Dr Thava Palanisami

Dr Thava Palanisami

Senior Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

My research career over last 10 years has been strongly based on cutting-edge research on contamination risk assessment and remediation. I conducted my Ph.D. research at the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, on the bioavailability and bioremediation of mixed contaminants. My Ph.D. research outcome demonstrated that chemicals in contaminated sites occur as mixtures rather than single contaminants which had been the previous assumption for several decades. Through my special focus on long-term contaminated soils, I demonstrated that mixtures such as PAHs and metals are more toxic and bioavailable than when they occur as single contaminants.

End-user-driven research has remained the enduring strength of my research career following doctorate. On completion of Ph.D., I took up a research-only position to assess and manage chemical contamination such as petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals in mining and other industry sites. I played a pivotal role, in our team, in developing and implementation of several costs effective, innovative, green remediation technologies on the field for the rehabilitation of chemical contamination in mine sites. Our team was instrumental in the first ever field level implementation of Risk Based Land Management (RBLM) approach to manage weathered hydrocarbon contaminated sites in Australia. RBLM defines that the site is deemed to be contaminated only if it poses a risk to local receptors. It has huge implications for future risk assessment and management of long-term contaminated soils.  

My current and future research focus is on adding new dimensions in ecological and human health risk assessment and remediation. My ongoing research on human health risk assessment targets the role of contaminant metabolites in human health, which haven't been understood very well so far. I use in-vitro and in vivo animal models to delineate the role played by contaminant metabolites. I have established a strong national and international collaborations on this research focus. Two of my publications on this work is under review and seeking more funding to continue the work.

My ongoing research work on advanced ecological risk assessment is about Microplastics as a vector for contaminant transport. Microplastics is a rapidly emerging contaminant of global concern.  I first introduced this new theme research in the University of Newcastle and now my team is the largest in Australia. I work on developing a new knowledge on the risk assessment of microplastics and lay the foundation for regulatory guidelines.Our team is has established some strong, elite international collaboration to address this emerging challenge.   My ongoing research outputs based on microplastics could help us better assess and manage plastic pollution issue in Australia and the world.  To deliver the outstanding outputs and solutions, currently seeking funding support from several funding agencies.

On remediation aspect, I continue my work on understanding the microbial role in the reclamation of derelict mine sites and managing chemical contaminants inactive industrial sites. I have a significant expertise in developing custom made green remediation technologies for complex contaminants.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Contaminant metabolites
  • Contaminant-microbe interaction
  • Ecological risk assessment
  • Microplastics
  • Microplastics
  • Mine Site Reclamation
  • Mixed contaminants
  • Molecular Microbiology
  • Risk based land management
  • Soil Antibiotic Resistome
  • Soil Genomics
  • Toxicity & Bioavailability
  • contaminants & Human microbiome
  • human health risk assessment

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 50
050204 Environmental Impact Assessment 25
100205 Environmental Marine Biotechnology 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
24/01/2014 - 24/01/2015 Research Fellow University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia
18/10/2009 - 23/01/2014 Research Associate University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 Science Meets Parliament (SmP) Ambassador Award-SETAC AU
Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Australasia

Member

Year Award
2016 The Scientific Advisory Board
The scientific advisory board

Invitations

Committee Member

Year Title / Rationale
2017 INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE-19th International Conference on Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology
2017 Technical Committee Member- International Conference on Contaminated Site Remediation 2017
2015 Technical Committee-CleanUp Australia 2015

Organiser

Year Title / Rationale
2016 Organizing Secretary-International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference-CleanUp India 2016
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Kuppusamy S, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ex-situ remediation technologies for environmental pollutants: A critical perspective', Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 117-192 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20013-2_2
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'In-situ remediation approaches for the management of contaminated sites: A comprehensive overview', Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 1-115 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20013-2_1
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Mixed contamination of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals at manufactured gas plant sites: toxicity and implications to bioremediation', Environmental contamination¿health risks, bioavailability and bioremediation, Taylor and Francis, New York 347-367 (2012)

Journal article (57 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Singh S, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation potential, surfactant production, metal resistance and enzymatic activity of two novel cellulose-degrading bacteria isolated from koala faeces', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 76 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12665-016-6337-3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Thavamani P, Samkumar RA, Satheesh V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ramadass K, Naidu R, et al., 'Microbes from mined sites: Harnessing their potential for reclamation of derelict mine sites', Environmental Pollution, 230 495-505 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.056
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Subramanian A, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Aryal R, Saint C, 'Analysis of chromium status in the revegetated flora of a tannery waste site and microcosm studies using earthworm E. fetida.', Environ Sci Pollut Res Int, (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-0543-8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Kuppusamy S, Venkateswarlu K, Thavamani P, Lee YB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Quercus robur acorn peel as a novel coagulating adsorbent for cationic dye removal from aquatic ecosystems', ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, 101 3-8 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoleng.2017.01.014
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Evaluation of relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure for an assessment of lead bioavailability in mixed metal contaminated soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 7 229-238 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 1... [more]

© 2017 This study investigates the effect of contaminant zinc (Zn) on lead (Pb) bioavailability and bioaccessibility in six contrasting soils spiked with 1500 mg Pb/kg and aged 12 months under laboratory conditions. Zn was added to the soils (7500 mgZn/kg soil) and aged for a further two weeks. In vivo studies were conducted using juvenile swine as a surrogate model for young children. Two compartment pharmacokinetic models were used to analyze the biological response produced by Pb oral solution and spiked soils. Absolute and relative bioavailability of Pb in soils (oral dose of 100 µ g Pb/kg body weight/day) were estimated by comparing them with intravenously administered soluble Pb salt (25 µ g Pb/kg/day) and orally administered the same Pb salt [Pb acetate =(CH 3 COO) 2 Pb·3H 2 O] administered to 3 juvenile pigs per treatment. Lead bioaccessibility was calculated using the in vitro RBALP (i.e. relative bioaccessibility leaching procedure) method. The in vitro results of RBALP were compared to in vivo relative Pb bioavailability to ascertain whether the changes in bioaccessibility correlated with the in vivo data. Although the in vivo Pb relative bioavailability (RB) in all soils except in MLA (Mount Lofty Acidic) revealed an increase (18%¿159%) in the presence of Zn, the in vitro RBALP bioaccessibility results indicated otherwise (1%¿38% decrease). In vivo RB of Pb in MLA declined by 37% in the presence of Zn. However, the RBALP in vitro bioaccessible Pb did not correlate with the relative bioavailabilities of Pb in the juvenile swine dosing experiment. Caution is therefore needed when predicting Pb bioavailability/bioaccessibility in the presence of metal mixtures. The literature contains much information on the correlation of metal and metalloid bioaccessibility with their bioavailability. There is, however, a paucity of studies investigating the effects of other metals on Pb and their IVIVC (in vitro and in vivo correlations). The current study addresses this knowledge gap by assessing in vivoand in vitro bioavailability of Pb in the presence of Zn.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.02.007
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb, Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2017 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Remediation approaches for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils: Technological constraints, emerging trends and future directions', CHEMOSPHERE, 168 944-968 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.10.115
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Chen Z, Krishnamurti GSR, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Toxicity and bioaccumulation of iron in soil microalgae', Journal of Applied Phycology, 28 2767-2776 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Microalgae are extensively used in the remediation of heavy metals like iron. However, factors like toxicity, bioavailability a... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Microalgae are extensively used in the remediation of heavy metals like iron. However, factors like toxicity, bioavailability and iron speciation play a major role in its removal by microalgae. Thus, in this study, toxicity of three different iron salts (FeSO 4 , FeCl 3 and Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ) was evaluated towards three soil microalgal isolates, Chlorella sp. MM3, Chlamydomonas sp. MM7 and Chlorococcum sp. MM11. Interestingly, all the three iron salts gave different EC50 concentrations; however, ferric nitrate was found to be significantly more toxic followed by ferrous sulphate and ferric chloride. The EC 50 analysis revealed that Chlorella sp. was significantly resistant to iron compared to other microalgae. However, almost 900¿µg¿g -1 iron was accumulated by Chlamydomonas sp. grown with 12¿mg¿L -1 ferric nitrate as an iron source when compared to other algae and iron salts. The time-course bioaccumulation confirmed that all the three microalgae adsorb the ferric salts such as ferric nitrate and ferric chloride more rapidly than ferrous salt, whereas intracellular accumulation was found to be rapid for ferrous salts. However, the amount of iron accumulated or adsorbed by algae, irrespective of species, from ferrous sulphate medium is comparatively lower than ferric chloride and ferric nitrate medium. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis shows that the oxygen atom and P = O group of polysaccharides present in the cell wall of algae played a major role in the bioaccumulation of iron ions by algae.

