Dr Adam Fahy

Dr Adam Fahy

Senior ANFF Support Officer

School of Information and Physical Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Adam Fahy is a Support Officer for the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) within the Newcastle Hub of the Materials Node. Adam completed a PhD at the University of Newcastle, focusing on the development of a new type of microscope employing neutral helium atoms to generate an image of a sample surface. He joined the ANFF network in 2015, and is responsible for the operation, maintenance and training for a range of instruments, most notably the x-ray photoelectron spectrometer facilities. Adam also specialises in instrument and device design and manufacture for both industry and research sectors. Projects have ranged from the creation of medical devices, to vacuum system customisation, to the continued development of large area organic photovoltaic arrays.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Physics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Physics), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours)(Physics), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Helium
  • Helium Atom Scattering
  • Instrument Design
  • Neutral Atom Imaging
  • X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
510405 Soft condensed matter 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior ANFF Support Officer University of Newcastle
School of Information and Physical Sciences
Australia
Casual Lecturer University of Newcastle
Learning and Teaching
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (32 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Barr MG, Chambon S, Fahy A, Jones TW, Marcus MA, Kilcoyne ALD, et al., 'Nanomorphology of eco-friendly colloidal inks, relating non-fullerene acceptor surface energy to structure formation', Materials Chemistry Frontiers, 5 2218-2233 (2021) [C1]

Nanoengineered, eco-friendly, solution-processable electroactive materials are in demand for the growing field of printed electronics, and these material requirements can be achie... [more]

Nanoengineered, eco-friendly, solution-processable electroactive materials are in demand for the growing field of printed electronics, and these material requirements can be achieved by the development of waterborne colloidal dispersions. Functionality in these composite materials can be tuned by thermodynamically modifying the material nanomorphology, often by creation of kinetically stabilized aqueous nanoparticle dispersions. In this work we demonstrate that the internal structure of organic nanoparticles is controlled by the surface energy difference between the polymeric donor material and the non-fullerene acceptor (NFA) material. Nanoparticles of the following donor-acceptor combinations, suitable for printed organic photovoltaics, have been synthesized: TQ1:N2200, TQ1:PNDIT10, P3HT:N2200, P3HT:o-IDTBR and P3HT:eh-IDTBR. Advanced synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy are used to correlate the formation of core-shell nanoparticle morphology to the material surface energy. We subsequently present a viable avenue for customizing the blended nanoparticle structure into (i) core-shell, (ii) molecularly intermixed, or (iii) inverted shell-core structures. Our results showed that TQ1:PNDIT10 and P3HT:o-IDTBR nanoparticles were comprised of a donor-rich shell and an NFA-rich core, however, interestingly we show a reversal to the inverse NFA shell/donor core structure for TQ1:N2200, P3HT:N2200 and P3HT:eh-IDTBR nanoparticles, driven by the low surface energy of N2200 (23.7 mJ m-2) and eh-IDTBR (18.3 mJ m-2). This article is the first report of a flipped nanoparticle core-shell morphology comprising an NFA-rich shell for the miniemulsion synthesis route. The composition of the shells and cores was able to be controlled by the differential mismatch in the surface energy of the donor and acceptor materials, with ?Gsurface > 0, ?Gsurface = 0, and ?Gsurface < 0 for acceptor core-donor shell, molecularly intermixed, and acceptor shell-donor core, respectively. Accordingly, we introduce an entirely overlooked new figure of merit (FoM) for customizing nanoparticulate colloidal inks: tunable surface energy of non-fullerene-based semiconductors. The establishment of this FoM opens up electroactive material design to a wide range of functional printing applications with varying device and ink structure requirements, thereby reshaping the nanoengineering toolkit for waterborne colloidal dispersions and hence printed electronics.

