Dr Andrew Reid

Dr Andrew Reid

Postdoctoral Researcher

School of Medicine and Public Health

Telescopes to Microscopes: an ingrained love for science

Dr Andrew Reid may have taken the long road to medical research, but it’s not one he regrets.

Dr Andrew Reid

“When I was still in high school my real passion was astronomy – my Dad had bought me a telescope and I got really into it."

“So when I started out at university, I was doing a double major in maths and physics.”

Hailing from the Central Coast, Andrew’s regular commute to Sydney for his studies was a gruelling one.

“Once I got to the third year it all got to be too much – I ended up deferring and I worked in retail for a while. Then one evening I was talking to my manager – who had always wanted to be a police officer – and we made a deal. He would join the police force and I would go back to university.”

Andrew transferred his credits to UON and was able to complete his science degree, but with a major in biology.

“It turns out biology and chemistry were my calling! I ended up getting First Class Honours and the University Medal.”

On top of those accolades, Andrew was also awarded the Faculty of Science Medal for best thesis and the Barry Boettcher Award for leading grade point average.

For his Honours and PhD projects, Andrew worked in UON’s Reproductive Science group, under the supervision of Dr Shaun Roman and Professor Brett Nixon, respectively.

Andrew’s PhD research focussed on the role of the dynamin protein in sperm maturation and fertilisation. For his work, he was awarded the New Investigator Award from the Australian Society of Reproductive Biology in 2011.

Focus on epithelium

The epithelial cell layer, or ‘epithelium’, occurs throughout the body wherever surfaces come into contact with the outside environment and also on the insides of vessels, tracts and tubules.

The architecture of epithelial cells is highly regulated, and the intracellular junctions are particularly important for maintaining function. These junctions are made up of protein complexes which allow cells to communicate, share nutrients and maintain physical contact with each other.

“The final chapter of my PhD thesis was actually on the epithelium of the epididymis – a duct within the male reproductive system."

“One of the good things about learning about those cells is they stay pretty similar throughout all the different areas of the body.”

Indeed, when Professor Darryl Knight was looking for help in his lab with an asthma research project with the PRC for Healthy Lungs, it turns out Andrew had experience in all the right areas.

“I’ve also got a lot of experience with fluorescence and electron microscopy.”

The disappearing mucus

Previous research by some of Darryl’s international collaborators had highlighted the significance of the Beta-catenin signalling pathway in airway disease, in particular in the epithelial cells lining the airways.

The amount of Beta-catenin protein in the intracellular junctions was different in asthmatic compared to non-asthmatic individuals.

Upon looking closer at this phenomenon, Darryl and Andrew noticed a strange effect of Beta-catenin blocking chemicals.

“Mucus production was decreasing – but it wasn’t via the normal mucus-stimulating cellular pathways. It instead appeared to be happening via the Notch Signalling pathway."

The Notch protein has been well described for its role in tissue development, but this direct involvement in mucus regulation was a novel observation.

Using a specialised cell culture technique, known as air liquid interface culture, researchers within the PRC for Healthy Lungs are able to grow human donor airway epithelial cells in the lab.

The cells differentiate into specific cell types and assume an architecture all but identical to that of the human respiratory epithelial layer.

“Every few days I’ve got to come in and wash off the mucus from the surface of my asthmatic cells and it’s all gluggy and horrible."

“But then when I inhibit Notch, you don’t get that mucus. The cells are all there and they’re happy, they’re still alive - they’re just not spitting out mucus.”

Looking ahead

As well as Notch appearing to regulate mucus production itself, it can also modify the characteristics of the mucus, making it less sticky.

This mucosal stickiness is a problem not just in asthmatics, but also for patients with chronic bronchitis and COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease).

“We’re hoping to identify which interactions in the Notch signalling pathway are causing these changes in mucus production."

“Then we could design new pharmaceuticals targeting these proteins and increase the quality of life for these patients.”

It’s an exciting field, and one that Andrew’s looking forward to continuing to explore.

Telescopes to Microscopes: an ingrained love for science

Dr Andrew Reid has a hand in increasing the life of asthma patients.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research overview

Dr Andrew Reid completed his Bachelor of Science (Hons I) degree in 2009 with a perfect grade point average and earning both the faculty and university medals. He was offered a prestigious Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship as well as the Deputy Vice Chancellor’s award to complete his PhD. Andrew's PhD on the role of dynamin in mouse spermatozoa and the epididymal epithelium earned him 3 high ranking publications during his PhD tenure. In addition to numerous scientific and artistic prizes throughout his tenure, Dr Reid was nominated for the PhD medal on the back of his exemplary studies.

