Dr Kavitha Ramadass

Dr Kavitha Ramadass

Research Associate

School of Engineering

Career Summary

Biography

Biography

Dr. Kavitha Ramadass is a Post-doctoral researcher in Prof. Ajayan Vinu’s group at the Global Innovative Centre for Advanced Nanomaterials (GICAN), University of Newcastle. Before joining GICAN centre, she was working as a Research Associate at Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Kavitha was born in Tamilnadu, South India and got her Bachelor’s degree in Agricultural sciences from Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore in 2002. She continued in the same university for her Master’s course in Environmental Sciences and graduated in 2004. She worked as a research scholar before she moved to Australia in 2008 for her PhD through International Postgraduate Research Scholarship at the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia. Her PhD research topic was on ecotoxicology and bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons. After the completion of PhD, she remained in UniSA for her Post-doctoral position, worked in multiple projects on bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils funded by BHP Billiton Iron Ore (BHPBIO) and Co-operative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE). Now she is focussing on developing innovative and efficient technologies on synthesis of multifunctional nanomaterials for various energy and environmental applications including the efficient removal of pollutants and biological contaminants.

Research Interests

        Novel nanoporous materials synthesis and application on CO2 conversion and energy storage, adsorption and separation of environmental toxins

        Fabrication and textural parameter control of novel nanoporous carbon nitride materials with different nitrogen content

        Preparation and the structural and the morphological design of novel nanoporous carbon with tunable pore diameters

        Synthesis, characterization and catalytic applications of  metal doped mesoporous Carbon nitrrides

        Fine chemical synthesis using nanostructured catalytic materials

        Environmental application of novel nanoporous materials for adsorption and removal of environmental contaminants

        Synthesis of value added product (manure) from solid waste composting and its application.

        Environmental Remediation particularly in relation to hazard characterization, risk assessment, and regulatory aspects of chemicals and nanomaterials


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of South Australia
  • Master of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University Coimbatore

Keywords

  • Advanced material characterisation
  • Nanoporous materials
  • Nanoprous material synthesis and application

Languages

  • Tamil (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
340301 Inorganic materials (incl. nanomaterials) 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (51 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Sugi Y, Joseph S, Ramadass K, Sathish CI, Premkumar S, Dasireddy VDBC, et al., 'The isopropylation of naphthalene over a beta zeolite with BEA topoplogy. The selectivity of the products', Molecular Catalysis, 505 (2021) [C1]

The isopropylation of naphthalene (NP) was carried out over a BEA zeolite (BEA38; SiO2/Al2O3 = 38) focused on the selectivities for diisopropylnaphthalene (DIPN) and triisopropyln... [more]

The isopropylation of naphthalene (NP) was carried out over a BEA zeolite (BEA38; SiO2/Al2O3 = 38) focused on the selectivities for diisopropylnaphthalene (DIPN) and triisopropylnaphthalene (TriIPN) isomers. The isopropylation gave possible eight DIPN isomers including ß,ß- (2,6- and 2,7-), a,ß- (1,3-, 1,6-, and 1,7-), and a,a- (1,4- and 1,5-). The catalysis over BEA works two types of controls: kinetic control operates to form predominantly bulky and unstable a,a-DIPN at low temperatures, and thermodynamic controls work for the predominant formation of the slim and stable ß,ß-DIPN at high temperatures, although the intermediately bulky and stable a,ß-DIPN are the major products through both controls. The enhanced selectivities for ß,ß-DIPN were observed at the early stages of the catalysis in the range of 200-300 °C, which operate under new type of thermodynamic control over fresh catalyst through thermodynamically preferred transition states; however, they decreased with the increase in the selectivities for a,a- and a,ß-DIPN, and converged after prolonged reaction period. The isopropylation of DIPN isomers gives TriIPN isomers: unstable and bulky 1,3,5- and 1,4,6-TriIPN with a,a,ß-substitution, and stable and slim 1,3,7- and 1,3,6-TriIPN with a,ß,ß-substitution. The low temperatures favor the former isomers, whereas the selectivity for the latter isomers increases with increasing reaction temperature. These results indicate that TriIPN isomers principally form under kinetic control at low temperatures, and thermodynamic controls participate in the catalysis at high temperatures. The selectivities for TriIPN isomers kept constant during the reaction at all temperatures: 200, 250, and 300 °C. The catalysis occurs inside the BEA channels and allow even the formation of bulky 1,3,5- and 1,4,6-TriIPN; however, all isomers cannot be isomerized to the others in the channels and on the external surfaces. Severe coke-deposition occurred during the catalysis, particularly in the early stages; however, the catalyst is recovered by the calcination with a small change in catalytic activity.

