Dr Gerard Kaiko

Research Fellow

School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kaiko is a UoN Research Fellow and an NHMRC Early Career (CJ Martin) Research Fellow.

Background

Dr Kaiko's PhD studies in respiratory disease and immunology in Australia examined the role of the innate immune system in regulating the interaction between viral infections and asthma. After a stint working in London at NIMR (MRC) with an immunology focus, Dr Kaiko became an NHMRC overseas early career fellow (CJ Martin) and moved to Washington University in St Louis, USA (one of the top medical research centres in the world) in 2013. There he transitioned to the study of adult stem cells, as well as the study of metabolomics and the microbiota in gastrointestinal diseases. In these fields he has published in the world's top tier journals including Cell, 2016 and Science, 2017. His work in microbial metabolomics and disease has been the feature of media articles in multiple international news outlets such as the Huffington Post. While working in the USA, Dr Kaiko was a senior part of a team that developed a novel 3D technology to generate adult epithelial stem cells from all regions of the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems. These stem cells are cultured in vitro and retain their properties of the mammalian host long term. Only a tiny patient biopsy is required to grow these stem cells in the laboratory. They can then be expanded and re-differentiated into mature "organ-like" tissues to conduct an unlimited array of 3D or 2D tests, including drug discovery, diagnostic tests for personalised medicine, toxicology screening, and better understanding of epithelial biology. 

Current Focus

Dr Kaiko returned to Australia to set up an independent research group with a current and future focus on:

1) The role of novel microbial and mammalian metabolites in respiratory diseases such as asthma.

2) Developing screening assays for translational medicine using the human adult stem cell technology. In particular, to screen for new therapies for respiratory (cystic fibrosis, asthma, COPD) and gastrointestinal (inflammatory bowel disease and oesophagitis) diseases. As the healthcare system evolves and more and more therapeutic options become available for these particular mucosal diseases, this stem cell technology will also be used to improve precision medicine through personalised drug-functional assays that can match the right patient to the most optimal therapy in real-time. This has the potential to save tremendous costs and time, and reduces the likelihood of being prescribed a sub-optimal therapy. 

Dr Kaiko maintains strong international collaborations particularly in the USA and UK.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Immunology & Microbiology), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Adult stem cells
  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Gastrointestinal disease
  • Metabolomics
  • Mucosal Immunology
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Tissue repair

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
100404 Regenerative Medicine (incl. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering) 40
110203 Respiratory Diseases 40
110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
4/01/2017 -  NHMRC CJ Martin fellow The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Australia
1/02/2015 - 1/01/2018 Research Associate Washington University In St. Louis
Pathology and Immunology
United States
10/01/2013 - 31/01/2015 NHMRC CJ Martin (Overseas) fellow Washington University In St. Louis
Pathology and Immunology
United States
1/05/2012 - 1/12/2012 Postdoctoral researcher National Institute of Medical Research (MRC), Mill Hill, London
United Kingdom
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Steed AL, Christophi GP, Kaiko GE, Sun L, Goodwin VM, Jain U, et al., 'The microbial metabolite desaminotyrosine protects from influenza through type I interferon', Science, 357 498-502 (2017)

© 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved. The microbiota is known to modulate the host response to influenza infection through as-yet-uncl... [more]

© 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science. All rights reserved. The microbiota is known to modulate the host response to influenza infection through as-yet-unclear mechanisms. We hypothesized that components of the microbiota exert effects through type I interferon (IFN), a hypothesis supported by analysis of influenza in a gain-of-function genetic mouse model. Here we show that a microbially associated metabolite, desaminotyrosine (DAT), protects from influenza through augmentation of type I IFN signaling and diminution of lung immunopathology. A specific human-associated gut microbe, Clostridium orbiscindens, produced DAT and rescued antibiotic-treated influenza-infected mice. DAT protected the host by priming the amplification loop of type I IFN signaling. These findings show that specific components of the enteric microbiota have distal effects on responses to lethal infections through modulation of type I IFN.