DOI 10.1039/d0qm00980f
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2021 Hassan M, Deb AK, Qi F, Liu Y, Du J, Fahy A, et al., 'Magnetically separable mesoporous alginate polymer beads assist adequate removal of aqueous methylene blue over broad solution pH', Journal of Cleaner Production, 319 (2021)

Adsorption is a promising technology for removal of organic and inorganic contaminants from soil and water system. In this study, magnetically separable mesoporous polymeric beads... [more]

Adsorption is a promising technology for removal of organic and inorganic contaminants from soil and water system. In this study, magnetically separable mesoporous polymeric beads (NiZnFe4O4-HNT@alg) were synthesised for efficient removal of methylene blue (MB, cationic dye) under broad solution pH (from pH 3.41 to pH 8.43). Alginate biopolymer were used to stabilize halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and nickel zinc iron oxide nanoparticles (NiZnFe4O4 < 100 nm). NiZnFe4O4 was incorporated onto the polymer beads to generate the adsorbents' magnetic properties and catalytic degradability. The adsorbent (NiZnFe4O4-HNT@alg) have higher surface area (122.43 m2/g), suitable mesoporosity (~6.68 nm), larger pore volume (0.11 cm3/g), and abundance of active sites, enabling high adsorption capacity (264 mg/g) of MB. The abundance of hydroxyl, carboxyl, and siloxane groups enabled cationic dye sorption through ionic interaction. The removal efficiency of MB was ~99% under a wide solution pH range from 10 mg/L of MB, in which the adsorbent dose was 2 g/L. Both Langmuir (R2 = 0.99; p < 0.001) and Freundlich (R2 = 0.99; p < 0.001) isotherm models fitted well, whereas trends of kinetics model fitting are pseudo-second-order (R2 = 0.99) > intraparticle diffusion (R2 = 0.93) > pseudo-first-order (R2 = 0.87). Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental mapping demonstrated that MB has a co-distribution with silicon, aluminium, and alginate carbon phase but is limited with iron and nickel, indicating HNTs and alginate polymer performed as sorption sites, whereas NiZnFe4O4 performed as a catalyst. The presence (post-sorption) and absence (pre-sorption) of inorganic, total carbon or total organic carbon content at different solution pH, contact time, and initial concentration of MB demonstrated that the adsorbent act as a catalyst as well for degradation of MB. NiZnFe4O4-HNT@alg triggers efficient removal of MB with the assist of adsorption and catalytic degradation at broad solution pH. A comparison in removal of MB by various adsorbents including, biochars, clays, activated carbon, nanoparticles, polymers, nano composites, graphene oxides, carbon nanotubes, and polymer beads with the result of this study were performed, illustrating competitive sorption capacity of NiZnFe4O4-HNT@alg.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2021.128694
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Jianhua Du, Yanju Liu
2021 Posar JA, Davis J, Alnaghy S, Wilkinson D, Cottam S, Lee DM, et al., 'Polymer Photodetectors for Printable, Flexible, and Fully Tissue Equivalent X-Ray Detection with Zero-Bias Operation and Ultrafast Temporal Responses', ADVANCED MATERIALS TECHNOLOGIES, 6 (2021)
DOI 10.1002/admt.202001298
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Matthew Barr
2021 Holmes NP, Elkington DC, Bergin M, Griffith MJ, Sharma A, Fahy A, et al., 'Temperature-Modulated Doping at Polymer Semiconductor Interfaces', ACS Applied Electronic Materials, 3 1384-1393 (2021) [C1]

Understanding doping in polymer semiconductors has important implications for the development of organic electronic devices. This study reports a detailed investigation of the dop... [more]

Understanding doping in polymer semiconductors has important implications for the development of organic electronic devices. This study reports a detailed investigation of the doping of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/Nafion bilayer interfaces commonly used in organic biosensors. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (d-SIMS), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and electrical device characterization reveals that the doping of P3HT increases with annealing temperature, and this increase is associated with thermally activated interdiffusion of the P3HT and Nafion. First-principles modeling of d-SIMS depth profiling data demonstrates that the diffusivity coefficient is a strong function of the molar concentration, resulting in a discrete intermixed region at the P3HT/Nafion interface that grows with increasing annealing temperature. Correlating the electrical conductance measurements with the diffusion model provides a detailed model for the temperature-modulated doping that occurs in P3HT/Nafion bilayers. Point-of-care testing has created a market for low-cost sensor technology, with printed organic electronic sensors well positioned to meet this demand, and this article constitutes a detailed study of the doping mechanism underlying such future platforms for the development of sensing technologies based on organic semiconductors.