In 2014, Andrew began his employment under world-renowned epithelial cell biologist Professor Darryl Knight at the Hunter Medical Research Institute. Here, Andrew's experience in a wide range of microscopy (including immunofluorescent, phase contrast and electron microscopy) and pharmacological inhibition techniques were adopted as no standard procedure. Dr Reid has published under Professor Knight on the roles of the signalling molecule beta-catenin during epithelial to mesenchymal transition, the contributions of genetic and epigenetic dysregulations in asthma and has recently published in Pharmacology and Therapeutics on the "Persistent induction of goblet cell differentiation in the airways: Therapeutic approaches".

Currently, Andrew's investigations centre on the imbalance of certain developmental signalling pathways and how this contributes to increased mucus production and accumulation in the airway epithelium of asthmatics. As of January 2018, Dr. Reid has taken command of Conjoint Professor Chris Grainge’s most recently awarded NHMRC grant to investigate the role of mechanical forces at the dysregulated asthmatic airway epithelium.

Collaborations

Dr Reid has encouraged a number of local as well as international collaborations throughout his PhD and early post-doctoral career. Collaborations with UoN's own Professor Adam McCluskey (Chemistry) and Professor Phil Robinson of the Children's Medical Research Institute through Andrew's then PhD supervisor Professor Brett Nixon enabled the publication of Andrew's first two scientific manuscripts. Currently, collaborations with the James Hogg Research Institute (Canada) and Cornell University (New York) have provided Andrew with rare tissue samples and cells required for his epithelial mucus research.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Air-liquid Interface culture
  • ELISA
  • Western blotting
  • PCR
  • qPCR
  • Notch signalling
  • Immunocytochemistry
  • Mucus
  • Asthma
  • Airway epithelium
  • Molecular biology
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • COPD
  • Nanostring

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110203 Respiratory Diseases 50
060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Researcher Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Researcher University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
31/01/2014 - 31/12/2017 Posdoctoral Researcher

During this time I performed experiments using primary bronchial epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface from asthmatic and non-asthmatic donors. I also Investigated the Notch and beta-catenin signalling pathways within asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways.  I performed pharmacological inhibition of these pathways and analysed the effects on airway morphology. I also developed a number of immunofluorescence and protein quantification techniques used in our laboratory today.

The University of Newcastle - School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Respiratory
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2010 University Medal
The University of Newcastle
2010 Faculty Medal
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle

Prize

Year Award
2017 Conference Travel Award
The Thoracic Society of Australia & New Zealand
2017 Cell/Biology/Immunology SIG award
The Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand
2016 Early Career Award
Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
2013 Beautiful Science award
The University of Newcastle, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
2012 Society for Reproductive Biology travel award
Australian Society for Reproductive Biology
2011 New Investigator Award
Australian Society of Reproductive Biology
2011 Society for Reproductive Biology travel award
Australian Society for Reproductive Biology
2010 Barry Boettcher Award
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
2010 Australian Postgraduate Award
The University of Newcastle
2010 Deputy Vice Chancellor Research and Innovation Scholarship
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
BIOL3090 Molecular Biology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Assessed and marked presentations given by students as per tutorial demonstrator role.
Head Tutorial Demonstrator 1/07/2010 - 30/06/2011
BIOL2001 Molecular Laboratory Skills for Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Laboratory Demonstrator
Laboratory Demonstrator 2/03/2009 - 30/06/2009
BIOL2001 Molecular Laboratory Skills for Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Head Laboratory Demonstrator
Laboratory Demonstrator 1/03/2010 - 30/06/2010
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Reid AT, Veerati PC, Gosens R, Bartlett NW, Wark PA, Grainge CL, et al., 'Persistent induction of goblet cell differentiation in the airways: Therapeutic approaches', Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 185 155-169 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Dysregulated induction of goblet cell differentiation results in excessive production and retention of mucus and is a common feature of several chronic airways diseases. To... [more]

© 2017 Dysregulated induction of goblet cell differentiation results in excessive production and retention of mucus and is a common feature of several chronic airways diseases. To date, therapeutic strategies to reduce mucus accumulation have focused primarily on altering the properties of the mucus itself, or have aimed to limit the production of mucus-stimulating cytokines. Here we review the current knowledge of key molecular pathways that are dysregulated during persistent goblet cell differentiation and highlights both pre-existing and novel therapeutic strategies to combat this pathology.

