Dr Matthew Bergin

Dr Matthew Bergin

Research Associate

School of Information and Physical Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Matthew is a research associate in the Centre for Organic Electronics (COE) and a support officer for the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). He received his M.Sci. degree in Natural Sciences and his PhD in Physics from the University of Cambridge. His PhD research was on instrumentation and contrast mechanisms in scanning helium microscopy, involving the development of a high efficiency electron ionisation mass spectrometer. Since graduating in 2019, he has worked as a research associate in the SMF group at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge and worked in the Surface Dynamics group at the Department of Chemistry, Swansea University.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Cambridge - UK
  • Master of Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge - UK
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Cambridge - UK
  • Master of Arts, University of Cambridge - UK

Keywords

  • Computational physics
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Physics
  • Scanning helium microscopy

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
510201 Atomic and molecular physics 50
510499 Condensed matter physics not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Information and Physical Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Holmes NP, Elkington DC, Bergin M, Griffith MJ, Sharma A, Fahy A, et al., 'Temperature-Modulated Doping at Polymer Semiconductor Interfaces', ACS Applied Electronic Materials, 3 1384-1393 (2021) [C1]

Understanding doping in polymer semiconductors has important implications for the development of organic electronic devices. This study reports a detailed investigation of the dop... [more]

Understanding doping in polymer semiconductors has important implications for the development of organic electronic devices. This study reports a detailed investigation of the doping of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/Nafion bilayer interfaces commonly used in organic biosensors. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (d-SIMS), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and electrical device characterization reveals that the doping of P3HT increases with annealing temperature, and this increase is associated with thermally activated interdiffusion of the P3HT and Nafion. First-principles modeling of d-SIMS depth profiling data demonstrates that the diffusivity coefficient is a strong function of the molar concentration, resulting in a discrete intermixed region at the P3HT/Nafion interface that grows with increasing annealing temperature. Correlating the electrical conductance measurements with the diffusion model provides a detailed model for the temperature-modulated doping that occurs in P3HT/Nafion bilayers. Point-of-care testing has created a market for low-cost sensor technology, with printed organic electronic sensors well positioned to meet this demand, and this article constitutes a detailed study of the doping mechanism underlying such future platforms for the development of sensing technologies based on organic semiconductors.

DOI 10.1021/acsaelm.1c00008
Co-authors Warwick Belcher, Adam Fahy, Paul Dastoor
2021 Bergin M, Ward DJ, Lambrick SM, von Jeinsen NA, Holst B, Ellis J, et al., 'Low-energy electron ionization mass spectrometer for efficient detection of low mass species', Review of Scientific Instruments, 92 (2021)

The design of a high-efficiency mass spectrometer is described, aimed at residual gas detection of low mass species using low-energy electron impact, with particular applications ... [more]

The design of a high-efficiency mass spectrometer is described, aimed at residual gas detection of low mass species using low-energy electron impact, with particular applications in helium atom microscopy and atomic or molecular scattering. The instrument consists of an extended ionization volume, where electrons emitted from a hot filament are confined using a solenoidal magnetic field to give a high ionization probability. Electron space charge is used to confine and extract the gas ions formed, which are then passed through a magnetic sector mass filter before reaching an ion counter. The design and implementation of each of the major components are described in turn, followed by the overall performance of the detector in terms of mass separation, detection efficiency, time response, and background count rates. The linearity of response with emission current and magnetic field is discussed. The detection efficiency for helium is very high, reaching as much as 0.5%, with a time constant of (198 ± 6) ms and a background signal equivalent to an incoming helium flux of (8.7 ± 0.2) × 106 s-1