DOI 10.1007/s10811-016-0837-0
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Saint C, Aryal R, Thavamani P, Venkateswarlu K, et al., 'Metal bioavailability to Eisenia fetida through copper mine dwelling animal and plant litter, a new challenge on contaminated environment remediation', INTERNATIONAL BIODETERIORATION & BIODEGRADATION, 113 208-216 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2016.03.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Oak (Quercus robur) Acorn Peel as a Low-Cost Adsorbent for Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Aquatic Ecosystems and Industrial Effluents', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 227 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Springer International Publishing. The efficiency of low-cost, abundantly available local forestry waste, oak (Quercus robur) acorn peel (OP), to remove toxic Cr(VI) from ... [more]

© 2016 Springer International Publishing. The efficiency of low-cost, abundantly available local forestry waste, oak (Quercus robur) acorn peel (OP), to remove toxic Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions was studied in a batch system as a function of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, and pH. In an equilibrium time of 420 min, the maximum Cr removal by OP at pH 2 and 10 was 100 and 97 %, respectively. The sorption data fitted well with Langmuir adsorption model. Evaluation using Langmuir expression presented a monolayer sorption capacity of 47.39 mg g -1 with an equilibrium sorbent dose of 5 g L -1 and pH 7. Uptake of Cr by OP was described by pseudo-second-order chemisorption model. ICP-OES, LC-ICPMS analysis of the aqueous and solid phases revealed that the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal is by 'integrated adsorption and reduction' mechanism. ESEM-EDX and XRD analysis of OP before and after adsorption also confirmed that both adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr 3+ forms followed by complexation onto the adsorbent surface contributed to the removal of Cr(VI). Consistent with batch studies, OP effectively removed ( > 95 %) Cr from the real water samples collected from lake and sea. The results of this study illustrate that OP could be an economical, green, and effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from natural aquatic ecosystems and industrial effluents.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-016-2760-z
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial diversity in soils contaminated long-term with PAHs and heavy metals: Implications to bioremediation', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 317 169-179 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.. Diversity, distribution and composition of bacterial community of soils contaminated long-term with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy m... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V.. Diversity, distribution and composition of bacterial community of soils contaminated long-term with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals were explored for the first time following 454 pyrosequencing. Strikingly, the complete picture of the Gram positive (+ve) and Gram negative (-ve) bacterial profile obtained in our study illustrates novel postulates that include: (1) Metal-tolerant and PAH-degrading Gram -ves belonging to the class Alphaproteobacteria persist relatively more in the real contaminated sites compared to Gram +ves, (2) Gram +ves are not always resistant to heavy metal toxicity, (3) Stenotrophomonas followed by Burkholderia and Pseudomonas are the dominant genera of PAH degraders with high metabolic activity in long-term contaminated soils, (4) Actinobacteria is the predominant group among the Gram +ves in soils contaminated with high molecular weight PAHs that co-exist with toxic heavy metals like Pb, Cu and Zn, (5) Microbial communities are nutrient-driven in natural environments and (6) Catabolically potential Gram +/-ves with diverse applicability to remediate the real contaminated sites evolve eventually in the historically-polluted soils. Thus, the most promising indigenous Gram +/-ve strains from the long-term contaminated sites with increased catabolic potential, enzymatic activity and metal tolerance need to be harnessed for mixed contaminant cleanups.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.05.066
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Bolan S, Naidu R, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Ok YS, Palanisami T, et al., 'Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines', Science of the Total Environment, 539 304-312 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine t... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and exten ded x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.124
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Morrow Dong, Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri
2016 Abbasian F, Lockington R, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multiwall carbon nanotubes increase the microbial community in crude oil contaminated fresh water sediments', Science of the Total Environment, 539 370-380 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Since crude oil contamination is one of the biggest environmental concerns, its removal from contaminated sites is of interest for both researchers and indus... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Since crude oil contamination is one of the biggest environmental concerns, its removal from contaminated sites is of interest for both researchers and industries. In situ bioremediation is a promising technique for decreasing or even eliminating crude oil and hydrocarbon contamination. However, since these compounds are potentially toxic for many microorganisms, high loads of contamination can inhibit the microbial community and therefore reduce the removal rate. Therefore, any strategy with the ability to increase the microbial population in such circumstances can be of promise in improving the remediation process. In this study, multiwall carbon nanotubes were employed to support microbial growth in sediments contaminated with crude oil. Following spiking of fresh water sediments with different concentrations of crude oil alone and in a mixture with carbon nanotubes for 30. days, the microbial profiles in these sediments were obtained using FLX-pyrosequencing. Next, the ratios of each member of the microbial population in these sediments were compared with those values in the untreated control sediment. This study showed that combination of crude oil and carbon nanotubes can increase the diversity of the total microbial population. Furthermore, these treatments could increase the ratios of several microorganisms that are known to be effective in the degradation of hydrocarbons.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.09.031
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Abbasian F, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Lockington R, Ramadass K, 'Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis', Biotechnology Progress, 32 638-648 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation... [more]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identificati on of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638¿648, 2016.