DOI 10.1016/j.mcat.2021.111521
Co-authors Jaehun Yang, Sathish Ci, Ajayan Vinu
2021 Sugi Y, Joseph S, Ramadass K, Indirathankam SC, Premkumar S, Dasireddy VDBC, et al., 'The Isopropylation of Naphthalene over USY Zeolite with FAU Topology. The Selectivities of the Products', BULLETIN OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN, 94 606-615 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1246/bcsj.20200340
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jaehun Yang, Ajayan Vinu, Sathish Ci
2021 Bolan N, Sarkar B, Vithanage M, Singh G, Tsang DCW, Mukhopadhyay R, et al., 'Distribution, behaviour, bioavailability and remediation of poly- and per-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in solid biowastes and biowaste-treated soil', Environment International, 155 (2021) [C1]

Aqueous film-forming foam, used in firefighting, and biowastes, including biosolids, animal and poultry manures, and composts, provide a major source of poly- and perfluoroalkyl s... [more]

Aqueous film-forming foam, used in firefighting, and biowastes, including biosolids, animal and poultry manures, and composts, provide a major source of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) input to soil. Large amounts of biowastes are added to soil as a source of nutrients and carbon. They also are added as soil amendments to improve soil health and crop productivity. Plant uptake of PFAS through soil application of biowastes is a pathway for animal and human exposure to PFAS. The complexity of PFAS mixtures, and their chemical and thermal stability, make remediation of PFAS in both solid and aqueous matrices challenging. Remediation of PFAS in biowastes, as well as soils treated with these biowastes, can be achieved through preventing and decreasing the concentration of PFAS in biowaste sources (i.e., prevention through source control), mobilization of PFAS in contaminated soil and subsequent removal through leaching (i.e., soil washing) and plant uptake (i.e., phytoremediation), sorption of PFAS, thereby decreasing their mobility and bioavailability (i.e., immobilization), and complete removal through thermal and chemical oxidation (i.e., destruction). In this review, the distribution, bioavailability, and remediation of PFAS in soil receiving solid biowastes, which include biosolids, composts, and manure, are presented.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2021.106600
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Nanthi Bolan, Gurwinder Singh
2021 Cha W, Kim S, Selvarajan P, Lee JM, Davidraj JM, Joseph S, et al., 'Nanoporous carbon oxynitride and its enhanced lithium-ion storage performance', Nano Energy, 82 (2021) [C1]

Heteroatom doped nanomaterials are reported to be excellent electrodes for energy storage and conversion applications. However, the introduction of these heteroatoms in materials ... [more]

Heteroatom doped nanomaterials are reported to be excellent electrodes for energy storage and conversion applications. However, the introduction of these heteroatoms in materials such as carbon nitride is quite challenging owing to the poor thermodynamic stability of these atoms in the carbon matrix. In this report, we demonstrate the single-step approach for the preparation of highly ordered nanoporous carbon oxynitride (O-MCN) materials with tailored pore sizes by employing carbohydrazide as a single C, N, O precursor using nano-templating approach. Experimental characterization of the O-MCN confirms oxygen doping in C-N framework. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate that the O-MCN optimized with AB type bilayer structure can adsorb nine Li ions per unit cell with mild Li-ion binding energy value of 5.16 eV. The synthesized O-MCN materials are firstly applied in Li-ion batteries as anode materials. The optimized O-MCN displays 2.5 times higher reversible capacity than that of non-porous g-C3N4 with remarkable stability in the long run in the Li-ion battery.

DOI 10.1016/j.nanoen.2020.105733
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jangmee Lee, Ajayan Vinu
2021 O'Connor J, Hoang SA, Bradney L, Dutta S, Xiong X, Tsang DCW, et al., 'A review on the valorisation of food waste as a nutrient source and soil amendment', Environmental Pollution, 272 (2021) [C1]

Valorisation of food waste offers an economical and environmental opportunity, which can reduce the problems of its conventional disposal. Food waste is commonly disposed of in la... [more]

Valorisation of food waste offers an economical and environmental opportunity, which can reduce the problems of its conventional disposal. Food waste is commonly disposed of in landfills or incinerated, causing many environmental, social, and economic issues. Large amounts of food waste are produced in the food supply chain of agriculture: production, post-harvest, distribution (transport), processing, and consumption. Food waste can be valorised into a range of products, including biofertilisers, bioplastics, biofuels, chemicals, and nutraceuticals. Conversion of food waste into these products can reduce the demand of fossil-derived products, which have historically contributed to large amounts of pollution. The variety of food chain suppliers offers a wide range of feedstocks that can be physically, chemically, or biologically altered to form an array of biofertilisers and soil amendments. Composting and anaerobic digestion are the main large-scale conversion methods used today to valorise food waste products to biofertilisers and soil amendments. However, emerging conversion methods such as dehydration, biochar production, and chemical hydrolysis have promising characteristics, which can be utilised in agriculture as well as for soil remediation. Valorising food waste into biofertilisers and soil amendments has great potential to combat land degradation in agricultural areas. Biofertilisers are rich in nutrients that can reduce the dependability of using conventional mineral fertilisers. Food waste products, unlike mineral fertilisers, can also be used as soil amendments to improve productivity. These characteristics of food wastes assist in the remediation of contaminated soils. This paper reviews the volume of food waste within the food chain and types of food waste feedstocks that can be valorised into various products, including the conversion methods. Unintended consequences of the utilisation of food waste as biofertilisers and soil-amendment products resulting from their relatively low concentrations of trace element nutrients and presence of potentially toxic elements are also evaluated.

DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115985
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Nanthi Bolan
2020 Ruban SM, Sathish CI, Ramadass K, Joseph S, Kim S, Dasireddy VDBC, et al., 'Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nitrides with Tuneable Nitrogen Contents and Basicity for Knoevenagel Condensation', CHEMCATCHEM, 13 468-474 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cctc.202001434
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Sathish Ci
2020 Trinh AT, Nguyen XH, Dang TB, Thai TT, Ramadass K, Sathish CI, et al., 'Hydrothermal Synthesis of Cobalt Doped Magnetite Nanoparticles for Corrosion Protection of Epoxy Coated Reinforced Steel', JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY, 20 3519-3526 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1166/jnn.2020.17413
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Sathish Ci
2020 Idowu O, Semple KT, Ramadass K, O'Connor W, Hansbro P, Thavamani P, 'Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their polar derivatives in soils of an industrial heritage city of Australia', Science of the Total Environment, 699 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.134303
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Philip Hansbro
2020 Kim S, Cha W, Ramadass K, Singh G, Kim IY, Vinu A, 'Single-Step Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride/Molybdenum Sulfide Nanohybrids for High-Performance Sodium-Ion Batteries', Chemistry - An Asian Journal, 15 1863-1868 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/asia.202000349
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Gurwinder Singh, Ajayan Vinu
2020 Ramadass K, Kuppusamy S, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Megharaj M, 'Unresolved complex mixtures of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment: An overview of ecological effects and remediation approaches', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2020.1813066
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2020 Ramadass K, Sathish CI, Mariaruban S, Kothandam G, Joseph S, Singh G, et al., 'Carbon Nanoflakes and Nanotubes from Halloysite Nanoclays and their Superior Performance in CO2 Capture and Energy Storage', ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 12 11922-11933 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.9b21510
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Sathish Ci, Ajayan Vinu, Stalin Joseph, Ajay Karakoti, Jiabao Yi, Gurwinder Singh
2020 Selvaraj PS, Periasamy K, Suganya K, Ramadass K, Muthusamy S, Ramesh P, et al., 'Novel resources recovery from anaerobic digestates: Current trends and future perspectives', CRITICAL REVIEWS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, (2020)
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2020.1864957
Co-authors Thava Palanisami
2020 Thai H, Thuy Nguyen C, Thi Thach L, Thi Tran M, Duc Mai H, Thi Thu Nguyen T, et al., 'Characterization of chitosan/alginate/lovastatin nanoparticles and investigation of their toxic effects in vitro and in vivo', Scientific Reports, 10 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-57666-8
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Sathish Ci
2020 Joseph S, Saianand G, Benzigar MR, Ramadass K, Singh G, Gopalan A-I, et al., 'Recent Advances in Functionalized Nanoporous Carbons Derived from Waste Resources and Their Applications in Energy and Environment', ADVANCED SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS, 5 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/adsu.202000169
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Gurwinder Singh, Jiabao Yi, Saianand Gopalan, Stalin Joseph, Ajayan Vinu, Jaehun Yang
2019 Benzigar MR, Joseph S, Saianand G, Gopalan AI, Sarkar S, Srinivasan S, et al., 'Highly ordered iron oxide-mesoporous fullerene nanocomposites for oxygen reduction reaction and supercapacitor applications', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 285 21-31 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2019.04.071
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Saianand Gopalan, Ajayan Vinu, Stalin Joseph
2019 Singh G, Ramadass K, Lee JM, Ismail IS, Singh M, Bansal V, et al., 'Convenient design of porous and heteroatom self-doped carbons for CO2 capture', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 287 1-8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2019.05.042
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jangmee Lee, Jaehun Yang, Gurwinder Singh, Ajayan Vinu
2019 Idowu O, Semple KT, Ramadass K, O'Connor W, Hansbro P, Thavamani P, 'Beyond the obvious: Environmental health implications of polar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 123 543-557 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2018.12.051
Citations Scopus - 90Web of Science - 83
Co-authors Philip Hansbro, Thava Palanisami
2019 Talapaneni SN, Ramadass K, Ruban SJ, Benzigar M, Lakhi KS, Yang J-H, et al., '3D cubic mesoporous C3N4 with tunable pore diameters derived from KIT-6 and their application in base catalyzed Knoevenagel reaction', CATALYSIS TODAY, 324 33-38 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cattod.2018.08.003
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Jaehun Yang
