Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada

Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

Career Summary

Biography

Sreenivasulu Chadalavada joined the University of Newcastle in 2016 as Conjoint Senior Lecturer at Global Centre for Environmental Remediation(GCER). Prior to joining the University of Newcastle, Sreenivasulu worked as Adjunct Research Fellow/ Senior Hydrogeologist at University of South Australia and as Research Associate at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur. Sreenivasulu currently works as Program Coordinator for two major research programs on Department of Defence and BHP at CRC CARE which has headquarter at the University of Newcastle.

Sreenivasulu plays a major role in demonstrating cost effective remediation solutions to manage the contaminated sites across Australia. As Department of Defence Program and BHP Program coordinator, Sreenivasulu manage and coordinate the Defence and BHP projects under national contaminated sites demonstration programme. This role involves applying for grants, managing and accessing the performance for future strategy. Sreenivasulu also undertake research in mathematical modelling aspects of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in groundwater contaminated aquifers and provide consultation services to various large projects.

Sreenivasulu’s research career over last 10 years has been strongly based on cutting-edge groundwater modelling and hydrogeology research on efficient characterisation of potentially contaminated sites. Sreenivasulu completed his Ph.D. research at the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, on the simulation-optimization modelling approach to identify the unknown groundwater pollution sources. The research conducted under PhD has facilitated to come up with a novel software tool in hydrogeological modelling.  Sreenivasulu’s current and future research focus is on developing mathematical models to simulate various hydrogeological processes and vapour migration pathways. Sreenivasulu is currently engaged with teaching Hydrogeology and environmental remediation course and supervision of PhD students. 


Keywords

  • Genetic Algorithms
  • Hydrogeology
  • Portfolio Management
  • Simulation-Optimization methods
  • Vapour Intrusion Models

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Telugu (Mother)
  • Hindi (Fluent)
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Naidu R, Bekele D, Birke V, 'Permeable Reactive Barriers: Cost-Effective and Sustainable Remediation of Groundwater', Permeable Reactive Barriers: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 1-24 (2014)
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Dawit Bekele, Ravi Naidu
2014 Bekele D, Ravi N, Volker B, Sreenivasulu C, 'Choosing the Best Design and Construction Technologies for Permeable Reactive Barriers', Permeable Reactive Barrier: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 41-62 (2014)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele
2014 Chadalavada S, Wegner M, Naidu R, 'Groundwater modeling involving PRBs: General aspects, case study', Permeable Reactive Barrier: Sustainable Groundwater Remediation 63-85 (2014)

Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology is an increasingly viable option for remediating chlorinated hydrocarbon, petroleum hydrocarbon, and dissolved heavy metals contaminati... [more]

Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology is an increasingly viable option for remediating chlorinated hydrocarbon, petroleum hydrocarbon, and dissolved heavy metals contamination (Chapters 2 and 3). The PRB is an in situ passive remediation technology and has certain advantages compared to other active remediation technologies such as the pump-and-treat and chemical oxidation. This technology also prevents the contamination from migrating to uncontaminated aquifer systems. About 200 PRBs have been installed worldwide (Das, 2002; ETI, 2005, see Chapter 3) for treating common contaminants like chlorinated hydrocarbons (Burris et al., 1995; Orth and Gillham, 1996; Roberts et al., 1996; McMahon et al., 1999; Vogan et al., 1999; Schlicker et al., 2000), petroleum hydrocarbons (Guerin et al., 2002) and heavy metals (Powell et al., 1995; Gu et al., 1998; Shokes and Möller, 1999). A schematic diagram demonstrating the PRB technology is shown in Figure 4.1. The most important components of the design and implementation of the PRB are a detailed understanding of the subsurface hydrogeology, the kinetics of the reactive material chosen for the barrier, and the long-term monitoring plan. The kinetics of the different reactive materials is well understood and documented. While a number of different reactive materials have been used, most of the PRBs installed worldwide utilize zerovalant iron (ZVI) as the reactive material (Rabideau et al., 2005). An overview of hydrogeological modeling for PRBs is given in Gupta and Fox (1999). The most challenging component of PRB design and implementation is the site hydraulics, and several case studies of PRBs demonstrate this aspect of the technology.

