Chen Z, Wang T, Jin X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multifunctional kaolinite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron used for the adsorption and degradation of crystal violet in aqueous solution', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 398 59-66 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2013.02.020
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 62
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Kuang Y, Wang Q, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Heterogeneous Fenton-like oxidation of monochlorobenzene using green synthesis of iron nanoparticles', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 410 67-73 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2013.08.020
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 67
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Rathnayake IVN, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal toxicity to bacteria - Are the existing growth media accurate enough to determine heavy metal toxicity?', CHEMOSPHERE, 90 1195-1200 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.09.036
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Naidu R, Wong MH, 'Contaminants of emerging concern Foreword', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 463 1077-1078 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.085
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2013 Pal R, Megharaj M, Kirkbride KP, Naidu R, 'Illicit drugs and the environment - A review', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 463 1079-1092 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.05.086
Citations Scopus - 77Web of Science - 72
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Man M, Naidu R, Wong MH, 'Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 463 1133-1137 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.07.017
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
2013 Thangarajan R, Bolan NS, Tian G, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Role of organic amendment application on greenhouse gas emission from soil', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 465 72-96 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.01.031
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 71
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 465 216-225 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.12.093
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Jeong J, Kim C, Lee K-S, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Carbon storage and soil CO2 efflux rates at varying degrees of damage from pine wilt disease in red pine stands', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 465 273-278 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.11.080
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Duan L, Naidu R, 'Effect of Ionic Strength and Index Cation on the Sorption of Phenanthrene', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1700-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Luchun Duan
2013 Sarkar B, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Simultaneous Adsorption of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium by Organoclay Mixtures', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1704-0
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Naidu R, 'Recent Advances in Contaminated Site Remediation', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1705-z
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2013 Naidu R, Sreedaran BR, Smith E, 'Electroremediation of Lead-Contaminated Kaolinite using Cation Selective Membrane and Different Electrolyte Solutions', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1708-9
Citations Scopus - 1
2013 Xie ZM, Chen J, Naidu R, 'Not All Phosphate Fertilizers Immobilize Lead in Soils', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1712-0
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
2013 Wang WH, Hoag GE, Collins JB, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of Surfactant-Enhanced In Situ Chemical Oxidation (S-ISCO) in Contaminated Soil', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1713-z
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
2013 Das P, Arias E VA, Kambala V, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Remediation of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate in Contaminated Soils by Modified Clay Adsorbent-a Risk-Based Approach', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1714-y
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Victor Arias
2013 Sudharshan S, Mallavarapu M, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Effect of Seaweeds on Degradation of DDT in Soils', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1715-x
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Thangavadivel K, Wang WH, Birke V, Naidu R, 'A Comparative Study of Trichloroethylene (TCE) Degradation in Contaminated Groundwater (GW) and TCE-Spiked Deionised Water Using Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) Under Various Mass Transport Conditions', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1718-7
Citations Web of Science - 1
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Water: Recent Advances and Future Prospects', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1722-y
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Mezbaul Bahar, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Naidu R, Smith E, Wong MH, Megharaj M, Bolan N, Juhasz AL, Lombi E, 'Remediation of Site Contamination', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1723-x
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of arsenic-contaminated water: Recent advances and future prospects topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013)

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Considering its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of ... [more]

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Considering its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsenic-contaminated water has become a high priority. There are several physicochemical-based conventional technologies available for removing arsenic from water. However, these technologies possess a number of limitations such as high cost and generation of toxic by-products, etc. Therefore, research on new sustainable and cost-effective arsenic removal technologies for water has recently become an area of intense research activity. Bioremediation technology offers great potential for possible future application in decontamination of pollutants from the natural environment. It is not only environmentally friendly but cost-effective as well. This review focuses on the state-of-art knowledge of currently available arsenic remediation methods, their prospects, and recent advances with particular emphasis on bioremediation strategies. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1722-y
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2013 Naidu R, 'Recent advances in contaminated site remediation topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1705-z
Citations Scopus - 5
2013 Wang WH, Hoag GE, Collins JB, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of surfactant-enhanced in situ chemical oxidation (S-ISCO) in contaminated soil topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013)

This work evaluated surfactant-enhanced in situ chemical oxidation (S-ISCO) in a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. Surfactants and efficacy of oxidant activation as well as the treat... [more]

This work evaluated surfactant-enhanced in situ chemical oxidation (S-ISCO) in a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. Surfactants and efficacy of oxidant activation as well as the treatability of contaminated soil were assessed. The surfactant VeruSOL-3 with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 5.5 g/L was selected. Based on the results, activated oxidations by sodium persulphate and hydrogen peroxide were able to effectively destroy target organic compounds in emulsion and soil. The destruction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in emulsion was completed in 14 days and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in excess of 96 %. Green nanoiron was much more active than other activators in emulsion. The data also indicates that oxidation using activators was much less pronounced in soil matrices. However, it is expected that given sufficient dose and treatment time, a higher destruction rate in the contaminated soil can be achieved. The study showed that the remediation of target organic contaminants (TPH, PAH) in soil by S-ISCO using activated sodium persulphate is feasible. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1713-z
Citations Scopus - 3
2013 Duan L, Naidu R, 'Effect of ionic strength and index cation on the sorption of phenanthrene topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013)

Sorption characteristics of phenanthrene were studied in batch equilibrium experiments with 32 Australian soils that varied widely in physicochemical properties. Sorption of phena... [more]

Sorption characteristics of phenanthrene were studied in batch equilibrium experiments with 32 Australian soils that varied widely in physicochemical properties. Sorption of phenanthrene varied widely among the soils and was generally nonlinear, with the nonlinearity index (n) of the Freundlich isotherm varying from 0.62 to 1.01. Simple regression analyses revealed that total organic carbon (TOC) accounts for about 68 % of the variation in the partition coefficient (K' f ) for sorption among the soils at an equilibrium concentration (C e ) of 0.05 mg/L. The organic carbon normalized distribution coefficient (K OC ), varied considerably between soils with > 70 % of the variance of logK OC being accounted for by logTOC, clay and log dissolved organic carbon (DOC). These results show that the phenanthrene C e is influenced by both TOC as well as the DOC in soil suspensions. The effects of ionic strength (IS) and index cation were investigated using four contrasting soils. Results show that with an increase in IS from 0.03 to 0.15 M sorption of phenanthrene generally increased in CaCl 2 background solutions, whereas the effect was less significant and variable in NaCl background solutions. Sorption of phenanthrene was slightly higher at low IS (0.03 M) with Na + as index cation compared with that of Ca 2+ , whereas an opposite trend was observed at higher IS (0.15 M). For two soils high in TOC, the flocculation of endogenous DOC in the presence of Ca 2+ reduced the influence of background electrolyte and resulted in a more linear sorption isotherm as well as higher sorption capacity. This trend was more significant with Ca 2+ relative to Na + . © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1700-4
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Luchun Duan
2013 Bolan NS, Makino T, Kunhikrishnan A, Kim P-J, Ishikawa S, Murakami M, et al., 'Cadmium Contamination and Its Risk Management in Rice Ecosystems', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 119, 119 183-273 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-407247-3.00004-4
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Subashchandrabose SR, Ramakrishnan B, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Mixotrophic cyanobacteria and microalgae as distinctive biological agents for organic pollutant degradation', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 51 59-72 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2012.10.007
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose
2013 Jiang C, Liu Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Impact of iron-based nanoparticles on microbial denitrification by Paracoccus sp. strain YF1', AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY, 142 329-335 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.aquatox.2013.09.005
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Lin H, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of TNT using Bacillus mycoides immobilized in PVA-sodium alginate-kaolin', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 83-84 336-342 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2013.08.004
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Park J, Naidu R, 'Microbial Transformation of Trace Elements in Soils in Relation to Bioavailability and Remediation', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 225, 225 1-56 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-6470-9_1
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Lombi E, Donner E, Taheri S, Tavakkoli E, Jaemting AK, McClure S, et al., 'Transformation of four silver/silver chloride nanoparticles during anaerobic treatment of wastewater and post-processing of sewage sludge', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 176 193-197 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2013.01.029
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 82
2013 Loganathan P, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 248 1-19 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.12.043
Citations Scopus - 94Web of Science - 81
2013 Kiddee P, Naidu R, Wong MH, 'Metals and polybrominated diphenyl ethers leaching from electronic waste in simulated landfills', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 252 243-249 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.03.015
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
2013 Naidu R, Juhasz A, Mallavarapu M, Smith E, Lombi E, Bolan NS, et al., 'Chemical Bioavailability in the Terrestrial Environment - recent advances Preface', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 685-686 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.10.001
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Naidu R, 'Sorption-bioavailability nexus of arsenic and cadmium in variable-charge soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 725-732 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.09.074
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Kim W-I, 'Recycled water sources influence the bioavailability of copper to earthworms', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 784-792 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.10.015
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Sarkar B, Megharaj M, Shanmuganathan D, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of organoclays to microbial processes and earthworm survival in soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 793-800 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.11.061
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Differential effect of coal combustion products on the bioavailability of phosphorus between inorganic and organic nutrient sources', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 817-825 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.04.051
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Harmsen J, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability as a tool in site management', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 840-846 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.12.044
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 18
2013 Wang T, Su J, Jin X, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Functional clay supported bimetallic nZVI/Pd nanoparticles used for removal of methyl orange from aqueous solution', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 819-825 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.09.028
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Bundschuh J, Bhattacharya P, Nath B, Naidu R, Ng J, Guilherme LRG, et al., 'Arsenic ecotoxicology: The interface between geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 883-886 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.08.019
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Kinetics of arsenite oxidation by Variovorax sp MM-1 isolated from a soil and identification of arsenite oxidase gene', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 997-1003 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.11.064
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Mezbaul Bahar, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Rahman MM, Asaduzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Consumption of arsenic and other elements from vegetables and drinking water from an arsenic-contaminated area of Bangladesh', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 1056-1063 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.06.045
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2013 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity, transformation and accumulation of inorganic arsenic species in a microalga Scenedesmus sp isolated from soil', JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYCOLOGY, 25 913-917 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10811-012-9923-0
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2013 Prasad TNVKV, Kambala VSR, Naidu R, 'Phyconanotechnology: Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using brown marine algae Cystophora moniliformis and their characterisation', Journal of Applied Phycology, 25 177-182 (2013)

Biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a relatively new developing area of nanotechnology which has economic and environmentally friendly advantages over conventional chemical ... [more]

Biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a relatively new developing area of nanotechnology which has economic and environmentally friendly advantages over conventional chemical and physical methods of synthesis. In this paper, we report for the first time, on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the Australasian brown marine algae Cystophora moniliformis. An extract of this alga was used as a reducing and stabilising agent. Temperature-dependent variation of the size of the AgNPs was observed. Agglomeration of the nanoparticles was observed at high temperatures. The average size of the AgNPs formed at temperatures < 65°C was 75 nm, whereas they were > 2 µm at higher temperatures. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern revealed face-centered cubic structure of the formed Ag nanoparticles. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

DOI 10.1007/s10811-012-9851-z
Citations Scopus - 34
2013 Weng X, Huang L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles by green tea extract and their degradation of malachite', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 51 342-347 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2013.09.024
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Shi L-N, Zhou Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Simultaneous adsorption and degradation of Zn2+ and Cu2+ from wastewaters using nanoscale zero-valent iron impregnated with clays', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 20 3639-3648 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-012-1272-7
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Wong M-H, Noller B, Naidu R, Baumgartl T, 'Contaminated land, ecological assessment, and remediation conference series (CLEAR 2012): environmental pollution and risk assessments', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 20 8313-8315 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-2194-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Naidu R, Channey R, McConnell S, Johnston N, Semple KT, McGrath S, et al., 'Towards bioavailability-based soil criteria: past, present and future perspectives', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-7 (2013)

Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated si... [more]

Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated sites is similar, and the decisions are based on threshold contaminant concentration. The uncertainty in the definition and measurement of bioavailability had limited its application to environment risk assessment and remediation. Last ten years have seen major developments in bioavailability research and acceptance. The use of bioavailability in the decision making process as one of the key variables has led to a gradual shift towards a more sophisticated risk-based approach. Now a days, many decision makers and regulatory organisations 'more readily accept' this concept. Bioavailability should be the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated sites that pose risk to environmental and human health. This paper summarises the potential application of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility to the assessment of sites affected by different contaminants, and the potential for this to be the underlying basis for sustainable risk assessment and remediation in Europe, North America and Australia over the coming decade. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1617-x
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Thava Palanisami
2013 Ng JC, Juhasz A, Smith E, Naidu R, 'Assessing the bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals and metalloids', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-24 (2013)

Bioavailability (BA) determines the potential harm of a contaminant that exerts on the receptor. However, environmental guidelines for site contamination assessment are often set ... [more]

Bioavailability (BA) determines the potential harm of a contaminant that exerts on the receptor. However, environmental guidelines for site contamination assessment are often set assuming the contaminant is 100¿% bioavailable. This conservative approach to assessing site risk may result in the unnecessary and expensive remediation of a contaminated site. The National Environmental Protection Measures in Australia has undergone a statutory 5-year review that recommended that contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility (BAC) measures be adopted as part of the contaminated site risk assessment process by the National Environment Protection Council. We undertook a critical review of the current bioavailability and bioaccessibility approaches, methods and their respective limitations. The 'gold' standard to estimate the portion of a contaminant that reaches the system circulatory system (BA) of its receptor is to determine BA in an in vivo system. Various animal models have been utilised for this purpose. Because of animal ethics issues, and the expenses associated with performing in vivo studies, several in vitro methods have been developed to determine BAC as a surrogate model for the estimation of BA. However, few in vitro BAC studies have been calibrated against a reliable animal model, such as immature swine. In this review, we have identified suitable methods for assessing arsenic and lead BAC and proposed a decision tree for the determination of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility for health risk assessment. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1820-9
Citations Scopus - 21
2013 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, 'Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-15 (2013)

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites w... [more]