2019 Ramadass K, Singh G, Lakhi KS, Benzigar MR, Yang JH, Kim S, et al., 'Halloysite nanotubes: Novel and eco-friendly adsorbents for high-pressure CO2 capture', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 277 229-236 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2018.10.035
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh, Jaehun Yang
2019 Hoang T, Ramadass K, Loc TT, Mai TT, Giang LD, Thang VV, et al., 'Novel Drug Delivery System Based on Ginsenoside Rb1 Loaded to Chitosan/Alginate Nanocomposite Films', Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 19 3293-3300 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1166/jnn.2019.16116
Citations Web of Science - 7
2019 Ramadass K, Sathish CI, Johns A, Ruban SJ, Singh G, Lakhi KS, et al., 'Characterization and Hydrogen Storage Performance of Halloysite Nanotubes', Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 19 7892-7898 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1166/jnn.2019.16751
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh, Sathish Ci
2019 Singh G, Lakhi KS, Sathish CI, Ramadass K, Yang J-H, Vinu A, 'Oxygen-Functionalized Mesoporous Activated Carbons Derived from Casein and Their Superior CO2 Adsorption Capacity at Both Low- and High-Pressure Regimes', ACS APPLIED NANO MATERIALS, 2 1604-1613 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsanm.9b00059
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Jaehun Yang, Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh, Sathish Ci
2019 Singh G, Tiburcius S, Ruban SM, Shanbhag D, Sathish CI, Ramadass K, Vinu A, 'Pure and strontium carbonate nanoparticles functionalized microporous carbons with high specific surface areas derived from chitosan for CO2 adsorption', Emergent Materials, 2 337-349 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s42247-019-00050-8
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Sathish Ci, Gurwinder Singh
2019 Naidu Talapaneni S, Ramadass K, Benzigar MR, Lakhi KS, Yang JH, Ravon U, et al., 'Controlled synthesis of three dimensional mesoporous C3N4 with ordered porous structure for room temperature Suzuki coupling reaction', Molecular Catalysis, 477 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.mcat.2019.110548
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Jaehun Yang
2019 Singh G, Ismail IS, Bilen C, Shanbhag D, Sathish CI, Ramadass K, Vinu A, 'A facile synthesis of activated porous carbon spheres from D-glucose using a non-corrosive activating agent for efficient carbon dioxide capture', Applied Energy, 255 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apenergy.2019.113831
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Gurwinder Singh, Ajayan Vinu, Sathish Ci
2019 Singh G, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, Sathish CI, Vinu A, 'High-Performance Biomass-Derived Activated Porous Biocarbons for Combined Pre- and Post-Combustion CO2 Capture', ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 7 7412-7420 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acssuschemeng.9b00921
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Sathish Ci, Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh
2019 Sai-Anand G, Sivanesan A, Benzigar MR, Singh G, Gopalan A-I, Baskar AV, et al., 'Recent Progress on the Sensing of Pathogenic Bacteria Using Advanced Nanostructures', BULLETIN OF THE CHEMICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN, 92 216-244 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1246/bcsj.20180280
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 72
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh, Saianand Gopalan
2019 Cha W, Kim IY, Lee JM, Kim S, Ramadass K, Gopalakrishnan K, et al., 'Sulfur-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Nitride with an Ordered Porous Structure for Sodium-Ion Batteries', ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES, 11 27192-27199 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acsami.9b07657
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Jangmee Lee
2018 Benzigar MR, Talapaneni SN, Joseph S, Ramadass K, Singh G, Scaranto J, et al., 'Recent advances in functionalized micro and mesoporous carbon materials: synthesis and applications', Chemical Society Reviews, 47 2680-2721 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/C7CS00787F
Citations Scopus - 404Web of Science - 388
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Gurwinder Singh, Stalin Joseph
2018 Singh G, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, Kim S, Stockdale D, Vinu A, 'A combined strategy of acid-assisted polymerization and solid state activation to synthesize functionalized nanoporous activated biocarbons from biomass for CO2capture', Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 271 23-32 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.micromeso.2018.05.035
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Gurwinder Singh, Ajayan Vinu
2018 Nirola R, Megharaj M, Subramanian A, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Aryal R, Saint C, 'Analysis of chromium status in the revegetated flora of a tannery waste site and microcosm studies using earthworm E. fetida', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 25 5063-5070 (2018) [C1]