DOI 10.1126/science.aam5336
2017 Plank MW, Kaiko GE, Maltby S, Weaver J, Tay HL, Shen W, et al., 'Th22 Cells Form a Distinct Th Lineage from Th17 Cells In Vitro with Unique Transcriptional Properties and Tbet-Dependent Th1 Plasticity.', J Immunol, 198 2182-2190 (2017)
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1601480
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Steven Maltby, Paul Foster
2017 Foster PS, Maltby S, Rosenberg HF, Tay HL, Hogan SP, Collison AM, et al., 'Modeling TH 2 responses and airway inflammation to understand fundamental mechanisms regulating the pathogenesis of asthma.', Immunol Rev, 278 20-40 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/imr.12549
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Steven Maltby, Paul Foster, Adam Collison, Joerg Mattes, Philip Hansbro, Ming Yang
2016 Kaiko GE, Ryu SH, Koues OI, Collins PL, Solnica-Krezel L, Pearce EJ, et al., 'The Colonic Crypt Protects Stem Cells from Microbiota-Derived Metabolites', Cell, 165 1708-1720 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. In the mammalian intestine, crypts of Leiberkühn house intestinal epithelial stem/progenitor cells at their base. The mammalian intestine also harbors a div... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Inc. In the mammalian intestine, crypts of Leiberkühn house intestinal epithelial stem/progenitor cells at their base. The mammalian intestine also harbors a diverse array of microbial metabolite compounds that potentially modulate stem/progenitor cell activity. Unbiased screening identified butyrate, a prominent bacterial metabolite, as a potent inhibitor of intestinal stem/progenitor proliferation at physiologic concentrations. During homeostasis, differentiated colonocytes metabolized butyrate likely preventing it from reaching proliferating epithelial stem/progenitor cells within the crypt. Exposure of stem/progenitor cells in vivo to butyrate through either mucosal injury or application to a naturally crypt-less host organism led to inhibition of proliferation and delayed wound repair. The mechanism of butyrate action depended on the transcription factor Foxo3. Our findings indicate that mammalian crypt architecture protects stem/progenitor cell proliferation in part through a metabolic barrier formed by differentiated colonocytes that consume butyrate and stimulate future studies on the interplay of host anatomy and microbiome metabolism.

DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2016.05.018
Citations Scopus - 35
2016 Kaiko GE, Ryu SH, Koues OI, Collins PL, Solnica-Krezel L, Pearce EJ, et al., 'Erratum: The Colonic Crypt Protects Stem Cells from Microbiota-Derived Metabolites (Cell (2016) 165(7) (1708¿1720)(S0092867416305669)(10.1016/j.cell.2016.05.018))', Cell, 167 1137 (2016)

© 2016 (Cell 165, 1708¿1720; June 16, 2016) Our article investigated the effects of the metabolites produced by gut bacteria on intestinal stem cells and the role of intestinal ... [more]

© 2016 (Cell 165, 1708¿1720; June 16, 2016) Our article investigated the effects of the metabolites produced by gut bacteria on intestinal stem cells and the role of intestinal morphology in mitigating those effects. Part of the study involved the generation of stem cells and colonocytes in¿vitro. In Figure¿S4, we characterized these stem cells and colonocytes with immunostaining. In the leftmost and middle images of panel C, we had intended to present micrographs from spheroids enriched in stem cells (leftmost) and in¿vitro differentiated colonocyte spheroids (middle) derived from colon tissue, as indicated in the original figure legend. However, we mistakenly presented micrographs of spheroids originally derived from small intestinal tissue. To correct the inconsistency introduced between the figure image panels and the legend, we now present below the figure in which the leftmost and middle images of panel C display our micrographs of a colon-derived stem cell spheroid (leftmost panel) and in¿vitro differentiated colonocyte spheroid (middle panel). The figure has been corrected online, and as the spheroids from both sources show similar polarity and localization of actin and ß-catenin, this change does not alter any of our conclusions.

DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.034
Citations Scopus - 6
2015 Hickey CA, Kuhn KA, Donermeyer DL, Porter NT, Jin C, Cameron EA, et al., 'Colitogenic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron antigens access host immune cells in a sulfatase-dependent manner via outer membrane vesicles', Cell Host and Microbe, 17 672-680 (2015)

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Microbes interact with the host immune system via several potential mechanisms. One essential step for each mechanism is the method by which intestinal micro... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Microbes interact with the host immune system via several potential mechanisms. One essential step for each mechanism is the method by which intestinal microbes or their antigens access specific host immune cells. Using genetically susceptible mice (dnKO) that develop spontaneous, fulminant colitis, triggered by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta), we investigated the mechanism of intestinal microbial access under conditions that stimulate colonic inflammation. B. theta antigens localized to host immune cells through outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that harbor bacterial sulfatase activity. We deleted the anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme (anSME) from B. theta, which is required for post-translational activation of all B. theta sulfatase enzymes. This bacterial mutant strain did not stimulate colitis in dnKO mice. Lastly, access of B. theta OMVs to host immune cells was sulfatase dependent. These data demonstrate that bacterial OMVs and associated enzymes promote inflammatory immune stimulation in genetically susceptible hosts.

DOI 10.1016/j.chom.2015.04.002
Citations Scopus - 29
2015 Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank M, Li J, Maltby S, Essilfie A-T, et al., 'Correction: Antagonism of miR-328 Increases the Antimicrobial Function of Macrophages and Neutrophils and Rapid Clearance of Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae (NTHi) from Infected Lung.', PLoS Pathogens, 11 e1004956 (2015) [O1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004956
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, Paul Foster, Steven Maltby, Hock Tay, Philip Hansbro, Ming Yang
2015 Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank M, Li JJ, Maltby S, Essilfie AT, et al., 'Antagonism of miR-328 Increases the Antimicrobial Function of Macrophages and Neutrophils and Rapid Clearance of Non-typeable Haemophilus Influenzae (NTHi) from Infected Lung', PLoS Pathogens, 11 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Tay et al. Pathogenic bacterial infections of the lung are life threatening and underpin chronic lung diseases. Current treatments are often ineffective potentially due to... [more]

© 2015 Tay et al. Pathogenic bacterial infections of the lung are life threatening and underpin chronic lung diseases. Current treatments are often ineffective potentially due to increasing antibiotic resistance and impairment of innate immunity by disease processes and steroid therapy. Manipulation miRNA directly regulating anti-microbial machinery of the innate immune system may boost host defence responses. Here we demonstrate that miR-328 is a key element of the host response to pulmonary infection with non-typeable haemophilus influenzae and pharmacological inhibition in mouse and human macrophages augments phagocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and microbicidal activity. Moreover, inhibition of miR-328 in respiratory models of infection, steroid-induced immunosuppression, and smoke-induced emphysema enhances bacterial clearance. Thus, miRNA pathways can be targeted in the lung to enhance host defence against a clinically relevant microbial infection and offer a potential new anti-microbial approach for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004549
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Joerg Mattes, Paul Foster, Ming Yang, Steven Maltby, Hock Tay
2014 Kaiko GE, Stappenbeck TS, 'Host-microbe interactions shaping the gastrointestinal environment', Trends in Immunology, 35 538-548 (2014)

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Tremendous advances have been made in mapping the complexity of the human gut microbiota in both health and disease states. These analyses have revealed that... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Tremendous advances have been made in mapping the complexity of the human gut microbiota in both health and disease states. These analyses have revealed that, rather than a constellation of individual species, a healthy microbiota comprises an interdependent network of microbes. The microbial and host interactions that shape both this network and the gastrointestinal environment are areas of intense investigation. Here we review emerg-ing concepts of how microbial metabolic processes con-trol commensal composition, invading pathogens, immune activation, and intestinal barrier function. We posit that all of thes e factors are critical for the mainte-nance of homeostasis and avoidance of overt inflamma- tory disease. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms will shed light on the pathogenesis of many diseases and guide new therapeutic interventions.