This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites with differing soil physiochemical parameters. A series of amendments with differing mechanisms for stabilisation were applied to four shooting range soils and aged for 1¿year. Chemical stabilisation was monitored by pore water extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) over 1¿year. The performance of amendments when applied in conditions reflecting field application did not match the performance in the batch studies. Pore water-extractable metals were not greatly affected by amendment addition. TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced significantly by amendments, particularly lime and magnesium oxide. Antimony leaching was reduced by red mud but mobilised by some of the other amendments. Bioaccessible Pb measured by PBET shows that bioaccessible Pb increased with time after an initial decrease due to the presence of metallic fragments in the soil. Amendments were able to reduce bioaccessible Pb by up to 50¿%. Bioaccessible Sb was not readily reduced by soil amendments. Soil amendments were not equally effective across the four soils. © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Australia.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1918-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson
2013 Kiddee P, Naidu R, Wong MH, 'Electronic waste management approaches: An overview', WASTE MANAGEMENT, 33 1237-1250 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.wasman.2013.01.006
Citations Scopus - 119Web of Science - 102
2013 Bolan NS, Thangarajan R, Seshadri B, Jena U, Das KC, Wang H, Naidu R, 'Landfills as a biorefinery to produce biomass and capture biogas', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 135 578-587 (2013)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2012.08.135
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2013 Kuang Y, Zhou Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Impact of Fe and Ni/Fe nanoparticles on biodegradation of phenol by the strain Bacillus fusiformis (BFN) at various pH values', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 136 588-594 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2013.03.018
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Yang D, Wang L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Investigation of Copper(II) Interference on the Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Lead(II) and Cadmium(II) at Bismuth Film Electrode', ELECTROANALYSIS, 25 2637-2644 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/elan.201300375
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang
2013 Subashchandrabose SR, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lockington R, Naidu R, 'Influence of nutrient mixtures on p-nitrophenol degradation by Stenotrophomonas sp isolated from groundwater', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 48 108-119 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/10934529.2012.707861
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Rees M, Kuchel T, Rofe A, et al., 'Predicting lead relative bioavailability in peri-urban contaminated soils using in vitro bioaccessibility assays', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 48 604-611 (2013)
DOI 10.1080/10934529.2013.731354
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
2013 Zhou Y, Kuang Y, Li W, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'A combination of bentonite-supported bimetallic Fe/Pd nanoparticles and biodegradation for the remediation of p-chlorophenol in wastewater', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 223 68-75 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2013.02.118
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Liu X, Chen Z, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Remediation of Direct Black G in wastewater using kaolin-supported bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 223 764-771 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2013.03.002
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2013 Tavakkoli E, Donner E, Juhasz A, Naidu R, Lombi E, 'A radio-isotopic dilution technique for functional characterisation of the associations between inorganic contaminants and water-dispersible naturally occurring soil colloids', ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY, 10 341-348 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/EN13020
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
2013 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Bowman M, Chadalavada S, 'Vapor Intrusion Models for Petroleum and Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds: Opportunities for Future Improvements', VADOSE ZONE JOURNAL, 12 (2013)
DOI 10.2136/vzj2012.0048
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Dawit Bekele
2013 Aryal R, Beecham S, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Spatial variation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and equivalent toxicity in Sydney Harbour, Australia', JOURNAL OF WATER AND CLIMATE CHANGE, 4 364-372 (2013)
DOI 10.2166/wcc.2013.059
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2012 Mohammed T, Aryal R, Vigneswaran S, Loganathan P, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Removal of heavy metals in stormwater by hydrous ferric oxide', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Water Management, 165 171-178 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1680/wama.2012.165.3.171
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2012 Lombi E, Donner E, Tavakkoli E, Turney TW, Naidu R, Miller BW, Scheckel KG, 'Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 46 9089-9096 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es301487s
Citations Scopus - 98Web of Science - 92
2012 Lin Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Degradation of scarlet 4BS in aqueous solution using bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 381 30-35 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2012.05.035
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Choppala GK, Bolan NS, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'The Influence of Biochar and Black Carbon on Reduction and Bioavailability of Chromate in Soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 41 1175-1184 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.2134/jeq2011.0145
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Bowman M, Mclure S, 'Effect of soil type on distribution and bioaccessibility of metal contaminants in shooting range soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 438 452-462 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.08.014
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Lamb DT, Heading S, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Use of Biosolids for Phytocapping of Landfill Soil', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 223 2695-2705 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-1060-x
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Cheng Y, Lin H, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of crystal violet using Burkholderia vietnamiensis C09V immobilized on PVA-sodium alginate-kaolin gel beads', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 83 108-114 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2012.06.017
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2012 Lamb DT, Naidu R, Ming H, Megharaja M, 'Copper phytotoxicity in native and agronomical plant species', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 85 23-29 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2012.08.018
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2012 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multivariate analysis of mixed contaminants (PAHs and heavy metals) at manufactured gas plant site soils', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 184 3875-3885 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10661-011-2230-4
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2012 Donner E, Ryan CG, Howard DL, Zarcinas B, Scheckel KG, McGrath SP, et al., 'A multi-technique investigation of copper and zinc distribution, speciation and potential bioavailability in biosolids', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 166 57-64 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2012.02.012
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
2012 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan N, Naidu R, 'Nutrient management in effluents derived from agricultural industries: An Australian perspective', WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment, (2012)
DOI 10.2495/SI120181
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Thavamani P, Malik S, Beer M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Microbial activity and diversity in long-term mixed contaminated soils with respect to polyaromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 99 10-17 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.12.030
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 60
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2012 Liu Y, Gan L, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Removal of nitrate using Paracoccus sp YF1 immobilized on bamboo carbon', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 229 419-425 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.06.029
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Pal R, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Klass G, Cox M, Kirkbride KP, 'Degradation in soil of precursors and by-products associated with the illicit manufacture of methylamphetamine: Implications for clandestine drug laboratory investigation', FORENSIC SCIENCE INTERNATIONAL, 220 245-250 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.forsciint.2012.03.011
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Subashchandrabose SR, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'p-nitrophenol toxicity to and its removal by three select soil isolates of microalgae: The role of antioxidants', ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY, 31 1980-1988 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/etc.1931
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Singh BK, Naidu R, 'Cleaning contaminated environment: a growing challenge', BIODEGRADATION, 23 785-786 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9590-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic bioremediation potential of a new arsenite-oxidizing bacterium Stenotrophomonas sp MM-7 isolated from soil', BIODEGRADATION, 23 803-812 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9567-4
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2012 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium', BIODEGRADATION, 23 823-835 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9572-7
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2012 Sudharshan S, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, Bolan N, 'DDT remediation in contaminated soils: a review of recent studies', BIODEGRADATION, 23 851-863 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9575-4
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Naidu R, Nandy S, Megharaj M, Kumar RP, Chadalavada S, Chen Z, Bowman M, 'Monitored natural attenuation of a long-term petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites: a case study', BIODEGRADATION, 23 881-895 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9580-7
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Ma C, Naidu R, Liu F, Lin C, Ming H, 'Influence of hybrid giant Napier grass on salt and nutrient distributions with depth in a saline soil', BIODEGRADATION, 23 907-916 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9583-4
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2012 Sarkar B, Naidu R, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Xi Y, 'Organoclays reduce arsenic bioavailability and bioaccessibility in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS, 12 704-712 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11368-012-0487-z
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Smith E, Weber J, Rofe A, Gancarz D, Naidu R, Juhasz AL, 'Assessment of DDT Relative Bioavailability and Bioaccessibility in Historically Contaminated Soils Using an in Vivo Mouse Model and Fed and Unfed Batch in Vitro Assays', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 46 2928-2934 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es203030q
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
2012 Pal R, Megharaj M, Kirkbride KP, Naidu R, 'Fate of 1-(1 ',4 '-cyclohexadienyl)-2-methylaminopropane (CMP) in soil: Route-specific by-product in the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 416 394-399 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.11.023
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Park JH, Bolan N, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Relative Value of Phosphate Compounds in Reducing the Bioavailability and Toxicity of Lead in Contaminated Soils', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 223 599-608 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-0885-7
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Mueller K, Laurenson S, Naidu R, Kim W-I, 'THE INFLUENCE OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION ON THE TRANSFORMATION AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF HEAVY METAL (LOID)S IN SOIL', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 115, 115 215-297 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-394276-0.00005-6
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2012 Ming H, He W, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of lead in contaminated soil depends on the nature of bioreceptor', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 78 344-350 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2011.11.045
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2012 Murtaza G, Haynes RJ, Kim K-R, Zia MH, Naidu R, Belyaeva ON, 'Effect of aging biosolids with soils of contrasting pH on subsequent concentrations of Cu and Zn in pore water and on their plant uptake', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 19 636-645 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-011-0592-3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 Zhou Y-F, Haynes RJ, Naidu R, 'Use of inorganic and organic wastes for in situ immobilisation of Pb and Zn in a contaminated alkaline soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 19 1260-1270 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-011-0648-4
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2012 Sreenivasulu C, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Degradation of p-nitrophenol by immobilized cells of Bacillus spp. isolated from soil', INTERNATIONAL BIODETERIORATION & BIODEGRADATION, 68 24-27 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2011.12.006
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Sarkar B, Xi Y, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, Bowman M, Rose H, Naidu R, 'Bioreactive Organoclay: A New Technology for Environmental Remediation', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 42 435-488 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2010.518524
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Loganathan P, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Cadmium Sorption and Desorption in Soils: A Review', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 42 489-533 (2012)
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2010.520234
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 52
2012 Sarkar B, Megharaj M, Xi Y, Naidu R, 'Surface charge characteristics of organo-palygorskites and adsorption of p-nitrophenol in flow-through reactor system', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 185 35-43 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2011.05.062
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Chen Z-X, Cheng Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Kaolin-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for removing cationic dye-crystal violet in aqueous solution', JOURNAL OF NANOPARTICLE RESEARCH, 14 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11051-012-0899-0
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2012 Kim C, Jeong J, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Short-term effects of fertilizer application on soil respiration in red pine stands', Journal of Ecology and Field Biology, 35 307-311 (2012)

This study was conducted to evaluate the dynamics of soil respiration (total soil and heterotrophic respiration) following fertilizer application in red pine forests. Fertilizer (... [more]

This study was conducted to evaluate the dynamics of soil respiration (total soil and heterotrophic respiration) following fertilizer application in red pine forests. Fertilizer (N:P:K = 113:150:37 kg/ha), which reflects current practices in Korean forest, was applied in April 2011, and total soil and heterotrophic respiration rates were monitored from April 2011 to March 2012. Monthly variation of total soil and heterotrophic respiration rates were similar between the fertilizer and control treatments, as soil temperature was the dominant factor controlling the both rates. Total soil respiration rates during the study period were not significantly different between the fertilizer (0.504 g CO 2 m -2 h -1 ) and control (0.501 g CO 2 m -2 h -1 ) treatments. However, the proportion of heterotrophic respiration was higher in the fertilizer (78% of total soil respiration rates) than in the control (62% of total soil respiration rates) treatments. These results suggest that current fertilizer practices in Korea forest soil do not substantially affect total soil respiration rates. © The Ecological Society of Korea.

DOI 10.5141/JEFB.2012.036
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2012 Sanderson P, Naidu R, Bolan N, Bowman M, 'Critical review on chemical stabilization of metal contaminants in shooting range soils', Journal of Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste, 16 258-272 (2012)

Shooting ranges have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as a potential source of contamination owing to the high loading of lead in the soil. Stabilization by the addit... [more]

Shooting ranges have come under increased scrutiny in recent years as a potential source of contamination owing to the high loading of lead in the soil. Stabilization by the addition of chemical amendments has been examined as a viable risk-based approach to managing shooting range contamination. Amendments have been shown to immobilize metals to varying degrees, determined by the target contaminant, the amendment used, soil properties, and the reaction kinetics in the contaminated soil and amendment system. Field scale evaluation of the effectiveness of chemical amendments for the stabilization of metal contaminants in shooting range soil is limited. Doubt remains over effectiveness and long-term stability under the varying conditions found in the field, which affect the kinetics of immobilization and dissolution in amended soil. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.

DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)HZ.2153-5515.0000113
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Optimal Identification of Groundwater Pollution Sources Using Feedback Monitoring Information: A Case Study', Environmental Forensics, 13 140-153 (2012)

A feedback-based methodology has been developed for identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater-contaminated aquifers. The methodology consists of models within an it... [more]

A feedback-based methodology has been developed for identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater-contaminated aquifers. The methodology consists of models within an iterative feedback system, with the capacity of feeding back real-time measurements of pollutant concentrations for the sequential optimal designs and characterization of the contaminated aquifer study area. The resulting linked-simulation optimization model considers the delineation of the contaminant plume, optimally characterizing the site in terms of pollutant sources and the optimal monitoring network leading to the remediation and/or management of the contaminated aquifer. As part of the methodology, a simulation-optimization code was developed by linking a groundwater flow and transport model with an optimization code for the purpose of identifying the unknown pollution sources. The proposed methodology addresses the source identification process with very limited information available regarding the observed contamination data for the identification of unknown pollution sources. This methodology is applied to a chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated site for the identification of unknown pollution sources. Information regarding the sources such as the magnitude, location and the duration of contamination activity were not known for the study area considered in this work except the information regarding the likely activities that led to its contamination. Developed methodology is applied to choose the optimal source locations from the identified potential locations. Depending on the availability of observed contaminant concentration values the domain for the methodology application is divided into three different management periods. The optimal source estimates obtained at the end of the third management period suggests that only one potential source location, S2, confirms to be the source and active. The qualitative assessment of the results also performed utilizing the contamination information obtained during the field investigations. The results demonstrate the practicability of the feedback-based methodology in identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/15275922.2012.676147
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2011 Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Effects of Carbaryl and 1-Naphthol on Soil Population of Cyanobacteria and Microalgae and Select Cultures of Diazotrophic Cyanobacteria', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 87 324-329 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-011-0347-3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Sun Q, Chen Z, Yuan D, Yu C-P, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'On-Line SPE Coupled with LC-APCI-MS for the Determination of Trace Explosives in Water', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 73 631-637 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s10337-011-1964-z
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2011 Su J, Lin S, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Dechlorination of p-chlorophenol from aqueous solution using bentonite supported Fe/Pd nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and kinetics', DESALINATION, 280 167-173 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.desal.2011.06.067
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Smith E, Kempson IM, Juhasz AL, Weber J, Rofe A, Gancarz D, et al., 'In Vivo-in Vitro and XANES Spectroscopy Assessments of Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Periurban Solis', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 45 6145-6152 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es200653k
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 43
2011 Donner E, Howard DL, de Jonge MD, Paterson D, Cheah MH, Naidu R, Lombi E, 'X-ray Absorption and Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy Investigation of Copper and Zinc Speciation in Biosolids', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 45 7249-7257 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es201710z
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 41
2011 Liu Y, Naidu R, Ming H, 'Red mud as an amendment for pollutants in solid and liquid phases', GEODERMA, 163 1-12 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2011.04.002
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Yanju Liu
2011 Chen Z-X, Jin X-Y, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Removal of methyl orange from aqueous solution using bentonite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 363 601-607 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.07.057
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 104
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Shanmuganathan D, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in marine foodstuffs in Australia: Residue levels and contamination status of PBDEs', MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, 63 154-159 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2011.06.002
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Phytoavailability of copper in the presence of recycled water sources', PLANT AND SOIL, 348 425-438 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11104-011-0899-3
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2011 Zhang X, Lin S, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Kaolinite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron for removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solution: Reactivity, characterization and mechanism', WATER RESEARCH, 45 3481-3488 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2011.04.010
Citations Scopus - 160Web of Science - 141
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Pal R, Megharaj M, Kirkbride KP, Heinrich T, Naidu R, 'Biotic and abiotic degradation of illicit drugs, their precursor, and by-products in soil', CHEMOSPHERE, 85 1002-1009 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.06.102
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Park JH, Bolan N, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Comparative value of phosphate sources on the immobilization of lead, and leaching of lead and phosphorus in lead contaminated soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 409 853-860 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.11.003
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2011 Thangavadivel K, Megharaj M, Smart RSC, Lesniewski PJ, Bates D, Naidu R, 'Ultrasonic Enhanced Desorption of DDT from Contaminated Soils', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 217 115-125 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-010-0572-0
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Murtaza G, Haynes RJ, Naidu R, Belyaeva ON, Kim K-R, Lamb DT, Bolan NS, 'Natural Attenuation of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd in Three Biosolids-Amended Soils of Contrasting pH Measured Using Rhizon Pore Water Samplers', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 221 351-363 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s11270-011-0795-8
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
2011 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, McFarland R, Naidu R, 'Finger printing of mixed contaminants from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils: Implications to bioremediation', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 37 184-189 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2010.08.017
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2011 Megharaj M, Ramakrishnan B, Venkateswarlu K, Sethunathan N, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation approaches for organic pollutants: A critical perspective', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 37 1362-1375 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2011.06.003
Citations Scopus - 252Web of Science - 215
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Uncertainty based optimal monitoring network design for a chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated site', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 173 929-940 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s10661-010-1435-2
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
2011 Sarkar B, Xi Y, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Orange II adsorption on palygorskites modified with alkyl trimethylammonium and dialkyl dimethylammonium bromide - An isothermal and kinetic study', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 51 370-374 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2010.11.032
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Xi Y, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Dispersion of zerovalent iron nanoparticles onto bentonites and use of these catalysts for orange II decolourisation', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 53 716-722 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2011.06.010
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Ramakrishnan B, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Sethunathan N, Naidu R, 'Mixtures of Environmental Pollutants: Effects on Microorganisms and Their Activities in Soils', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 211, 211 63-120 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8011-3_3
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Aryal R, Baral B, Vigneswaran S, Naidu R, Loganathan P, 'Seasonal influence on urban dust PAH profile and toxicity in Sydney, Australia', WATER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 63 2238-2243 (2011)
DOI 10.2166/wst.2011.504
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2011 Park JH, Bolan N, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Concomitant rock phosphate dissolution and lead immobilization by phosphate solubilizing bacteria (Enterobacter sp.)', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 92 1115-1120 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2010.11.031
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2011 Park JH, Bolan N, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Isolation of phosphate solubilizing bacteria and their potential for lead immobilization in soil', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 185 829-836 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.09.095
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan
2011 Smith E, Weber J, Naidu R, McLaren RG, Juhasz AL, 'Assessment of lead bioaccessibility in peri-urban contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 186 300-305 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.10.111
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
2011 Sarkar B, Megharaj M, Xi Y, Naidu R, 'Structural characterisation of Arquad (R) 2HT-75 organobentonites: Surface charge characteristics and environmental application', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 195 155-161 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2011.08.016
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Subashchandrabose SR, Ramakrishnan B, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Consortia of cyanobacteria/microalgae and bacteria: Biotechnological potential', BIOTECHNOLOGY ADVANCES, 29 896-907 (2011)
DOI 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2011.07.009
Citations Scopus - 97Web of Science - 91
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Caceres TP, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and transformation of insecticide fenamiphos to the earthworm Eisenia fetida', ECOTOXICOLOGY, 20 20-28 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s10646-010-0552-6
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Aryal R, Kandasamy J, Vigneswaran S, Naidu R, Lee SH, 'Review of stormwater quality, quantity and treatment methods part 1: Stormwater quantity modelling', Environmental Engineering Research, 16 71-78 (2011)

