Dr Mahmud Rahman

Dr Mahmud Rahman

Senior Research Fellow

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman is a native of Bangladesh and was educated at the Jahangirnagar University where he received Bachelor of Science (Hons.) degree in Chemistry in 1996 and Master of Science in Chemistry (major in physical and inorganic chemistry) in 1999. He completed his PhD from the School of Environmental Studies (SOES), Jadavpur University, India in March 2004 on “Present status of groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh and detailed study of Murshidabad, one of the affected neighbouring districts in West Bengal, India. He received prestigious scholarship from the Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi, India for pursuing PhD study. 

Dr Rahman joined as Post-doctoral Research Associate in the Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR) located at the University of South Australia in 2004 where he was working in the “Arsenic in food chain of Bangladesh” project funded by the AusAID. In October 2015, he has moved to the University of Newcastle, Australia as Senior Research Fellow at the Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER). 

Although Dr Rahman’s research mostly focussed on arsenic, other trace elements such as cadmium, lead, mercury; nanomaterials including nano-encapsulated pesticides: formations and its fate and impact on the environment and other organic contaminants are also of interest. 

Dr Rahman has built up excellent national and international reputation as a young scientist in environmental and analytical research. He made significant contributions in the field of environmental science especially on groundwater arsenic contamination, arsenic related non-cancer effects such as dermatological symptoms, neurological involvement and pregnancy outcomes, arsenic in food crops grown in contaminated areas, evaluation of arsenic field testing kits and arsenic removal plants, social and socio-economic aspects of arsenicosis. He has elegantly combined laboratory-based studies with field survey to understand the arsenic chemistry, toxicity, mechanism, speciation, food chain and human health risk issues including arsenic related diseases.

Dr Rahman has extensive knowledge in the fields of analytical and speciation techniques of metals and metalloids such as arsenic, vanadium, chromium, tin and selenium in environmental samples such as water, soil and urine by ion chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). 

Based on his research excellence and knowledge on arsenic research, he was invited by the Crawford Fund, Australia for organizing a training workshop on arsenic for young scientists from a few developing countries including Bangladesh, Nepal, Vietnam and Cambodia during 2011.

Dr. Rahman has international research collaboration links with renowned Scientists at various countries including USA, UK, India, Bangladesh, China, Nigeria etc.

Media coverage of my research findings
Some of my research findings received enormous interests and have been captured by media in several journal news and magazines. Details below:  
1. High arsenic levels revealed in soil, ground water near Karnataka gold mine. The Hindu, November 21, 2012 (http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-otherstates/high-arsenic-levels-revealed-in-soil-ground-water-near-karnataka-gold-mine/article4118175.ece).
2. Arsenic-free Water still a Pipedream. Nature Magazine, Vol 436, Page 313, 21st July 2005 (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v436/n7049/pdf/436313a.pdf).
3. Arsenic's fatal legacy grows worldwide. New Scientist, August 6, 2003 (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn4024-arsenics-fatal-legacy-grows-worldwide.html).
4. Asia’s arsenic crisis deepens. Nature News, February 15, 2003 (http://www.nature.com/news/2003/030215/full/news030210-14.html).
5. Field kits fail to provide accurate measure of arsenic in groundwater. Environmental Science and Technology, 35a-38a, January 1, 2003 (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es0323289).
6. Flawed water tests put millions at risk. New Scientist (London), November, 13, 2002 (http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn3048-flawed-water-tests-put-millions-at-risk.html).
7. Inaccurate arsenic test kits jeopardize water safety in Bangladesh and India. American Chemical Society News, November 19, 2002. (http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2002/E/2002324.html).
8. Arsenic field test kits may lead to mislabelled wells. RSC Environmental Chemistry Group Bulletin, January 2003, Page 5 (http://www.rsc.org/images/scaf003_200301_tcm18-9786.pdf).