Co-authors Ravi Naidu

Journal article (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Wang L, Cheng Y, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, Bekele D, Gell P, et al., 'Application of portable gas chromatography mass spectrometer for rapid field based determination of TCE in soil vapour and groundwater', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 21 (2021) [C1]

The application of portable chromatography¿mass spectrometer (GC¿MS) is restrained by its detection limits without the development of proper sample pre-concentration methods. The ... [more]

The application of portable chromatography¿mass spectrometer (GC¿MS) is restrained by its detection limits without the development of proper sample pre-concentration methods. The primary focus of this paper is to introduce a practical field measurement methodology for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil vapour and groundwater using a portable gas (GC¿MS)system for application to in situ assessment of vapour intrusion from VOC contamination. A solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) technique was applied for sample pre-concentration before the GC¿MS¿ measurement. Practical in-field soil gas SPME sampling methods have been developed to optimise the SPME extraction efficiency to then ultimately improve the detection limits of portable GC¿MS. An Australian site impacted by a chlorinated VOC, trichloroethylene (TCE), was the subject of the case study. To rapidly assess soil vapour samples in subsurface soil, in-house-developed retractable soil vapour sampling probes (SVSPs) were installed at the site in clusters at depths of 1 m, 2 m and 3 m below ground level at each sampling location. Use of the SVSPs for sampling enabled the generation of a three-dimensional map and distribution contours for TCE concentrations using the in situ measurement results of a portable GC¿MS analysis for vapour intrusion investigation. The results of the portable GC¿MS¿ analysis were compared with the results from conventional USEPA methods, such as TO-15 and Method 8265 for soil vapour and groundwater samples, respectively. This work demonstrates that the developed methodology of using a portable GC¿MS system has the capability for in-field quantitative analysis of VOCs for rapid contaminated site vapour intrusion assessment.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.101274
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele, Liang Wang, Ying Cheng
2021 McCance W, Jones OAH, Cendón DI, Edwards M, Surapaneni A, Chadalavada S, Currell M, 'Decoupling wastewater impacts from hydrogeochemical trends in impacted groundwater resources', Science of the Total Environment, 774 (2021) [C1]

In the urban environment, anthropogenic activities provide numerous potential sources of contamination, which can often lead to difficulties in identifying the processes impacting... [more]

In the urban environment, anthropogenic activities provide numerous potential sources of contamination, which can often lead to difficulties in identifying the processes impacting groundwater quality (natural and anthropogenic). This is particularly relevant at Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) that are often subject to changes in land use and composition of contaminant sources over time and space, as well as multiple potential hydrogeochemical interactions. To help address this issue, we demonstrate how long-term time-series analysis of major ions and key contaminants of concern, which are routinely collected by WWTP operators, can be analysed using hydrogeochemical plotting tools, multivariate statistics and targeted isotopic analysis, to provide a means of better characterising key hydrogeochemical influences and anthropogenic inputs. Application of this approach to a WWTP in south-eastern Australia indicated that anthropogenic impacts were the primary driver influencing the local hydrogeochemical environment and groundwater quality. However, secondary processes, including mineral (particularly calcite) dissolution, ion exchange and possible dedolomitisation, as well as natural degradation/transformation of contaminants were also important. Long-term, time-series analysis of trends in NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca2+, SO42-, HCO3- and K+ in conjunction with the other lines of evidence, allowed for enhanced separation between individual contaminant sources, particularly when paired with a detailed site history and Conceptual Site Model (CSM). This indicated that off-site agricultural impacts post-date most site derived impacts, and to date, have not significantly added to the identified contaminant plume. The outcomes of this work have significant global application in the identification, assessment, and control of environmental and health risks at complex sites and show how significant value (rarely obtained) can be derived from the analysis of routine monitoring datasets, particularly when analysed using a multiple lines of evidence approach.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145781
2021 Umeh AC, Naidu R, Shilpi S, Boateng EB, Rahman A, Cousins IT, et al., 'Sorption of PFOS in 114 Well-Characterized Tropical and Temperate Soils: Application of Multivariate and Artificial Neural Network Analyses', Environmental Science and Technology, 55 1779-1789 (2021) [C1]