Chromium from tannery waste dump site causes significant environmental pollution affecting surrounding flora and fauna. The primary aims of this study were to survey vegetation, i... [more]

Chromium from tannery waste dump site causes significant environmental pollution affecting surrounding flora and fauna. The primary aims of this study were to survey vegetation, investigate the degree of soil pollution occurring near tannery waste dump site and make a systematic evaluation of soil contamination based on the chromium levels found in plants and earthworms from the impacted areas. This paper presents the pollution load of toxic heavy metals, and especially chromium, in 10 soil samples and 12 species of plants. Soil samples were analysed for heavy metals by using ICP-MS/ICP-OES method. Results indicated that Cr in soils exceeded soil quality guideline limits (SQGL). The total chromium present in the above ground parts of plants ranged from 1.7¿mg¿kg-1 in Casuarina sp.¿to 1007¿mg¿kg-1 in Sonchus asper. The Cr bioaccumulation in Eisenia fetida from tannery waste soil ranged from 5 to 194¿mg¿kg-1. The high enrichment factor of Cr in S. asper and bioaccumulation factor in earthworms indicate that there is a steady increase of toxic chromium risk in this area, which could be correlated with the past dumping activity. Emphasis needs to be put on control measures of pollution and remediation techniques in such areas to achieve an ecologically sustainable industrialisation.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-0543-8
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2018 Joseph S, Benzigar MR, Ilbeygi H, Gopalan SA, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, et al., 'Mesoporous Carbons with Hexagonally Ordered Pores Prepared from Carbonated Soft-Drink for CO2 Capture at High Pressure', JOURNAL OF NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY, 18 7830-7837 (2018)
DOI 10.1166/jnn.2018.15415
Citations Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Saianand Gopalan, Ajayan Vinu
2018 Sugi Y, Ramadass K, Rajesh B, Vinu A, Vinu A, 'H-Mordenite as a Molecular Reactor for the Isopropylation of Biphenyl', International Journal of Chemical Engineering and Applications, 9 75-81 (2018)
DOI 10.18178/ijcea.2018.9.2.702
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu
2018 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability of weathered hydrocarbons in engine oil-contaminated soil: Impact of bioaugmentation mediated by Pseudomonas spp. on bioremediation', Science of the Total Environment, 636 968-974 (2018) [C1]

Heavier fraction hydrocarbons (C15-C36) formed in soil after biotic and abiotic weatherings of engine oil are the continuing constraints in the bioremediation strategy, and their ... [more]

Heavier fraction hydrocarbons (C15-C36) formed in soil after biotic and abiotic weatherings of engine oil are the continuing constraints in the bioremediation strategy, and their bioavailability remains a poorly quantified regulatory factor. In a microcosm study, we used two strains of Pseudomonas, P. putida TPHK-1 and P. aeruginosa TPHK-4, in strategies of bioremediation, viz., natural attenuation, biostimulation and bioaugmentation, for removal of weathered total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in soil contaminated long-term with high concentrations of engine oil (39,000¿41,000 mg TPHs kg-1 soil). Both the bacterial strains exhibited a great potential in remediating weathered hydrocarbons of engine oil. Addition of inorganic fertilizers (NPK), at recommended levels for bioremediation, resulted in significant inhibition in biostimulation/enhanced natural attenuation as well as bioaugmentation. The data on dehydrogenase activity clearly confirmed those of bioremediation strategies used, indicating that this enzyme assay could serve as an indicator of bioremediation potential of oil-contaminated soil. Extraction of TPHs from engine oil-contaminated soil with hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin (HPCD), but not 1-butanol, was found reliable in predicting the bioavailability of weathered hydrocarbons. Also, 454 pyrosequencing data were in accordance with those of bioremediation strategies used in the present microcosm study, suggesting the possible use of pyrosequencing in designing approaches for bioremediation.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.379
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Thavamani P, Samkumar RA, Satheesh V, Subashchandrabose SR, Ramadass K, Naidu R, et al., 'Microbes from mined sites: Harnessing their potential for reclamation of derelict mine sites', Environmental Pollution, 230 495-505 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.06.056
Citations Scopus - 44Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Suresh Subashchandrabose, Thava Palanisami, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecotoxicity of measured concentrations of soil-applied diesel: Effects on earthworm survival, dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification activities', Applied Soil Ecology, 119 1-7 (2017) [C1]

Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diesel towards earthworms a... [more]

