Mrs Kavitha Ramadass

Mrs Kavitha Ramadass

Research Associate

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

Biography

Dr. Kavitha Ramadass is a Post-doctoral researcher in Prof. Ajayan Vinu’s group at the Global Innovative Centre for Advanced Nanomaterials (GICAN), University of Newcastle. Before joining GICAN centre, she was working as a Research Associate at Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Kavitha was born in Tamilnadu, South India and got her Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural sciences from Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore in 2002. She continued in the same university for her Master’s course in Environmental Sciences and graduated in 2004. She worked as a research scholar before she moved to Australia in 2008 for her PhD through International Postgraduate Research Scholarship at the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia. Her PhD research topic was on ecotoxicology and bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons. After the completion of PhD, she remained in UniSA for her Post-doctoral position, worked in multiple projects on bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils funded by BHP Billiton Iron Ore (BHPBIO) and Co-operative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE). Now she is focussing on developing innovative and efficient technologies on synthesis of multifunctional nanomaterials for various energy and environmental applications including the efficient removal of pollutants and biological contaminants.

Research Interests

        Novel nanoporous materials synthesis and application on CO2 conversion and energy storage, adsorption and separation of environmental toxins

        Fabrication and textural parameter control of novel nanoporous carbon nitride materials with different nitrogen content

        Preparation and the structural and the morphological design of novel nanoporous carbon with tunable pore diameters

        Synthesis, characterization and catalytic applications of  metal doped mesoporous Carbon nitrrides

        Fine chemical synthesis using nanostructured catalytic materials

        Environmental application of novel nanoporous materials for adsorption and removal of environmental contaminants

        Synthesis of value added product (manure) from solid waste composting and its application.

        Environmental Remediation particularly in relation to hazard characterization, risk assessment, and regulatory aspects of chemicals and nanomaterials


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia
  • Master of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University Coimbatore

Keywords

  • Advanced material characterisation
  • Nanoporous materials
  • Nanoprous material synthesis and application

Languages

  • Tamil (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
030301 Chemical Characterisation of Materials 30
030306 Synthesis of Materials 30
030601 Catalysis and Mechanisms of Reactions 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Office - DVC (Research and Innovation)
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (24 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Ramadass K, Singh G, Lakhi KS, Benzigar MR, Yang JH, Kim S, et al., 'Halloysite nanotubes: Novel and eco-friendly adsorbents for high-pressure CO2 capture', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 277 229-236 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2018.10.035
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Kripal Lakhi
2018 Benzigar MR, Talapaneni SN, Joseph S, Ramadass K, Singh G, Scaranto J, et al., 'Recent advances in functionalized micro and mesoporous carbon materials: synthesis and applications', Chemical Society Reviews, 47 2680-2721 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/C7CS00787F
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Stalin Joseph, Ajayan Vinu, Siddulunaidu Talapaneni
2018 Singh G, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, Kim S, Stockdale D, Vinu A, 'A combined strategy of acid-assisted polymerization and solid state activation to synthesize functionalized nanoporous activated biocarbons from biomass for CO2capture', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 271 23-32 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2018.05.035
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Kripal Lakhi
2018 Naidu Talapaneni S, Ramadass K, Ruban SJ, Benzigar M, Lakhi KS, Yang JH, et al., '3D cubic mesoporous C

© 2018 A novel highly ordered three dimensional mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (MGCN-6) with C3N4 stoichiometry having amorphous wall structure, tunable textural parameters w... [more]

© 2018 A novel highly ordered three dimensional mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (MGCN-6) with C3N4 stoichiometry having amorphous wall structure, tunable textural parameters with body-centered cubic Ia3d framework has been prepared from 3D mesoporous silica, KIT-6 with adjustable pore diameters as hard templates through a temperature-induced poly condensation followed by the polymerization reaction of cyanamide (CNNH2) precursor. The structure of the resulting mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride materials consists of sheets of three-dimensionally arranged s-heptazine units that are held together by covalent bonds between C and N atoms. The realized MGCN-6 materials have been thoroughly characterized using various techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 physisorption, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV¿vis and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The characterization data reveal that the resultant materials possess a well-defined ordered three-dimensional porous structure with a high surface area and a large pore volume. The catalytic activity of these materials has been tested in the Knoevenagel condensation between benzaldehyde and malononitrile. This catalyst is found to be highly active and shows a high conversion with 100% product selectivity even at room temperature.