A review of stormwater quantity and quality in the urban environment is presented. The review is presented in three parts. The first part reviews the mathematical methods for stor... [more]

A review of stormwater quantity and quality in the urban environment is presented. The review is presented in three parts. The first part reviews the mathematical methods for stormwater quantity and has been undertaken by examining a number of stormwater models that are in current use. The important feature of models, their applications, and management has been discussed. Different types of stormwater management models are presented in the literatures. Generally, all the models are simplified as conceptual or empirical depending on whether the model is based on physical laws or not. In both cases if any of the variables in the model are regarded as random variables having a probability distribution, then the model is stochastic model. Otherwise the model is deterministic (based on process descriptions). The analytical techniques are presented in this paper.

Citations Scopus - 3
2011 Aryal R, Kandasamy J, Vigneswaran S, Naidu R, Lee HS, 'Review of stormwater quality, quantity and treatment methods part 2: Stormwater: Quality modelling', Environmental Engineering Research, 16 143-149 (2011)

In this paper, review of stormwater quality and quantity in the urban environment is presented. The review is presented in three parts. This second part reviews the mathematical t... [more]

In this paper, review of stormwater quality and quantity in the urban environment is presented. The review is presented in three parts. This second part reviews the mathematical techiques used in the stromwater quality modelling and has been undertaken by examining a number of models that are in current use. The important features of models are discussed.

Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Park JH, Bolan NS, Chung JW, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Environmental monitoring of the role of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of lead in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, 13 2234-2242 (2011)
DOI 10.1039/c1em10275c
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Haynes RJ, Zhou YF, Naidu R, 'Recycling and use of wastes/co-products from the iron/steel and alumina industries', International Journal of Environment and Waste Management, 8 174-211 (2011)

The current and potential uses for Blast Furnace (BF) slag, steel slag and red mud, and their environmental implications, are outlined and discussed as are the difficulties associ... [more]

The current and potential uses for Blast Furnace (BF) slag, steel slag and red mud, and their environmental implications, are outlined and discussed as are the difficulties associated with red mud disposal and subsequent rehabilitation of the disposal sites. Whilst practicable bulk uses for the large amounts of slags that are produced have been found, the uses for red mud are limited and only utilise an extremely small proportion of the waste. Strategies to reduce the cost of red mud disposal are addressed and it is concluded that, as is already the case for slags, bulk uses for red mud need to be developed. Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

DOI 10.1504/IJEWM.2011.040973
Citations Scopus - 4
2011 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Optimisation approach for pollution source identification in groundwater: An overview', International Journal of Environment and Waste Management, 8 40-61 (2011)

Groundwater pollution occurs from different anthropogenic sources like leakage from Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and depositories, leakage from hazardous waste dump sites and ... [more]

Groundwater pollution occurs from different anthropogenic sources like leakage from Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and depositories, leakage from hazardous waste dump sites and soak pits. Remediation of these contaminated sites requires optimal decision-making system so that the remediation is done in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Identification of unknown pollution sources plays an important role in remediation and containment of contaminant plume in a hazardous site. This paper reviews different optimisation algorithms like classical, nonclassical such as Genetic Algorithm, Artificial Neural Network and Simulated Annealing and hybrid methods, which can be applied for optimal identification of unknown groundwater pollution sources. Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