DOI 10.1002/btpr.2249
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Venkateswarlu K, Nirola R, Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Abandoned metalliferous mines: ecological impacts and potential approaches for reclamation', Reviews in Environmental Science and Biotechnology, 15 327-354 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The lack of awareness for timely management of the environment surrounding a metal mine site results in several adverse consequ... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. The lack of awareness for timely management of the environment surrounding a metal mine site results in several adverse consequences such as rampant business losses, abandoning the bread-earning mining industry, domestic instability and rise in ghost towns, increased environmental pollution, and indirect long-term impacts on the ecosystem. Although several abandoned mine lands (AMLs) exist globally, information on these derelict mines has not been consolidated in the literature. We present here the state-of-the-art on AMLs in major mining countries with emphasis on their impact towards soil health and biodiversity, remediation methods, and laws governing management of mined sites. While reclamation of metalliferous mines by phytoremediation is still a suitable option, there exist several limitations for its implementation. However, many issues of phytoremediation at the derelict mines can be resolved following phytostabilization, a technology that is effective also at the modern operational mine sites. The use of transgenic plant species in phytoremediation of metals in contaminated sites is also gaining momentum. In any case, monitoring and efficacy testing for bioremediation of mined sites is essential. The approaches for reclamation of metalliferous mines such as environmental awareness, effective planning and assessment of pre- and post-mining activities, implementation of regulations, and a safe and good use of phytostabilizers among the native plants for revegetation and ecological restoration are discussed in detail in the present review. We also suggest the use of microbially-enhanced phytoremediation and nanotechnology for efficient reclamation of AMLs, and identify future work warranted in this area of research. Further, we believe that the integration of science of remediation with mining policies and regulations is a reliable option which when executed can virtually balance economic development and environmental destruction for safer future.

DOI 10.1007/s11157-016-9398-6
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaugmentation with Novel Microbial Formula vs. Natural Attenuation of a Long-Term Mixed Contaminated Soil - Treatability Studies in Solid- and Slurry-Phase Microcosms', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 227 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Treatability studies in real contaminated soils are essential to predict the feasibility of microbial consortium augmentatio... [more]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Treatability studies in real contaminated soils are essential to predict the feasibility of microbial consortium augmentation for field-scale bioremediation of contaminated sites. In this study, the biodegradation of a mixture of seven PAHs in a manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil contaminated with 3967 mg kg -1 of total PAHs using novel acid-, metal-tolerant, N-fixing, P-solubilizing, and biosurfactant-producing LMW and HMW PAH-degrading bacterial combinations as inoculums was compared in slurry- and solid-phase microcosms over natural attenuation. Bioaugmentation of 5 % of bacterial consortia A and N in slurry- and solid-phase systems enhanced 4.6-5.7 and 9.3-10.7 % of total PAH degradation, respectively, over natural attenuation. Occurrence of 62.7-88 % of PAH biodegradation during natural attenuation in soil and slurry illustrated the accelerated rate of intrinsic metabolic activity of the autochthonous microbial community in the selected MGP soil. Monitoring of the total microbial activity and population of PAH degraders revealed that the observed biodegradation trend in MGP soil resulted from microbial mineralization. In the slurry, higher biodegradation rate constant (k) and lower half-life values (t 1/2 ) was observed during bioaugmentation with consortium N, highlighting the use of bioaugmentation in bioslurries/bioreactor to achieve rapid and efficient bioremediation compared to that of a static solid system. In general, natural attenuation was on par with bioaugmentation. Hence, depending on the type of soil, natural attenuation might outweigh bioaugmentation and a careful investigation using laboratory treatability studies are highly recommended before the upscale of a developed bioremediation strategy to field level.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-015-2709-7
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Nirola R, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Assessment of antioxidant activity, minerals, phenols and flavonoid contents of common plant/tree waste extracts', INDUSTRIAL CROPS AND PRODUCTS, 83 630-634 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.indcrop.2015.12.060
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Ramadass K, Palanisami T, Smith E, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Earthworm Comet Assay for Assessing the Risk of Weathered Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils: Need to Look Further than Target Contaminants', Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 71 561-571 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00244-016-0318-0
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ganeshkumar V, Thavamani P, Chen Z, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Cultivation of Chlorella on brewery wastewater and nano-particle biosynthesis by its biomass', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 211 698-703 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2016.03.154
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Zuliang Chen
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Isolation and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degrading, pH tolerant, N-fixing and P-solubilizing novel bacteria from manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 6 204-219 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Dearth of high molecular weight contaminant degradation, pH tolerance and growth limiting nutrient assimilation potentials of the selected microorganisms are... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Dearth of high molecular weight contaminant degradation, pH tolerance and growth limiting nutrient assimilation potentials of the selected microorganisms are some of the prime factors reasonable for the failures in field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils. Hence an effort was made in this study for the first time to identify HMW PAHs degrading, N-fixing and P-solubilizing bacteria with pH tolerance from long-term manufactured gas plant site soils. Four distinct strains that could degrade both LMW and HMW PAHs were identified. Among the isolates, Stenotrophomonas (MTS-2) followed by Citrobacter (MTS-3) and Pseudomonas (MTS-1) were furthermost effective in the degradation of HMW PAHs either as individual or in the presence of co-substrate (LMW PAHs). MTS-1, 2 and 3 (co)degraded model LMW PAHs, Phe (100% of 150 mg L -1 ) and HMW PAHs Pyr (100% of 150 mg L -1 ) or BaP (90¿100% of 50 mg L -1 ) in 3, 12¿15 and 30 days, respectively and recorded the least half-life time (t 1/2 ) and highest biodegradation rate constants (k). One of the significant findings is the diazotrophic P-solubilization ability, acid and alkali tolerance (optimum pH=5.0¿8.0) of the HMW PAHs degrading Pseudomonas strain MTS-1. Stenotrophomonas (MTS-2) was also found to be superior as it could solubilize P and tolerate acidic condition (optimum pH=5.0¿7.5) during HMW PAHs degradation. Further, our study is the first evidence of diazotrophic P solubilization potential of Agrobacterium (MTS-4) and P-solubilizing capacity of Citrobacter (MTS-3) during bioremediation. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the promising use of the newly identified PAH degraders, notably MTS-1, 2 and 3 either as individuals or as consortia as an excellent candidate in the bioremediation or phytoremediation of PAHs contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2016.04.006
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Potential of Melaleuca diosmifolia leaf as a low-cost adsorbent for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated water bodies', Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 100 173-182 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. The present study describes for the first time the utilization of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia, fallen off from the plant, t... [more]

© 2016 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. The present study describes for the first time the utilization of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia, fallen off from the plant, to detoxify and remove hexavalent chromium or Cr(VI) from aqueous systems. Initial characterization by gas chromatography revealed that the selected biomaterial is one of the natural sources of eucalyptol. It constituted high concentrations of reducing compounds (iron, phenols and flavonoids). Batch studies revealed that the biosorbent (5 g L -1 ) was able to remove 97-99.9% of 250 mg L -1 Cr(VI) at wide-ranging pH (2-10) and temperature (24-48 °C). Adsorption kinetics was well described using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, while the equilibrium adsorption data were interpreted in terms of the Langmuir isotherm model. The monolayer adsorption capacity was 62.5 mg g -1 . Both inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and liquid chromatography analyses of the aqueous and solid phases revealed that the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal was 'adsorption-coupled reduction'. Scanning electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses of the biosorbent before and after adsorption also confirmed that both adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) followed by complexation onto functional groups of the active surface contributed to the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The selected biomaterial effectively (99.9%) removed Cr(VI) in lake and sea water samples, highlighting its potential for remediating Cr(VI) in real environmental conditions.