DOI 10.1016/j.cattod.2018.08.003
Co-authors Siddulunaidu Talapaneni, Ajayan Vinu, Kripal Lakhi
2018 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Subramanian A, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Aryal R, Saint C, 'Analysis of chromium status in the revegetated flora of a tannery waste site and microcosm studies using earthworm E. fetida', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 25 5063-5070 (2018) [C1]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Chromium from tannery waste dump site causes significant environmental pollution affecting surrounding flora and fauna. The primary aims of t... [more]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Chromium from tannery waste dump site causes significant environmental pollution affecting surrounding flora and fauna. The primary aims of this study were to survey vegetation, investigate the degree of soil pollution occurring near tannery waste dump site and make a systematic evaluation of soil contamination based on the chromium levels found in plants and earthworms from the impacted areas. This paper presents the pollution load of toxic heavy metals, and especially chromium, in 10 soil samples and 12 species of plants. Soil samples were analysed for heavy metals by using ICP-MS/ICP-OES method. Results indicated that Cr in soils exceeded soil quality guideline limits (SQGL). The total chromium present in the above ground parts of plants ranged from 1.7¿mg¿kg-1 in Casuarina sp.¿to 1007¿mg¿kg-1 in Sonchus asper. The Cr bioaccumulation in Eisenia fetida from tannery waste soil ranged from 5 to 194¿mg¿kg-1. The high enrichment factor of Cr in S. asper and bioaccumulation factor in earthworms indicate that there is a steady increase of toxic chromium risk in this area, which could be correlated with the past dumping activity. Emphasis needs to be put on control measures of pollution and remediation techniques in such areas to achieve an ecologically sustainable industrialisation.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-0543-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2018 Joseph S, Benzigar MR, Ilbeygi H, Gopalan SA, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, et al., 'Mesoporous Carbons with Hexagonally Ordered Pores Prepared from Carbonated Soft-Drink for CO2 Capture at High Pressure', JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY, 18 7830-7837 (2018)
DOI 10.1166/jnn.2018.15415
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Kripal Lakhi
2018 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of weathered hydrocarbons in engine oil-contaminated soil: Impact of bioaugmentation mediated by Pseudomonas spp. on bioremediation', Science of the Total Environment, 636 968-974 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Heavier fraction hydrocarbons (C15-C36) formed in soil after biotic and abiotic weatherings of engine oil are the continuing constraints in the bioremediation... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Heavier fraction hydrocarbons (C15-C36) formed in soil after biotic and abiotic weatherings of engine oil are the continuing constraints in the bioremediation strategy, and their bioavailability remains a poorly quantified regulatory factor. In a microcosm study, we used two strains of Pseudomonas, P. putida TPHK-1 and P. aeruginosa TPHK-4, in strategies of bioremediation, viz., natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation, for removal of weathered total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in soil contaminated long-term with high concentrations of engine oil (39,000¿41,000 mg TPHs kg-1 soil). Both the bacterial strains exhibited a great potential in remediating weathered hydrocarbons of engine oil. Addition of inorganic fertilizers (NPK), at recommended levels for bioremediation, resulted in significant inhibition in biostimulation/enhanced natural attenuation as well as bioaugmentation. The data on dehydrogenase activity clearly confirmed those of bioremediation strategies used, indicating that this enzyme assay could serve as an indicator of bioremediation potential of oil-contaminated soil. Extraction of TPHs from engine oil-contaminated soil with hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin (HPCD), but not 1-butanol, was found reliable in predicting the bioavailability of weathered hydrocarbons. Also, 454 pyrosequencing data were in accordance with those of bioremediation strategies used in the present microcosm study, suggesting the possible use of pyrosequencing in designing approaches for bioremediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.379
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Thavamani P, Samkumar RA, Satheesh V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ramadass K, Naidu R, et al., 'Microbes from mined sites: Harnessing their potential for reclamation of derelict mine sites', Environmental Pollution, 230 495-505 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.056
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Suresh Subashchandrabose, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecotoxicity of measured concentrations of soil-applied diesel: Effects on earthworm survival, dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification activities', Applied Soil Ecology, 119 1-7 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diesel... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diesel towards earthworms always relied on growth inhibition endpoint (EC50) values that were determined based on the spiked concentrations (nominal), ignoring the substantial portion of hydrocarbons volatilized from soil. In the present study we used, for the first time, the measured concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil-applied diesel to assess earthworm (Eisenia fetida) survival, and the activities of dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification as indicators of soil health. The mortality endpoint (LC50) value for initially measured concentrations after exposure of earthworms to diesel for 28¿days was 916¿±¿10¿mg TPHs kg-1 soil which was equivalent to the nominal (initially added) concentration of 1426¿±¿19¿mg TPHs kg-1 soil. Morphological abnormalities such as clitella swelling and curling were noticed when the measured concentrations of diesel were more than 971¿mg¿kg-1 soil. Significant increases in activities of soil dehydrogenase (38¿58%) as well as urease were observed in the diesel-applied soil. Presence of earthworms further enhanced the activities of these soil enzymes. Nitrification was sensitive to application of diesel to soil, and it was inhibited in a dose-related manner even in the presence of earthworms. The differential response of the toxicity criteria to diesel-contaminated soil observed in the present study clearly warrants more studies involving several soil health parameters to arrive at a generalization of ecotoxicity of an environmental pollutant.