DOI 10.1504/IJEWM.2011.040964
Citations Scopus - 5
2011 Prasad TNVKV, Kambala VSR, Naidu R, 'A Critical Review on Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles and their Antimicrobial Activity', CURRENT NANOSCIENCE, 7 531-544 (2011)
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
2011 Rahman MM, Asaduzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic Exposure from Rice and Water Sources in the Noakhali District of Bangladesh', WATER QUALITY EXPOSURE AND HEALTH, 3 1-10 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s12403-010-0034-3
Citations Web of Science - 18
2010 Juhasz AL, Weber J, Naidu R, Gancarz D, Rofe A, Todor D, Smith E, 'Determination of Cadmium Relative Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils and Its Prediction Using in Vitro Methodologies', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 44 5240-5247 (2010)
DOI 10.1021/es1006516
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 34
2010 Kim K-R, Owens G, Naidu R, Kwon S-I, 'Influence of plant roots on rhizosphere soil solution composition of long-term contaminated soils', GEODERMA, 155 86-92 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.geoderma.2009.11.028
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 35
2010 Sarkar B, Xi Y, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Synthesis and characterisation of novel organopalygorskites for removal of p-nitrophenol from aqueous solution: Isothermal studies', JOURNAL OF COLLOID AND INTERFACE SCIENCE, 350 295-304 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.06.030
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Xi Y, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Reduction and adsorption of Pb2+ in aqueous solution by nano-zero-valent iron-A SEM, TEM and XPS study', MATERIALS RESEARCH BULLETIN, 45 1361-1367 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.materresbull.2010.06.046
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 59
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Sun Q, Yuan D, Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Reduction of polyatomic interferences during ion-chromatographic speciation of metal ions via their EDTA complexes along with ICP-MS detection using an octopole reaction system', MICROCHIMICA ACTA, 169 41-47 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00604-010-0311-7
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Patra RC, Malik S, Beer M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Molecular characterization of chromium (VI) reducing potential in Gram positive bacteria isolated from contaminated sites', SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, 42 1857-1863 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2010.07.005
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Lamb DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Phytotoxicity and Accumulation of Lead in Australian Native Vegetation', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 58 613-621 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00244-009-9460-2
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Lamb DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Relative Tolerance of a Range of Australian Native Plant Species and Lettuce to Copper, Zinc, Cadmium, and Lead', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 59 424-432 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s00244-010-9481-x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Xi Y, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Preparation, characterization of surfactants modified clay minerals and nitrate adsorption', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 48 92-96 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2009.11.047
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 82
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Xi Y, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-D on organo-palygorskite', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 49 255-261 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2010.05.015
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 58
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Aryal R, Vigneswaran S, Kandasamy J, Naidu R, 'Urban stormwater quality and treatment', KOREAN JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, 27 1343-1359 (2010)
DOI 10.1007/s11814-010-0387-0
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 32
2010 Sarkar B, Xi Y, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, Rajarathnam D, Naidu R, 'Remediation of hexavalent chromium through adsorption by bentonite based Arquad (R) 2HT-75 organoclays', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 183 87-97 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.06.110
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 68
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Sarkar B, Megharaj M, Xi Y, Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Sorption of quaternary ammonium compounds in soils: Implications to the soil microbial activities', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 184 448-456 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.08.055
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Brodie K, 'THE ROLE OF COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN MANAGING THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF NUTRIENTS AND HEAVY METALS IN SOILS', JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION, 10 378-398 (2010)
DOI 10.4067/S0718-95162010000100011
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2010 Okour Y, Shon HK, El Saliby IJ, Naidu R, Kim JB, Kim J-H, 'Preparation and characterisation of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and thiourea-doped titanate nanotubes prepared from wastewater flocculated sludge', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 101 1453-1458 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2009.06.096
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 24
2010 Kim KR, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Effect of Root-Induced Chemical Changes on Dynamics and Plant Uptake of Heavy Metals in Rhizosphere Soils', PEDOSPHERE, 20 494-504 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2010 Ramakrishnan B, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Sethunathan N, 'The Impacts of Environmental Pollutants on Microalgae and Cyanobacteria', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 40 699-821 (2010)
DOI 10.1080/10643380802471068
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Thangavadivel K, Megharaj M, Smart RSC, Lesniewski PJ, Naidu R, 'Sonochemical destruction of chloroform by using low frequency ultrasound in batch and flow cell', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 45 483-489 (2010)
DOI 10.1080/10934520903539390
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Kim K-R, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal distribution, bioaccessibility, and phytoavailability in long-term contaminated soils from Lake Macquarie, Australia', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 47 166-176 (2009)
DOI 10.1071/SR08054
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
2009 Juhasz AL, Weber J, Smith E, Naidu R, Marschner B, Rees M, et al., 'Evaluation of SBRC-Gastric and SBRC-Intestinal Methods for the Prediction of In Vivo Relative Lead Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 43 4503-4509 (2009)
DOI 10.1021/es803238u
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 54
2009 Juhasz AL, Weber J, Smith E, Naidu R, Rees M, Rofe A, et al., 'Assessment of Four Commonly Employed in Vitro Arsenic Bioaccessibility Assays for Predicting in Vivo Relative Arsenic Bioavailability in Contaminated Soils', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 43 9487-9494 (2009)
DOI 10.1021/es902427y
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 65
2009 Wang W, Chen Z, Davey DE, Naidu R, 'Extraction of selenium species in pharmaceutical tablets using enzymatic and chemical methods', MICROCHIMICA ACTA, 165 167-172 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s00604-008-0115-1
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2009 Damayanti TA, Naidu RA, 'Identification of Peanut bud necrosis virus and Tomato spotted wilt virus in Indonesia for the first time', PLANT PATHOLOGY, 58 782-782 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3059.2009.02103.x
2009 Chen Z, He W, Beer M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Speciation of glyphosate, phosphate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in soil extracts by ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with an octopole reaction system', TALANTA, 78 852-856 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2008.12.052
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Basu NB, Suresh P, Rao C, Poyer IC, Nandy S, Mallavarapu M, et al., 'Integration of traditional and innovative characterization techniques for flux-based assessment of Dense Non-aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) sites', JOURNAL OF CONTAMINANT HYDROLOGY, 105 161-172 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2008.12.005
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Naidu R, Bhattacharya P, 'Arsenic in the environment-risks and management strategies', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 1-8 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9243-0
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
2009 Rahman MM, Naidu R, Bhattacharya P, 'Arsenic contamination in groundwater in the Southeast Asia region', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 9-21 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9233-2
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 54
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2009 Bhattacharya P, Hasan MA, Sracek O, Smith E, Ahmed KM, von Bromssen M, et al., 'Groundwater chemistry and arsenic mobilization in the Holocene flood plains in south-central Bangladesh', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 23-43 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9230-5
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 23
2009 Arora M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic testing field kits: some considerations and recommendations', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 45-48 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9231-4
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Smith E, Naidu R, 'Chemistry of inorganic arsenic in soils: kinetics of arsenic adsorption-desorption', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 49-59 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9228-z
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
2009 Naidu R, Smith E, Huq SMI, Owens G, 'Sorption and bioavailability of arsenic in selected Bangladesh soils', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 61-68 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9229-y
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2009 Rahman MM, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Extraction of arsenic species in soils using microwave-assisted extraction detected by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 93-102 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9227-0
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Mahmud Rahman
2009 Rahman F, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'A comparative study of the extractability of arsenic species from silverbeet and amaranth vegetables', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 103-113 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9225-2
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2009 Rahman F, Naidu R, 'The influence of arsenic speciation (As-III & As-v) and concentration on the growth, uptake and translocation of arsenic in vegetable crops (silverbeet and amaranth): greenhouse study', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 115-124 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9241-2
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 9
2009 He W, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of tri- and penta-valent arsenic, alone and in combination, to the cladoceran Daphnia carinata: the influence of microbial transformation in natural waters', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 133-141 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9239-9
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Khan NI, Owens G, Bruce D, Naidu R, 'Human arsenic exposure and risk assessment at the landscape level: a review', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 143-166 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9240-3
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 33
2009 Rees M, Sansom L, Rofe A, Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, et al., 'Principles and application of an in vivo swine assay for the determination of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated matrices', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 167-177 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9237-y
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 31
2009 Rahman MM, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Arsenic levels in rice grain and assessment of daily dietary intake of arsenic from rice in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh-implications to groundwater irrigation', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 179-187 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9238-x
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2009 Rahman MM, Ng JC, Naidu R, 'Chronic exposure of arsenic via drinking water and its adverse health impacts on humans', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 189-200 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9235-0
Citations Scopus - 153Web of Science - 136
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2009 Rahman MM, Rahman F, Sansom L, Naidu R, Schmidt O, 'Arsenic interactions with lipid particles containing iron', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 201-206 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9236-z
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2009 Khan NI, Bruce D, Naidu R, Owens G, 'Implementation of food frequency questionnaire for the assessment of total dietary arsenic intake in Bangladesh: Part B, preliminary findings', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 221-238 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9232-3
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
2009 Thangavadivel K, Megharaj M, Smart RSC, Lesniewski PJ, Naidu R, 'Application of high frequency ultrasound in the destruction of DDT in contaminated sand and water', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 168 1380-1386 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.03.024
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Lamba DT, Ming H, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal (Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) partitioning and bioaccessibility in uncontaminated and long-term contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 171 1150-1158 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2009.06.124
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2009 Caceres TP, He W, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Effect of insecticide fenamiphos on soil microbial activities in Australian and Ecuadorean soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART B-PESTICIDES FOOD CONTAMINANTS AND AGRICULTURAL WASTES, 44 13-17 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/03601230802519504
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Han F, Kambala VSR, Srinivasan M, Rajarathnam D, Naidu R, 'Tailored titanium dioxide photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes in wastewater treatment: A review', APPLIED CATALYSIS A-GENERAL, 359 25-40 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.apcata.2009.02.043
Citations Scopus - 548Web of Science - 500
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan
2009 Chen Z, Owen G, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Speciation of Zn-aminopolycarboxylic complexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY, 23 419-424 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/rcm.3897
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Sun Q, Chen Z, Yuan D, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'On-line solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of trace tributyltin and triphenyltin in water samples', RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY, 23 3795-3802 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/rcm.4321
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2009 Caceres TP, Megharaj M, Malik S, Beer M, Naidu R, 'Hydrolysis of fenamiphos and its toxic oxidation products by Microbacterium sp in pure culture and groundwater', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 100 2732-2736 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2008.12.043
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Guo Z, Megharaj M, Beer M, Ming H, Rahman MM, Wu W, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal impact on bacterial biomass based on DNA analyses and uptake by wild plants in the abandoned copper mine soils', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 100 3831-3836 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2009.02.043
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mahmud Rahman
2009 Kambala VSR, Naidu R, 'Disinfection Studies on TiO2 Thin Films Prepared by a Sol-Gel Method', JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL NANOTECHNOLOGY, 5 121-129 (2009)
DOI 10.1166/jbn.2009.1002
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
2008 Chen Z, Kim K-R, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Determination of carboxylic acids from plant root exudates by ion exclusion chromatography with ESI-MS', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 67 113-117 (2008)
DOI 10.1365/s10337-007-0457-6
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2008 Chen Z, Akter KF, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'The separation of arsenic species in soils and plant tissues by anion-exchange chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry using various mobile phases', MICROCHEMICAL JOURNAL, 89 20-28 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.microc.2007.10.007
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Zuliang Chen
2008 Smith E, Naidu R, Weber J, Juhasz AL, 'The impact of sequestration on the bioaccessibility of arsenic in long-term contaminated soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 71 773-780 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.10.012
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
2008 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Rees M, Rofe A, Kuchel T, et al., 'Application of an in vivo swine model for the determination of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated vegetables', CHEMOSPHERE, 71 1963-1969 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.12.021
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
2008 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Naidu R, Rees M, Rofe A, et al., 'Effect of soil ageing on in vivo arsenic bioavailability in two dissimilar soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 71 2180-2186 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.12.022
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 35
2008 Smith E, Juhasz AL, Weber J, Naidu R, 'Arsenic uptake and speciation in rice plants grown under greenhouse conditions with arsenic contaminated irrigation water', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 392 277-283 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2007.11.023
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 44
2008 Caceres T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and transformation of fenamiphos and its metabolites by two micro algae Pseudokirchneiriella subcapitata and Chlorococcum sp.', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 398 53-59 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.03.022
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Malik S, Beer M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'The use of molecular techniques to characterize the microbial communities in contaminated soil and water', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 34 265-276 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2007.09.001
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 70
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Caceres TP, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of the Pesticide Fenamiphos by Ten Different Species of Green Algae and Cyanobacteria', CURRENT MICROBIOLOGY, 57 643-646 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s00284-008-9293-7
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Caceres TC, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Degradation of fenamiphos in soils collected from different geographical regions: The influence of soil properties and climatic conditions', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART B-PESTICIDES FOOD CONTAMINANTS AND AGRICULTURAL WASTES, 43 314-322 (2008)
DOI 10.1080/03601230801941659
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Caceres TP, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Sorption of fenamiphos to different soils: The influence of soil properties', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART B-PESTICIDES FOOD CONTAMINANTS AND AGRICULTURAL WASTES, 43 605-610 (2008)
DOI 10.1080/03601230802234690
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Chen Z, Wang W, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Comparison of no gas and He/H-2 cell modes used for reduction of isobaric interferences in selenium speciation by ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', SPECTROCHIMICA ACTA PART B-ATOMIC SPECTROSCOPY, 63 69-75 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.sab.2007.11.019
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Thiruverikatachari R, Vigneswaran S, Naidu R, 'Permeable reactive barrier for groundwater remediation', JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY, 14 145-156 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.jiec.2007.10.001
Citations Scopus - 139Web of Science - 125
2007 Chen Z, Owens G, Kim K-R, Naidu R, 'Confirmation of lead aminocarboxylic complex formation using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and speciation by anion-exchange chromatography coupled with ICP-MS', ANALYTICA CHIMICA ACTA, 599 163-169 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.aca.2007.08.012
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen ZL, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Determination of bromate and bromide in seawater by ion chromatography, with an ammonium salt solution as mobile phase, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 65 115-118 (2007)
DOI 10.1365/s10337-006-0128-z
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen Z, Khan NI, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Elimination of chloride interference on arsenic speciation in ion chromatography inductively coupled mass spectrometry using an octopole collision/reaction system', MICROCHEMICAL JOURNAL, 87 87-90 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.microc.2007.05.011
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Speciation of chromium in waste water using ion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', TALANTA, 72 394-400 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2006.10.041
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Speciation of iodate and iodide in seawater by non-suppressed ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', TALANTA, 72 1842-1846 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2007.02.014
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen Z, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Removal of interferences in the speciation of chromium using an octopole reaction system in ion chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', TALANTA, 73 948-952 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2007.05.030
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2007 Caceres T, He W, Naidu R, Meharaj M, 'Toxicity of chlorpyrifos and TCP alone and in combination to Daphnia carinata: The influence of microbial degradation in natural water', WATER RESEARCH, 41 4497-4503 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2007.06.025
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2007 Caceres T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of fenamiphos and its metabolites to the cladoceran Daphnia carinata: The influence of microbial degradation in natural waters', CHEMOSPHERE, 66 1264-1269 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2006.07.027
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2007 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Rees M, Rofe A, Kuchel T, et al., 'In vitro assessment of arsenic bioaccessibility in contaminated (anthropogenic and geogenic) soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 69 69-78 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.04.046
Citations Scopus - 71Web of Science - 78
2007 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Rees M, Rofe A, Kuchel T, et al., 'Comparison of in vivo and in vitro methodologies for the assessment of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 69 961-966 (2007)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2007.05.018
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 70
2007 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, 'Explosives: Fate, dynamics, and ecological impact in terrestrial and marine environments', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 191, 191 163-215 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/978-0-387-69163-3_6
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 33
2007 Chen Z, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Speciation of vanadium by anion-exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and con. rmation of vanadium complex formation using electrospray mass spectrometry', JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL ATOMIC SPECTROMETRY, 22 811-816 (2007)
DOI 10.1039/b705481e
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Mahmud Rahman
2007 Kim K-W, Naidu R, 'KoSSGE 10th Anniversary International Symposium on Soil and Groundwater Environment - Preface', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 29 257-258 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-007-9102-4
2006 Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, 'Distribution and nature of arsenic along former railway corridors of South Australia', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 363 175-182 (2006)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2005.05.039
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
2006 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Rees M, Rofe A, Kuchel T, et al., 'In vivo assessment of arsenic bioavailability in rice and its significance for human health risk assessment', ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES, 114 1826-1831 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 132Web of Science - 125
2006 Sun Y, Xie ZM, Li J, Xu JM, Chen ZL, Naidu R, 'Assessment of toxicity of heavy metal contaminated soils by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 28 73-78 (2006)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-005-9014-0
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2006 Ying Z, Naidu R, Crawford CR, 'Dual energy computed tomography for explosive detection', JOURNAL OF X-RAY SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 14 235-256 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 69
2006 Huq SMI, Joardar JC, Parvin S, Correll R, Naidu R, 'Arsenic contamination in food-chain: Transfer of arsenic into food materials through groundwater irrigation', JOURNAL OF HEALTH POPULATION AND NUTRITION, 24 305-316 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 55
2006 Chen Z, Akter KF, Mahmudur M, Rahman, Naidu R, 'Speciation of arsenic by ion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using ammonium eluents', JOURNAL OF SEPARATION SCIENCE, 29 2671-2676 (2006)
DOI 10.1002/jssc.200500304
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Zuliang Chen
2005 Akter KF, Chen Z, Smith L, Davey D, Naidu R, 'Speciation of arsenic in ground water samples: A comparative study of CE-UV HG-AAS and LC-ICP-MS', TALANTA, 68 406-415 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.talanta.2005.09.011
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2005 Sethunathan N, Megharaj M, Smith L, Kamaludeen SPB, Avudainayagam S, Naidu R, 'Microbial role in the failure of natural attenuation of chromium(VI) in long-term tannery waste contaminated soil', AGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT, 105 657-661 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.agee.2004.08.008
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2005 Akter KF, Owens G, Davey DE, Naidu R, 'Arsenic speciation and toxicity in biological systems', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 184, 184 97-149 (2005)
DOI 10.1007/0-387-27565-7_3
Citations Scopus - 91Web of Science - 80
2005 Li J, Xie ZM, Zhu YG, Naidu R, 'Risk assessment of heavy metal contaminated soil in the vicinity of a lead/zinc mine', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, 17 881-885 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 28
2004 Singh N, Megharaj M, Gates WP, Churchman J, Kookana RS, Naidu R, Sethunathan N, 'Sorption-desorption of fenamiphos in surfactant-modified clays', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 72 276-282 (2004)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-003-8944-4
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2004 Sethunathan N, Megharaj M, Chen ZL, Williams BD, Lewis G, Naidu R, 'Algal degradation of a known endocrine disrupting insecticide, alpha-endosulfan, and its metabolite, endosulfan sulfate, in liquid medium and soil', JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 52 3030-3035 (2004)
DOI 10.1021/jf035173x
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2004 Krishnamurti GSR, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of cadmium-organic complexes to soil alga - An exception to the free ion model', JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 52 3894-3899 (2004)
DOI 10.1021/jf035501t
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2004 Chen ZL, Naidu R, 'On-column complexation capillary electrophoretic separation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ using 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid coupled with large-volume sample stacking', JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY A, 1023 151-157 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.chroma.2003.10.002
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2004 Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, Juhasz AL, 'Desorption of DDT from a contaminated soil using cosolvent and surfactant washing in batch experiments', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 151 71-86 (2004)
DOI 10.1023/B:WATE.0000009899.03630.78
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
2004 Hettipathirana TD, Grey NA, Naidu R, 'Analysis of silicates using wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry for major elements: Effects of loss elimination and catch-weights', X-RAY SPECTROMETRY, 33 117-123 (2004)
DOI 10.1002/xrs.709
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
2004 Bhattacharya P, Welch AH, Ahmed KM, Jacks G, Naidu R, 'Arsenic in groundwater of sedimentary aquifers', APPLIED GEOCHEMISTRY, 19 163-167 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2003.09.004
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 57
2004 Chen ZL, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Determination of tetrachloroethene, trichloroethylene, and their metabolites at trace levels in ground waters by on-line solid phase extraction/HPLC', JOURNAL OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY & RELATED TECHNOLOGIES, 27 885-896 (2004)
DOI 10.1081/JLC-120029705
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2004 Kantachote D, Singleton I, Naidu R, McClure N, Megharaj M, 'Sodium application enhances DDT transformation in a long-term contaminated soil', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 154 115-125 (2004)
DOI 10.1023/B:WATE.0000022934.70231.1a
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2004 Kantachote D, Naidu R, Williams B, McClure N, Megharaj M, Singleton I, 'Bioremediation of DDT-contaminated soil: Enhancement by seaweed addition', JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 79 632-638 (2004)
DOI 10.1002/jctb.1032
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2004 Edvantoro BB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Merrington G, Singleton I, 'Microbial formation of volatile arsenic in cattle dip site soils contaminated with arsenic and DDT', APPLIED SOIL ECOLOGY, 25 207-217 (2004)
DOI 10.1016/j.apsoil.2003.09.006
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Baskaran S, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Contrasting behaviour of chlorpyrifos and its primary metabolite, TCP (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol), with depth in soil profiles', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 41 749-760 (2003)
DOI 10.1071/SR02062
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 36
2003 Scott TL, Janusz A, Perkins MV, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Kirkbride KP, 'Effect of amphetamine precursors and by-products on soil enzymes of two urban soils', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 70 824-831 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-003-0056-7
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, Zhu YG, Wang LS, Jiang JY, Cao ZH, 'Toxicity issues associated with geogenic arsenic in the groundwater-soil-plant-human continuum', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 71 1100-1107 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-003-0231-x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
2003 Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Solid-solution equilibria of cadmium in soils', GEODERMA, 113 17-30 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0016-7061(02)00313-0
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 58
2003 Singh N, Megharaj M, Gates WP, Churchman GJ, Anderson J, Kookana RS, et al., 'Bioavailability of an organophosphorus pesticide, fenamiphos, sorbed on an organo clay', JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 51 2653-2658 (2003)
DOI 10.1021/jf025978p
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Wong MH, Bridges J, Bridges O, Cai ZW, Chan KKK, Dickinson NM, et al., 'Special issue: Environmental and public health management - Preface', CHEMOSPHERE, 52 1345-1346 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0045-6535(03)00542-3
2003 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, 'Development of a two-phase cosolvent washing-fungal biosorption process for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 146 111-126 (2003)
DOI 10.1023/A:1023951420733
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2003 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, 'In situ remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using a two-phase cosolvent flushing-fungal biosorption process', WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 147 263-274 (2003)
DOI 10.1023/A:1024593815925
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2003 Edvantoro BB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Singleton I, 'Changes in microbial properties associated with long-term arsenic and DDT contaminated soils at disused cattle dip sites', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 55 344-351 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0147-6513(02)00092-1
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Kamaludeen SPB, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Singleton I, Juhasz AL, Hawke BG, Sethunathan N, 'Microbial activity and phospholipid fatty acid pattern in long-term tannery waste-contaminated soil', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 56 302-310 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S0147-6513(02)00075-1
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Megharaj M, Singh N, Kookana RS, Naidu R, Sethunathan N, 'Hydrolysis of fenamiphos and its oxidation products by a soil bacterium in pure culture, soil and water', APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 61 252-256 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00253-002-1206-2
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Bolan NS, Adriano DC, Naidu R, 'Role of phosphorus in (im)mobilization and bioavailability of heavy metals in the soil-plant system', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 177, 177 1-44 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/0-387-21725-8_1
Citations Scopus - 82Web of Science - 64
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2003 Avudainayagam S, Megharaj A, Owens G, Kookana RS, Chittleborough D, Naidu R, 'Chemistry of chromium in soils with emphasis on tannery waste sites', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 178, 178 53-91 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/0-387-21728-2_3
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Chen ZL, Naidu R, 'Separation of sulfur species in water by co-electroosmotic capillary electrophoresis with direct and indirect UV detection', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 83 749-759 (2003)
DOI 10.1080/030731031000114938
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2003 Megharaj M, Avudainayagam S, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of hexavalent chromium and its reduction by bacteria isolated from soil contaminated with tannery waste', CURRENT MICROBIOLOGY, 47 51-54 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00284-002-3889-0
Citations Scopus - 216Web of Science - 188
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Kanitsar K, Chen ZL, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Influence of organic modifiers on the separation of carboxylic acids using Co-EOF capillary electrophoresis', JOURNAL OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY & RELATED TECHNOLOGIES, 26 455-468 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/JLC-120017182
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2003 Vig K, Megharaj M, Sethunathan N, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability and toxicity of cadmium to microorganisms and their activities in soil: a review', ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, 8 121-135 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/S1093-0191(02)00135-1
Citations Scopus - 236Web of Science - 219
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2003 Smith E, Smith J, Smith L, Biswas T, Correll R, Naidu R, 'Arsenic in Australian environment: An overview', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 38 223-239 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/ESE-120016891
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 40
2003 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, 'Remediation of persistent organic pollutants using a novel two-phase soil washing biosorption process', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution: Focus, 3 233-242 (2003)