DOI 10.1021/acsaelm.1c00008
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Matthew Bergin, Paul Dastoor
2020 Myles TA, Fahy A, Martens J, Dastoor PC, Barr MG, 'Fast neutral atom microscopy: An optimisation framework for stagnation detectors', Measurement: Journal of the International Measurement Confederation, 151 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.measurement.2019.107263
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2019 Ameri M, Al-Mudhaffer MF, Almyahi F, Fardell GC, Marks M, Al-Ahmad A, et al., 'Role of Stabilizing Surfactants on Capacitance, Charge, and Ion Transport in Organic Nanoparticle-Based Electronic Devices', ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, 11 10074-10088 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.8b19820
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Michael Dickinson, Paul Dastoor, Krishna Feron
2019 Hart AS, Andersen TR, Griffith MJ, Fahy A, Vaughan B, Belcher WJ, Dastoor PC, 'Roll-to-roll solvent annealing of printed P3HT : ICXA devices', RSC Advances, 9 42294-42305 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c9ra08826a
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2019 Lee CY, Mitchell DRG, Molino P, Fahy A, Wallace GG, 'Tunable solution-processable anodic exfoliated graphene', Applied Materials Today, 15 290-296 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmt.2019.02.008
Citations Scopus - 13
2019 Almyahi F, Andersen TR, Fahy A, Dickinson M, Feron K, Belcher WJ, Dastoor PC, 'The role of surface energy control in organic photovoltaics based on solar paints', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 7 9202-9214 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c8ta09521c
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Michael Dickinson, Paul Dastoor, Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron
2019 Myles TA, Eder SD, Barr MG, Fahy A, Martens J, Dastoor PC, 'Taxonomy through the lens of neutral helium microscopy', SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-36373-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Matthew Barr
2019 Holmes NP, Munday H, Barr MG, Thomsen L, Marcus MA, Kilcoyne ALD, et al., 'Unravelling donor-acceptor film morphology formation for environmentally-friendly OPV ink formulations', GREEN CHEMISTRY, 21 5090-5103 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c9gc02288k
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2018 Almyahi F, Andersen TR, Cooling N, Holmes NP, Fahy A, Barr MG, et al., 'Optimization, characterization and upscaling of aqueous solar nanoparticle inks for organic photovoltaics using low-cost donor: acceptor blend', ORGANIC ELECTRONICS, 52 71-78 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orgel.2017.10.008
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor, Warwick Belcher
2018 Pan X, Sharma A, Gedefaw D, Kroon R, Diaz de Zerio A, Holmes NP, et al., 'Environmentally friendly preparation of nanoparticles for organic photovoltaics', Organic Electronics: physics, materials, applications, 59 432-440 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.orgel.2018.05.040
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Xiaojing Zhou, Warwick Belcher, Paul Dastoor
2018 Fahy A, Eder SD, Barr M, Martens J, Myles TA, Dastoor PC, 'Image formation in the scanning helium microscope.', Ultramicroscopy, 192 7-13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.05.004
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Matthew Barr
2018 Holmes NP, Marks M, Cave JM, Feron K, Barr MG, Fahy A, et al., 'Engineering Two-Phase and Three-Phase Microstructures from Water-Based Dispersions of Nanoparticles for Eco-Friendly Polymer Solar Cell Applications', Chemistry of Materials, 30 6521-6531 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b03222
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Krishna Feron, Matthew Barr, Xiaojing Zhou, Warwick Belcher
2017 Tsarev S, Collins RN, Ilton ES, Fahy A, Waite TD, 'The short-term reduction of uranium by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI): Role of oxide shell, reduction mechanism and the formation of U(v)-carbonate phases', Environmental Science: Nano, 4 1304-1313 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c7en00024c
Citations Scopus - 29
2017 Myles T, Martens J, Fahy A, Barr M, Dastoor PC, 'Atom microscopy - Imaging with a deft touch', Australian Physics, 54 206-213 (2017)

The destruction of fragile samples is an inevitable side-effect of many current microscopy techniques. A new type of instrument, the scanning helium microscope or SHeM, utilises n... [more]

The destruction of fragile samples is an inevitable side-effect of many current microscopy techniques. A new type of instrument, the scanning helium microscope or SHeM, utilises neutral helium as the probe particle to provide an alternative solution for such materials. The helium atoms are inert, neutral, and have an energy several orders of magnitude lower than that of photons or electrons at comparable wavelengths. As a result, the technique is totally surface sensitive and completely non-destructive, making it ideal in instances where exposure to high energy beams would either limit experimental time, or the reliability of the results.