DOI 10.1016/j.apsoil.2017.05.017
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of diesel water accommodated fraction toward microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella sp MM3', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 142 538-543 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.04.052
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Park D-H, Lakhi K, Ramadass K, Kim M-K, Talapaneni S, Joseph S, et al., 'Energy efficient synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon nitrides with a high nitrogen content and enhanced CO2 capture capacity', Chemistry-A European Journal, (2017)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Stalin Joseph, Ajayan Vinu, Siddulunaidu Talapaneni, Kripal Lakhi
2017 Talapaneni SN, Mane GP, Park D-H, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, Joseph S, et al., 'Diaminotetrazine based mesoporous C 3 N 6 with a well-ordered 3D cubic structure and its excellent photocatalytic performance for hydrogen evolution', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 5 18183-18192 (2017)
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Kripal Lakhi, Stalin Joseph, Ajayan Vinu, Siddulunaidu Talapaneni
2016 Abbasian F, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Lockington R, Ramadass K, 'Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis', Biotechnology Progress, 32 638-648 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation ... [more]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identificati on of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638¿648, 2016.

DOI 10.1002/btpr.2249
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami
2016 Ramadass K, Palanisami T, Smith E, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Earthworm Comet Assay for Assessing the Risk of Weathered Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils: Need to Look Further than Target Contaminants', Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 71 561-571 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00244-016-0318-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Sensitivity and Antioxidant Response of Chlorella sp. MM3 to Used Engine Oil and Its Water Accommodated Fraction', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 97 71-77 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) t... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) to determine growth inhibition and response of antioxidant enzymes. Oil type and oil concentration greatly affected the microalgal growth. Used oil at 0.04¿% (0.4¿g L-1) resulted in 50¿% inhibition in algal growth, measured in terms of chlorophyll-a, while the corresponding concentration of unused oil was nontoxic. Similarly, used oil WAF showed significant toxicity to the algal growth at 10¿% level, whereas WAF from unused oil was nontoxic even at 100¿% concentration. Peroxidase enzyme in the microalga significantly increased with used oil at concentrations above 0.04¿g L-1whereas the induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase was apparent only at 0.06¿g L-1. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes increased significantly when the microalga was exposed to 75 and 100¿% WAF obtained from used oil. The used oil toxicity on microalga could be due to the presence of toxic soluble mono- and polyaromatic compounds, heavy metals, and other compounds attained by the oil during its use in the motor engines.

DOI 10.1007/s00128-016-1817-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Talapaneni SN, Park D-H, Choy J-H, Ramadass K, Elzatahry A, Al Balawi AS, et al., 'Facile Synthesis of Crystalline Nanoporous GaN Templated by Nitrogen Enriched Mesoporous Carbon Nitride for Friedel-Crafts Reaction', CHEMISTRYSELECT, 1 6062-6068 (2016)
DOI 10.1002/slct.201601545
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Siddulunaidu Talapaneni, Ajayan Vinu
2016 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Soil bacterial strains with heavy metal resistance and high potential in degrading diesel oil and n-alkanes', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 13 2863-2874 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil a... [more]

© 2016, Islamic Azad University (IAU). Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil and identified. Strains of Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas putida TPHK-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TPHK-4, were more efficient in degrading high concentrations of the hydrocarbons than the other two strains, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia TPHK-2 and Acenitobacter sp. TPHK-3. P. putida TPHK-1 exhibited tolerance to very high concentrations of heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, zinc and copper. The innate ability of P. putida TPHK-1, as evidenced by the amplified genes alkB1 and alkB2 that encode alkane hydroxylases, and cat12o and cat23o coding for catechol dioxygenase, in degrading diesel oil in the presence of heavy metals is far greater than that of the strains reported in the literature. Heavy metal tolerance coupled with rapid degradation of hydrocarbons, even at high concentrations, suggests that P. putida TPHK-1 has a great potential in remediating soils contaminated with mixtures of hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

DOI 10.1007/s13762-016-1113-1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and oxidative stress induced by used and unused motor oil on freshwater microalga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 22 8890-8901 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3403-9
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecological implications of motor oil pollution: Earthworm survival and soil health', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 85 72-81 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2015.02.026
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Smith E, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in arid environments: Evaluation of bioslurry and biopiling techniques', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 101 56-65 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.03.029
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2015 Ramadass K, Smith E, Palanisami T, Mathieson G, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of constraints in bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated arid soils through microcosm biopile study', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 12 3597-3612 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s13762-015-0793-2
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu
2007 Ramadass K, Palaniyandi S, 'Effect of enriched municipal solid waste compost application on soil available macronutrients in the rice field', Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, 53 497-506 (2007)