DOI 10.1016/j.it.2014.08.002
Citations Scopus - 30
2013 Kaiko G, Loh Z, Spann K, Lynch J, Lalwani A, Davidson S, et al., 'TLR7 gene deficiency and early-life pneumovirus infection interact to predispose toward the development of asthma-like pathology in mice', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 42 (2013)
Co-authors Paul Foster
2013 Kaiko GE, Loh Z, Spann K, Lynch JP, Lalwani A, Zheng Z, et al., 'Toll-like receptor 7 gene deficiency and early-life Pneumovirus infection interact to predispose toward the development of asthma-like pathology in mice', JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, 131 1331-U132 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.02.041
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Katherine Baines, Jodie Simpson, Paul Foster
2013 Foster PS, Plank MW, Collison AM, Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Li J, et al., 'The emerging role of microRNAs in regulating immune and inflammatory responses in the lung', Immunological Reviews, 253 198-215 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Joerg Mattes, Ming Yang, Adam Collison, Hock Tay, Paul Foster
2013 Hansbro PM, Scott GV, Essilfie A-T, Kim RY, Starkey MR, Nguyen D, et al., 'Th2 cytokine antagonists: Potential treatments for severe asthma', Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs, 22 49-69 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Malcolm Starkey, Paul Foster, Ming Yang, Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro
2011 Kaiko GE, Foster PS, 'New insights into the generation of Th2 immunity and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of asthma', Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 11 39-45 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/aci.0b013e328342322f
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Paul Foster
2011 Asquith KL, Horvat JC, Kaiko GE, Carey AJ, Beagley KW, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'Interleukin-13 promotes susceptibility to chlamydial infection of the respiratory and genital tracts', PLoS Pathogens, 7 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1001339
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Jay Horvat, Paul Foster
2011 Hansbro PM, Kaiko GE, Foster PS, 'Cytokine/anti-cytokine therapy - Novel treatments for asthma?', British Journal of Pharmacology, 163 81-95 (2011) [C2]
DOI 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01219.x
Citations Scopus - 78Web of Science - 72
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster
2011 Davidson SK, Kaiko GE, Loh Z, Lalwani A, Zhang V, Spann K, et al., 'Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells promote host defense against Acute Pneumovirus infection via the TLR7-MyD88-Dependent signaling pathway', Journal of Immunology, 186 5938-5948 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1002635
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Nicole Hansbro, Paul Foster
2010 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Angkasekwinai P, Dong C, Foster PS, 'NK cell deficiency predisposes to viral-induced Th2-type allergic inflammation via epithelial-derived IL-25', Journal of Immunology, 185 4681-4690 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.4049/jimmunol.1001758
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 73
Co-authors Paul Foster
2009 Phipps S, Lam CE, Kaiko GE, Foo A, Collison AM, Mattes J, et al., 'Toll/IL-1 signaling is critical for house dust mite-specific Th1 and Th2 responses', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 179 883-893 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1164/rccm.200806-974oc
Citations Scopus - 118Web of Science - 113
Co-authors Adam Collison, Paul Foster, Joerg Mattes
2008 Kaiko GE, Horvat JC, Beagley KW, Hansbro PM, 'Immunological decision-making: How does the immune system decide to mount a helper T-cell response?', Immunology, 123 326-338 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2007.02719.x
Citations Scopus - 187Web of Science - 168
Co-authors Jay Horvat, Philip Hansbro
2008 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Hickey DK, Lam CE, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, Beagley KW, 'Chlamydia muridarum infection subverts dendritic cell function to promote Th2 immunity and airways hyperreactivity', Journal of Immunology, 180 2225-2232 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Paul Foster, Philip Hansbro
2007 Horvat JC, Beagley KW, Wade MA, Preston JA, Hansbro NG, Hickey DK, et al., 'Neonatal chlamydial infection induces mixed T-cell responses that drive allergic airway disease', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 176 556-564 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1164/rccm.200607-1005OC
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 58
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster, Jay Horvat, Nicole Hansbro, Peter Gibson
Show 19 more journal articles