Research higher degree supervisor
The University of Newcastle (UON) offers exciting opportunities for research higher degree candidates. Both national and international applicants are encourage to contact me directly. For more information about eligibility and available scholarships, please check the following links 

https://www.newcastle.edu.au/international/study-with-us/research-higher-degree   

http://www.newcastle.edu.au/research-and-innovation/graduate-research/phd-and-research-degrees/scholarships



Qualifications

  • PhD, Jadavpur University - Kolkata - India
  • Bachelor of Science, Jahangirnagar University
  • Master of Science, Jahangirnagar University

Keywords

  • Arsenic Geochemistry, speciation, Bioavailability
  • Bioaccumulation
  • Drinking Water Quality
  • Environmental Analytical Chemistry
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Environmental Nanometerials
  • Environmental Remediation
  • Environmental Science and Management
  • Food Safety
  • Heavy metals pollution
  • Human Health Efftect
  • Metals speciation
  • Nano-encapsulation
  • Nano-pesticides
  • Phytoremediation
  • Risk Assessment
  • Toxicity
  • Water Quality Assessment
  • Water and waste water treatment

Languages

  • Bengali (Mother)
  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 50
050204 Environmental Impact Assessment 30
050206 Environmental Monitoring 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
3/09/2013 - 8/10/2015 Senior Research Fellow and Laboratory Manager University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia
1/01/2012 - 2/09/2013 Senior Research Fellow University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia
1/07/2007 - 31/12/2011 Research Fellow University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia
21/06/2004 - 30/06/2007 Research Associate University of South Australia
Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR)
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2003 Jaharwal Nehru Memorial Scholarship Scheme
Jaharwal Nehru Memorial Scholarship Scheme
2002 Visiting Scientist Travel Award
National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, Japan
2002 Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) scholarship
Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR)
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Nuruzzaman M, Liu Y, Rahman M, Dharmarajan R, Duan L, Jamaluddin AFM, Naidu R, 'Chapter 4: Nano-biopesticide: Composition and preparation methods', Nano-biopesticides Today and Future Perspectives, Academic Press, USA (2019)
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu, Md Nuruzzaman, Raja Dharmarajan, Luchun Duan
2018 Chandra Manna M, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Sahu A, Bhattacharjya S, Wanjari RH, et al., 'Bio-Waste Management in Subtropical Soils of India: Future Challenges and Opportunities in Agriculture', Advances in Agronomy, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands 87-148 (2018) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/bs.agron.2018.07.002
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic: Southeast Asia', Encyclopedia of Soil Science, Third Edition, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 161-167 (2017)
DOI 10.1081/E-ESS3-120053532
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2015 Rahman MM, Chakraborti D, Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in bengal delta and its health effects', Safe and Sustainable Use of Arsenic-Contaminated Aquifers in the Gangetic Plain: A Multidisciplinary Approach 215-253 (2015)

© Capital Publishing Company 2015. Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been detected in more than 70 countries and has become a major public health concern worldwide (Bundsch... [more]

© Capital Publishing Company 2015. Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been detected in more than 70 countries and has become a major public health concern worldwide (Bundschuh et al. Environ Geochem Health 32:307-315, 2010). Arsenic contamination in groundwater of Southeast Asian regions received significant interest in recent years. In this region, countries affected with As in groundwater include Bangladesh, several states of India, Nepal, Myanmar, Pakistan, Vietnam, Lao People¿s Democratic Republic, Cambodia, several provinces of China (Inner Mongolia, Shanxi, Xinjiang, Ningxia, Jilin, Shandong, Qinghai, Sichuan, Anhui, Heilongjiang, Henan, Gansu, Jiangsu, Yunnan and Hunan) and lowlands of Sumatra in Indonesia (Rahman et al. Environ Geochem Health 31:9-21, 2009; Yu et al. Environ Health Perspect 115:636-642, 2007).