The influence of soil properties on PFOS sorption are not fully understood, particularly for variable charge soils. PFOS batch sorption isotherms were conducted for 114 temperate ... [more]

The influence of soil properties on PFOS sorption are not fully understood, particularly for variable charge soils. PFOS batch sorption isotherms were conducted for 114 temperate and tropical soils from Australia and Fiji, that were well-characterized for their soil properties, including total organic carbon (TOC), anion exchange capacity, and surface charge. In most soils, PFOS sorption isotherms were nonlinear. PFOS sorption distribution coefficients (Kd) ranged from 5 to 229 mL/g (median: 28 mL/g), with 63% of the Fijian soils and 35% of the Australian soils showing Kd values that exceeded the observed median Kd. Multiple linear regression showed that TOC, amorphous aluminum and iron oxides contents, anion exchange capacity, pH, and silt content, jointly explained about 53% of the variance in PFOS Kd in soils. Variable charge soils with net positive surface charges, and moderate to elevated TOC content, generally displayed enhanced PFOS sorption than in temperate or tropical soils with TOC as the only sorbent phase, especially at acidic pH ranges. For the first time, two artificial neural networks were developed to predict the measured PFOS Kd (R2 = 0.80) in the soils. Overall, both TOC and surface charge characteristics of soils are important for describing PFOS sorption.

DOI 10.1021/acs.est.0c07202
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Anthony Umeh, Dane Lamb
2021 Unnithan A, Bekele DN, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Insights into vapour intrusion phenomena: Current outlook and preferential pathway scenario', Science of the Total Environment, 796 (2021)

Vapour intrusion (VI) is the phenomenon by which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) migrate from the subsurface source through the soil and enter into the overlying buildings, affe... [more]

Vapour intrusion (VI) is the phenomenon by which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) migrate from the subsurface source through the soil and enter into the overlying buildings, affecting the indoor air quality and ultimately causing health hazards to the occupants. Health risk assessments associated with hydrocarbon contaminated sites and recommendations of site closure are often made by quantifying the VI risks using mathematical models known as ¿vapour intrusion models¿ (VIM). In order to predict the health risk, various factors such as the lithological and geochemical conditions of the subsurface, environmental conditions, building operational conditions etc. are commonly evaluated using VIMs. Use of these models can overlook the role of preferential pathways like highly permeable subsurface layers and utility lines which act as the path of least resistance for vapour transport, which can increase the VI risks. The extensive networks of utility lines and sanitary sewer systems in urban areas can significantly exacerbate the uncertainty of VI investigations. The backfill materials like sand and gravel surrounding the utility lines can allow the vapours to easily pass through due to their high porosity as compared to natural formations. Hence, failure to understand the role of preferential pathways on the fate and transport of VOC in the vadose zone can result in more conservative predictions of indoor air vapour concentrations and wrong clean up approaches. This comprehensive review outlines the vapour transport mechanisms, factors influencing VI, VIMs and the role of preferential pathways in predicting indoor air vapour concentrations.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148885
Co-authors Dawit Bekele, Ravi Naidu
2021 Saini A, Bekele DN, Chadalavada S, Fang C, Naidu R, 'Electrokinetic remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil (I)', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 23 (2021) [C1]

The remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a contaminated soil by electrokinetic (EK) treatment was studied in the laboratory. The effects of applying a constant electrica... [more]