Conference (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Plank MW, Kaiko GE, Maltby S, Weaver J, Tay H, Shen W, et al., 'Th22 cells form a distinct th lineage from Th17 cells in vitro with unique transcriptional properties and Tbet-dependent Th1 plasticity', ALLERGY (2017)
Co-authors Paul Foster, Steven Maltby
2015 Tay H, Kaiko G, Plank M, Li J, Essilfie A, Maltby S, et al., 'THE ROLE OF MIR-328 IN RESPIRATORY DISEASES', RESPIROLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster, Ming Yang, Joerg Mattes, Steven Maltby
2015 Tay H, Kaiko G, Mattes J, Hansbro P, Foster P, 'The role of miR-328 in respiratory diseases', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY (2015)
Co-authors Paul Foster, Philip Hansbro, Joerg Mattes
2013 Tay H, Kaiko G, Hansbro P, Foster P, 'The role of miRNA in regulating bacterial clearance', JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Paul Foster, Hock Tay
2012 Kaiko GE, Tay HL, Plank MW, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'MicroRNA regulate bacterial phagocytosis in the lung', Immunology: Abstracts of the European Congress of Immunology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster, Philip Hansbro
2012 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Plank MW, Tay HL, Lam CE, Foster PS, 'Inhibition of microRNA reverses CD8 T cell exhaustion and improves immunity against respiratory virus infection', Respirology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster, Hock Tay
2012 Plank MW, Kaiko GE, Luck H, Li J, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'The role of micrornas in CD4 T cell function', Respirology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster, Philip Hansbro, Joerg Mattes
2012 Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank MW, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, Foster PS, 'MiRNAs regulate bacterial infection in lungs', Respirology (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Joerg Mattes, Hock Tay, Paul Foster, Philip Hansbro
2011 Foster PS, Tay HL, Kaiko GE, Plank MW, Mattes J, Hansbro PM, 'MiRNA and its roles in regulating bacterial infection in lungs', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Hock Tay, Paul Foster, Joerg Mattes
2007 Phipps S, Lam CE, Kaiko GE, Collison A, Smith L, Mansell A, et al., 'Contribution of multiple toll-like receptors to the development of murine allergic airways inflammation', Immunology and Cell Biology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster
2007 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Foster PS, 'Importance of CD4 T cells in the clearance of a primary Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection and in protection against the development of exhausted CD8 T cell memory', Immunology and Cell Biology (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster
2007 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Foster PS, 'Respiratory Syncytial Virus up-regulates PD-1 expression; comparison to a model of CD8 T cell exhaustion in BALB/c mice', Immuno 2007: 13th International Congress of Immunology, Abstracts and Posters (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Paul Foster
2006 Kaiko GE, Phipps S, Lam CE, Hickey DK, Hansbro NG, Foster PS, Beagley KW, 'The chlamydia infection of dendritic cells drives the development of a pro-asthmatic response', Immunology and Cell Biology (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Nicole Hansbro, Paul Foster
Show 10 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $348,827

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20132 grants / $348,827

Investigating the interaction between susceptibility genes, viral infection, and gut microbiota in inflammation and epithelial repair processes$328,827

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Gerard Kaiko
Scheme Early Career Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1100647
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

DP73 Digital colour and monochrome camera + cellSens software + Xcite120 fluorescence lamp illuminator$20,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Paul Foster, Doctor Alan Hsu, Professor Phil Hansbro, Professor Joerg Mattes, Doctor Katie Baines, Professor Jodie Simpson, Professor Rakesh Kumar, Doctor Nicole Hansbro, Doctor Steven Maltby, Doctor Ming Yang, Doctor Gerard Kaiko, Doctor Jay Horvat, Associate Professor Simon Keely, Doctor Andrew Jarnicki, Doctor Michael Fricker
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201186
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y
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Research Opportunities

PhD scholarships to study adults stem cells in regenerative medicine OR study mechanisms of respiratory diseases

Study adults stem cells in regenerative medicine OR study mechanisms of respiratory diseases (asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis).

PHD

Faculty of Health and Medicine

10/01/2018 - 10/01/2021

Contact

Doctor Gerard Kaiko
University of Newcastle
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
gerard.kaiko@newcastle.edu.au

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News

PHD Scholarship - Developing New Diagnostic Tests and Therapies for Respiratory Diseases

August 24, 2017

PhD Scholarships are available through the Faculty of Health and Medicine at the University of Newcastle for a student to investigate new diagnostic tests and therapies for respiratory diseases under the supervision of Dr Gerard Kaiko and Professor Paul Foster.

Dr Gerard Kaiko

Position

Research Fellow
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email gerard.kaiko@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420227

Office

Building HMRI
Location Level 2 East Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

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