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-16124-2_14
Citations Scopus - 3
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Arsenic in Rice: Sources and Human Health Risk', Wheat and Rice in Disease Prevention and Health, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netheralnds 365-375 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-401716-0.00028-3
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2012 Deeba F, Rahman MM, 'Cognitive behaviour therapy for children and adolescents in Bangladesh', Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Non-Western Cultures 37-50 (2012)
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Das A, Rahman M, Das B, Pati S, Dutta RN, Saha KC, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination', Encyclopedia of Environmental Management (EEM), CRC Press, CRC Press 1262-1280 (2012)
2009 Rahman MM, Das B, Chakraborti D, 'Sampling and Analysis of Arsenic in Groundwater in West Bengal, India, and Bangladesh', Handbook of Water Purity and Quality 95-130 (2009)

This chapter provides an understanding of the contamination situation in an area. The sampling could be hotspot sampling, blanket sampling, and total screening of samples. Collect... [more]

This chapter provides an understanding of the contamination situation in an area. The sampling could be hotspot sampling, blanket sampling, and total screening of samples. Collection and preservation of samples are as important as analysis. Sampling technique is very crucial for the determination of arsenic in water samples. The major concern for sampling and storage are to prevent contamination and minimize the loss of trace amounts of analytes for assessing the total concentration of any element. Several analytical methods are currently used for the determination of total arsenic in water samples. The widely used analytical methods for the determination of arsenic in water are colorimetric/spectrophotometric/silver-diethyldithiocar-bamate (Ag-DDTC) methods, atomic absorption spectrometry (hydride generation and graphite furnace) methods, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods. Various clinical, epidemiological, and hydrogeological studies are shown in arsenic-affected areas of West Bengal to determine the magnitude of arsenic contamination and its health effects. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-374192-9.00005-4
2008 Chakraborti D, Das B, Nayak B, Pal A, Rahman M, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Groundwater Arsenic Contamination in Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra Plain, its Health Effects and an Approach for Mitigation', UNESCO UCI Groundwater Conference Proceedings, UNESCO, the University of California, USGS, Irvine, United States 264-282 (2008)
2008 Chakraborti D, Das B, Nayak B, Pal A, Rahman M, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and its adverse health effects in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain', Arsenic Calamity of Groundwater in Bangladesh: Contamination in water, soil and plants, Kingshuk Roy, Japan 13-44 (2008)
2007 Das B, Nayak B, Pal A, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain', Groundwater for Sustainable Development-Problems, Perspectives and Challenges, Taylor & Francis, Taylor & Francis 257-270 (2007)
2006 Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Das B, Ahamed S, et al., 'Arsenic contamination incidents around the world', Managing Arsenic in the Environment, CSIRO publishing, Australia 3-30 (2006)
2003 Chakraborti D, Sengupta MK, Rahman MM, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Ahamed S, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic exposure in India', , ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV 3-24 (2003)
DOI 10.1016/B978-044451441-7/50002-6
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 3
2003 Chowdhury UK, Rahman M, Biswas BK, Samanta G, Lodh D, Basu GK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic calamity in West Bengal-India and Bangladesh', Bioavailability, Toxicity and Risk Relationships in Ecosystems, Science Publishers Inc, Enfield (NH), USA 291-329 (2003)
2003 Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Quamruzzaman Q, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination', Encyclopedia of Water Science, CRC Press, CRC Press 324-329 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/E-EWS120010367
2003 Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, Basu GK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and human suffering in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India', Strategic Management of Environmental and Socio-economic Issues, Guizhou Science and Technology Publishing House, Guiyang, China 102-111 (2003)
2001 Chakraborti D, Basu GK, Biswas BK, Chowdhury UK, Rahman M, Paul K, et al., 'Characterization of arsenic bearing sediments in Gangetic delta of West Bengal-India', Arsenic Exposure and Health Effects, Elsevier science, Amsterdam-Lausanne-New York-Oxford-Tokyo 27-52 (2001)
Citations Web of Science - 73
Show 14 more chapters