Diesel is an important petroleum product, and a common pollutant in soil caused by leaks and accidental spills. Studies dealing with the ecotoxicity of diesel towards earthworms always relied on growth inhibition endpoint (EC50) values that were determined based on the spiked concentrations (nominal), ignoring the substantial portion of hydrocarbons volatilized from soil. In the present study we used, for the first time, the measured concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) from soil-applied diesel to assess earthworm (Eisenia fetida) survival, and the activities of dehydrogenase, urease and nitrification as indicators of soil health. The mortality endpoint (LC50) value for initially measured concentrations after exposure of earthworms to diesel for 28¿days was 916¿±¿10¿mg TPHs kg-1 soil which was equivalent to the nominal (initially added) concentration of 1426¿±¿19¿mg TPHs kg-1 soil. Morphological abnormalities such as clitella swelling and curling were noticed when the measured concentrations of diesel were more than 971¿mg¿kg-1 soil. Significant increases in activities of soil dehydrogenase (38¿58%) as well as urease were observed in the diesel-applied soil. Presence of earthworms further enhanced the activities of these soil enzymes. Nitrification was sensitive to application of diesel to soil, and it was inhibited in a dose-related manner even in the presence of earthworms. The differential response of the toxicity criteria to diesel-contaminated soil observed in the present study clearly warrants more studies involving several soil health parameters to arrive at a generalization of ecotoxicity of an environmental pollutant.

DOI 10.1016/j.apsoil.2017.05.017
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity of diesel water accommodated fraction toward microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella sp MM3', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 142 538-543 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.04.052
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2017 Park D-H, Lakhi K, Ramadass K, Kim M-K, Talapaneni S, Joseph S, et al., 'Energy efficient synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon nitrides with a high nitrogen content and enhanced CO2 capture capacity', Chemistry-A European Journal, (2017)
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu, Stalin Joseph
2017 Talapaneni SN, Mane GP, Park D-H, Lakhi KS, Ramadass K, Joseph S, et al., 'Diaminotetrazine based mesoporous C 3 N 6 with a well-ordered 3D cubic structure and its excellent photocatalytic performance for hydrogen evolution', Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 5 18183-18192 (2017)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Stalin Joseph, Ajayan Vinu
2016 Abbasian F, Palanisami T, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Lockington R, Ramadass K, 'Microbial diversity and hydrocarbon degrading gene capacity of a crude oil field soil as determined by metagenomics analysis', Biotechnology Progress, 32 638-648 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation ... [more]

© 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Soils contaminated with crude oil are rich sources of enzymes suitable for both degradation of hydrocarbons through bioremediation processes and improvement of crude oil during its refining steps. Due to the long term selection, crude oil fields are unique environments for the identificati on of microorganisms with the ability to produce these enzymes. In this metagenomic study, based on Hiseq Illumina sequencing of samples obtained from a crude oil field and analysis of data on MG-RAST, Actinomycetales (9.8%) were found to be the dominant microorganisms, followed by Rhizobiales (3.3%). Furthermore, several functional genes were found in this study, mostly belong to Actinobacteria (12.35%), which have a role in the metabolism of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons (2.51%), desulfurization (0.03%), element shortage (5.6%), and resistance to heavy metals (1.1%). This information will be useful for assisting in the application of microorganisms in the removal of hydrocarbon contamination and/or for improving the quality of crude oil. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:638¿648, 2016.

DOI 10.1002/btpr.2249
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Ramadass K, Palanisami T, Smith E, Mayilswami S, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Earthworm Comet Assay for Assessing the Risk of Weathered Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils: Need to Look Further than Target Contaminants', Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 71 561-571 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00244-016-0318-0
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Sensitivity and Antioxidant Response of Chlorella sp. MM3 to Used Engine Oil and Its Water Accommodated Fraction', Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 97 71-77 (2016) [C1]

We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) to determine growth inhibition and response of anti... [more]

We exposed the microalgal strain, Chlorella sp. MM3, to unused or used engine oil, or their water accommodated fractions (WAFs) to determine growth inhibition and response of antioxidant enzymes. Oil type and oil concentration greatly affected the microalgal growth. Used oil at 0.04¿% (0.4¿g L-1) resulted in 50¿% inhibition in algal growth, measured in terms of chlorophyll-a, while the corresponding concentration of unused oil was nontoxic. Similarly, used oil WAF showed significant toxicity to the algal growth at 10¿% level, whereas WAF from unused oil was nontoxic even at 100¿% concentration. Peroxidase enzyme in the microalga significantly increased with used oil at concentrations above 0.04¿g L-1 whereas the induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase was apparent only at 0.06¿g L-1. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes increased significantly when the microalga was exposed to 75 and 100¿% WAF obtained from used oil. The used oil toxicity on microalga could be due to the presence of toxic soluble mono- and polyaromatic compounds, heavy metals, and other compounds attained by the oil during its use in the motor engines.