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost, w... [more]

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost, which has multiple benefits to the crop system. The key players in this transformation process were Azotobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., Phosphobacteria sp. and the waste materials like poultry litter and spent wash. This enrichment process increases both the quality and nutrient content of the municipal solid waste compost significantly. A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of application of different levels of enriched municipal solid waste compost on the availability of the macronutrient content to the rice field soil. The effect of enriched compost on soil available nutrients was significant. The soil ammonium nitrogen and soil nitrate nitrogen content was found to be high in the plots where the enriched compost was applied along with inorganic fertilizer with the values of 38.87 mg kg-1 and 32.87 mg kg-1, respectively. In addition, the availability decreased towards crop growth. The soil available P and K were also increased with enriched compost application to about 22.46 kg ha-1 and 647 kg ha-1 compared with control values of 19.44 kg ha-1 and 518 kg ha-1, respectively. Both phosphorus and potassium content decreased towards advancement of crop growth. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/03650340701581479
Citations Scopus - 7
2007 Kavitha R, Subramanian P, 'Effect of enriched municipal solid waste compost application on growth, plant nutrient uptake and yield of rice', Journal of Agronomy, 6 586-592 (2007)

A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost (EMSWC) application on gro... [more]

A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost (EMSWC) application on growth, plant nutrient uptake and yield of rice in RBD during the year of 2004. The growth attributes viz., plant height, leaf area index, number of tillers and dry matter production differed significantly due to different treatments. These attributes increased significantly owing to the application of enriched compost, which has enhanced nutrient level, which leads to the continuous availability of nutrients in available form to the plants. The highest grain yield and straw yield were observed in the treatment combination of 25% of enriched compost and 75% of recommended dose of inorganic fertilizer (T5) with value of 5.22 and 8.65 t ha-1, respectively. Application of 5 t ha-1enriched MSWC in combination with 25% N through inorganic fertilizer recorded grain yield of 4.33 t ha-1. The lowest grain yield (3.78 t ha-1) was recorded in treatment where the compost was applied alone. © 2007 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

DOI 10.3923/ja.2007.586.592
Citations Scopus - 12
2007 Kavitha R, Subramanian P, 'Bioactive compost - A value added compost with microbial inoculants and organic additives', Journal of Applied Sciences, 7 2514-2518 (2007)

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost through th... [more]

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost through the addition of various substrates, which has multiple benefits to the crop system. The key players in this transformation process were Azotobacter, Pseudomonas, Phosphobacteria, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash. This enrichment process has increased the nutritive value of compost. The highest nitrogen content (1.75%) and phosphorus content (1.16%) was observed in the treatment T5(compost enriched with composted poultry litter, spent wash, microbial inoculants and rock phosphate). The beneficial microorganism viz., Azotobacter, Pseudomonas and Phosphobacteria population were higher in the treatment T5where all the inputs (composted poultry litter, microbial consortium, rock phosphate and spent wash) were added to the compost. The plant growth promoters viz., IAA and GA content was more in the treatment applied with spent wash and microbial inoculum. Beneficial microorganisms, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash contributes maximum level of nutrients and growth promoters to the compost with small expenses. © 2007 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

DOI 10.3923/jas.2007.2514.2518
Citations Scopus - 11
Show 21 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Park D-H, Lakhi K, Ramadass K, Kim MK, Vinu A, 'Nitrogen-rich mesoporous carbon nitrides for CO2 capture and conversion', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, San Francisco, CA (2017)
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $260,324

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20186 grants / $260,324

Phase identification of Halloysite and Kaolinite clay mixtures: Key step for product development and commercialisation$49,984

Funding body: Andromeda Metals Limited

Funding body Andromeda Metals Limited
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Jae-Hun Yang, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass
Scheme Entrepreneurs’ Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801022
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Phase identification of Halloysite and Kaolinite clay mixtures: Key step for product development and commercialisation$49,983

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Jae-Hun Yang, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801025
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Transformation of halloysite into high value products$49,910

Funding body: Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd

Funding body Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800658
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Transformation of halloysite into high value products$49,908

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800705
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Structural characterisation and the application of Halloysite nanotubes$31,410

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701436
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Structural characterisation and the application of Halloysite nanotubes$29,129

Funding body: Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd

Funding body Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Mrs Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701435
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Beyond the Obvious: Risk Assessment of Contaminant Transformation Products and Metabolites PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 22
India 13
Saudi Arabia 6
Japan 1
Korea, Republic of 1
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Mrs Kavitha Ramadass

Position

Research Associate
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Contact Details

Email kavitha.ramadass@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40939604
Link Research Networks
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