Journal article (89 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Islam S, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Impact of water and fertilizer management on arsenic bioaccumulation and speciation in rice plants grown under greenhouse conditions.', Chemosphere, 214 606-613 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.09.158
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2019 Liu Y, Du J, Dong Z, Rahman MM, Gao Y, Yan K, Naidu R, 'Bioavailability and risk estimation of heavy metal(loid)s in chromated copper arsenate treated timber after remediation for utilisation as garden materials.', Chemosphere, 216 757-765 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.10.141
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2018 Mwale T, Rahman MM, Mondal D, 'Risk and benefit of different cooking methods on essential elements and arsenic in rice', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15061056
Citations Scopus - 1
2018 Chakraborti D, Singh SK, Rahman MM, Dutta RN, Mukherjee SC, Pati S, Kar PB, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in the ganga river basin: A future health danger', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15020180
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
2018 Shahid M, Niazi NK, Dumat C, Naidu R, Khalid S, Rahman MM, Bibi I, 'A meta-analysis of the distribution, sources and health risks of arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Pakistan', Environmental Pollution, 242 307-319 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2018.06.083
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Rashid MH, Rahman MM, Correll R, Naidu R, 'Arsenic and Other Elemental Concentrations in Mushrooms from Bangladesh: Health Risks.', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15050919
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Qi F, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Yan Y, Ok YS, et al., 'Cadmium solubility and bioavailability in soils amended with acidic and neutral biochar', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 610 1457-1466 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.228
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2018 Islam R, Kumar S, Karmoker J, Kamruzzaman M, Rahman MA, Biswas N, et al., 'Bioaccumulation and adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on ecosystems and human exposure: A review study on Bangladesh perspectives', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 12 115-131 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2018.08.002
2018 Singh SK, Taylor RW, Rahman MM, Pradhan B, 'Developing robust arsenic awareness prediction models using machine learning algorithms', Journal of Environmental Management, 211 125-137 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.01.044
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2018 Nuruzzaman M, Liu Y, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Dharmarajan R, Shon HK, Woo YC, 'Core-Shell Interface-Oriented Synthesis of Bowl-Structured Hollow Silica Nanospheres Using Self-Assembled ABC Triblock Copolymeric Micelles.', Langmuir, (2018)
DOI 10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b00792
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Raja Dharmarajan, Md Nuruzzaman, Ravi Naidu
2018 Kumar M, Ramanathan AL, Mukherjee A, Verma S, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Hydrogeo-morphological influences for arsenic release and fate in the central Gangetic Basin, India', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 12 243-260 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2018.09.004
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Shakoor MB, Bibi I, Niazi NK, Shahid M, Nawaz MF, Farooqi A, et al., 'The evaluation of arsenic contamination potential, speciation and hydrogeochemical behaviour in aquifers of Punjab, Pakistan', Chemosphere, 199 737-746 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.02.002
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2018 Hussain I, Aleti G, Naidu R, Puschenreiter M, Mahmood Q, Rahman MM, et al., 'Microbe and plant assisted-remediation of organic xenobiotics and its enhancement by genetically modified organisms and recombinant technology: A review', Science of the Total Environment, 628-629 1582-1599 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.037
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Malik AI, Nasim M, Flower K, Hossain MA, Rahman MS, Anwar B, et al., 'Cropping system intensification: Vegetable pea can replace fallow between rainfed monsoon rice and irrigated spring rice', Journal of Agricultural Science, 155 1287-1298 (2017)

© Copyright Cambridge University Press 2017. SUMMARY The Eastern Gangetic Plain is among the world's most intensively farmed regions, where rainfed and irrigated agriculture ... [more]

© Copyright Cambridge University Press 2017. SUMMARY The Eastern Gangetic Plain is among the world's most intensively farmed regions, where rainfed and irrigated agriculture coexist. While the region and especially Bangladesh is a major producer of rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica), there is potential to further develop sustainable rice production systems. Specifically, there is scope to include a replacement crop for the short fallow between rice crops in the dominant cropping pattern of rainfed monsoon rice harvest followed by irrigated spring rice. The aim of the current research was to identify a suitable cool-season legume crop - pea (Pisum sativum L.) or lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. ssp. culinaris) - that could be grown in the brief period between rice crops. The study comprised four crop sequence experiments comparing legume cultivars differing in maturity grown in between both long and short duration rice cultivars. These experiments were done at the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute regional station at Rajshahi over three cropping cycles. This was followed by an evaluation of pea vs. fallow between rice crops on three farmers' fields in one cropping cycle. Here it is demonstrated that green pod vegetable pea is one of the best options to intensify the rainfed monsoon rice-fallow-spring irrigated rice cropping system, notwithstanding other remunerative rabi cropping options that could displace boro rice. The inclusion of an extra crop, pea as green pod vegetable, increased farm productivity by 1·4-fold over the dominant cropping sequence (rice-fallow-rice) and farm net income by fourfold. The study highlighted the advantages in total system productivity and monetary return of crop intensification with the inclusion of a pea crop between successive rice crops instead of a fallow period.

