Dr Tessa Lord

Dr Tessa Lord

Lecturer

School of Environmental and Life Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Lecturer in Biological Sciences and a researcher in the Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Science. My research is primarily focused on understanding how the stem cells in the testis function to drive sperm production, and on harnessing this knowledge to support stem cell maintenance in an in vitro environment. The ultimate aim of my research is to develop a methodology that will allow stem cells from the testis to be used as a therapeutic tool to treat infertility caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, particularly in pre-pubertal boys who currently have no other options to safeguard their fertility.

I completed my PhD under the supervision of L. Prof. John Aitken and Prof. Brett Nixon at the University of Newcastle in October 2015. My doctoral studies were focused on understanding the molecular processes that drive the rapid demise of the oocyte (egg) in the culture dish, prior to its utilization for IVF. In working with members of the PRC in Reproductive Science, we identified that oxidative stress as a key factor instigating oocyte degeneration, and demonstrated that supplementation of oocyte culture media with the antioxidant melatonin could prolong the window for fertilization and improve the quality the embryos produced.

Following my PhD, I moved to Washington State University, USA, where I worked as a Postdoctoral fellow for 3 years under the supervision of Prof. Jon Oatley. As a member of the Centre for Reproductive Biology at WSU, I conducted research on spermatogonial stem cells, with a particular focus on identifying transcription factors that regulate stem cell maintenance and self-renewal, and on developing novel high-throughput methodologies that can be used to study the stem cell pool.

My current research areas of interest include:

1. Understanding the microenvironment within which stem cells reside in the testis, with a particular interest in oxygen tension

2. Identifying/characterising molecular networks that regulate self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells, including oxygen-responsive transcription factors

3. Adapting culture conditions to facilitate robust maintenance and proliferation of spermatogonial stem cells in vitro, allowing for transplantation that could potentially restore sperm production in an infertile testis


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biotechnology, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Biotechnology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Fertility
  • Reproductive biology
  • Stem cells
  • Transcription factors

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111404 Reproduction 40
060803 Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology 30
060802 Animal Cell and Molecular Biology 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
30/10/2015 - 30/12/2018 Postdoctoral researcher Washington State University
Centre for Reproductive Biology, School of Molecular Biosciences
United States

Awards

Award

Year Award
2019 2019 PVC Conference Assistance Funding
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
2017 Winner of ‘Best Presentation by a Postdoc’ travel award, WSU SMB retreat
Washington State University
2015 Selected for ‘Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer’ advanced training course
Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer
2014 Faculty of Science and I.T. Conference Scholarship
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2014 ‘Best Presentation by a PhD Student’ prize - ASMR satellite meeting
Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR)
2013 SRB ‘Oozoa award’ for best student presentation
Australian Society for Reproductive Biology
2012 Australian Postgraduate Award PhD Scholarship
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2011 Don Angus Memorial Prize for Molecular Biology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2011 School of Environmental and Life Sciences ‘Summer Research Scholarship’
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2011 Faculty of Science and I.T. Honours Scholarship
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
2011 Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Innovation (Honours) Scholarship
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Distinction

Year Award
2011 University medal for exceptional academic merit
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
2011 Faculty Medal for exceptional academic merit
Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
BIOL2050 Molecular Genetics
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Lecturer 21/01/2019 - 31/12/2023
BIOL2010 Biochemistry
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Lecturer 21/01/2019 - 31/12/2023
BIOL3020 Reproductive Physiology and Development
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Lecturer 27/07/2015 - 27/11/2015
BIOL2001 Molecular Laboratory Skills for the Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Demonstrator 21/02/2011 - 10/07/2014
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lord T, Oatley JM, 'Spermatogonial Response to Somatic Cell Interactions. Volume 3: Gametogenesis, Fertilization and Early Development - Spermatogenesis', Encyclopedia of Reproduction Second Edition, Academic Press, Cambridge, USA 53-53 (2018)
2017 Lord T, Oatley JM, 'Regulation of spermatogonial stem cell maintenance and self-Renewal', The Biology of Mammalian Spermatogonia 91-129 (2017)

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) reside within the stem cell niche along the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules in the testi... [more]