The remediation of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in a contaminated soil by electrokinetic (EK) treatment was studied in the laboratory. The effects of applying a constant electrical current on soil pH, moisture content, electrical conductivity (EC), temperature, and the concentrations of three fractions of TPH (C10¿C16, C17¿C34 and C35¿C40) were investigated. The experiment was run for seven days and soil samples were collected at the end of the 7 day period for analysis of soil pH and TPH concentration. There were extreme pH conditions near the electrodes. At the end of the experiment there was around a 37% reduction of C10¿C16 chain compounds compared to the initial concentration of 164 ± 18 mg/kg. The study investigated TPH remediation to a depth of 24 cm, which is significantly more than most studies of EK remediation of TPH-contaminated soils. We observed reductions in TPH concentrations even at a depth of 24 cm. The spatial distribution of reductions in TPH concentrations was also studied and it was observed that more remediation occurred near the cathodes than near the anodes. Further, the greatest reductions in TPH concentrations were recorded near the electrodes in the lowest and middle parts of the experimental set-up. The application of electrokinetics to remediate TPH-contaminatedsoils could be a viable option as an in situ remediation technology.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2021.101585
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Cheng Fang, Dawit Bekele
2020 Saini A, Bekele DN, Chadalavada S, Fang C, Naidu R, 'A review of electrokinetically enhanced bioremediation technologies for PHs', Journal of Environmental Sciences, 88 31-45 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jes.2019.08.010
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Cheng Fang, Dawit Bekele
2020 Logeshwaran P, Sivaram AK, Yadav M, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Phytotoxicity of Class B aqueous firefighting formulations, Tridol S 3 and 6% to Lemna minor', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 18 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100688
Co-authors Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2020 Naidu R, Nadebaum P, Fang C, Cousins I, Pennell K, Conder J, et al., 'Per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS): Current status and research needs', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 19 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100915
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Bhabananda Biswas, Fangjie Qi, Dawit Bekele, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Cheng Fang, Yanju Liu, Anthony Umeh, Luchun Duan
2020 Al Amin M, Sobhani Z, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, Fang C, 'Smartphone-based / Fluoro-SPE for selective detection of PFAS at ppb level', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 18 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100778
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Cheng Fang
2020 Al Amin M, Sobhani Z, Liu Y, Dharmaraja R, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, et al., 'Recent advances in the analysis of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) A review', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 19 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2020.100879
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Cheng Fang, Ravi Naidu
2020 McCance W, Jones OAH, Cendón DI, Edwards M, Surapaneni A, Chadalavada S, et al., 'Combining environmental isotopes with Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) to characterise wastewater derived impacts on groundwater quality', Water Research, 182 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2020.116036
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2019 Sanderson P, Thangavadivel K, Ranganathan S, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, Bowman M, 'Effectiveness of gravity based particle separation and soil washing for reduction of Pb in a clay loam shooting range soil', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2019.100480
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Peter Sanderson
2019 Bekele DN, Du J, de Freitas LG, Mallavarapu M, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Actively facilitated permeable reactive barrier for remediation of TCE from a low permeability aquifer: Field application', Journal of Hydrology, 572 592-602 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2019.03.059
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jianhua Du, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele
2019 Wang L, Cheng Y, Lamb D, Dharmarajan R, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Application of infrared spectrum for rapid classification of dominant petroleum hydrocarbon fractions for contaminated site assessment', Spectrochimica Acta Part A-Molecular And Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 207 183-188 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.saa.2018.09.024
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Ying Cheng, Liang Wang, Ravi Naidu
2018 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Development of a modular vapor intrusion model with variably saturated and non-isothermal vadose zone', Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 40 887-902 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10653-017-0032-5
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele
2018 Besha AT, Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Recent advances in surfactant-enhanced In-Situ Chemical Oxidation for the remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid contaminated soils and aquifers', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 9 303-322 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.08.004
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Dawit Bekele, Ravi Naidu
2018 Thangavadivel K, Ranganathan S, Sanderson P, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, Bowman M, 'Case study of testing heavy-particle concentrator-aided remediation of lead-contaminated rifle shooting range soil', Remediation, 28 67-74 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/rem.21561
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Sanderson, Ravi Naidu
2018 McCance W, Jones OAH, Edwards M, Surapaneni A, Chadalavada S, Currell M, 'Contaminants of Emerging Concern as novel groundwater tracers for delineating wastewater impacts in urban and peri-urban areas.', Water Research, 146 118-133 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2018.09.013
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 40
2018 Logeshwaran P, Megharaj M, Chadalavada S, Bowman M, Naidu R, 'Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) in groundwater aquifers: An overview of environmental fate, toxicity, microbial degradation and risk-based remediation approaches', Environmental Technology & Innovation, 10 175-193 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2018.02.001
Citations Scopus - 55Web of Science - 48
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Ravi Naidu
2017 Du J, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Synthesis of porous bentonite organoclay granule and its adsorption of tributyltin', Applied Clay Science, 148 131-137 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2017.07.033
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Jianhua Du
2016 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Influence of soil properties on vapor-phase sorption of trichloroethylene', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 306 34-40 (2016) [C1]