DOI 10.1017/S0021859617000351
2017 Joshi SK, Bajpai RK, Kumar P, Tiwari A, Bachkaiya V, Manna MC, et al., 'Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics in a Chhattisgarh Vertisol after Use of a Rice-Wheat System for 16 Years', AGRONOMY JOURNAL, 109 2556-2569 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2134/agronj2017.04.0230
Citations Scopus - 1
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Effect of irrigation and genotypes towards reduction in arsenic load in rice', Science of the Total Environment, 609 311-318 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) bioaccumulation in rice grains has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many other parts of the world. Suitable rice genotypes al... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Arsenic (As) bioaccumulation in rice grains has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many other parts of the world. Suitable rice genotypes along with proper water management practice regulating As levels in rice plants must be chosen and implemented. A field study was conducted to investigate the effect of continuous flooding (CF) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) irrigation on the bioaccumulation of As in ten rice cultivars at three locations having different levels of soil As and irrigation water As. Results showed that As concentration in different parts of rice plants varied significantly (P¿<¿0.0001) with rice genotypes and irrigation practices in the three study locations. Lower levels of As in rice were found in AWD irrigation practice compared to CF irrigation practice. Higher grain As bioaccumulation was detected in plants in areas of high soil As in combination with CF irrigation practice. Our data show that use of AWD irrigation practice with suitable genotypes led to 17 to 35% reduction in grain As level, as well as 7 to 38% increase in grain yield. Overall, this study advances our understanding that, for moderate to high levels of As contamination, the Binadhan-5, Binadhan-6, Binadhan-8, Binadhan-10 and BRRI dhan47 varieties were quite promising to mitigate As induced human health risk.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.111
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Liu Y, Bello O, Rahman MM, Dong Z, Islam S, Naidu R, 'Investigating the relationship between lead speciation and bioaccessibility of mining impacted soils and dusts', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLLUTION RESEARCH, 24 17056-17067 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9250-8
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Rahman MA, Naidu R, 'Inorganic arsenic in rice and rice-based diets: Health risk assessment', Food Control, 82 196-202 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Total and inorganic arsenic (As) content in rice and rice-based diets (n = 59) obtained from supermarkets in South Australia were studied to investigate the co... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Total and inorganic arsenic (As) content in rice and rice-based diets (n = 59) obtained from supermarkets in South Australia were studied to investigate the contamination levels and whether consumption of these products pose potential health risks to young children and adults. Results show that of the 59 rice-based products, 31 (53%) exceeded the EU recommended value (100 µg/kg) of As for young children and 13 (22%) samples had higher than maximum level of 200 µg/kg recommended for adults. Arsenic content varies as rice crackers > baby rice > rice cakes > puffed rice > other rice-based snacks > ready-to-eat rice. Of the 6 categories of rice-based products, except ready-to-eat rice, all others exceeded the EU recommended value for young children. Even manufacture recommended servings deliver significant amounts (0.56¿6.87 µg) of inorganic As. These amounts are within the range of BMDL01 values indicated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which means the risk cannot be avoided for young children and adults considering the levels of total and inorganic As in rice-based products.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodcont.2017.06.030