A two-phase soil washing biosorption process was developed for the remediation of p, p&apos;-DDT-contaminated soil. The process involved desorption of contaminants from soil using... [more]

A two-phase soil washing biosorption process was developed for the remediation of p, p'-DDT-contaminated soil. The process involved desorption of contaminants from soil using dilute primary alcohols (40% 1-propanol) followed by contaminant removal from cosolvent solutions using fungal biosorption. Bench scale remediation studies were preformed to simulate ex situ (recycling experiment) or in situ (soil column study) treatment strategies. Both systems were effective at cleaning the soil to below Australian regulatory p, p'-DDT levels. After 50-80 hours of soil washing, over 93% of p, p'-DDT was removed from the soil (990 mg kg -1 to < 65 mg kg -1 ) using either of these methods. p,p'-DDT was removed from the cosolvent phase by sorption onto the fungal biomass. This resulted in only low levels of p, p'-DDT remaining in the cosolvent solution ( < 1.5 mg 1 -1 ). The application of both treatment strategies resulted in the rapid clean up of p, p' -DDT-contaminated soil and the potential to recycle cosolvent solutions. The ability to recycle cosolvent solutions provides a mechanism for cost reductions of the remediation strategy. © 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

DOI 10.1023/A:1023954406995
Citations Scopus - 3
2003 Chen ZL, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Enhanced selectivity and sensitivity for inorganic anions using an ion-pairing reagent and sample stacking in capillary zone electrophoresis with direct UV detection', ANALYTICAL AND BIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 375 182-187 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00216-002-1621-3
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2003 Chen ZL, Lin JM, Naidu R, 'Separation of arsenic species by capillary electrophoresis with sample-stacking techniques', ANALYTICAL AND BIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 375 679-684 (2003)
DOI 10.1007/s00216-003-1777-5
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2003 Kantachote D, Singleton I, McClure N, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Harch BD, 'DDT resistance and transformation by different microbial strains isolated from DDT-contaminated soils and compost materials', COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION, 11 300-310 (2003)
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2002 Sethunathan N, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Singh N, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Persistence of endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate in soil as affected by moisture regime and organic matter addition', BULLETIN OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 68 725-731 (2002)
DOI 10.1007/s00128-001-0314-5
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2002 Chen ZL, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Comparison of adsorbents for on-line solid-phase extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons before liquid chromatography with UV detection', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 56 105-108 (2002)
DOI 10.1007/BF02490254
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Megh Mallavarapu
2002 Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Solid-solution speciation and phytoavailability of copper and zinc in soils', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 36 2645-2651 (2002)
DOI 10.1021/es001601t
Citations Scopus - 111Web of Science - 91
2002 Chen ZL, Naidu R, 'On-column complexation of metal ions using 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and separation of their anionic complexes by capillary electrophoresis with direct UV detection', JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY A, 966 245-251 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0021-9673(02)00741-0
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2002 Smith E, Naidu R, Alston AM, 'Chemistry of inorganic arsenic in soils: II. Effect of phosphorus, sodium, and calcium on arsenic sorption', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 31 557-563 (2002)
Citations Scopus - 198Web of Science - 193
2002 Chen ZL, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'On-line solid phase extraction of pesticide residues in natural water, coupled with liquid chromatography and UV detection, using various sorbents', JOURNAL OF LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY & RELATED TECHNOLOGIES, 25 1779-1790 (2002)
DOI 10.1081/JLC-120005873
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2002 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Smith J, Naidu R, 'Biosorption of organochlorine pesticides using fungal biomass', JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MICROBIOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY, 29 163-169 (2002)
DOI 10.1038/sj.jim.7000280
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
2002 Chen ZL, Naidu R, 'On-column complexation and simultaneous separation of vanadium(IV) and vanadium(V) by capillary electrophoresis with direct UV detection', ANALYTICAL AND BIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 374 520-525 (2002)
DOI 10.1007/s00216-002-1456-y
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2001 Avudainayagam S, Naidu R, Kookana RS, Alston AM, McClure S, Smith LH, 'Effects of electrolyte composition on chromium desorption in soils contaminated by tannery waste', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 39 1077-1089 (2001)
DOI 10.1071/SR00085
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11
2001 Chen ZL, Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Separation of phenolic acids in soil and plant tissue extracts by co-electroosmotic capillary electrophoresis with direct UV detection', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 53 179-184 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2001 Naidu R, Chen ZL, 'Application of co-electroosmotic capillary electrophoresis for the determination of inorganic anions and carboxylic acids in soil and plant extract with direct UV detection', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 54 495-500 (2001)
DOI 10.1007/BF02491206
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2001 Chen ZL, Naidu R, Subramanian A, 'Separation of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) by capillary electrophoresis using 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as a pre-column complexation agent', JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY A, 927 219-227 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0021-9673(01)01116-5
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 46
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2001 Harter RD, Naidu R, 'An assessment of environmental and solution parameter impact on trace-metal sorption by soils', SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL, 65 597-612 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 162Web of Science - 146
2001 Kantachote D, Naidu R, Singleton I, McClure N, Harch BD, 'Resistance of microbial populations in DDT-contaminated and uncontaminated soils', APPLIED SOIL ECOLOGY, 16 85-90 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0929-1393(00)00058-5
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
2000 Krishnamurti GSR, Smith LH, Naidu R, 'Method for assessing plant-available cadmium in soils', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 38 823-836 (2000)
DOI 10.1071/SR99122
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
2000 Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, 'Speciation and phytoavailability of cadmium in selected surface soils of South Australia', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 38 991-1004 (2000)
DOI 10.1071/SR99129
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 46
2000 Chen ZL, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Determination of sulfonylurea herbicides in soil extracts by solid-phase extraction and capillary zone electrophoresis', CHROMATOGRAPHIA, 52 142-146 (2000)
DOI 10.1007/BF02490444
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Zuliang Chen
2000 Megharaj M, Singleton I, McClure NC, Naidu R, 'Influence of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination on microalgae and microbial activities in a long-term contaminated soil', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, 38 439-445 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 72
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2000 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, 'Extraction and recovery of organochlorine pesticides from fungal mycelia', JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS, 39 149-158 (2000)
DOI 10.1016/S0167-7012(99)00111-6
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
2000 Megharaj M, Kantachote D, Singleton I, Naidu R, 'Effects of long-term contamination of DDT on soil microflora with special reference to soil algae and algal transformation of DDT', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 109 35-42 (2000)
DOI 10.1016/S0269-7491(99)00231-6
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 69
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2000 Naidu R, Smith J, McLaren RG, Stevens DP, Sumner ME, Jackson PE, 'Application of capillary electrophoresis to anion speciation in soil water extracts: II. Arsenic', SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL, 64 122-128 (2000)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
2000 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a review of the microbial degradation of benzo[a]pyrene', INTERNATIONAL BIODETERIORATION & BIODEGRADATION, 45 57-88 (2000)
DOI 10.1016/S0964-8305(00)00052-4
Citations Scopus - 609Web of Science - 538
2000 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, 'Enrichment and isolation of non-specific aromatic degraders from unique uncontaminated (plant and faecal material) sources and contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY, 89 642-650 (2000)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.2000.01161.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
1999 Oliver DP, Tiller KG, Alston AM, Naidu R, Cozens GD, 'A comparison of three soil tests for assessing Cd accumulation in wheat grain', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 37 1123-1138 (1999)
DOI 10.1071/SR99017
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
1999 Oliver DP, McLaughlin MJ, Naidu R, Smith LH, Maynard EJ, Calder IC, 'Measuring Pb bioavailability from household dusts using an in vitro model', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 33 4434-4439 (1999)
DOI 10.1021/es981212n
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 22
1999 Baskaran S, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Degradation of bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos and imidacloprid in soil and bedding materials at termiticidal application rates', PESTICIDE SCIENCE, 55 1222-1228 (1999)
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1096-9063(199912)55:12&lt;1222::AID-PS83&gt;3.0.CO;2-7
Citations Scopus - 87Web of Science - 66
1999 Megharaj M, Singleton I, Kookana R, Naidu R, 'Persistence and effects of fenamiphos on native algal populations and enzymatic activities in soil', SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, 31 1549-1553 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/S0038-0717(99)00078-4
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
1999 Naidu R, Haynes RJ, 'Chemical composition of saturation paste extracts of a Fijian Oxisol after liming and repeated wetting and drying', TROPICAL AGRICULTURE, 76 29-35 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
1999 Smith E, Naidu R, Alston AM, 'Chemistry of arsenic in soils: I. Sorption of arsenate and arsenite by four Australian soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 28 1719-1726 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 137Web of Science - 132
1999 Juhasz AL, Naidu R, 'Apparent degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) by a Cladosporium sp.', BIOTECHNOLOGY LETTERS, 21 991-995 (1999)
DOI 10.1023/A:1005694416926
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
1999 Bolan NS, Naidu R, Khan MAR, Tillman RW, Syers JK, 'The effects of anion sorption on sorption and leaching of cadmium', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 37 445-460 (1999)
DOI 10.1071/S97046
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
1999 Bolan NS, Naidu R, Syers JK, Tillman RW, 'Surface charge and solute interactions in soils', ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY, VOL 67, 67 87-140 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/S0065-2113(08)60514-3
Citations Scopus - 110Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
1998 Kookana RS, Baskaran S, Naidu R, 'Pesticide fate and behaviour in Australian soils in relation to contamination and management of soil and water: a review', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 36 715-764 (1998)
DOI 10.1071/S97109
Citations Scopus - 109Web of Science - 106
1998 Hamon RE, McLaughlin MJ, Naidu R, Correll R, 'Long-term changes in cadmium bioavailability in soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 32 3699-3703 (1998)
DOI 10.1021/es980198b
Citations Scopus - 79Web of Science - 74
1998 Gupta VVSR, Rogers S, Naidu R, 'Effects of secondary treated sewage effluent application on the populations of microfauna in a hardwood plantation soil: Bolivar HIAT trial', GEODERMA, 84 249-263 (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0016-7061(97)00132-8
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
1998 McLaren RG, Naidu R, Smith J, Tiller KG, 'Fractionation and distribution of arsenic in soils contaminated by cattle dip', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 27 348-354 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 105Web of Science - 99
1998 Naidu R, Sumner ME, Harter RD, 'Sorption of heavy metals in strongly weathered soils: an overview', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 20 5-9 (1998)
DOI 10.1023/A:1006519009465
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 74
1998 Naidu R, Harter RD, 'Effect of different organic ligands on cadmium sorption by and extractability from soils', SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL, 62 644-650 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 182Web of Science - 165
1998 Haynes RJ, Naidu R, 'Influence of lime, fertilizer and manure applications on soil organic matter content and soil physical conditions: a review', NUTRIENT CYCLING IN AGROECOSYSTEMS, 51 123-137 (1998)
DOI 10.1023/A:1009738307837
Citations Scopus - 515Web of Science - 483
1998 Naidu R, 'Preface', Geoderma, 84 1-2 (1998)
Citations Scopus - 1
1997 Fotovat A, Naidu R, Sumner ME, 'Water:Soil ratio influences aqueous phase chemistry of indigenous copper and zinc in soils', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 35 687-709 (1997)
DOI 10.1071/S96086
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
1997 Fotovat A, Naidu R, 'Ion exchange resin and MINTEQA2 speciation of Zn and Cu in alkaline sodic and acidic soil extracts', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 35 711-726 (1997)
DOI 10.1071/S96079
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 19
1997 Hamon R, Wundke J, McLaughlin M, Naidu R, 'Availability of zinc and cadmium to different plant species', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 35 1267-1277 (1997)
DOI 10.1071/S97052
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 61
1997 Naidu R, Morrison RJ, Janik L, Asghar M, 'Clay mineralogy and surface charge characteristics of basaltic soils from Western Samoa', CLAY MINERALS, 32 545-556 (1997)
DOI 10.1180/claymin.1997.032.4.05
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
1997 Baskaran S, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Determination of the insecticide imidacloprid in water and soil using high-performance liquid chromatography', JOURNAL OF CHROMATOGRAPHY A, 787 271-275 (1997)
DOI 10.1016/S0021-9673(97)00652-3
Citations Scopus - 86Web of Science - 86
1997 Morrison RJ, Gangaiya P, Naqasima MR, Naidu R, 'Trace metal studies in the Great Astrolabe Lagoon, Fiji, a pristine marine environment', MARINE POLLUTION BULLETIN, 34 353-356 (1997)
DOI 10.1016/S0025-326X(96)00147-6
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
1997 Naidu R, Kookana RS, Sumner ME, Harter RD, Tiller KG, 'Cadmium sorption and transport in variable charge soils: A review', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 26 602-617 (1997)
Citations Scopus - 195Web of Science - 178
1996 Naidu R, McClure S, McKenzie NJ, Fitzpatrick RW, 'Soil solution composition and aggregate stability changes caused by long-term farming at four contrasting sites in south Australia', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 34 511-527 (1996)
DOI 10.1071/SR9960511
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
1996 Fotovat A, Smith L, Naidu R, Oades JM, 'Analysis of indigenous zinc in alkaline sodic soil solutions by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry', COMMUNICATIONS IN SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT ANALYSIS, 27 2997-3012 (1996)
DOI 10.1080/00103629609369757
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
1996 McLaughlin MJ, Tiller KG, Naidu R, Stevens DP, 'Review: The behaviour and environmental impact of contaminants in fertilizers', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 34 1-54 (1996)
DOI 10.1071/SR9960001
Citations Scopus - 247Web of Science - 225
1994 NAIDU R, MITCHELL BD, MACKENZIE RC, 'EFFECT OF DRAINAGE ON CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME SOILS OF THE ORKNEY ISLANDS', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 32 519-534 (1994)
DOI 10.1071/SR9940519
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
1994 KOOKANA RS, NAIDU R, TILLER KG, 'SORPTION NONEQUILIBRIUM DURING CADMIUM TRANSPORT THROUGH SOILS', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 32 635-651 (1994)
DOI 10.1071/SR9940635
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 42
1994 FITZPATRICK RW, BOUCHER SC, NAIDU R, FRITSCH E, 'ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF SOIL SODICITY', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 32 1069-1093 (1994)
DOI 10.1071/SR9941069
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
1994 NAIDU R, BOLAN NS, KOOKANA RS, TILLER KG, 'IONIC-STRENGTH AND PH EFFECTS ON THE SORPTION OF CADMIUM AND THE SURFACE-CHARGE OF SOILS', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE, 45 419-429 (1994)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2389.1994.tb00527.x
Citations Scopus - 327Web of Science - 281
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
1993 NAIDU R, RENGASAMY P, 'ION INTERACTIONS AND CONSTRAINTS TO PLANT NUTRITION IN AUSTRALIAN SODIC SOILS', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 31 801-819 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/SR9930801
Citations Scopus - 123Web of Science - 108
1993 NAIDU R, MERRY RH, CHURCHMAN GJ, WRIGHT MJ, MURRAY RS, FITZPATRICK RW, ZARCINAS BA, 'SODICITY IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA - A REVIEW', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 31 911-929 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/SR9930911
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
1993 NAIDU R, SUMNER ME, RENGASAMY P, 'NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SODIC SOILS - SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF SOIL RESEARCH, 31 949-956 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/SR9930949
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
1993 NAIDU R, WILLIAMSON DR, FITZPATRICK RW, HOLLINGSWORTH IO, 'EFFECT OF LANDUSE ON THE COMPOSITION OF THROUGHFLOW WATER IMMEDIATELY ABOVE CLAYEY-B HORIZONS IN THE WARREN CATCHMENT, SOUTH-AUSTRALIA', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL AGRICULTURE, 33 239-244 (1993)
DOI 10.1071/EA9930239
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 16
1993 NAIDU R, WILLIAMSON DR, FITZPATRICK RW, HOLLINGSWORTH IO, 'EFFECT OF LANDUSE ON THE COMPOSITION OF THROUGHFLOW WATER IMMEDIATELY ABOVE CLAYEY-B HORIZONS IN THE WARREN CATCHMENT, SOUTH-AUSTRALIA (VOL 33, PG 239, 1993)', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL AGRICULTURE, 33 U259-U259 (1993)
1992 Fitzpatrick RW, Naidu R, Self PG, 'Iron deposits and microorganisms in saline sulfidic soils with altered soil water regimes in South Australia', Catena Supplement, 21 263-286 (1992)