Current practices in health risk assessment from vapor intrusion (VI) using mathematical models are based on assumptions that the subsurface sorption equilibrium is attained. The ... [more]

Current practices in health risk assessment from vapor intrusion (VI) using mathematical models are based on assumptions that the subsurface sorption equilibrium is attained. The time required for sorption to reach near-steady-state conditions at sites may take months or years to achieve. This study investigated the vapor phase attenuation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in five soils varying widely in clay and organic matter content using repacked columns. The primary indicators of TCE sorption were vapor retardation rate (Rt), the time required for the TCE vapor to pass through the soil column, and specific volume of retention (VR), and total volume of TCE retained in soil. Results show TCE vapor retardation is mainly due to the rapid partitioning of the compound to SOM. However, the specific volume of retention of clayey soils with secondary mineral particles was higher. Linear regression analyses of the SOM and clay fraction with VR show that a unit increase in clay fraction results in higher sorption of TCE (VR) than the SOM. However, partitioning of TCE vapor was not consistent with the samples' surface areas but was mainly a function of the type of secondary minerals present in soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.12.002
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele
2016 Datta B, Durand F, Laforge S, Prakash O, Esfahani HK, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Preliminary Hydrogeologic Modeling and Optimal Monitoring Network Design for a Contaminated Abandoned Mine Site Area: Application of Developed Monitoring Network Design Software', Journal of Water Resource and Protection, 08 46-64 (2016)
DOI 10.4236/jwarp.2016.81005
2014 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Chadalavada S, 'Influence of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion', Atmospheric Environment, 88 14-22 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.01.053
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Dawit Bekele, Ravi Naidu
2014 Du J, Chadalavada S, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Environmental remediation techniques of tributyltin contamination in soil and water: A review', CHEMICAL ENGINEERING JOURNAL, 235 141-150 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.cej.2013.09.044
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Jianhua Du, Ravi Naidu
2013 Bekele DN, Naidu R, Bowman M, Chadalavada S, 'Vapor Intrusion Models for Petroleum and Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds: Opportunities for Future Improvements', VADOSE ZONE JOURNAL, 12 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2136/vzj2012.0048
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dawit Bekele
2012 Naidu R, Nandy S, Megharaj M, Kumar RP, Chadalavada S, Chen Z, Bowman M, 'Monitored natural attenuation of a long-term petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites: a case study', BIODEGRADATION, 23 881-895 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9580-7
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Optimal Identification of Groundwater Pollution Sources Using Feedback Monitoring Information: A Case Study', Environmental Forensics, 13 140-153 (2012)

A feedback-based methodology has been developed for identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater-contaminated aquifers. The methodology consists of models within an it... [more]

A feedback-based methodology has been developed for identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater-contaminated aquifers. The methodology consists of models within an iterative feedback system, with the capacity of feeding back real-time measurements of pollutant concentrations for the sequential optimal designs and characterization of the contaminated aquifer study area. The resulting linked-simulation optimization model considers the delineation of the contaminant plume, optimally characterizing the site in terms of pollutant sources and the optimal monitoring network leading to the remediation and/or management of the contaminated aquifer. As part of the methodology, a simulation-optimization code was developed by linking a groundwater flow and transport model with an optimization code for the purpose of identifying the unknown pollution sources. The proposed methodology addresses the source identification process with very limited information available regarding the observed contamination data for the identification of unknown pollution sources. This methodology is applied to a chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated site for the identification of unknown pollution sources. Information regarding the sources such as the magnitude, location and the duration of contamination activity were not known for the study area considered in this work except the information regarding the likely activities that led to its contamination. Developed methodology is applied to choose the optimal source locations from the identified potential locations. Depending on the availability of observed contaminant concentration values the domain for the methodology application is divided into three different management periods. The optimal source estimates obtained at the end of the third management period suggests that only one potential source location, S2, confirms to be the source and active. The qualitative assessment of the results also performed utilizing the contamination information obtained during the field investigations. The results demonstrate the practicability of the feedback-based methodology in identifying the unknown pollution sources in groundwater. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/15275922.2012.676147
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2011 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Uncertainty based optimal monitoring network design for a chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminated site', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 173 929-940 (2011)
DOI 10.1007/s10661-010-1435-2
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2011 Chadalavada S, Datta B, Naidu R, 'Optimisation approach for pollution source identification in groundwater: An overview', International Journal of Environment and Waste Management, 8 40-61 (2011)