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Geographical variation and age-related dietary exposure to arsenic in rice from Bangladesh', Science of the Total Environment, 601-602 122-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. An extensive number (965) of rice samples collected by household survey from 73 upazilas (i.e. sub-districts) in Bangladesh was analyzed to determine regional... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. An extensive number (965) of rice samples collected by household survey from 73 upazilas (i.e. sub-districts) in Bangladesh was analyzed to determine regional variation, distribution and associated health risks from arsenic (As). No previous study had conducted a study examining such a large number of rice samples. The mean and median concentrations of total As were 126¿µg/kg and 107¿µg/kg, respectively, ranging from between 3 and 680¿µg/kg. Importantly, total As levels of aromatic rice were significantly lower (average 58¿µg/kg) than non-aromatic rice (average 150¿µg/kg) and also varied with rice grain size. The variation in As content was dominated by the location (47% among the upazilas, 71% among districts) and rice variety (14%). Inorganic As content in rice grain ranged between 11 and 502¿µg/kg (n¿=¿162) with the highest fraction being 98.6%. The daily intake of inorganic As from rice ranged between 0.38 and 1.92¿µg/kg BW in different districts. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) for individuals due to the consumption of rice varied between 0.57¿×¿10-¿3 to 2.88¿×¿10-¿3 in different districts, and 0.54¿×¿10-¿3 to 2.12¿×¿10-¿3 in different varieties, higher than the US EPA threshold. The 2¿10 age group experiences higher carcinogenic risks than others and females are more susceptible than males.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.05.184
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Usese A, Chukwu OL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Islam S, Oyewo EO, 'Concentrations of arsenic in water and fish in a tropical open lagoon, Southwest-Nigeria: Health risk assessment', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 164-171 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in water, muscle tissue of four demersal fish species (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, Mugil cephalus, Liz... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in water, muscle tissue of four demersal fish species (Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus, Mugil cephalus, Liza falcipinnis and Bathygobious soporator) and whole tissues of periwinkle (Tympanotonus fuscatus) in Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria. The observed mean total As concentration in water (1.29µgl-1) during the wet and dry seasons did not exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value of 10µgl-1. Among the examined biota, Tympanotonus fuscatus recorded higher As levels (2.31±0.24mgkg-1) and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus recorded the least As content (0.67±0.08mgkg-1). A significant positive correlation (p<0.05) was observed between As concentrations in fish muscles and water during the dry and wet seasons. The health risks associated with human consumption of fish estimated using Target Hazard Quotient (THQ) were lower than the USEPA guideline value of 1 for all fish species examined except in populations that consume larger amounts of fish. However, higher THQ values (>2) were obtained for Tympanotonus fuscatus, suggesting the potential for non-carcinogenic health outcomes in adults after a prolonged period of consumption. This calls for continuous monitoring and enforcement of regulations to ensure safety of fishery resources from Lagos Lagoon.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.005
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Usese A, Chukwu OL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Islam S, Oyewo EO, 'Enrichment, contamination and geo-accumulation factors for assessing arsenic contamination in sediment of a Tropical Open Lagoon, Southwest Nigeria', Environmental Technology and Innovation, 8 126-131 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The presence of toxic heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic environments constitutes a major risk and there is an urgent need for continuous monitoring of su... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. The presence of toxic heavy metals and metalloids in aquatic environments constitutes a major risk and there is an urgent need for continuous monitoring of such pollutants. This study assesses the concentrations of arsenic (As) in surface sediments from 15 locations on the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria during the wet and dry seasons to determine the degree of contamination. The results showed that the mean total As concentration in sediment (2.44 mg kg-1 dry weight) did not exceed the Canadian Interim Sediment Quality Guideline (CISQG) value of 7.24 mg kg-1 dry weight during the wet and dry seasons. Based on the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and ecological risk assessment using the enrichment factor (EF), contamination factor (CF) and geo-accumulation index (Igeo), the study's results indicate two things: firstly, low to moderate and significant levels of enrichment from As; and secondly, low to moderate degree of contamination in Lagos Lagoon during the study period.