DOI 10.1016/j.psep.2016.01.009
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Abbasi S, Lamb DT, Palanisami T, Kader M, Matanitobua V, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioaccessibility of barium from barite contaminated soils based on gastric phase in vitro data and plant uptake', Chemosphere, 144 1421-1427 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contam... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Barite contamination of soil commonly occurs from either barite mining or explorative drilling operations. This work reported in vitro data for barite contaminated soils using the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) methodology. The existence of barite in plant tissue and the possibility of 'biomineralised' zones was also investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Soils with low barium (Ba) concentrations showed a higher proportion of Ba extractability than barite rich samples. Barium uptake to spinach from soil was different between short term spiking studies and field weathered soils. Furthermore, Ba crystals were not evident in spinach tissue or acid digest solutions grown in barium nitrate spiked soils despite high accumulation. Barite was found in the plant digest solutions from barite contaminated soils only. Results indicate that under the conservative assumptions made, a child would need to consume extreme quantities of soil over an extended period to cause chronic health problems.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.10.031
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dane Lamb, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Ramakrishnan P, Nagarajan S, Thiruvenkatam V, Palanisami T, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, Rajendran S, 'Cation doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles enhance strontium adsorption from aqueous system: A comparative study with and without calcination', APPLIED CLAY SCIENCE, 134 136-144 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2016.09.022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Beecham S, Aryal R, Thavamani P, Vankateswarlu K, Saint C, 'Remediation of metalliferous mines, revegetation challenges and emerging prospects in semi-arid and arid conditions', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 23 20131-20150 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-7372-z
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Kinetics of PAH degradation by a new acid-metal-tolerant Trabulsiella isolated from the MGP site soil and identification of its potential to fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphorous', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 307 99-107 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.12.068
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation potential of a new acid tolerant, diazotrophic P-solubilizing and heavy metal resistant bacterium Cupriavidus sp. MTS-7 isolated from long-term mixed contaminated soil', Chemosphere, 162 31-39 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both L... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd An isolate of Cupriavidus (strain MTS-7) was identified from a long-term PAHs and heavy metals mixed contaminated soil with the potential to biodegrade both LMW and HMW PAHs with added unique traits of acid and alkali tolerance, heavy metal tolerance, self-nutrient assimilation by N fixation and P solubilization. This strain completely degraded the model 3 (150¿mg¿L -1 Phe), 4 (150¿mg¿L -1 Pyr) and 5 (50¿mg¿L -1 BaP) ring PAHs in 4, 20 and 30 days, respectively. It could mineralize 90¿100% of PAHs (200¿mg¿L -1 of Phe and Pyr) within 15 days across pH ranging from 5 to 8 and even in the presence of toxic metal contaminations. During biodegradation, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 (Cu 2+ ) and 3 (Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ ) mg L -1 of the potentially bioavailable metal ions and over 17¿mg¿L -1 metal levels was lethal for the microbe. Further, it could fix 217¿274¿µg¿mL -1 of N and solubilize 79¿135¿µg¿mL -1 of P while PAHs degradation. MTS-7 as a superior candidate could be thus used in the enhanced bioaugmentation and/or phytoremediation of long-term mixed contaminated sites.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.07.052
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Aryal R, Thavamani P, Ramdass K, Sarkar B, Saint C, 'Stress responses and specific metal exclusion on mine soils based on germination and growth studies by Australian golden wattle', Ecological Indicators, 71 113-122 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd We reported the Australian golden wattle as a copper stabilizer in abandoned copper mine soils earlier. Here we investigate to confirm this plant's suita... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd We reported the Australian golden wattle as a copper stabilizer in abandoned copper mine soils earlier. Here we investigate to confirm this plant's suitability to grow on metal contaminated mine soils based on stress indication. The seeds of Acacia pycnantha collected from mining area were germinated after heat and no heat treatment on two types of irrigation. The daily irrigated and heat treated seeds gave up to 85% germination on sandy soil. The A. pycnantha was grown under greenhouse condition in six different soils collected from abandoned copper mine at Kapunda in South Australia. Among the six soil samples, soil-1 with the highest copper concentration produced 2.05 mmol g -1 tissue of proline. Proline expression was prominent in more saline soils (1, 5 and 6) having electrical conductivity (EC) 1184, 1364 and 1256 µS, respectively. Chlorophyll a, b and carotenoid levels in plants showed a gradually decreasing trend in all the soils as experiment progressed. The plants grown on soil sample-1, containing 4083 ± 103 mg kg -1 of copper resulted in 18 ± 2 mg kg -1 accumulation in its leaf. The calcium accumulation was significant up to 11648 ± 1209 mg kg -1 in leaf. Although pore water samples showed higher Cu concentration in soils, an increased mobility of arsenic and lead was observed in all the soil samples. Our experiment points out the need for proper monitoring of revegetation processes to avoid revegetation and reclamation failure.

DOI 10.1016/j.ecolind.2016.06.062
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Solomon OO, Palanisami T, 'Microplastics in the Marine Environment: Current Status, Assessment Methodologies, Impacts and Solutions', Journal of Pollution Effects & Control, 4 1-13 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2375-4397.1000161
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Agronomic and remedial benefits and risks of applying biochar to soil: Current knowledge and future research directions', Environment International, 87 1-12 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. 'Biochar' represents an emerging technology that is increasingly being recognized for its potential role in carbon sequestration, reducing greenhou... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. 'Biochar' represents an emerging technology that is increasingly being recognized for its potential role in carbon sequestration, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, waste management, renewable energy, soil improvement, crop productivity enhancement and environmental remediation. Published reviews have so far focused mainly on the above listed agronomic and environmental benefits of applying biochar, yet paid little or no attention to its harmful effects on the ecological system. This review highlights a balanced overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the pyrolysis process of biochar production, end-product quality and the benefits versus drawbacks of biochar on: (a) soil geochemistry and albedo, (b) microflora and fauna, (c) agrochemicals, (d) greenhouse gas efflux, (e) nutrients, (f) crop yield, and (g) contaminants (organic and inorganic). Future research should focus more on the unintended long-term consequences of biochar on biological organisms and their processes in the soil.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2015.10.018
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by novel bacterial consortia tolerant to diverse physical settings - Assessments in liquid- and slurry-phase systems', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 108 149-157 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils have proved to be difficult and challenging due to inhibited growth of PAH degrading microbes. In this ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Field-scale bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soils have proved to be difficult and challenging due to inhibited growth of PAH degrading microbes. In this study, for the first time mixed bacterial cultures designated as consortia-A and N were developed using elite metal or acid tolerant, N-fixing, P-solubilizing and biosurfactant producing PAH degraders enriched from manufactured gas plant sites. The two consortia could degrade both LMW and HMW PAHs. Kinetic studies of PAH degradation by the consortia showed the highest biodegradation rate constants (k = 0.027-0.61 day -1 ) and lowest half-life time (t 1/2 = 1-26 days) values reported to date in liquid cultures and highlighted the use of consortium-A for the remediation of acidic soils due to its tolerance up to pH 5. Furthermore, bioaugmentation of these consortia has proven to be effective in degradation of LMW ( > 95%) and HMW (90%) PAHs from spiked soil slurries. Amendment of consortia-A and N exhibited 10.7 and 44.3% more total PAHs degradation, respectively than natural attenuation in 60 days even from the real long-term mixed contaminated soils. Thus the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of these novel bacterial consortia, particularly consortium-N for use in field-scale bioremediation of PAHs in long-term mixed contaminated neutral soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.12.013
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Lee YB, Naidu R, 'Potential of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel, non-conventional and low-cost coagulating adsorbent for removing both cationic and anionic dyes', Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 37 198-207 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Korean Society of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.The potential of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel biosorbent for removing three cationic dyes, me... [more]