DOI 10.1007/s00128-016-1817-4
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Talapaneni SN, Park D-H, Choy J-H, Ramadass K, Elzatahry A, Al Balawi AS, et al., 'Facile Synthesis of Crystalline Nanoporous GaN Templated by Nitrogen Enriched Mesoporous Carbon Nitride for Friedel-Crafts Reaction', CHEMISTRYSELECT, 1 6062-6068 (2016)
DOI 10.1002/slct.201601545
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu
2016 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Soil bacterial strains with heavy metal resistance and high potential in degrading diesel oil and n-alkanes', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 13 2863-2874 (2016) [C1]

Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil and identified. Strains of Pseudomonas s... [more]

Four bacterial strains, capable of degrading diesel oil, n-alkanes or hexadecane, were isolated from soils contaminated with petroleum oil and identified. Strains of Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas putida TPHK-1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TPHK-4, were more efficient in degrading high concentrations of the hydrocarbons than the other two strains, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia TPHK-2 and Acenitobacter sp. TPHK-3. P. putida TPHK-1 exhibited tolerance to very high concentrations of heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, zinc and copper. The innate ability of P. putida TPHK-1, as evidenced by the amplified genes alkB1 and alkB2 that encode alkane hydroxylases, and cat12o and cat23o coding for catechol dioxygenase, in degrading diesel oil in the presence of heavy metals is far greater than that of the strains reported in the literature. Heavy metal tolerance coupled with rapid degradation of hydrocarbons, even at high concentrations, suggests that P. putida TPHK-1 has a great potential in remediating soils contaminated with mixtures of hydrocarbons and heavy metals.

DOI 10.1007/s13762-016-1113-1
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Toxicity and oxidative stress induced by used and unused motor oil on freshwater microalga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 22 8890-8901 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-014-3403-9
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Megharaj M, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, 'Ecological implications of motor oil pollution: Earthworm survival and soil health', Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 85 72-81 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.soilbio.2015.02.026
Citations Scopus - 62Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2015 Smith E, Thavamani P, Ramadass K, Naidu R, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, 'Remediation trials for hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in arid environments: Evaluation of bioslurry and biopiling techniques', International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation, 101 56-65 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.ibiod.2015.03.029
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Thava Palanisami, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2015 Ramadass K, Smith E, Palanisami T, Mathieson G, Srivastava P, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Evaluation of constraints in bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbon-contaminated arid soils through microcosm biopile study', International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, 12 3597-3612 (2015)
DOI 10.1007/s13762-015-0793-2
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu, Thava Palanisami
2007 Ramadass K, Palaniyandi S, 'Effect of enriched municipal solid waste compost application on soil available macronutrients in the rice field', Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, 53 497-506 (2007)

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost, w... [more]

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost, which has multiple benefits to the crop system. The key players in this transformation process were Azotobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., Phosphobacteria sp. and the waste materials like poultry litter and spent wash. This enrichment process increases both the quality and nutrient content of the municipal solid waste compost significantly. A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of application of different levels of enriched municipal solid waste compost on the availability of the macronutrient content to the rice field soil. The effect of enriched compost on soil available nutrients was significant. The soil ammonium nitrogen and soil nitrate nitrogen content was found to be high in the plots where the enriched compost was applied along with inorganic fertilizer with the values of 38.87 mg kg-1 and 32.87 mg kg-1, respectively. In addition, the availability decreased towards crop growth. The soil available P and K were also increased with enriched compost application to about 22.46 kg ha-1 and 647 kg ha-1 compared with control values of 19.44 kg ha-1 and 518 kg ha-1, respectively. Both phosphorus and potassium content decreased towards advancement of crop growth. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/03650340701581479
Citations Scopus - 7
2007 Kavitha R, Subramanian P, 'Effect of enriched municipal solid waste compost application on growth, plant nutrient uptake and yield of rice', Journal of Agronomy, 6 586-592 (2007)

A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost (EMSWC) application on gro... [more]

A field experiment was conducted at Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India, to study the effect of Enriched Municipal Solid Waste Compost (EMSWC) application on growth, plant nutrient uptake and yield of rice in RBD during the year of 2004. The growth attributes viz., plant height, leaf area index, number of tillers and dry matter production differed significantly due to different treatments. These attributes increased significantly owing to the application of enriched compost, which has enhanced nutrient level, which leads to the continuous availability of nutrients in available form to the plants. The highest grain yield and straw yield were observed in the treatment combination of 25% of enriched compost and 75% of recommended dose of inorganic fertilizer (T5) with value of 5.22 and 8.65 t ha-1, respectively. Application of 5 t ha-1 enriched MSWC in combination with 25% N through inorganic fertilizer recorded grain yield of 4.33 t ha-1. The lowest grain yield (3.78 t ha-1) was recorded in treatment where the compost was applied alone. © 2007 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