DOI 10.1016/j.eti.2017.06.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2017 Chakraborti D, Das B, Rahman MM, Nayak B, Pal A, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Arsenic in groundwater of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC), India: Critical review and modes of mitigation', CHEMOSPHERE, 180 437-447 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.04.051
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2017 Islam S, Rahman MM, Duan L, Islam MR, Kuchel T, Naidu R, 'Variation in arsenic bioavailability in rice genotypes using swine model: An animal study', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 599 324-331 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.215
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Luchun Duan
2017 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Das B, Chatterjee A, Das D, Nayak B, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in India', HYDROGEOLOGY JOURNAL, 25 1165-1181 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10040-017-1556-6
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2016 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Ahamed S, Dutta RN, Pati S, Mukherjee SC, 'Arsenic groundwater contamination and its health effects in Patna district (capital of Bihar) in the middle Ganga plain, India', Chemosphere, 152 520-529 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. We investigated the extent and severity of groundwater arsenic (As) contamination in five blocks in Patna district, Bihar, India along with As in biological s... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. We investigated the extent and severity of groundwater arsenic (As) contamination in five blocks in Patna district, Bihar, India along with As in biological samples and its health effects such as dermatological, neurological and obstetric outcome in some villages. We collected 1365 hand tube-well water samples and analyzed for As by the flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HG-AAS). We found 61% and 44% of the tube-wells had As above 10 and 50 µg/l, respectively, with maximum concentration of 1466 µg/l. Our medical team examined 712 villagers and registered 69 (9.7%) with arsenical skin lesions. Arsenical skin lesions were also observed in 9 children of 312 screened. We analyzed 176 biological samples (hair, nail and urine). Out of these, 69 people had arsenical skin lesions and rest without skin lesions. We found 100% of the biological samples had As above the normal levels (concentrations of As in hair, nail and urine of unexposed individuals usually ranges from 20 to 200 µg/kg, 20-500 µg/kg and <100 µg/l, respectively), indicating many people are sub-clinically affected. Arsenical neuropathy was observed in 40.5% of 37 arsenicosis patients with 73.3% prevalence for predominant sensory neuropathy and 26.7% for sensor-motor. Among patients, different clinical and electrophysiological neurological features and abnormal quantitative sensory perception thresholds were also noted. The study also found that As exposed women with severe skin lesions had adversely affected their pregnancies. People including children in the affected areas are in danger. To combat As situation in affected areas, villagers urgently need (a) provision of As-safe water for drinking and cooking, (b) awareness about the danger of As toxicity, and (c) nutritious food.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.02.119
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
2016 Dong Z, Yan K, Liu Y, Naidu R, Duan L, Wijayawardena A, et al., 'A meta-analysis to correlate lead bioavailability and bioaccessibility and predict lead bioavailability', Environment International, 92-93 139-145 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.04.009
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Luchun Duan, Ravi Naidu, Yanju Liu, Ayanka Wijayawardena
2016 Kumar M, Rahman MM, Ramanathan AL, Naidu R, 'Arsenic and other elements in drinking water and dietary components from the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India: Health risk index', Science of the Total Environment, 539 125-134 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigates the level of contamination and health risk assessment for arsenic (As) and other elements in drinking water, vegetables and other foo... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigates the level of contamination and health risk assessment for arsenic (As) and other elements in drinking water, vegetables and other food components in two blocks (Mohiuddinagar and Mohanpur) from the Samastipur district, Bihar, India. Groundwater (80%) samples exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value (10. µg/L) of As while Mn exceeded the previous WHO limit of 400. µg/L in 28% samples. The estimated daily intake of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn from drinking water and food components were 169, 19, 26, 882, 4645, 14582, 474, 1449 and 12,955. µg, respectively (estimated exposure 3.70, 0.41, 0.57, 19.61, 103.22, 324.05, 10.53, 32.21 and 287.90. µg per kg bw, respectively). Twelve of 15 cooked rice contained high As concentration compared to uncooked rice. Water contributes (67%) considerable As to daily exposure followed by rice and vegetables. Whereas food is the major contributor of other elements to the dietary exposure. Correlation and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated natural source for As but for other elements, presence of diffused anthropogenic activities were responsible. The chronic daily intake (CDI) and health risk index (HRI) were also estimated from the generated data. The HRI were >. 1 for As in drinking water, vegetables and rice, for Mn in drinking water, vegetables, rice and wheat, for Pb in rice and wheat indicated the potential health risk to the local population. An assessment of As and other elements of other food components should be conducted to understand the actual health hazards caused by ingestion of food in people residing in the middle Gangetic plain.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.08.039
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Bello O, Naidu R, Rahman MM, Liu Y, Dong Z, 'Lead concentration in the blood of the general population living near a lead-zinc mine site, Nigeria: Exposure pathways', Science of the Total Environment, 542 908-914 (2016) [C1]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. year... [more]