© 2016 The Korean Society of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry.The potential of dried twigs of Melaleuca diosmifolia as a novel biosorbent for removing three cationic dyes, methylene blue (MB), acridine orange (AO) and malachite green (MG), and an anionic dye, eriochrome black T (EB) was evaluated in a batch adsorption process. Notably, the biosorbent removed 77-99% of both cationic and anionic dyes in a wide ranging pH of 2-10, and the reactions were endothermic. The dye adsorption equilibria were rapidly attained within 3 h. The monolayer adsorption capacity of the sorbent added at 5 g L-1 was 119.05, 126.8, 116.28 and 94.34 mg g-1 for MB, AO, MG and EB, respectively. The water extract obtained from the plant material induced fast decolourization of both categories of dyes followed by gradual flocculation, indicating its potential as a natural coagulant. Gas chromatographic analysis also indicated that the main electrostatic attraction between 1,8-cineole, 1-p-methene-8-thiol and furfural compounds of the biomaterial, and dye molecules resulted in the formation of initial supramolecular complexes which further progressed into strong aggregates, leading to precipitation of dye-biomaterial complexes. Subsequently, the overall complex mechanism of dye removal was confirmed to be a combined process of adsorption and coagulation. Consistent with the batch studies, using selected plant material in real environmental water samples also resulted in effective dye removal, highlighting its potential for use in wastewater treatment.

DOI 10.1016/j.jiec.2016.03.021
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Kuppusamy S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation potential of natural polyphenol rich green wastes: A review of current research and recommendations for future directions', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 4 17-28 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. 'Green waste' (food, agro-industrial and forest residues) is a renowned valuable resource of polyphenols. Natural polyphenols are relatively effici... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. 'Green waste' (food, agro-industrial and forest residues) is a renowned valuable resource of polyphenols. Natural polyphenols are relatively efficient in the clean-up of environmental pollutants based on their unique traits of chelation, adsorption, reduction, complexation, nutrient cycling, antibacterial effects and plant growth promotion. These significant traits have found emerging applications in the removal of heavy metals, pathogenic bacteria and dyes from contaminated soil and water through existing bioremedial techniques such as biosorption, phytoextraction and coagulation. Increasingly, polyphenol-rich natural extracts harnessed for green nanoparticle synthesis (production of particles between 1 and 100 nm in size using biological entities such as microorganisms or plant biomass) have found promising use as a remedial agent in the detoxification of toxic pollutants. However, current bioremediation approaches do not sufficiently exploit natural polyphenols, which are abundantly available and are non-toxic. This review examines the extent of natural polyphenol availability in green waste, and provides a critical view on the existing remedial options, knowledge gaps and hence scope for future research. It highlights the use of natural polyphenol-rich green wastes as nanofertilizers, bioamendments, biofilters and bacteriostats. Field application strategies such as microbe-assisted phytoremediation, bioaugmention and biostimulation are also emphasized, showing the multifunctional biotechnological potentials offered by natural polyphenols.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.04.001
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Thavamani P, Smith E, Kavitha R, Mathieson G, Megharaj M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Risk based land management requires focus beyond the target contaminants-A case study involving weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soils', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 4 98-109 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Irrespective of the nature of contamination, the use of total contaminant loading as a measure of risk together with conservative policy guidance is proving ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Irrespective of the nature of contamination, the use of total contaminant loading as a measure of risk together with conservative policy guidance is proving major stumbling block towards remediation of contaminated sites. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of risk based approach to manage contaminated sites at field scale. This study recognizes the presence of weathered hydrocarbon compounds in long-term total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contaminated soils and that such compounds may not pose risk to local receptors. A multispecies ecotoxicological assessment was used to determine the potential risk from weathered hydrocarbons to the surrounding environment. The ecotoxicity of soil residual TPHs was evaluated using earthworm, water-flea, two native and two non-native Australian plants, and soil microbial activity. Plant germination was 100% in all soils but post germination, seedlings except Ryegrass failed to establish. Earthworm toxicity studies found that there was a negative impact on earthworm reproduction and mortality. Further investigation of the poor plant growth and earthworm mortality revealed that it was due to the elevated salinity that developed due to surface evaporation of the saturated calcium sulphate and not residual soil TPHs. Toxicity assessment of the soil leachate on the aquatic environment showed no effect on the survival of water-flea even though the TPH concentrations in the first year leachate were as high as 1.6 mg TPH L -1 . The study concluded that the residual TPHs in soils had little impact on a range of environmental receptors. Assessment of the residual TPH ecotoxicity was complicated by the elevated salinity of stockpile soils which impacted on the earthworm and phytotoxicity assessments. Therefore results of this study suggest that it is paramount to focus beyond target contaminants while implementing risk-based management approach. Indicators for risk based assessment are considered critical for regulatory decision making. The results of this study provide a valuable input in to the risk based management of contaminated sites.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2015.04.005
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Naidu R, Channey R, McConnell S, Johnston N, Semple KT, McGrath S, et al., 'Towards bioavailability-based soil criteria: past, present and future perspectives', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8779-8785 (2015)

© 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framewor... [more]