Co-authors Paul Dastoor, Matthew Barr
2016 Holmes NP, Marks M, Kumar P, Kroon R, Barr MG, Nicolaidis N, et al., 'Nano-pathways: Bridging the divide between water-processable nanoparticulate and bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics', Nano Energy, 19 495-510 (2016) [C1]

Here we report the application of a conjugated copolymer based on thiophene and quinoxaline units, namely poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diy... [more]

Here we report the application of a conjugated copolymer based on thiophene and quinoxaline units, namely poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (TQ1), to nanoparticle organic photovoltaics (NP-OPVs). TQ1 exhibits more desirable material properties for NP-OPV fabrication and operation, particularly a high glass transition temperature (Tg) and amorphous nature, compared to the commonly applied semicrystalline polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This study reports the optimisation of TQ1:PC71BM (phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester) NP-OPV device performance by the application of mild thermal annealing treatments in the range of the Tg (sub-Tg and post-Tg), both in the active layer drying stage and post-cathode deposition annealing stage of device fabrication, and an in-depth study of the effect of these treatments on nanoparticle film morphology. In addition, we report a type of morphological evolution in nanoparticle films for OPV active layers that has not previously been observed, that of PC71BM nano-pathway formation between dispersed PC71BM-rich nanoparticle cores, which have the benefit of making the bulk film more conducive to charge percolation and extraction.

DOI 10.1016/j.nanoen.2015.11.021
Citations Scopus - 53Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Xiaojing Zhou, Matthew Barr, Krishna Feron, Paul Dastoor
2016 Barr M, Fahy A, Martens J, Jardine AP, Ward DJ, Ellis J, et al., 'Unlocking new contrast in a scanning helium microscope', Nature Communications, 7 (2016) [C1]

Delicate structures (such as biological samples, organic films for polymer electronics and adsorbate layers) suffer degradation under the energetic probes of traditional microscop... [more]

Delicate structures (such as biological samples, organic films for polymer electronics and adsorbate layers) suffer degradation under the energetic probes of traditional microscopies. Furthermore, the charged nature of these probes presents difficulties when imaging with electric or magnetic fields, or for insulating materials where the addition of a conductive coating is not desirable. Scanning helium microscopy is able to image such structures completely non-destructively by taking advantage of a neutral helium beam as a chemically, electrically and magnetically inert probe of the sample surface. Here we present scanning helium micrographs demonstrating image contrast arising from a range of mechanisms including, for the first time, chemical contrast observed from a series of metal-semiconductor interfaces. The ability of scanning helium microscopy to distinguish between materials without the risk of damage makes it ideal for investigating a wide range of systems.

DOI 10.1038/ncomms10189
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2016 Tsarev S, Collins RN, Fahy A, Waite TD, 'Reduced Uranium Phases Produced from Anaerobic Reaction with Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron', Environmental Science & Technology, 50 2595-2601 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b06160
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 28
2016 Barr M, Fahy A, Martens J, Dastoor PC, 'A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly', REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS, 87 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1063/1.4948391
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2016 Andersen TR, Almyahi F, Cooling NA, Elkington D, Wiggins L, Fahy A, et al., 'Comparison of inorganic electron transport layers in fully roll-to-roll coated/printed organic photovoltaics in normal geometry', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 4 15986-15996 (2016) [C1]

We investigate the suitability of four different inorganic materials (chromium oxide (CrOX), titanium oxide (TiOX), aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO) and zinc oxide (ZnO)) as elect... [more]

We investigate the suitability of four different inorganic materials (chromium oxide (CrOX), titanium oxide (TiOX), aluminium doped zinc oxide (AZO) and zinc oxide (ZnO)) as electrode transport layers in fully roll-to-roll (R2R) fabricated P3HT:ICxA organic solar cells. CrOX and TiOX were found to be unsuitable, as the CrOX devices did not exhibit rectifying behaviour while the TiOX devices did not withstand the annealing conditions. Of the last two ETLs, ZnO showed by far the most promise with devices demonstrating an average efficiency of 2.2%, which is the highest reported value for R2R devices in normal geometry, and a significantly extended lifetime compared with AZO devices under ISOS-L-2 conditions.