The precipitates found in oxidized surface layers of waterlogged Mollic Natraqualfs during the wet winter months and the thin crusts formed on the soil surface in the dry summer m... [more]

The precipitates found in oxidized surface layers of waterlogged Mollic Natraqualfs during the wet winter months and the thin crusts formed on the soil surface in the dry summer months were investigated in catchments subject to rising saline watertables folllowing partial deforestation in the Mount Lofty Ranges in South Australia. The gelatinous iron-rich precipitates found in the oxidized surface layers of these soils results from rapid bacterial and chemical oxidation of the Fe 2+ in the seepage waters formed within these soils. Powder X-ray diffraction, thermal and thermogravimetric analyses, and microscopy studies showed the presence of poorly-crystalline, hydrous iron oxide minerals (mainly ferrihydrite with traces of goethite). Ferrihydrite together with poorly crystalline goethite and traces of a similar pooly crystalline oxyhydroxysulfate mineral was identified in the thin reddish-brown crusts that form in summer around margins of the saline seep areas. -from Authors

Citations Scopus - 18
1992 Naidu R, Hollingsworth I, Fitzpatrick RW, 'Warren Reservoir catchment studies: chemistry of throughflow water immediately above sodic B horizons', Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, 32 992 (1992)
DOI 10.1071/EA9920992z
1992 NAIDU R, SYERS JK, 'INFLUENCE OF SUGARCANE MILLMUD, LIME, AND PHOSPHORUS, ON SOIL CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES AND THE GROWTH OF LEUCAENA-LEUCOCEPHALA IN AN OXISOL FROM FIJI', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 41 65-70 (1992)
DOI 10.1016/0960-8524(92)90100-C
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
1991 NAIDU R, SYERS JK, TILLMAN RW, KIRKMAN JH, 'ASSESSMENT OF PLANT-AVAILABLE PHOSPHATE IN LIMED, ACID SOILS USING SEVERAL SOIL-TESTING PROCEDURES', FERTILIZER RESEARCH, 30 47-53 (1991)
DOI 10.1007/BF01048826
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
1991 CURTIN D, NAIDU R, SYERS JK, 'CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME STRONGLY WEATHERED FIJIAN SOILS - FERTILITY IMPLICATIONS', GEODERMA, 48 363-372 (1991)
DOI 10.1016/0016-7061(91)90054-W
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
1990 NAIDU R, SYERS JK, TILLMAN RW, KIRKMAN JH, 'EFFECT OF LIMING AND ADDED PHOSPHATE ON CHARGE CHARACTERISTICS OF ACID SOILS', JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE, 41 157-164 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 52Web of Science - 48
1990 NAIDU R, SYERS JK, TILLMAN RW, KIRKMAN JH, 'EFFECT OF LIMING ON PHOSPHATE SORPTION BY ACID SOILS', JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE, 41 165-175 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 36
1990 NAIDU R, TILLMAN RW, SYERS JK, KIRKMAN JH, 'LIME-ALUMINUM-PHOSPHORUS INTERACTIONS AND THE GROWTH OF LEUCAENA-LEUCOCEPHALA .1. PLANT-GROWTH STUDIES', PLANT AND SOIL, 126 1-8 (1990)
DOI 10.1007/BF00041363
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
1990 NAIDU R, TILLMAN RW, SYERS JK, KIRKMAN JH, 'LIME-ALUMINUM-PHOSPHORUS INTERACTIONS AND THE GROWTH OF LEUCAENA-LEUCOCEPHALA .2. CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION', PLANT AND SOIL, 126 9-17 (1990)
DOI 10.1007/BF00041364
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
1988 NAIDU R, SYERS JK, TILLMAN RW, LEE R, KIRKMAN JH, 'EXTRACTION OF ALUMINUM FROM ACID, STRONGLY WEATHERED FIJIAN SOILS USING M KCL - A COMPARISON OF METHODS OF EXTRACTION AND DETERMINATION', JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, 45 291-299 (1988)
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.2740450402
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
1987 Naidu R, Tillman RW, Syers JK, Kirkman JH, 'Effect of liming on phosphate extracted by two soil-testing procedures', Fertilizer Research, 14 143-152 (1987)

Lime and phosphate (P) additions had a variable effect on Olsen- and Mehlich-extractable P in 4 acid soils from Fiji. Olsen-extractable P was at a minimum between pH values of 5.5... [more]

Lime and phosphate (P) additions had a variable effect on Olsen- and Mehlich-extractable P in 4 acid soils from Fiji. Olsen-extractable P was at a minimum between pH values of 5.5-6.0, on either side of which it increased, particularly in soils which received large amounts of added P. The initial decrease in Olsen-extractable P is attributed to the removal of P from solution by precipitation during the Olsen extraction. The increase at higher pH values is thought to be due to the slow release of P from precipitated Ca-P compounds. There was a consistent decrease in Mehlich-extractable P with increasing soil pH. When the pH of the Mehlich reagent was kept constant, using an autotitrator, there was no decrease in Mehlich-extractable P, suggesting that in the absence of pH control the decrease in extractable P was largely due to the neutralizing effect of lime on the Mehlich reagent. © 1987 Martinus Nijhoff Publishers.

DOI 10.1007/BF01066607
Citations Scopus - 8
1987 NAIDU R, KIRKMAN JH, MORRISON RJ, 'MINERALOGY OF SOILS FROM BASALTIC ASH, TAVEUNI, FIJI', GEODERMA, 39 181-192 (1987)
DOI 10.1016/0016-7061(87)90001-2
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Show 594 more journal articles

Conference (65 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Vilma F, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'ACROSS International Symposium on Advances in Separation Sciences (ASASS 2)' (2016)
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan
2016 Bhattacharya P, Vahter M, Jarsjö J, Kumpiene J, Ahmad A, Sparrenbom C, et al., 'Editors¿ foreword', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016)
2016 Faustorilla MV, Dharmarajan R, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous samples through the improvised GC-FID technique' (2016)
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Mallavarapu M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Effect of iron chloride precursor on synthesis of stable iron nanoparticles for chromium remediation' (2016)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Faustorilla V, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated aqueous samples through an improvised GC-FID technique' (2016)
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan
2016 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Shahid M, et al., 'Speciation and health risk assessment of arsenic in groundwater of Punjab, Pakistan', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1201/b20466-215
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Peng C, Xia Q, Muthusamy S, Lal V, Ng J, Lamb D, et al., 'Metal interaction on arsenic toxicity in both in vivo and in vitro biological systems including human cells' (2016)
DOI 10.1201/b20466-159
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kumar M, Ramanathan AL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Bhattacharya P, 'Arsenic and trace elements in groundwater, vegetables and selected food grains from middle gangetic plain¿human health perspective', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1201/b20466-154
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Nuruzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Can irrigation practice for rice cultivation reduce the risk of arsenic to human?', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, London. Arsenic bioaccumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many parts of the world. Rice is one o... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Arsenic bioaccumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many parts of the world. Rice is one of the crops affected by arsenic due to its semiaquatic nature. A field study was conducted to investigate the effect of variety and water management on the bioaccumulation of arsenic within the rice plants in different rice cultivars. Ten of the most popularly grown BRRI, BINA and local rice cultivars were screened for susceptibility to arsenic under varying irrigation options. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with conventional irrigation practice. Results showed that appropriate water management practice and suitable variety resulted in a reduction of grain arsenic level around 39% in addition to increase grain yield around 38%.

Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2016 Faustorilla M, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Solid phase extraction and fractionation of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by GC-MSD/FID techniques', Journal of Chromatography and Separation Techniques (2016)
DOI 10.4172/2157-7064.C1.020
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2015 Ganesh VK, Subashchandrabose SR, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Microalgal biomass production and piggery wastewater remediation ¿ Using the soil isolates of Chlamydomonas sp. and Desmodesmus sp.' (2015)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Mallavarapu M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Algal Biomass After Bioremediation ¿ An Economical Source for Biosynthesis of Iron Nanoparticles' (2015)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Subashchandrabose SR, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Computational analyses on the interaction of mononitrophenols on Rhodococcus wratislaviensis 4-NP monooxygenase' (2015)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Krishnan K, Megharaj M, Mayilswami S, Sivaram AK, Panneerselvan L, Naidu R, 'Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) And Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA): Ecotoxicity And Environmental Concerns.' (2015)
Co-authors Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Kannan Krishnan
2015 Palanisami T, Ramadass K, Smith E, Mallavarapu M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Challenges in Real Field Implementation of Risk Based Land Management Approach: a Case Study Involving Weathered Hydrocarbons', Clean up 2015: 6th International Contmainated Site Remediation Conference: Proceedings (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Krishnan K, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Differential Gene Expression Analysis in Eisenia fetida chronically exposed To Benzo (A) Pyrene' (2015)
Co-authors Kannan Krishnan
2015 Arias V, Sarkar B, Naidu R, 'Adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (pfos) and perfluorooctanoic acid (pfoa) by an organically modified palygorskite', Proceedings: 6th International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference. CleanUp 2015 (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Victor Arias
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Kuchel T, Wijayawardena AMA, 'Influence of soil ageing on lead bioavailability', International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference (Cleanup 2015) (2015)
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Thava Palanisami, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2015 Naidu R, Jit J, Arias V, Kennedy B, 'Emerging contaminant uncertainties and policy: The chicken/egg conundrum' (2015)
Co-authors Victor Arias
2015 Naidu R, Arias V, Jit J, 'Emerging Contaminants in the environment: Risk-based analysis for better management' (2015)
Co-authors Victor Arias
2015 Faustorilla V, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Solid phase extraction and fractionation of total petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil by GC-MSD technique' (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2015 Faustorilla V, Nanayakkara A, Chen Z, Dharmarajan R, Naidu R, 'Refined LVI-PTV-GC-MS for analysis of low level polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated groundwater and soil samples' (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Raja Dharmarajan, Zuliang Chen
2015 Palanisami T, Mallavarapu M, Naidu RAVI, 'Contaminants of emerging concern in the coastal zone: the need for new monitoring,assessment and management strategies' (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Wang L, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'ANALYTE ION DETECTION METHOD AND DEVICE (ProbeCARE TM )' (2015)
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang
2015 Palanisami T, Ramadass K, Smith E, Mallavarapu M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Challenges in Real Field Implementation of Risk Based Land Management Approach: a Case Study Involving Weathered Hydrocarbons', Clean up 2015: 6th International Contmainated Site Remediation Conference: Proceedings (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Chuasavathi T, Bolan NS, Naidu R, Seshadri B, 'Biosolids-based Co-composts reduce the bioavailability of heavy metals', Acta Horticulturae (2014)

Biosolid samples from the Bolivar Wastewater Treatment Plant (South Australia) were mixed with lime (1, 3 and 5%; w/w basis), red mud (Comalco Alumina Refinery, Queensland, Austra... [more]

Biosolid samples from the Bolivar Wastewater Treatment Plant (South Australia) were mixed with lime (1, 3 and 5%; w/w basis), red mud (Comalco Alumina Refinery, Queensland, Australia), fly ash (Alinta Energy, South Australia, Australia) and bentonite (IPOH Pacific Ltd., Queensland, Australia) (5, 10 and 20%; w/w basis). They were incubated under aerobic conditions at room temperature for seven months so that the effects of various additives on transformation of heavy metals in biosolids could be examined. The specific objectives were to study, (i) the redistribution of metals in the biosolids; and (ii) the mobilization of metals and their subsequent release to pore water. Both the NH 4 NO 3 extractable concentration of Cd (Cd NN ), Cu (Cu NN ) and Pb (Pb NN ) from biosolids and the concentration of these metals in pore water were investigated. Co-composting biosolids using alkaline materials and clay mineral have been shown to immobilize metals. The pH of both biosolids and pore water increased while dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased on co-composting biosolids with inorganic amendments. The addition of red mud and lime resulted in the highest pH increase, and red mud proved to be most efficient in the sorption of DOC, Cd, Cu and Pb in comparison to lime, coal fly ash, and bentonite. The NH 4 NO 3 extractable Cd (Cd NN ), Pb (Pb NN ) and Cu (Cu NN ) from biosolids and these metals' total concentration in pore water were lower in all amendments than biosolids alone. The effect of amendments on immobilizing biosolids-derived Cd, Pb and Cu varied according to both the nature and level of amendments being added. While red mud and lime were most effective in the immobilization of Cd and Pb in the biosolids and their subsequent release to pore water, bentonite was most effective in immobilizing Cu in the biosolids.

Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Ganeshkumar V, Subashchandrabose SR, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Nutrient removal and lipid accumulation by soil micro alga Chlorella sp. MM3 grown on piggery and winery wastewater mixture' (2014)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Fang C, Wang Z, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Self-assembling of nanocubes and nanoparticles', 2014 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY (ICONN) (2014)
Co-authors Cheng Fang, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Kader M, Lamb DT, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Does cadmium influence arsenic phytotoxicity?', One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (2014)

Arsenic (As) and Cadmium (Cd) phytotoxicity was studied individually and as a mixture in solution as well as in soil. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growt... [more]

Arsenic (As) and Cadmium (Cd) phytotoxicity was studied individually and as a mixture in solution as well as in soil. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth for root elongation to pot study was significantly varied though having significant correlation. The interaction of As and Cd was antagonistic in solution. In addition, As toxicity was significantly negatively affected in soil. The reduced binding ability of acidic soils for Cd may have impacted As phytotoxicity as the binding constant is 3-4 times less in alkaline soil. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Lamb DT, Kader M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic phytotoxicity in Australian soils', One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (2014)

Arsenic phytotoxicity was studied using two tests in a range of soils. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth (EC 50 ) for the 4 week growth study was 13 t... [more]

Arsenic phytotoxicity was studied using two tests in a range of soils. The effective concentrations causing a 50% reduction in growth (EC 50 ) for the 4 week growth study was 13 to 235 mg/kg compared to 42 to 452 mg/kg using root elongation. Phytotoxicity thresholds for both tests were strongly correlated to each other. The EC 50 values were related strongly to soil pH and the Freundlich partitioning (K f ) constants. The EC 50 values were most consistently related to K f values. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2013 Wijayawardena AMA, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability and Toxicity of Lead to Earthworms in Three Soils', CleanUp 2013: 5th International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference (2013)
Co-authors Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Arias V, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Assessment of clay minerals based materials for AFFF removal', ICYRAM 2012 (2012)
Co-authors Victor Arias, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Gabesh VK, Subashchandrabose SR, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Characterization of soil microalgae for remediation and biofuel production' (2012)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Wong MH, Armour MA, Naidu R, Man M, 'Persistent toxic substances: Sources, fates and effects', Reviews on Environmental Health (2012)

Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and org... [more]

Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed. © 2012 by Walter de Gruyter.

DOI 10.1515/reveh-2012-0040
Citations Scopus - 14
2012 Naidu R, 'Bioavailability and bio-accessibility of arsenic for ecological and human health risk assessment: The geological and health interface', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

Arsenic (As) contamination is currently reported in over 70 countries worldwide. This overview of As contamination links its presence in groundwater to human exposure including it... [more]

Arsenic (As) contamination is currently reported in over 70 countries worldwide. This overview of As contamination links its presence in groundwater to human exposure including its bioaccessibility from ecological and human health perspectives. Arsenic content in food crops grown in As-contaminated areas, human health effects due to consumption of As-contaminated water, bioavailability and bioaccessibility of As and the ecological effects of As are also considered. Inorganic As is mainly present in food crops such as rice and vegetables grown in As-contaminated areas which pose additional health risks to humans. An effective management strategy is required to minimize human exposure to As from water, soil and food. The focus of this paper is largely Bangladesh and West Bengal, India given the catastrophic impact of As recorded in these countries and subsequent studies that have relevance elsewhere. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2012 Rahman MM, Asaduzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Concentration of arsenic, cadmium and lead in home garden vegetables of Bangladesh', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

The study assesses the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in home-garden vegetables from a severely As-contaminated area of Bangladesh. The mean concentrat... [more]

The study assesses the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in home-garden vegetables from a severely As-contaminated area of Bangladesh. The mean concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in 87 vegetables were 113 %mu;g/kg, 134 %mu;g/kg and 3100 %mu;g/kg, respectively. The daily total consumption of As, Cd and Pb from vegetables alone for adult was 18 %mu;g, 22 %mu;g and 440 %mu;g, respectively. Vegetables alone did not contribute sufficiently enough to exceed Provisional Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI) values for Cd except for Pb. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Mahmud Rahman
2012 Wijayawardena MAA, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability and toxicity of arsenic to earthworms in three soils', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

The acute toxicity of arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)] to the earthworm Eisenia fetida was studied in three different soils in order to provide basic toxicity and bioavail... [more]

The acute toxicity of arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)] to the earthworm Eisenia fetida was studied in three different soils in order to provide basic toxicity and bioavailability data for formulating risk characterization benchmarks. Arsenic biotransformation in earthworms was also investigated to understand the mechanisms by which these organisms mitigate arsenic toxicity. Arsenic was more toxic to earthworms in acidic soil than in the alkaline soil. Earthworms transformed As(V) to more toxic As(III) which has implications to soil health. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ayanka Wijayawardena, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Juhasz AL, Smith E, Weber J, Naidu R, 'Incidental ingestion of arsenic contaminated soil and dust: Refining exposure through bioavailability and bioaccessibility assessment', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

In order to define remediation goals for arsenic (As)-contaminated sites, site-specific data is required to ensure an accurate assessment of potential risk at the site. Site speci... [more]

In order to define remediation goals for arsenic (As)-contaminated sites, site-specific data is required to ensure an accurate assessment of potential risk at the site. Site specific data is also warranted to refine default risk variables which, as a result of their conservative nature, may result in unnecessarily low remediation goals, use of additional remediation resources and deliver unwarranted remediation costs. A parameter that may be utilised for refining site specific remediation goals is As relative bioavailability. Adjustments to this parameter may be achieved through the assessment of in vivo As relative bioavailability or in vitro As bioaccessibility. This paper provides an overview of in vivo and in vitro techniques for the assessment of soil-borne As and research priorities in order to apply these assays for the refinement of human health exposure assessment. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

2012 Bahar MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Oxidation of arsenic (III) by a Stenotrophomonas sp. isolated from soil', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

The involvement of microorganism in global cycling of arsenic is well-known. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria play an important role in reducing arsenic toxicity and mobility in arseni... [more]

The involvement of microorganism in global cycling of arsenic is well-known. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria play an important role in reducing arsenic toxicity and mobility in arsenic contaminated environment. In this study, a gram negative bacterium, MM-7 able to efficiently oxidize arsenite [As (III)] to arsenate [As (V)] was isolated from soil. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that the strain is a close relative to Stenotrophomonas panacihumi with 99% identity. The presence of the arsenite oxidase gene was detected in this bacterium. The amino acid sequences of the arsenite oxidase from MM-7 showed the highest identity with the arsenite oxidase from Bosea sp. (67%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of As (III) oxidation by Stenotrophomonas sp. This strain has great potential for remediation of arsenic contaminated water. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2012 Megharaj M, Bahar MM, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of arsenic contaminated water: Prospects and recent advances', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Due to its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsen... [more]

Arsenic contamination of groundwater and surface water is widespread throughout the world. Due to its carcinogenicity and toxicity to human and animal health, remediation of arsenic contaminated water has become a high priority. There are several physico-chemical based conventional technologies available for arsenic removal from water. However, these technologies have some limitations such as high cost, generation of toxic by-products etc. Therefore, research on sustainable and cost-effective arsenic removal technologies for water has gained enormous attention recently. This paper will focus on the state-of-art knowledge on the currently available arsenic remediation methods, their prospects and recent advances with particular emphasis on bioremediation approaches. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mezbaul Bahar
2012 Matheyarasu R, Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Naidu R, 'Nutrient management in effluents derived from agricultural industries: An Australian perspective', WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment (2012)

The effluents derived from agricultural industries are major sources of wastewater with significant amounts of nutrients and organic load. Australia&apos;s agricultural industries... [more]

The effluents derived from agricultural industries are major sources of wastewater with significant amounts of nutrients and organic load. Australia's agricultural industries have experienced rapid growth in recent years, with nearly 152 abattoirs, 1798 wine industries, 9256 dairy farms and 1835 piggeries in operation. Agricultural industries require huge volumes of water for processing the farm products towards commercial value and quality. For instance, around 200 L of water required for processing a cattle in an abattoir; around 2.4-2.5 L for producing 1 L of wine; 500-800 L for 1 L of milk; and 12-45 L for sow and litter management in piggeries. As a result, these industries generate huge volumes of wastewater. For example, Australian meat industries produce an average of 4000 m 3 /day wastewater, with high concentration of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The annual average N and P loads in some of the farm effluents are: abattoir - 722 and 722 t; winery - 280 and 280 t; dairy - 150000 and 110000 t; and piggery - 72895 and 5075t. With Australia's average fertiliser consumption being 1 Mt N and 0.5 Mt P, the huge amounts of N and P from the agricultural effluents can be re-used as a potential alternative for fertiliser usage. Sustainable management of nutrients in the wastewater irrigated soil is a critical step to prevent contamination of both surface and ground-water. The available technologies for wastewater treatment require high investment. Hence, using high biomass-producing plants (e.g., Pennisetum purpureum and Arundo donax) as remediators, which also has the potential to uptake high amount of nutrients and heavy metals, can serve as a cost effective technology. Consequently, the plants used not only act as remediators, but also provide biomass that can also be used for energy generation, paper production and as a feed for animals. © 2012 WIT Press.

DOI 10.2495/SI120181
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri
2012 Ng JC, Noller BN, Naidu R, Bundschuh J, Bhattacharya P, 'Editors' foreword', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)
2011 Arias V, Rachakonda PK, Perso F, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, 'Before and after purge sampling, is there any difference?', 4th International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference. Program and Proceedings (2011)
Co-authors Victor Arias, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Feng Y, Xiao B, Goerner K, Naidu R, 'Influence of catalyst and temperature on gasification performance', Advanced Materials Research (2011)

In the present study the catalytic steam gasification of biomass to produce hydrogen-rich gas with calcined dolomite and Nano-NiO/¿-Al 2 O 3 as catalyst in an externally heated... [more]

In the present study the catalytic steam gasification of biomass to produce hydrogen-rich gas with calcined dolomite and Nano-NiO/¿-Al 2 O 3 as catalyst in an externally heated fixed bed reactor was investigated. The influence of the catalyst and reactor temperature on gasification performance was studied at the temperature range of 700°C-900°C. Over the ranges of experimental conditions examined, Nano-NiO/¿-Al 2 O 3 and calcined dolomite both revealed better catalytic performance, at the presence of steam, tar was completely decomposed as temperature increases from 800°C to 900 °C. Higher temperature resulted in more H 2 and CO 2 production, and dry gas yield. The highest H 2 content of 58.27V% and the highest H 2 yield of 2.23 Nm 3 /kg biomass were observed at the highest temperature level of 900 °C. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

DOI 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.281.90
2011 Feng Y, Xiao B, Goerner K, Naidu R, 'Influence of particle size and temperature on gasification performance', Advanced Materials Research (2011)

In the present study the catalytic steam gasification of biomass to produce hydrogen-rich gas with calcined dolomite as catalyst in an externally heated fixed bed reactor was inve... [more]

In the present study the catalytic steam gasification of biomass to produce hydrogen-rich gas with calcined dolomite as catalyst in an externally heated fixed bed reactor was investigated. The influence of the reactor temperature and particle size on yield and product composition was studied at the temperature range of 700°C-900°C. Over the ranges of experimental conditions examined, tar was completely decomposed as temperature increases from 800°C to 900°C. Higher temperature and smaller particle size resulted in more H 2 and CO 2 production, and dry gas yield. The highest H 2 content of 58.27 V%, and the highest H 2 yield of 2.23 Nm 3 /kg biomass were observed at the highest temperature level of 900 o C when the particle size was below 0.125mm. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

DOI 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.281.78
Citations Scopus - 3
2010 Subashchandrabose SR, Krishnan K, Gratton E, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Potential of fluorescence imaging techniques to monitor mutagenic PAH uptake by microalga' (2010)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Kannan Krishnan
2010 Naidu R, Juhasz AL, Smith E, Lombi E, 'Bioavailability and speciation of arsenic contaminated food and the relevance to human exposure', Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2010)
2010 Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Asaduzzaman M, 'Arsenic exposure from drinking water and rice in the Noakhali district of Bangladesh', Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2010)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Mahmud Rahman
2008 Naidu R, Kim KR, 'Contaminant Fate, Dynamics and Bioavailability: Biochemical and Molecular Mechanism at the Soil: Root interface', REVISTA DE LA CIENCIA DEL SUELO Y NUTRICION VEGETAL (2008)
2005 Imamul Huq SM, Naidu R, 'Arsenic in groundwater and contamination of the food chain: Bangladesh scenario', Natural Arsenic in Groundwater: Occurrence, Remediation and Management - Proceedings of the Pre-Congress Workshop "Natural Arsenic in Groundwater (BWO 06)", 32nd International Geological Congress (2005)

Ingestion of arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater is the major cause of As poisoning in Bangladesh. However, poisoning among the population is not consistent with the level of wa... [more]

Ingestion of arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater is the major cause of As poisoning in Bangladesh. However, poisoning among the population is not consistent with the level of water intake. Moreover, there is also a spatial variation of the manifestation of arsenicosis in the country. This has raised the question about the role of the food habit, nature and amount of food intake in the As dilemma. Even if an As-safe drinking water supply is ensured yet, the same As contaminated groundwater will continue to be the main source of irrigation for about 40% of the net cultivable area as more than 60% of irrigation water comes from groundwater. This leaves a risk of soil accumulation of the toxic element and eventual exposure of the food chain to As contamination through plant uptake and animal consumption. Water (hand tube wells and irrigation pumps), soil and vegetables/crop samples collected from as many as 150 different locations covering 15 districts of the country have revealed that the average background concentration of As in Bangladesh is much below 10 mg/kg soil. However, in some areas where soils receive Ascontaminated groundwater irrigation, the concentration has been found to be as high as 80 mg/kg soil. The soil As varies both spatially and vertically. The soil formation and the aquifer characters control the spatial variation, while the vertical distribution is controlled by the clay contents. The maximum As concentration in irrigation water was found to be 0.55 mg/L; irrigating a rice field with this water when the requirement is 1000 mm of water, it has been calculated that the As load will come to 5 kg As/ha/yr. Many crops receiving As contaminated water as irrigation have been found to accumulate As at levels that exceed the maximum allowable daily limit (MADL) of 0.2 mg per kg dry weight (dw). Some vegetables crops like Arum (Colocassia antiquorum), Kalmi (Ipomea aquatica), Amaranthus (Amaranthus spp.) etc. were found to be As accumulators. The transfer factor for As has been found to exceed the value of 0.1 in a number of plants indicating their affinity towards this element. In Arum, the concentration of As have been found to be as high as more than 150 mg/kg dw. Rice and wheat receiving As-contaminated irrigation water have been found to sequester the toxic metalloid into roots and stems. However, the quantities of rice consumed per person per day with the content of As in the grain may in many instances, surpass the MADL. © 2005, Taylor & Francis Group.