© 2013, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated sites is similar, and the decisions are based on threshold contaminant concentration. The uncertainty in the definition and measurement of bioavailability had limited its application to environment risk assessment and remediation. Last ten years have seen major developments in bioavailability research and acceptance. The use of bioavailability in the decision making process as one of the key variables has led to a gradual shift towards a more sophisticated risk-based approach. Now a days, many decision makers and regulatory organisations ¿more readily accept¿ this concept. Bioavailability should be the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated sites that pose risk to environmental and human health. This paper summarises the potential application of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility to the assessment of sites affected by different contaminants, and the potential for this to be the underlying basis for sustainable risk assessment and remediation in Europe, North America and Australia over the coming decade.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1617-x
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2015 Duan L, Naidu R, Liu Y, Palanisami T, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Semple KT, 'Effect of ageing on benzo[a]pyrene extractability in contrasting soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 296 175-184 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2015.04.050
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Luchun Duan, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Morrow Dong
2015 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Chlorococcum sp. MM11¿a novel phyco-nanofactory for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles', Journal of Applied Phycology, 27 1861-1869 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s10811-014-0492-2
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Zuliang Chen
2015 Duan L, Naidu R, Thavamani P, Meaklim J, Megharaj M, 'Managing long-term polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soils: a risk-based approach', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8927-8941 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-2270-0
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Luchun Duan
2015 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Metal-tolerant PAH-degrading bacteria: development of suitable test medium and effect of cadmium and its availability on PAH biodegradation', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8957-8968 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1850-3
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Smith E, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in arid environments: Evaluation of bioslurry and biopiling techniques', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 101 56-65 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.03.029
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Zheng X, Han B, Thavamani P, Duan L, Naidu R, 'Composition, source identification and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of the Subei Grand Canal, China', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 74 2669-2677 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s12665-015-4287-9
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Luchun Duan
2015 Ramadass K, Smith E, Palanisami T, Mathieson G, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of constraints in bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated arid soils through microcosm biopile study', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 12 3597-3612 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s13762-015-0793-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Influence of ageing on lead bioavailability in soils: a swine study', Environmental science and pollution research international, 22 8979-8988 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3577-1
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Kuchel T, 'Using soil properties to predict in vivo bioavailability of lead in soils', CHEMOSPHERE, 138 422-428 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.06.073
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Dane Lamb
2015 Singh S, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multifarious activities of cellulose degrading bacteria from Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces.', Journal of animal science and technology, 57 23 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40781-015-0056-2
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Poorvisha R, Suriyaraj SP, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, Bhattacharyya A, Selvakumar R, 'Synthesis and characterisation of 3-dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures using a thermoplastic polyurethane nanofiber sacrificial template', RSC Advances, 5 97773-97780 (2015) [C1]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. In this study, we report a facile synthesis of shape controlled three dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures (HAp) using a sacrificial t... [more]

© The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. In this study, we report a facile synthesis of shape controlled three dimensional hydroxyapatite nanostructures (HAp) using a sacrificial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofiber template. The TPU nanofibers synthesised using an electrospinning process were used as a template during the HAp synthesis through a precipitation process. Various HAp morphologies including distinctly placed cylindrically porous HAp architecture, coral reef like, tightly packed fibrous sheet like and nanofiber like were synthesised using the TPU nanofiber template. All the synthesised HAp were characterized using appropriate techniques like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) attached with selected area electron diffraction (SAED), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, pore arrangement and the particle size of the HAp varied significantly with varying dimensions of the template and the template available per unit area of HAp. Hence, we have achieved four different 3D HAp morphologies using a single type of TPU nanofiber template. The TPU templated HAp nanostructures were more biodegradable than the control HAp.

DOI 10.1039/c5ra18593a
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2014 Selvakumar R, Seethalakshmi N, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Recent advances in the synthesis of inorganic nano/microstructures using microbial biotemplates and their applications', RSC ADVANCES, 4 52156-52169 (2014)
DOI 10.1039/c4ra07903e
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2014 Duan L, Palanisami T, Liu Y, Dong Z, Mallavarapu M, Kuchel T, et al., 'Effects of ageing and soil properties on the oral bioavailability of benzo[a]pyrene using a swine model', Environment International, 70 192-202 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2014.05.017
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Morrow Dong, Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu, Luchun Duan, Megh Mallavarapu
2013 Lamb DT, Matanitobua VP, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of Barium to Plants and Invertebrates in Soils Contaminated by Barite', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 47 4670-4676 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/es302053d
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Dane Lamb
2013 Naidu R, Channey R, McConnell S, Johnston N, Semple KT, McGrath S, et al., 'Towards bioavailability-based soil criteria: past, present and future perspectives', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 1-7 (2013)

Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated si... [more]

Bioavailability has been used as a key indicator in chemical risk assessment yet poorly quantified risk factor. Worldwide, the framework used to assess potentially contaminated sites is similar, and the decisions are based on threshold contaminant concentration. The uncertainty in the definition and measurement of bioavailability had limited its application to environment risk assessment and remediation. Last ten years have seen major developments in bioavailability research and acceptance. The use of bioavailability in the decision making process as one of the key variables has led to a gradual shift towards a more sophisticated risk-based approach. Now a days, many decision makers and regulatory organisations 'more readily accept' this concept. Bioavailability should be the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated sites that pose risk to environmental and human health. This paper summarises the potential application of contaminant bioavailability and bioaccessibility to the assessment of sites affected by different contaminants, and the potential for this to be the underlying basis for sustainable risk assessment and remediation in Europe, North America and Australia over the coming decade. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1617-x
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2012 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Multivariate analysis of mixed contaminants (PAHs and heavy metals) at manufactured gas plant site soils', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 184 3875-3885 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10661-011-2230-4
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2012 Thavamani P, Malik S, Beer M, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Microbial activity and diversity in long-term mixed contaminated soils with respect to polyaromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 99 10-17 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.12.030
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 63
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2012 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium', BIODEGRADATION, 23 823-835 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s10532-012-9572-7
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2011 Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Krishnamurti GSR, McFarland R, Naidu R, 'Finger printing of mixed contaminants from former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site soils: Implications to bioremediation', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 37 184-189 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2010.08.017
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2010 Balasubramanian R, Megharaj M, Kandasamy T, Thavamani P, Naidu R, 'Moulds: the major trigger of asthma?', Remediation Australasia, 2010 8-10 (2010)
2010 Thavamani P, Naidu R, 'The Dirty Dozen become the Dirty 21:the new list of Stockholm Priority Contaminants (POPs)', Remediation Australasia, 2010 20-21 (2010)
2008 Rajakumar S, Ayyasamy PM, Shanthi K, Thavamani P, Velmurugan P, Song YC, Lakshmanaperumalsamy P, 'Nitrate removal efficiency of bacterial consortium (Pseudomonas sp. KW1 and Bacillus sp. YW4) in synthetic nitrate-rich water', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 157 553-563 (2008)

The efficiency of bacterial isolates to reduce nitrate from synthetic nitrate-rich water was tested using a batch scale process. Two efficient nitrate reducing bacterial species w... [more]