DOI 10.1039/c6ta06746h
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Krishna Feron, Paul Dastoor
2015 Fahy A, Barr M, Martens J, Dastoor PC, 'A highly contrasting scanning helium microscope', Review of Scientific Instruments, 86 (2015) [C1]

We present a scanning helium microscope equipped to make use of the unique contrast mechanisms, surface sensitivity, and zero damage imaging the technique affords. The new design ... [more]

We present a scanning helium microscope equipped to make use of the unique contrast mechanisms, surface sensitivity, and zero damage imaging the technique affords. The new design delivers an order of magnitude increase in the available helium signal, yielding a higher contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. These improvements allow the microscope to produce high quality, intuitive images of samples using topological contrast, while setting the stage for investigations into further contrast mechanisms.

DOI 10.1063/1.4907539
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2015 O'Donnell KM, Warschkow O, Suleman A, Fahy A, Thomsen L, Schofield SR, 'Manipulating the orientation of an organic adsorbate on silicon: a NEXAFS study of acetophenone on Si(001)', JOURNAL OF PHYSICS-CONDENSED MATTER, 27 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/0953-8984/27/5/054002
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
2014 Barr M, Fahy A, Jardine A, Ellis J, Ward D, MacLaren DA, et al., 'A design for a pinhole scanning helium microscope', Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, 340 76-80 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nimb.2014.06.028
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2014 Martens J, Fahy A, Barr M, Jardine A, Allison W, Dastoor PC, 'Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source', Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, 340 85-89 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.nimb.2014.07.033
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2012 Shearer CJ, Fahy AJ, Barr MG, Moore KE, Dastoor PC, Shapter JG, 'Field emission from single-, double-, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon', Journal of Applied Physics, 111 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1063/1.3687363
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2012 Barr MG, O'Donnell KM, Fahy AJ, Allison W, Dastoor PC, 'A desktop supersonic free-jet beam source for a scanning helium microscope (SHeM)', Measurement Science & Technology, 23 1-7 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2012 O'Donnell K, Fahy AJ, Barr MG, Allison W, Dastoor PC, 'Field ionization detection of helium using a planar array of carbon nanotubes', Physical Review B, 85 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.113404
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2012 Shearer CJ, Fahy AJ, Barr MG, Dastoor PC, Shapter JG, 'Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon', Nanoscale Research Letters, 7 1-4 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
2011 O'Donnell K, Fahy AJ, Thomsen L, O'Connor JD, Dastoor PC, 'Field ionization detectors: a comparative model', Measurement Science & Technology, 22 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/0957-0233/22/1/015901
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Oconnor, Paul Dastoor
2011 Fahy AJ, O'Donnell K, Barr MG, Zhou X, Allison W, Dastoor PC, 'Development of an improved field ionization detector incorporating a secondary electron stage', Measurement Science and Technology, 22 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/0957-0233/22/11/115902
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Xiaojing Zhou, Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor
Show 29 more journal articles
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $402,981

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $4,955

3D printing a bioengineered gut-on-a-chip: pilot project consumables to build a 3D platform for a human gut-on-a-chip to use in disease modelling$4,955

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Ayesha Ayesha, Doctor Adam Fahy, Doctor Bojan Stojkovic
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2101064
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

20202 grants / $398,026

Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) – Materials Node - NSW RAAP Funding$308,026

Funding body: NSW Department of Industry

Funding body NSW Department of Industry
Project Team Professor Paul Dastoor, Doctor Matthew Barr, Doctor Adam Fahy, Doctor Benjamin Vaughan
Scheme Research Attraction and Acceleration Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2001074
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Charge Around Australia STEM Roadshow$90,000

Funding body: Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources

Funding body Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources
Project Team Doctor Benjamin Vaughan, Doctor Adam Fahy, Doctor Matthew Barr, Doctor Nicolas Nicolaidis, Doctor Michael Dickinson, Doctor Warwick Belcher, Professor Paul Dastoor
Scheme Maker Projects - Community Stem Engagement Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2001182
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Effects of Temperature in Neutral Helium Microscopy PhD (Physics), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Adam Fahy

Positions

Senior ANFF Support Officer
School of Information and Physical Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Casual Lecturer
Learning and Teaching
Academic Division

Contact Details

Email adam.fahy@newcastle.edu.au
Mobile 0424414405

Office

Room P-125
Building Physics Building
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