DOI 10.3923/ja.2007.586.592
Citations Scopus - 20
2007 Kavitha R, Subramanian P, 'Bioactive compost - A value added compost with microbial inoculants and organic additives', Journal of Applied Sciences, 7 2514-2518 (2007)

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost through th... [more]

A study was conducted in the Department of Environmental Science, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, to transform the normal compost into bioactive compost through the addition of various substrates, which has multiple benefits to the crop system. The key players in this transformation process were Azotobacter, Pseudomonas, Phosphobacteria, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash. This enrichment process has increased the nutritive value of compost. The highest nitrogen content (1.75%) and phosphorus content (1.16%) was observed in the treatment T5 (compost enriched with composted poultry litter, spent wash, microbial inoculants and rock phosphate). The beneficial microorganism viz., Azotobacter, Pseudomonas and Phosphobacteria population were higher in the treatment T5 where all the inputs (composted poultry litter, microbial consortium, rock phosphate and spent wash) were added to the compost. The plant growth promoters viz., IAA and GA content was more in the treatment applied with spent wash and microbial inoculum. Beneficial microorganisms, composted poultry litter, rock phosphate and diluted spent wash contributes maximum level of nutrients and growth promoters to the compost with small expenses. © 2007 Asian Network for Scientific Information.

DOI 10.3923/jas.2007.2514.2518
Citations Scopus - 14
Show 48 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Park D-H, Lakhi K, Ramadass K, Kim MK, Vinu A, 'Nitrogen-rich mesoporous carbon nitrides for CO2 capture and conversion', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, San Francisco, CA (2017)
Co-authors Ajayan Vinu
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $4,662,249

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20213 grants / $4,352,000

Halloysite Based Materials for Carbon Capture and Conversion$2,000,000

Funding body: Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd

Funding body Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Associate Professor Jiabao Yi, Associate Professor Ajay Karakoti, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Associate Professor Ashish Malik, Doctor Thava Palanisami
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2025
GNo G2100284
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

Halloysite Based Materials for Carbon Capture and Conversion$2,000,000

Funding body: Andromeda Metals Limited

Funding body Andromeda Metals Limited
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Associate Professor Jiabao Yi, Associate Professor Ajay Karakoti, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Associate Professor Ashish Malik
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2025
GNo G2100285
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

Removal and degradation of microplastics using halloysite nanocomposite$352,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Jiabao Yi, Dr Shaobin Wang, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Mr James Marsh, James Marsh, Tony Belperio
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2000941
Type Of Funding C1200 - Aust Competitive - ARC
Category 1200
UON Y

20191 grants / $49,925

Extraction of amino acids from bio-waste streams using an ecofriendly and innovative approach$49,925

Funding body: Department of Industry

Funding body Department of Industry
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Thava Palanisami, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass
Scheme Entrepreneurs’ Infrastructure Programme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1901172
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

20186 grants / $260,324

Phase identification of Halloysite and Kaolinite clay mixtures: Key step for product development and commercialisation$49,984

Funding body: Andromeda Metals Limited

Funding body Andromeda Metals Limited
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Jae-Hun Yang, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass
Scheme Entrepreneurs’ Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801022
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

Phase identification of Halloysite and Kaolinite clay mixtures: Key step for product development and commercialisation$49,983

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Jae-Hun Yang, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1801025
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y

Transformation of halloysite into high value products$49,910

Funding body: Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd

Funding body Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800658
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y

Transformation of halloysite into high value products$49,908

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1800705
Type Of Funding C2200 - Aust Commonwealth – Other
Category 2200
UON Y

Structural characterisation and the application of Halloysite nanotubes$31,410

Funding body: Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Funding body Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701436
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y

Structural characterisation and the application of Halloysite nanotubes$29,129

Funding body: Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd

Funding body Minotaur Exploration Pty Ltd
Project Team Professor Ajayan Vinu, Doctor Kavitha Ramadass, Tony Belperio
Scheme Entrepreneurs' Programme: Innovation Connections
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701435
Type Of Funding C3100 – Aust For Profit
Category 3100
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Electrocatalysis of CO2 Reduction Reaction PhD (Materials Science & Eng), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Self Sustainable Eco Communities PhD (Materials Science & Eng), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Recovery of Metals From Electronic Waste and Scale-Up of the Developed Processes PhD (Materials Science & Eng), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Beyond the Obvious: Understanding the Environmental Health Implications of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PACs) PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Direct Synthesis of Mesoporous Fullerene Hybrids for Energy Storage Applications PhD (Materials Science & Eng), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 48
India 18
Saudi Arabia 8
Korea, Republic of 6
Japan 4
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Dr Kavitha Ramadass

Position

Research Associate
School of Engineering
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email kavitha.ramadass@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0425882696
Link Research Networks
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