The efficiency of bacterial isolates to reduce nitrate from synthetic nitrate-rich water was tested using a batch scale process. Two efficient nitrate reducing bacterial species were isolated from water samples collected from Kodaikanal and Yercaud lakes. Bacterial analysis of the samples revealed the presence of nitrate reducing bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Bac illus, Micrococcus and Alcaligenes. Among the isolates, the consortium of Pseudomonas sp. KW1 and Bacillus sp. YW4 was found to be efficient in nitrate reduction. Influences of various carbon sources, incubation temperature and pH on nitrate reduction from synthetic wastewater were also studied. The results showed a rapid and efficient process of nitrate removal (99.4%) from synthetic wastewater supplemented with starch (1%), inoculated by bacterial consortium (Pseudomonas sp. KW1 and Bacillus sp. YW4) at incubation temperature of 30 °C at pH 7. This observation has led to the conclusion that the bacterial consortium was responsible for nitrate removal from synthetic nitrate-rich wastewater. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2008.01.020
Citations Scopus - 21
2008 Palanisami T, Thangavel P, Prabakaran J, 'The beneficial use of industrial sludge on amelioration and management of problem soils', International Journal of Agriculture Environment & Biotechnology, 1 68-72 (2008)
2003 Thangavel P, Palanisami T, Arulmozhiselvan K, 'Ameliorative potential of common effluent treatment plant (Textile and dye) sludge for problem soils', Bioscience Research Bulletin, 19 129-138 (2003)
Show 54 more journal articles

Conference (27 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Wijayawardena AMA, Naidu R, Mallavarapu M, Lamb D, Palanisami T, Kuchel T, 'Can lead enter independently in the presence of zinc into human body? A study on effect of zinc on lead bioavailability', Melbourne, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Dane Lamb, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Ravi Naidu
2016 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Mallavarapu M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Effect of iron chloride precursor on synthesis of stable iron nanoparticles for chromium remediation', Canberra, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Thavamani P, Mallavarapu M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Algal Biomass After Bioremediation ¿ An Economical Source for Biosynthesis of Iron Nanoparticles', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Palanisami T, Ramadass K, Smith E, Mallavarapu M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Challenges in Real Field Implementation of Risk Based Land Management Approach: a Case Study Involving Weathered Hydrocarbons', Clean up 2015: 6th International Contmainated Site Remediation Conference: Proceedings, Melbourne (2015) [E2]
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Wijayawardena MAA, Megharaj M, Lamb D, Thavamani P, Naidu R, Kuchel T, Wijayawardena AMA, 'Influence of soil ageing on lead bioavailability', International Contaminated Site Remediation Conference (Cleanup 2015), Melbourne, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Ayanka Wijayawardena, Dane Lamb
2015 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Chlamydomonas ¿ A green micro sized nano synthesizer: Phyco solution to nano problems', Tamil Nadu, India (2015)
2015 Ramadass K, Palanisami T, Smith E, Megharaj M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbon contaminated clay sediments', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Ramakrishnan P, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Rajendran S, 'Screening of cation doped hydroxyapatite for strontium removal from aqueous solutions', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Subramaniyam V, Palanisami T, Subashchandrabose SR, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Bionanotechnology ¿ An Eco friendly and cost effective solution for reusing industrial effluents', Tamil Nadu, India (2015)
2015 Bolan S, Naidu R, Clark I, Palanisami T, Seshadri B, 'Sources, speciation and bioavailability of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri
2015 Palanisami T, Mallavarapu M, Naidu RAVI, 'Contaminants of emerging concern in the coastal zone: the need for new monitoring,assessment and management strategies', Great Lakes, NSW (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2014 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Chen C, Naidu R, 'Chlorococcum sp. MM11¿a novel phyco-nanofactory for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles', Sydney, Australia (2014)
2014 Subramaniyam V, Subashchandrabose SR, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Microalgal solution to environmental nanotechnology ¿ from synthesis to remediation', Adelaide, Australia (2014)
2013 Thavamani P, Smith E, Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Srivastava P, Naidu R, 'Risk based management of hydrocarbon contaminated soils - A case study', International workshop in chemical bioavailability in the terrestrial environment, British geological survey, Nottingham, England (2013)
2013 Duan L, Naidu R, Thavamani P, Liu Y, Megharaj M, 'Effect of biochar and pulverised activated carbon on the bioavailability of benzo(a)pyrene in a soil aged over 90 days', British geological survey, Nottingham, England (2013)
2013 Thavamani P, Smith E, Ramadass K, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Pilot-scale remediation of total petroleum, hydrocarbons using bioslurry reactor', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2013)
2013 Naidu R, Juahsz A, Mallavarapu M, Duan L, Wijayawardena A, Smith E, et al., 'Moving towards 2020-Bioavailability challenges for environmental risk assessment and remediation', British geological survey, Nottingham, England (2013)
2013 Duan L, Thavamani P, Liu Y, Megharaj M, Meaklim J, Naidu R, 'Oral bioavailability of benzo(a)pyrene contaminated soils- The use of swine model', Melbourne,Victoria,Australia (2013)
2013 Subramaniyam V, Megharaj M, Thavamani P, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Photosynthesized Iron Nano Particles for the Remediation of Chromium', Melbourne,Victoria,Australia (2013)
2013 Duan L, Liu Y, Thavamani P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Effect of ageing on benzo(a)pyrene extractability in four contrasting soils', Melbourne,Victoria,Australia (2013)
2013 Ramadass K, Smith E, Palanisami T, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Biopiling weathered hydrocarbons-Attainable/Sustainable solution in arid soils?', Melbourne, Victoria (2013)
2013 Smith E, Palanisami T, Ramadass K, Wang W, Srivastava P, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Remediation options for heavily contaminated TPH sediments', Melbourne, Victoria (2013)
2012 Subashchandrabose SR, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Lockington R, Naidu R, 'Biodegradation of pyrene by Chlorella sp. MM3 isolated from the PAH contaminated soil', Adelaide, Australia (2012)
2010 Lamb D, Palanisami T, Matanitobua V, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of barium to invertebrates and humans in soils contaminated by barite', Brisbane, Australia (2010)
2008 Megharaj M, Palanisami T, Mercurio P, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and remediation of mixed contaminated soils', Sydney, Australia (2008)
2007 Palanisami T, Megharaj M, McFarland R, Naidu R, 'Assessing the toxicity of mixed contaminants (phenanthrene & cadmium) to earthworm using contact assay', Adlaide, SA (2007)
2005 Palanisami T, Rajakumar S, Ayyasamy PM, Shanthi K, Lakshmanaperumalsamy P, 'Bioremediation of Nitrate contaminated drinking water using Multibioreactor systems', South Korea (2005)
Show 24 more conferences

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Palanisami T, 'Plastic pollution in the Hunter's marine food chain and wastewater', (2017) [O1]
2017 Palanisami T, Maddison C, Subash NSBC, Sania A, Geetika B, Oluyoye(Michael) I, 'Plastic pollution in the Hunter's drinking water and environment', (2017) [O1]