DOI 10.1016/j.pharmthera.2017.12.009
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro, Peter Wark, Nathan Bartlett, Fatemeh Moheimani, Christopher Grainge
2018 Singanayagam A, Glanville N, Girkin JL, Ching YM, Marcellini A, Porter JD, et al., 'Corticosteroid suppression of antiviral immunity increases bacterial loads and mucus production in COPD exacerbations', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-04574-1
Co-authors Christopher Grainge, Darryl Knight, Nathan Bartlett, Peter Wark
2018 Moheimani F, Koops J, Williams T, Reid AT, Hansbro PM, Wark PA, Knight DA, 'Influenza A virus infection dysregulates the expression of microRNA-22 and its targets; CD147 and HDAC4, in epithelium of asthmatics', Respiratory Research, 19 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12931-018-0851-7
Co-authors Fatemeh Moheimani, Peter Wark, Philip Hansbro, Darryl Knight
2017 Zhou W, De Iuliis GN, Turner AP, Reid AT, Anderson AL, McCluskey A, et al., 'Developmental expression of the dynamin family of mechanoenzymes in the mouse epididymis', BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION, 96 159-173 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.116.145433
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Adam Mccluskey, Brett Nixon, Geoffry DeiuliIs
2016 Moheimani F, Hsu AC-Y, Reid AT, Williams T, Kicic A, Stick SM, et al., 'The genetic and epigenetic landscapes of the epithelium in asthma', RESPIRATORY RESEARCH, 17 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12931-016-0434-4
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Fatemeh Moheimani, Alan Hsu, Philip Hansbro, Peter Wark, Darryl Knight
2015 Moheimani F, Roth HM, Cross J, Reid AT, Shaheen F, Warner SM, et al., 'Disruption of ß-catenin/CBP signaling inhibits human airway epithelial-mesenchymal transition and repair', International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 68 59-69 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The epithelium of asthmatics is characterized by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the basal cell markers ck-5 and p63 that is indi... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The epithelium of asthmatics is characterized by reduced expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of the basal cell markers ck-5 and p63 that is indicative of a relatively undifferentiated repairing epithelium. This phenotype correlates with increased proliferation, compromised wound healing and an enhanced capacity to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The transcription factor ß-catenin plays a vital role in epithelial cell differentiation and regeneration, depending on the co-factor recruited. Transcriptional programs driven by the ß-catenin/CBP axis are critical for maintaining an undifferentiated and proliferative state, whereas the ß-catenin/p300 axis is associated with cell differentiation. We hypothesized that disrupting the ß-catenin/CBP signaling axis would promote epithelial differentiation and inhibit EMT. We treated monolayer cultures of human airway epithelial cells with TGFß1 in the presence or absence of the selective small molecule ICG-001 to inhibit ß-catenin/CBP signaling. We used western blots to assess expression of an EMT signature, CBP, p300, ß-catenin, fibronectin and ITGß1 and scratch wound assays to assess epithelial cell migration. Snai-1 and -2 expressions were determined using q-PCR. Exposure to TGFß1 induced EMT, characterized by reduced E-cadherin expression with increased expression of a-smooth muscle actin and EDA-fibronectin. Either co-treatment or therapeutic administration of ICG-001 completely inhibited TGFß1-induced EMT. ICG-001 also reduced the expression of ck-5 and -19 independent of TGFß1. Exposure to ICG-001 significantly inhibited epithelial cell proliferation and migration, coincident with a down regulation of ITGß1 and fibronectin expression. These data support our hypothesis that modulating the ß-catenin/CBP signaling axis plays a key role in epithelial plasticity and function.