Groundwater pollution occurs from different anthropogenic sources like leakage from Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and depositories, leakage from hazardous waste dump sites and ... [more]

Groundwater pollution occurs from different anthropogenic sources like leakage from Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and depositories, leakage from hazardous waste dump sites and soak pits. Remediation of these contaminated sites requires optimal decision-making system so that the remediation is done in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Identification of unknown pollution sources plays an important role in remediation and containment of contaminant plume in a hazardous site. This paper reviews different optimisation algorithms like classical, nonclassical such as Genetic Algorithm, Artificial Neural Network and Simulated Annealing and hybrid methods, which can be applied for optimal identification of unknown groundwater pollution sources. Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

DOI 10.1504/IJEWM.2011.040964
Citations Scopus - 11
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2008 Chadalavada S, Datta B, 'Dynamic optimal monitoring network design for transient transport of pollutants in groundwater aquifers', WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT, 22 651-670 (2008)
DOI 10.1007/s11269-007-9184-x
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 34
Bekele DN, Liu Y, Donaghey M, Umeh A, Arachchige CSV, Chadalavada S, Naidu R, 'Separation and Lithological Mapping of PFAS Mixtures in the Vadose Zone at a Contaminated Site', Frontiers in Water, 2 [C1]
DOI 10.3389/frwa.2020.597810
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu, Anthony Umeh, Dawit Bekele
Show 28 more journal articles
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $1,842,413

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $37,574

Hydrocarbon Contaminated Subsurface remediation using Electrokinetic Enhanced Bioremediation$37,574

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada, Doctor Cheng Fang, Mr Anish Saini
Scheme Scholarships
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1901064
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

20182 grants / $1,036,006

Identify natural attenuation that occurs as vapours move through the ground to the surface$546,642

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Yanju Liu, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801038
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Co-disposal of hydrocarbon contaminated soils with mine waste material (spoils) on OSAs during construction$489,364

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Doctor Yanju Liu, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1801033
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

1 grants / $768,833

Electronkinetic remediation of subsurface hydrocarbon contaminated soils$768,833

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Cheng Fang, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Sreenivasulu Chadalavada
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start
Funding Finish
GNo G1801024
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Groundwater Restoration and Protection: Influence Under Climate Change and Design Needs for Sustainable and Reliable Performance PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Novel tracers to delineate groundwater contamination from wastewater treatment plants
<p>The management and treatment of wastewater and solid wastes is a major worldwide sustainability challenge. This is particularly relevant for Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) that are often located in mixed source environments, where multiple potential contamination sources often lead to difficulties in distinguishing site-derived impacts from other sources. </p>
Civil Engineering, RMIT University Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Novel co-tracers for delineating sources of groundwater contamination at wastewater treatment plants Environmental Studies, RMIT University Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Effect of climate change on groundwater at potentially contaminated sites PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Developing Multi Dimensional Vapour Model PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Hydrocarbon Contaminated Subsurface remediation using Electrokinetic Enhanced Bioremediation PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD A Modular Vapour Intrusion Model for Effective Management and Remediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites Environmental Studies, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
Edit

Dr Sreenivasulu Chadalavada

Position

Conjoint Senior Lecturer

Contact Details

Email sreenivasulu.chadalavada@crccare.com
Phone (02) 4921 5201
Mobile 0431027069
Fax Enter in format (08) 83023124

Office

Room ATC-115
Building ATC Building
Edit