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) reside within the stem cell niche along the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules in the testis, and their actions provide the basis for continuity and regeneration of the spermatogenic lineage. SSCs must balance self-renewal with the production of progenitor spermatogonia in order to sustain optimal sperm production while preventing exhaustion of the stem cell reservoir. Regulation of SSC fate decision is in part influenced by signaling from growth factors, such as Gdnf and Fgf2, which are synthesized by somatic niche support cells. Such growth factors have been shown to directly influence expression of transcription factors such as Id4, Etv5, and Bcl6b within SSCs to stimulate self-renewal. Additionally, the undifferentiated state of both SSCs and progenitors is maintained by virtue of intracellular regulation at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels; both independently and dependently of characterized growth factors released from the niche. This intrinsic regulation not only acts to enrich the expression of genes important for maintaining the undifferentiated state, but also supresses expression of differentiation-driving factors. Although progress in SSC research has previously been dampened by a lack of SSC-specific markers that can be used to isolate pure populations for analysis, recent advances have seen the development of mouse lines in which the SSC population alone is marked by expression of a fluorescent reporter transgene; for example the Id4-eGfp mouse line. Consequently, in-depth analysis of the SSC population in comparison to undifferentiated progenitors and differentiating spermatogonia is now possible. Further progress in characterizing factors involved in SSC maintenance and self-renewal is important for understanding potential underlying causes of idiopathic infertility, and further, is the basis for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at reinstating fertility in patients who have been rendered infertile as a consequence of chemotherapeutic treatments in pre-pubertal life.

DOI 10.1007/978-1-4939-7505-1_5
Citations Scopus - 1

Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Martin JH, Aitken RJ, Bromfield E, Cafe SL, Sutherland JM, Frost ER, et al., 'Investigation into the presence and functional significance of proinsulin C-peptide in the female germline', Biology of Reproduction, 100 1275-1289 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/biolre/ioz008
Co-authors Jessie Sutherland, Brett Nixon, John Aitken, Elizabeth Bromfield, Jacinta Martin
2019 Tacer KF, Montoya MC, Oatley MJ, Lord T, Oatley JM, Klein J, et al., 'MAGE cancer-testis antigens protect the mammalian germline under environmental stress', SCIENCE ADVANCES, 5 (2019)
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.aav4832
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Martin J, Bromfield EG, Aitken RJ, Lord T, Nixon B, 'Double Strand Break DNA Repair occurs via Non-Homologous End-Joining in Mouse MII Oocytes', Scientific Reports, 8 1-15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-27892-2.
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Jacinta Martin, John Aitken, Elizabeth Bromfield
2018 Lord T, Oatley JM, 'Functional assessment of spermatogonial stem cell purity in experimental cell populations', STEM CELL RESEARCH, 29 129-133 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.scr.2018.03.016
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
2018 Lord T, Oatley MJ, Oatley JM, 'Testicular Architecture Is Critical for Mediation of Retinoic Acid Responsiveness by Undifferentiated Spermatogonial Subtypes in the Mouse', STEM CELL REPORTS, 10 538-552 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.stemcr.2018.01.003
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2017 Helsel AR, Yang QE, Oatley MJ, Lord T, Sablitzky F, Oatley JM, 'Id4 levels dictate the stem cell state in mouse spermatogonia', Development (Cambridge), 144 624-634 (2017)

© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Spermatogenesis is a classic model of cycling cell lineages that depend on a balance between stem cell self-renewal for continu... [more]

© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd. Spermatogenesis is a classic model of cycling cell lineages that depend on a balance between stem cell self-renewal for continuity and the formation of progenitors as the initial step in the production of differentiated cells. The mechanisms that guide the continuum of spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) to progenitor spermatogonial transition and precise identifiers of subtypes in the process are undefined. Here we used an Id4-eGfp reporter mouse to discover that EGFP intensity is predictive of the subsets, with the ID4-EGFPBright population being mostly, if not purely, SSCs, whereas the ID4-EGFPDim population is in transition to the progenitor state. These subsets are also distinguishable by transcriptome signatures. Moreover, using a conditional overexpression mouse model, we found that transition from the stem cell to the immediate progenitor state requires downregulation of Id4 coincident with a major change in the transcriptome. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the level of ID4 is predictive of stem cell or progenitor capacity in spermatogonia and dictates the interface of transition between the different functional states.