Citations Scopus - 31
2003 Zheng MX, Xu JM, Smith L, Naidu R, 'Why a fern (Pteris multifida) dominantly growing on an arsenic/heavy metal contaminated soil does not accumulate arsenic?', Journal De Physique. IV : JP (2003)

A kind of fern (Pteris multifida) is growing dominantly on a lead/zinc mine tailings contaminated soil located in Shaoxing, Zhejiang Province, the People&apos;s Republic of China.... [more]

A kind of fern (Pteris multifida) is growing dominantly on a lead/zinc mine tailings contaminated soil located in Shaoxing, Zhejiang Province, the People's Republic of China. The soil was heavily contaminated by heavy metals and arsenic, especially by lead, arsenic, and zinc. The total concentration (mg/kg) ranges for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the soil were 1370-4539, 3.0-9.3, 39-48, 65-206, 5271-16397, and 387-1221, respectively. The accumulative characteristics of heavy metals and arsenic in the fern pteris multifida showed that it accumulated lead 86-237 mg/kg in leaf, 33-741 mg/kg in stem, 879-4040 mg/kg in root and accumulated arsenic only 0.3-1.6 mg/kg in leaf, 0.5-8.0 mg/kg in stem, 24-45 mg/kg in root. Some ferns were reportedly As hyperaccumulators by some researchers. Why a fern (Pteris multifida) grown on a high As-contaminated soil in the present research could not accumulate arsenic? Further analyses indicated that water-soluble arsenic was almost zero and water-soluble Pb was high. It is suggested that high concentration Pb reacted with arsenic in soil solution to form a stable mineral. X-ray diffraction determination proved that there was a mineral, beudantite PbFe 3 (AsO 4 )(SO 4 )(OH 6 ) in < 0.002 mm clay fraction of the contaminated soil. The solubility product (Ksp) of beudantite was reportedly 10 -21 , leading to very low water-soluble As in the soil.

Citations Scopus - 5
2002 Kookana RS, Sadler R, Connell D, Sethunathan N, Megharaj M, Juhasz A, et al., 'Organic contaminants in soil environment - Environmental fate, impacts and remediation', ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS (2002)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2002 Raghu K, Sethunathan N, Singh N, Megharaj M, Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Wetland rice ecosystem: A favourable environment for pesticide biodegradation', ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS (2002)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
1999 Kookana RS, Naidu R, Barry DA, Tran YT, Bajracharya K, 'Sorption-desorption equilibria and dynamics of cadmium during transport in soil', FATE AND TRANSPORT OF HEAVY METALS IN THE VADOSE ZONE (1999)
Citations Web of Science - 11
1999 Van der Stegen G, Blanc M, Frank M, Vega F, Frisvad J, Taniwaki M, et al., 'Report on the workshop 'Enhancement of coffee quality by reduction of mould growth' - Thursday 5(th), August ASIC Helsinki, 1999', 18TH INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COLLOQUIUM ON COFFEE (1999)
1999 Naidu R, Bhat RV, Vasanthi S, 'Studies on ochratoxin A in Indian coffees and its management strategies', 18TH INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COLLOQUIUM ON COFFEE (1999)
1998 Naidu R, Kookana RS, Baskaran S, 'Pesticide dynamics in the tropical soil-plant ecosystem: Potential impacts on soil and crop quality', SEEKING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE FREE OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES (1998)
1998 Singleton I, McClure NC, Bentham R, Xie P, Kantachote D, Megharaj M, et al., 'Bioremediation of organochlorine-contaminated soil in South Australia: A collaborative venture', SEEKING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE FREE OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES (1998)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
1998 Fotovat A, Naidu R, 'Changes in composition of soil aqueous phase influence chemistry of indigenous heavy metals in alkaline sodic and acidic soils', GEODERMA (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0016-7061(97)00130-4
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30
1998 Kookana RS, Naidu R, 'Effect of soil solution composition on cadmium transport through variable charge soils', GEODERMA (1998)
DOI 10.1016/S0016-7061(97)00131-6
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 47
1997 Naidu R, Daivasikamani S, Nagaraj JS, 'Current status and strategies for management of mycotoxins in Indian coffees', SEVENTEENTH INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COLLOQUIUM ON COFFEE, NAIROBI, JULY 20-25, 1997 (1997)
1994 Hollingsworth I, Naidu R, Cox JW, Fitzpatrick RW, 'Warren reservoir catchment studies: stream gradient and stream water salinity', National Conference Publication - Institution of Engineers, Australia (1994)

We found a strong exponential relationship between the maximum stream chloride concentration and stream gradient in landform elements in which stream sampling sites were located (... [more]

We found a strong exponential relationship between the maximum stream chloride concentration and stream gradient in landform elements in which stream sampling sites were located (chloride concentration = 2.52 x stream gradient -0.575 , r 2 = 0.80). The maximum stream chloride concentration was comparable with the chloride concentration in alluvial aquifer systems in the Warren reservoir catchment. Therefore stream gradient can be used as a surrogate for maximum stream chloride concentration and shallow groundwater salinity in alluvial aquifer systems in a range of landscapes in the Adelaide hills. Maximum stream salinities occurred during summer and autumn, when rainfall was minimal, at most stream water sampling sites. There are large differences in stream salinity between sub-catchments of the Warren catchment. However, these differences can be mostly explained by differences in stream gradient. Groundwater and stream water salinities increased dramatically as stream gradient decreased below 0.5%. Stream gradients less than 0.5% occur in deep weathered peneplain and low hilly landscapes in the Warren reservoir catchment. Sodium and chloride dominate the stream and shallow groundwater chemistry, and the ratio of sodium to chloride is typical of cyclic salts (ie. salts originating in rainfall). The catchment is exporting salt to drainage systems at a rate similar to other mixed landuse catchments in the Adelaide Hills.

1994 Kookana R, Naidu R, Harter R, 'Vertical heterogeneity and contaminant transport through soil profiles', National Conference Publication - Institution of Engineers, Australia (1994)

Soils are highly heterogeneous in physical, chemical and biological properties; which determine the behaviour of a pollutant in the soil profile. To describe pollutant behaviour i... [more]

Soils are highly heterogeneous in physical, chemical and biological properties; which determine the behaviour of a pollutant in the soil profile. To describe pollutant behaviour in soils, a variety of solute transport models have been proposed in recent years. These models vary in conceptual approach and degree of complexity, however, rarely include the scale of heterogeneity of soil properties encountered in field. During simulation of solute transport, whilst some processes are usually considered in a greater detail, the soil profile is generally taken as uniform in terms of flow and other soil physical and chemical properties. Behaviour of numerous chemicals is governed by soil properties such as soil organic matter, pH, clay content permeability, etc. which vary markedly with depth in soils. Therefore, it is important to establish both the depth-wise distribution of these properties within a soil profile and the functional description of the behavioural dependence of the pollutants on these properties. Most such relationships are either not available or not have not yet built into the models. This paper discusses the distribution of soil properties, that vary markedly with depth within a soil profile, and their importance in affecting the pollutant behaviour with field examples of heterogeneities.

1993 RENGASAMY P, NAIDU R, BEECH TA, CHAN KY, CHARTRES C, 'RUPTURE STRENGTH AS RELATED TO DISPERSIVE POTENTIAL IN AUSTRALIAN SOILS', SOIL SURFACE SEALING AND CRUSTING (1993)
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
1991 NAIDU R, HAYNES RJ, GAWANDAR JS, MORRISON RJ, FITZPATRICK RW, 'CHEMICAL AND MINERALOGICAL PROPERTIES AND SOIL SOLUTION COMPOSITION OF ACID SOILS FROM THE SOUTH-PACIFIC ISLANDS', PLANT-SOIL INTERACTIONS AT LOW PH (1991)
Citations Web of Science - 7
Show 62 more conferences

Patent (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2012 Wang L, Naidu R, Chen Z, mallavarapu M, Analyte Ion Detection Method and Device (2012)
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Liang Wang, Megh Mallavarapu

Other (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Naidu R, Kumar RP, Arias V, 'Purging groundwater wells - is it necessary?', Remediation Australasia Magazine ( pp.22-23). Adelaide: CRC Care (2010)
Co-authors Victor Arias
2010 Naidu R, Kumar P, Arias V, 'Purging groundwater wells - is it necessary?', ( issue.4). South Australia: CRC CARE (2010)
2010 Naidu R, Kumar P, Arias V, 'Purging groundwater wells - is it necessary?', ( issue.4). South Australia: CRC CARE (2010)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 16
Total funding $3,364,932

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20177 grants / $1,731,287

A fully integrated risk assessment system$860,918

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Luchun Duan, Doctor Ayanka Wijayawardena, Doctor Morrow Dong, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700897
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Risk-based land management of weatherboard hydrocarbon contaminated sited by coupling in situ FTIR measurements with GIS models$307,100

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Liang Wang, Doctor Dane Lamb, Doctor Raja Dharmarajan, Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Prashant Srivastava, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700898
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Green Remediation technology for a recalcitrant and persistent hydrocarbon (1,4 dioxane being case example)$155,154

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Suresh Subashchandrabose, Professor Megh Mallavarapu, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700318
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Risk based management of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater$155,154

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Megh Mallavarapu, Doctor Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700320
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Development of Two Dimensional Vapour Intrusion Model for Real-Time Risk Prediction$109,701

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700321
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Integrated decision-making methodology and tools for groundwater remediation at Defence Site$82,060

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Jianhua Du
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700319
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Finucane Island and Nelson Point vapour modelling and site assessment$61,200

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700831
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20165 grants / $789,175

Innovative Bioremediation technologies for TCE contaminated groundwater$293,492

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501243
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Human Health Risk Assessment from Old Railway Sleepers - Port Hedland and Newman Mainline, WA$158,300

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Morrow Dong, Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600616
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Enhanced In situ Bioremediation of TCE towards closure of Site 14, EDP Edinburgh $143,015

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1700313
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from the Former Rail Loop Ponds at Mount Whaleback – Laboratory Biopile Study$106,641

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600698
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Clean Up Toxic Metals From CCA Treated Timber$87,727

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Doctor Jianhua Du, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501554
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20154 grants / $844,470

Long-Term Management Plan: Permeable Reactive Barrier to treat TCE Contaminated Groundwater at Site-9, EDP.$402,413

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Victor Arias, Mr Danidu Kudagamage, Mr Narasimha Gunda Rao Somasundara
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501239
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Biosensor for Monitoring Natural Attenuation of Benzene in Groundwater$346,722

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Professor Megh Mallavarapu, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501242
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Development and validation of indoorCARETM model for assessing vapor intrusion health risk$87,835

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Professor Ravi Naidu, Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501240
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Survey of emerging contaminants in the Lake Macquarie $7,500

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Yanju Liu, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1600174
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed7
Current19

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD6.95

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Implication of Nanotechnology for Water Treatment and Purification PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Role of Iron and Manganese Transporters on Cadmium Uptake in Rice PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Algal Bacterial Interaction in the Soil Ecosystem PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Arsenic Risk Remediation in Agricultural Crops Through Organic Amendment PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Effect of Manure and Water Management on Cadmium Availability in Paddy Soil and Accumulation in Rice Grain PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Indigenous Community Dietary Intake and Associated Health Implications PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Sustainability of Groundwater Use PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal of Contaminated Soil Using Metal Accumulation Crops PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Risk Assessment of Australian Biosolids Containing Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Applied to Agricultural Land PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Rehabilitation of Mining Impacted Farmland to Ensure Food Security in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metal(loid)s in Complementary Medicines PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Nanoencapsulated Pesticide: Insights Of Pesticide Loading To Enhance The Sustainability Of Nanocarriers PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Measurement for Human Health Risk Assessment and Compliance Model for Heavy Metals PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Toxicity and Impact of Nanoparticles Released to the Environment by Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals, Agricultural and Related Products PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Hydrocarbon Contaminated Groundwater remediation using Electrokinetic Enhanced Bioremediation PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Title Blight: The Impact of Public Policy on Remediation and Redevelopment of Contaminated Sites in Australia. PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Bioavailability, Risk Assessment and Remediation of Soil Organic Contaminants PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Wastewater Driven Biomass on Production for Energy Generation PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Bioaccessibility, Risk Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Land PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Predicting Phytotoxicity of Metal(loid)s and Their Mixtures in Soil using Pore-Water based Transfer Functions PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Investigation of the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Microorganisms in Soil and Water: A Metagenomic Approach PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Pyrogenic Carbon and its Interaction with Heavy Metals PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Phosphorus Recovery From Waste Streams Using Absorbents PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Arsenic in Rice: Genotypic Variation and its Bioavailability with Respect to Human Health Risk Assessment PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Phyco-nanotechnology for Chromium Remediation PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Illicit Drugs - Environmental Occurrence, Fate and Toxicity PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 625
China 98
India 62
Korea, Republic of 52
United States 47
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News

Professor Ravi Naidu

A clear approach to the global threat of contamination

June 9, 2017

In a commitment to furthering research into the global-threat of contamination, the University of Newcastle (UON) has today unveiled a $15 million world-leading lab facility dedicated to finding better ways to assess, manage, clean up and prevent environmental contamination.

Professor Ravi Naidu

High honour for Professor Naidu

July 4, 2016

University of Newcastle (UON) Professor Ravi Naidu has received a prestigious Doctor of Science from Massey University, NZ, honouring more than 30 years of world-class research in environmental contamination. The degree recognises Professor Naidu’s substantial original contributions to knowledge in his field.

CRC CARE 2

Expanding Australia’s contamination science effort

March 3, 2015

Australia's leading contamination and remediation research organisation will be based at the University of Newcastle (UON) from March 2015, in a move that extends the latest clean-up science to a wider range of the nation's major industries.

Professor Ravi Naidu

Position

Global Innovation Chair and Director
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email ravi.naidu@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8705

Office

Room ATC-147
Building Advanced Technology Centre
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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