DOI 10.1063/5.0050292
Citations Web of Science - 1
2020 Alkoby Y, Chadwick H, Godsi O, Labiad H, Bergin M, Cantin JT, et al., 'Setting benchmarks for modelling gas-surface interactions using coherent control of rotational orientation states', NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 11 (2020)
DOI 10.1038/s41467-020-16930-1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
2020 Lambrick SM, Vozdecký L, Bergin M, Halpin JE, Maclaren DA, Dastoor PC, et al., 'Multiple scattering in scanning helium microscopy', Applied Physics Letters, 116 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1063/1.5143950
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Paul Dastoor
2020 Bergin M, Lambrick SM, Sleath H, Ward DJ, Ellis J, Jardine AP, 'Observation of diffraction contrast in scanning helium microscopy', SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 10 (2020)
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-58704-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Bergin M, Ward DJ, Ellis J, Jardine AP, 'A method for constrained optimisation of the design of a scanning helium microscope', Ultramicroscopy, 207 (2019)

We describe a method for obtaining the optimal design of a normal incidence Scanning Helium Microscope (SHeM). Scanning helium microscopy is a recently developed technique that us... [more]

We describe a method for obtaining the optimal design of a normal incidence Scanning Helium Microscope (SHeM). Scanning helium microscopy is a recently developed technique that uses low energy neutral helium atoms as a probe to image the surface of a sample without causing damage. After estimating the variation of source brightness with nozzle size and pressure, we perform a constrained optimisation to determine the optimal geometry of the instrument (i.e. the geometry that maximises intensity) for a given target resolution. For an instrument using a pinhole to form the helium microprobe, the source and atom optics are separable and Lagrange multipliers are used to obtain an analytic expression for the optimal parameters. For an instrument using a zone plate as the focal element, the whole optical system must be considered and a numerical approach has been applied. Unlike previous numerical methods for optimisation, our approach provides insight into the effect and significance of each instrumental parameter, enabling an intuitive understanding of effect of the SHeM geometry. We show that for an instrument with a working distance of 1 mm, a zone plate with a minimum feature size of 25 nm becomes the advantageous focussing element if the desired beam standard deviation is below about 300 nm.

DOI 10.1016/j.ultramic.2019.112833
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Lambrick SM, Bergin M, Jardine AP, Ward DJ, 'A ray tracing method for predicting contrast in neutral atom beam imaging', Micron, 113 61-68 (2018)

A ray tracing method for predicting contrast in atom beam imaging is presented. Bespoke computational tools have been developed to simulate the classical trajectories of atoms thr... [more]

A ray tracing method for predicting contrast in atom beam imaging is presented. Bespoke computational tools have been developed to simulate the classical trajectories of atoms through the key elements of an atom beam microscope, as described using a triangulated surface mesh, using a combination of MATLAB and C code. These tools enable simulated images to be constructed that are directly analogous to the experimental images formed in a real microscope. It is then possible to understand which mechanisms contribute to contrast in images, with only a small number of base assumptions about the physics of the instrument. In particular, a key benefit of ray tracing is that multiple scattering effects can be included, which cannot be incorporated easily in analytic integral models. The approach has been applied to model the sample environment of the Cambridge scanning helium microscope (SHeM), a recently developed neutral atom pinhole microscope. We describe two applications; (i) understanding contrast and shadowing in images; and (ii) investigation of changes in image formation with pinhole-to-sample working distance. More generally the method has a broad range of potential applications with similar instruments, including understanding imaging from different sample topographies, refinement of a particular microscope geometry to enhance specific forms of contrast, and relating scattered intensity distributions to experimental measurements.

DOI 10.1016/j.micron.2018.06.014
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Show 4 more journal articles

Creative Work (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Dickinson M, Fahy A, Barr M, Nicolaidis N, Elkington D, Lewis T, et al., Lane Cove Canopy Precinct Commission, Lane Cove , Sydney, NSW, Australia, Lane Cove, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Sited on a former council carpark (2020)
Co-authors Matthew Barr, Paul Dastoor, Michael Dickinson
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Dr Matthew Bergin

Position

Research Associate
School of Information and Physical Sciences
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email matthew.bergin@newcastle.edu.au

Office

Room P-123
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