DOI 10.1242/dev.146928
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 46
2017 Lord T, Oatley JM, 'A revised A

© 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and progenitor spermatogonia encompass the undifferentiated spermatogonial pool in mammalian testes... [more]

© 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and progenitor spermatogonia encompass the undifferentiated spermatogonial pool in mammalian testes. In rodents, this population is comprised of Asingle, Apaired and chains of 4-16 Aaligned spermatogonia. Although traditional models propose that the entire Asingle pool represents SSCs, and formation of an Apaired syncytium symbolizes irreversible entry to a progenitor state destined for differentiation; recent models have emerged that suggest that the Asingle pool is heterogeneous, and Apaired/Aaligned can fragment to produce new SSCs. In this review, we explore evidence from the literature for these differing models representing SSC dynamics, including the traditional 'Asingle' and more recently formed 'fragmentation' models. Further, based on findings using a fluorescent reporter transgene (eGfp) that reflects expression of the SSC-specific transcription factor 'inhibitor of DNA binding 4' (Id4), we propose a revised version of the traditional model in which SSCs are a subset of the Asingle population; the ID4-eGFP bright cells (SSCultimate). From the SSCultimate pool, other Asingle and Apaired cohorts arise that are ID4-eGFP dim. Although the SSCultimate possess a transcriptome profile that reflects a self-renewing state, the transcriptome of the ID4-eGFP dim population resembles that of cells in transition (SSCtransitory) to a progenitor state. Accordingly, at the next mitotic division, these SSCtransitory are likely to join the progenitor pool and have lost stem cell capacity. This model supports the concept of a linear relationship between spermatogonial chain length and propensity for differentiation, while leaving open the possibility that the SSCtransitory (some Asingle and potentially some Apaired spermatogonia), may contribute to the self-renewing pool rather than transition to a progenitor state in response to perturbations of steady-state conditions.

DOI 10.1530/REP-17-0034
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2016 Martin JH, Bromfield EG, Aitken RJ, Lord T, Nixon B, 'Data on the concentrations of etoposide, PSC833, BAPTA-AM, and cycloheximide that do not compromise the vitality of mature mouse oocytes, parthenogenetically activated and fertilized embryos', DATA IN BRIEF, 8 1215-1220 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.dib.2016.07.046
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Elizabeth Bromfield, Jacinta Martin, John Aitken
2016 Martin JH, Nixon B, Lord T, Bromfield EG, Aitken RJ, 'Identification of a key role for permeability glycoprotein in enhancing the cellular defense mechanisms of fertilized oocytes', DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 417 63-76 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2016.06.035
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Brett Nixon, Elizabeth Bromfield, John Aitken, Jacinta Martin
2015 Lord T, Martin JH, Aitken RJ, 'Accumulation of Electrophilic Aldehydes During Postovulatory Aging of Mouse Oocytes Causes Reduced Fertility, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis', BIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION, 92 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.114.122820
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Jacinta Martin, John Aitken
2015 Lord T, Aitken RJ, 'Fertilization stimulates 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine repair and antioxidant activity to prevent mutagenesis in the embryo', Developmental Biology, 406 1-13 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Oxidative DNA damage harbored by both spermatozoa and oocytes at the time of fertilization must be repaired prior to S-phase of the first mitotic division to ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Oxidative DNA damage harbored by both spermatozoa and oocytes at the time of fertilization must be repaired prior to S-phase of the first mitotic division to reduce the risk of transversion mutations occurring in the zygote and subverting the normal patterns of cell differentiation and development. Of the characterised oxidative DNA lesions, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) is particularly mutagenic. The current study reveals for the first time a marked acceleration of 8OHdG repair in the mouse oocyte/zygote by the base excision repair (BER) pathway following fertilization. Specifically, fertilization initiates post-translational modification to BER enzymes such as OGG1 and XRCC1, causing nuclear localisation and accelerated 8OHdG excision. Additionally, both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes appear to benefit from increased protection against further 8OHdG formation by a fertilization-associated increase in glutathione peroxidase activity. The major limitation of the characterised 8OHdG repair system is the relatively low level of OGG1 expression in the oocyte, in contrast to the male germ line where it is the only constituent of the BER pathway. The male and female germ lines therefore collaborate in the repair of oxidative DNA damage, and oocytes are vulnerable to high levels of 8OHdG being carried into the zygote by the fertilizing spermatozoon.

DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2015.07.024
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors John Aitken
2013 Lord T, Nixon B, Jones KT, Aitken RJ, 'Melatonin Prevents Postovulatory Oocyte Aging in the Mouse and Extends the Window for Optimal Fertilization In Vitro', Biology of Reproduction, 88 1-9 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1095/biolreprod.112.106450
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 75
Co-authors John Aitken, Brett Nixon
2013 Smith TB, De Iuliis GN, Lord T, Aitken RJ, 'The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 as a model for oxidative stress and impaired DNA repair in the male germ line', Reproduction, 146 253-262 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/REP-13-0186
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 24
Co-authors John Aitken, Geoffry DeiuliIs
2013 Lord T, Aitken RJ, 'Oxidative stress and ageing of the post-ovulatory oocyte', Reproduction, 146 217-227 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1530/REP-13-0111
Citations Scopus - 81Web of Science - 78
Co-authors John Aitken
2013 Aitken RJ, Smith TB, Lord T, Kuczera L, Koppers AJ, Naumovski N, et al., 'On methods for the detection of reactive oxygen species generation by human spermatozoa: analysis of the cellular responses to catechol oestrogen, lipid aldehyde, menadione and arachidonic acid', Andrology, 1 192-205 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.2047-2927.2012.00056.x
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 39
Co-authors John Aitken, Mark Baker, Geoffry DeiuliIs
2012 Reid AT, Lord T, Stanger SJ, Roman SD, McCluskey A, Robinson PJ, et al., 'Dynamin regulates specific membrane fusion events necessary for acrosomal exocytosis in mouse spermatozoa', Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287 37659-37672 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Adam Mccluskey, Andrew Reid, John Aitken, Shaun Roman, Brett Nixon
Show 13 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Lord T, Martin JH, Aitken RJ, 'ACCUMULATION OF 4-HYDROXYNONENAL DURING POST-OVULATORY AGEING OF MOUSE OOCYTES CAUSES REDUCED FERTILITY, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND APOPTOSIS.', FERTILITY AND STERILITY, Honolulu, HI (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.07.1118
Co-authors Jacinta Martin, John Aitken

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Lord T, The role of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in post-ovulatory ageing and apoptosis of the mammalian oocyte, University of Newcastle (2015)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 18
Total funding $240,375

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20196 grants / $73,438

Novel strategies to reverse chemotherapy-induced infertility in male childhood cancer survivors$28,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Tessa Lord
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901485
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

HMRI Bob and Terry Kennedy Infertility Grant$28,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON N

Faculty of Science Strategic Investment Funding$8,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and IT, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and IT, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty of Science Strategic Investment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PRC for Reproductive Science Pilot Project Funding$5,000

Funding body: PRC for Reproductive Science, University of Newcastle

Funding body PRC for Reproductive Science, University of Newcastle
Scheme Pilot project funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2019 PVC Conference Assistance Funding$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle | Australia
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

GRC for Germinal Stem Cell Biology travel grant$1,438

Funding body: Gordon Research Conferences

Funding body Gordon Research Conferences
Scheme GRC for Germinal Stem Cell Biology travel grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20181 grants / $420

WSU Centre for Reproductive Biology travel award$420

Funding body: Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU

Funding body Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU
Scheme WSU Centre for Reproductive Biology travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

20174 grants / $71,470

Lalor Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship$70,000

Funding body: Lalor Foundation

Funding body Lalor Foundation
Project Team

Tessa Lord, Jon Oatley

Scheme Lalor Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

North American Testis Workshop speaker selection/travel award$700

Funding body: American Society of Andrology

Funding body American Society of Andrology
Scheme North American Testis Workshop speaker selection/travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

WSU Centre for Reproductive Biology travel award$420

Funding body: Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU

Funding body Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU
Scheme WSU Centre for Reproductive Biology travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

WSU School of Molecular Biosciences travel award$350

Funding body: School of Molecular Biosciences, WSU

Funding body School of Molecular Biosciences, WSU
Scheme WSU School of Molecular Biosciences travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

20161 grants / $700

Northwest Reproductive Sciences symposium travel award$700

Funding body: Northwest Reproductive Sciences Symposium and Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU

Funding body Northwest Reproductive Sciences Symposium and Centre for Reproductive Biology, WSU
Scheme NWRSS/CRB travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON N

20152 grants / $3,650

Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer travel award$2,650

Funding body: Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer

Funding body Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer
Scheme Frontiers in Stem Cells in Cancer travel award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

Faculty of Science and IT thesis submission scholarship$1,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Scheme FSCIT thesis submission scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20141 grants / $2,000

Faculty of Science and IT conference scholarship$2,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology The University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty of Science and IT conference scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20121 grants / $86,697

Australian Postgraduate Award$86,697

Funding body: Australian Commonwealth Government

Funding body Australian Commonwealth Government
Scheme Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20112 grants / $2,000

DVCR Honours Scholarship$1,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme DVCR honours scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty of Science and IT Honours Scholarship$1,000

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Scheme FSCIT honours scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Dr Tessa Lord

Position

Lecturer
PRC for Reproductive Sciences
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email tessa.lord@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40553026
Links Twitter
Research Networks

Office

Room LS4.38
Building Life Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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