Report (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Palanisami T, Bahar M, Smith E, Mathieson G, Ramadass K, Megharaj M, et al., 'Ecotoxicity assessment of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils subjected to biopile treatment' (2015)
2014 Smith E, Mathieson G, Palanisami T, Kavitha R, Bahar M, Megharaj M, et al., 'Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils through biopile technology' (2014)
2014 Smith E, Palanisami T, Kavitha R, Tunde H, Megharaj M, 'Risk based management of hydrocarbon impacted soils subjected to land farming at Mt Whaleback' (2014)
2013 Smith E, Palanisami T, Kavitha R, Mathieson G, Wang WH, Megharaj M, 'Green remediation options for rail loop evaporation pond sediments', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO (2013)
2013 Smith E, Raktim P, Palanisami T, Tunde F, Kavitha R, Megharaj M, 'Microcosm study of microbial remediation of TPH contaminated soils in arid regions collected from Newman, WA', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO (2013)
2013 Raktim P, Smith E, Palanisami T, Tunde H, Kavitha R, Megharaj M, 'Bioavailability of hydrocarbons in Arid soils collected from Newman, WA', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO (2013)
2012 Palanisami T, Smith E, 'Pilot scale remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils through bioreactor', Reviewed by CRC CRE and submitted to BHP BIO (2012)
2011 Smith E, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Remediation of mixed contaminated soils at the Locomotive Service Shop and Ore Car Repair Shop at Port Hedland, WA.', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO (2011)
2010 Smith E, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Chemical Oxidation Treatment of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils at the Locomotive Service Shop and Ore Car Repair Shop at Port Hedland, WA', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO (2010)
2010 Palanisami T, Smith E, Megharaj M, Megharaj R, 'Enhanced Solubility of TPHs in mixed contaminated soils at the Locomotive Service Shop and Ore Car Repair Shop at Port Hedland, WA', Reviewed by CRC CARE and submitted to BHP BIO, 2010, p1-24. (2010)
2010 Smith E, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Soil Sampling and Site Characterization at BHP BIO¿s Locomotive Service Shop and Ore Car Repair Shop at Port Hedland, WA.', Reviewed by CRC CRE and submitted to BHP BIO (2010)
2010 Palanisami T, Matanitobua VP, Megharaj M, 'Speciation, toxicity and bioavailability of Arsenic in proposed residential soils in South Australia', South Australia (2010)
2009 Lamb DT, Palanisami T, Matanitobua VP, Megharaj M, 'Megharaj M. Bioavailability of barium to invertebrate¿s and humans in soil contaminated by barite', barite (2009)
Show 10 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 14
Total funding $1,608,178

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $51,000

UHMD Hunter River Water Quality Study$51,000

Funding body: NSW Minerals Council

Funding body NSW Minerals Council
Project Team Professor Richard Bush, Doctor Zhaohui Wang, Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701095
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20165 grants / $497,633

Innovative Bioremediation technologies for TCE contaminated groundwater$293,492

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Dawit Bekele, Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501243
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils from the Former Rail Loop Ponds at Mount Whaleback – Laboratory Biopile Study$106,641

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Mezbaul Bahar, Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Dr Prashant Srivastava
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600698
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON Y

Occurrence, fate and behavior of microplastics in aquatic environment- implications to ecological and human health risk$45,000

Funding body: Newcastle City Council

Funding body Newcastle City Council
Project Team Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme 50/50 Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601286
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Understanding the Occurrence, Fate & Behavior, Management of Microplastics in Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants$45,000

Funding body: Hunter Water Corporation

Funding body Hunter Water Corporation
Project Team Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme 50/50 Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601289
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Ecological and human health risk assessment of microplastics$7,500

Ecological and human health risk assessment of microplastics

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Dr. Thava palanisami

Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $14,507

PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS in WATER, SEDIMENT and BIOTA$8,000

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Doctor Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Doctor Suresh Subashchandrabose, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Professor Megh Mallavarapu
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1600058
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

Microplastics in Lake Macquarie: Distribution, Characteristics $6,507

Funding body: Lake Macquarie City Council

Funding body Lake Macquarie City Council
Project Team Doctor Thava Palanisami, Doctor Suresh Subashchandrabose, Doctor Logeshwaran Panneerselvan, Doctor Kannan Krishnan, Professor Megh Mallavarapu
Scheme Lake Macquarie Environmental Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1600173
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Local
Category 2OPL
UON Y

20132 grants / $287,435

Pilot scale bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils$281,435

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Megharaj Mallavarapu, Euan Smith, Grant Mathieson, Thavamani Palanisami, Kavitha Ramadass, Mezbaul Bahar,

Scheme CRC
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

Synthesis of inorganic nano/microstructures using microbial biotemplates and their applications$6,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Scheme Early Career Researcher International Networking Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20121 grants / $727,603

Bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Arid region$727,603

Funding body: CRC CARE Pty Ltd

Funding body CRC CARE Pty Ltd
Project Team

Prof. Megh Mallavarapu, Dr. Euan Smith, Dr. Thava Palanisami, Dr. Kavitha Ramadass

Scheme CRC
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20102 grants / $15,000

Speciation, toxicity and bioavailability of Arsenic in proposed residential soils in regional South Australia$11,000

Funding body: TMK Eng. Pty Ltd.

Funding body TMK Eng. Pty Ltd.
Scheme Consultancy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N

Biomarkers for emerging contaminants$4,000

Funding body: University of South Australia

Funding body University of South Australia
Scheme Early Career Researcher Development Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20091 grants / $15,000

Bioavailability of barium to invertebrate’s and humans in soils contaminated by barite$15,000

Funding body: TMK Engineering

Funding body TMK Engineering
Scheme Consultancy
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current6

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD3.2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Contaminant Induced Antimicrobial Resistance (CIAMR) - A Threat to Human and Animal Health PhD (Immunology & Microbiol), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Environmentally relevant risk assessment of microplastics and complex chemical mixtures in Marine Environment: Implications for Trophic Transfer and Human Health PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Beyond the Obvious: Risk Assessment of Contaminant Transformation Products and Metabolites PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Microplastics as a Vector for Contaminant Transport in Fresh Water Ecosystem: An Ecotoxicological and Molecular Assessment PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Microplastics as an emerging contaminant in wastewater treatment plants PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Life in Plastisphere: Unravelling the interaction of microorganisms with microplastics PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Phyco-nanotechnology for Chromium Remediation PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Reclamation of derelict mine sites using metallophytes Environmental Studies, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Development of microbial inoculum for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs) and metal mixed contaminated soils Environmental Studies, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Effect of soil types and ageing on PAH bioavailability Environmental Health, University of South Australia Co-Supervisor
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Research Opportunities

Ecological and human health Risk Assessment of plastic debris

There are several exciting topics to work within this broader area, opportunity to collaborate with other elite national and international scientists.Looking for Honours and PhD candidates. Interested candidates can email me for more specific details.

Scholarship

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER)

1/04/2016 - 18/06/2018

Contact

Doctor Thava Palanisami
University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
thava.palanisami@newcastle.edu.au

Human health risk assessment of emerging contaminants and its metabolites

This broad research topic encompass several novel specific research questions which havent been studied so far. Candidates have the unlimited opportunities for learning advanced techniques under the supervision of multidisciplinary team. Looking for Honours and PhD candidates. Interested candidates can email me for more specific details and discussion

Scholarship

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER)

1/04/2016 - 20/03/2018

Contact

Doctor Thava Palanisami
University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
thava.palanisami@newcastle.edu.au

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 54
India 20
Korea, Republic of 14
United Kingdom 4
United States 3
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Dr Thava Palanisami

Position

Senior Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email thava.palanisami@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40339411

Office

Room ATC
Building Advanced Technology Centre.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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