DOI 10.1016/j.biocel.2015.08.014
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro, Fatemeh Moheimani
2015 Reid AT, Anderson AL, Roman SD, McLaughlin EA, McCluskey A, Robinson PJ, et al., 'Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates acrosomal exocytosis in mouse spermatozoa via dynamin phosphorylation', FASEB JOURNAL, 29 2872-2882 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1096/fj.14-265553
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Eileen Mclaughlin, Shaun Roman, Brett Nixon, Adam Mccluskey, John Aitken
2012 Reid AT, Lord T, Stanger SJ, Roman SD, McCluskey A, Robinson PJ, et al., 'Dynamin regulates specific membrane fusion events necessary for acrosomal exocytosis in mouse spermatozoa', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287 37659-37672 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Shaun Roman, Adam Mccluskey, John Aitken, Brett Nixon
2010 Reid AT, Redgrove KA, Aitken RJ, Nixon B, 'Cellular mechanisms regulating sperm-zona pellucida interaction', Asian Journal of Andrology, 13 88-96 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/aja.2010.74
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 35
Co-authors John Aitken, Brett Nixon, Kate Redgrove
Show 6 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Reid A, Moheimani F, Nichol K, Bartlett N, Wark P, Grainge C, Knight D, 'ACUTE INHIBITION OF NOTCH SIGNALLING ABLATES MUC5AC PRODUCTION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS FROM ASTHMATIC, NON-ASTHMATIC AND COPD DONORS.', RESPIROLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Fatemeh Moheimani, Peter Wark, Christopher Grainge, Nathan Bartlett, Darryl Knight
2017 Moheimani F, Williams T, Koops J, Reid AT, Hansbro PM, Wark PAB, Knight D, 'Micrornas As Potential Epigenetic Targets To Restore The Airway Epithelium Integrity In Asthmatics', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Washington, DC (2017)
Co-authors Fatemeh Moheimani, Philip Hansbro, Darryl Knight, Peter Wark
2017 Reid AT, Moheimani F, Nichol K, Bartlett N, Wark PAB, Grainge C, et al., 'Short-Term Inhibition Of Notch Signalling Ablates Muc5ac Production In Human Airway Epithelial Cells From Asthmatic, Non-Asthmatic And COPD Donors', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Washington, DC (2017)
Co-authors Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro, Christopher Grainge, Nathan Bartlett, Fatemeh Moheimani, Peter Wark
2016 Moheimani F, Koops J, Williams T, Reid A, Wark P, Knight D, 'MICRORNAS EXPRESSION ABNORMALITIES IN ASTHMATIC EPITHELIAL CELLS', Respirology, Perth, WA (2016)
Co-authors Darryl Knight, Fatemeh Moheimani, Peter Wark
2016 Moheimani F, Koops J, Williams T, Reid AT, Hansbro PM, Wark PA, Knight DA, 'ABNORMAL MICRORNAS EXPRESSION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS OF SEVERE ASTHMATICS', RESPIROLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Peter Wark, Darryl Knight, Fatemeh Moheimani
2015 Moheimani F, Roth H, Cross J, Reid A, Shaheen F, Warner S, et al., 'SUPPRESSION OF beta-CATENIN/CBP SIGNALING INHIBITS EPITHELIAL-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION AND MIGRATION OF HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIUM', RESPIROLOGY, Queensland, AUSTRALIA (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Fatemeh Moheimani, Darryl Knight, Philip Hansbro
2010 Reid AT, McEwan K, Campbell DM, Jans DA, Roman SD, 'Consistent nucleosome retention during chromatin packaging in human spermatozoa', OzBio 2010: The Molecules of Life - from Discovery to Biotechnology. Poster Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman
2010 Reid AT, Roman SD, Aitken RJ, Nixon B, 'Investigation of the role of dynamin in sperm surface remodelling', OzBio 2010: The Molecules of Life - from Discovery to Biotechnology. Poster Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Aitken, Brett Nixon, Shaun Roman
2010 Roman SD, Reid AT, McEwan K, Campbell DM, Jans DA, 'Nucleosome Retention During Chromatin Packaging in Spermatozoa', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, Sydney (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Shaun Roman
2010 Reid AT, Roman SD, Aitken RJ, Nixon B, 'Characterisation of the GTPASE dynamin throughout murine sperm maturation', Reproduction, Fertility and Development, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors John Aitken, Shaun Roman, Brett Nixon
Show 7 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $93,712

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $17,307

The role of apical mechanical shear stress on epithelial cell function in asthma$17,307

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Andrew Reid, Mr Punnam Veerati, Conjoint Associate Professor Christopher Grainge
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800434
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

20173 grants / $58,420

Zeiss ApoTome.2 Optical Slider assembly$31,458

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Foster, P.S., Knight, D.A., Kim, R.Y., Horvat J.C., Bartlett, N.W., Yang, M., Donovan, C., Starkey, M.R., Reid, A.T., Tay, H.L., Kaiko, G., Collison, A.M.

Scheme UON 2017 Researcher Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Hunter Medical Research Institute Equipment Grant$19,198

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

D.A. Knight, N.W. Bartlett, C.L. Grainge, M. Schuliga, M.T. Liang, A.T. Reid

Scheme HMRI Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Development of a medium throughput assay for assessing compounds that modulate fibroblast function in COPD$7,764

Funding body: Metera Pharmaceuticals Inc

Funding body Metera Pharmaceuticals Inc
Project Team Professor Darryl Knight, Dr Michael Schuliga, Doctor Andrew Reid
Scheme Research Consultancy
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701512
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y

20161 grants / $17,985

Upgrades for existing Zeiss Automated Fluorescent Microscope$17,985

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Starkey, M.R., Donovan, C., Kim, R.Y., Reid, A.T., Tay, H.L.

Scheme UoN Researcher Equipment Grant 2016
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD The Role of Beta-catenin in the Development of the Asthmatic Epithelial Phenotype PhD (Immunology & Microbiol), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD The Cross-Talk Between STAT Proteins Drives Dysfunctional Epithelial Responses to Viruses in Asthma PhD (Medical Biochemistry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Role of Mechanical Forces in Asthma Pathogenesis PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Andrew Reid

Position

Postdoctoral Researcher
Knight Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email andrew.reid@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0108

Office

Room HMRI2109
Building Hunter Medical Research Institute
Location New Lambton Heights

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