© 2015. Lead (Pb) poisoning in children is a major public health catastrophe worldwide. This report summarises both exposure pathways and blood Pb levels in children below 7. years of age and adults (above 18. years) from the Adudu community living near a lead-zinc mine in Nasawara, Nigeria. The average and median blood Pb levels in children and adults were 2.1 and 1.3 µg/dL, 3.1 and 1.8 µg/dL, respectively. However, Pb in 14% of adults' blood exceeded 5. µg/dL, which is the recommended threshold blood Pb concentration in adults as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore 68% of adults' blood exceeded blood Pb action level of 2 µg/dL. For children, 11.4% and 31% of the blood samples exceeded 5 µg/dL and 2 µg/dL, respectively, while no safe blood Pb level in children has been recommended. In Nasawara, a significant difference (p< 0.05) was observed between the various age groups in children with 2-4 years old having the highest levels and 6. year old children having the lowest Pb levels. Although this study did not detect elevated levels of Pb in children's blood in regions such as Zamfara, Nigeria and Kabwe, Zambia, a high percentage of samples exceeded 2 µg/dL. Soils, floor dusts, water and crops also reveal that Pb contamination in the study area could potentially be the major cause of blood Pb in the community exposed to mining. This study also observed a significant correlation between water Pb levels of adults and blood Pb levels, suggesting that water is the major exposure pathway. This analysis highlights the need to properly manage mining activities so that the health of communities living in the vicinity of a Pb-Zn mine is not compromised.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.10.143
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Yanju Liu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Wang L, Choppala G, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 50 13062-13069 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b03195
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Liang Wang, Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Perelomov L, Sarkar B, Rahman MM, Goryacheva A, Naidu R, 'Uptake of lead by Na-exchanged and Al-pillared bentonite in the presence of organic acids with different functional groups', Applied Clay Science, 119 417-423 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigated the uptake of lead (Pb) ions by Na-rich bentonite (Na-bentonite) and Al-pillared bentonite (Al-bentonite) in the presence or absence ... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.. This study investigated the uptake of lead (Pb) ions by Na-rich bentonite (Na-bentonite) and Al-pillared bentonite (Al-bentonite) in the presence or absence of organic acids containing different functional groups. Na-bentonite was an effective adsorbent for Pb2+ions. The element was taken up by the mineral through ion exchange mechanism; and the formation of a lead carbonate hydroxide (hydrocerussite) also occurred. Al-bentonite adsorbed a smaller amount of Pb than Na-bentonite. XRD data indicated that the totality of clay interlayers was occupied by the pillaring agent that led to decrease in Pb uptake. The amount of Pb taken up by Na-bentonite decreased with increasing concentration of citric acid both when Pb and organic acid were added together as a mixture, and when citric acid was added 2 h before the metal ions. Possible reasons for this were the formation of Pb-citrate complexes which had less affinity to Na-bentonite, and also hydrocerussite dissolution at acidic pH. Citric acid, however, did not change Pb uptake by Al-bentonite. Addition of lysine together with Pb did not have any effect on Pb uptake by Na-bentonite and Al-bentonite, which indicated occupation of different adsorption sites by Pb and lysine compared to citrate. However, lysine addition at 1:1 ratio 2 h before Pb decreased the metal uptake, which again may be explained by the effect of lysine in hydrocerussite dissolution. Uptake of Pb in the presence of lysine was also higher when using Na-bentonite compared to Al-bentonite.

DOI 10.1016/j.clay.2015.11.004
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Nuruzzaman M, Rahman MM, Liu Y, Naidu R, 'Nanoencapsulation, Nano-guard for Pesticides: A New Window for Safe Application', JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY, 64 1447-1483 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05214
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Md Nuruzzaman, Yanju Liu
2016 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Chatterjee A, Das D, Das B, Nayak B, et al., 'Fate of over 480 million inhabitants living in arsenic and fluoride endemic Indian districts: Magnitude, health, socio-economic effects and mitigation approaches', JOURNAL OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 38 33-45 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jtemb.2016.05.001
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
2016 Kumar M, Ramanathan AL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Concentrations of inorganic arsenic in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments from the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India', Science of the Total Environment, 573 1103-1114 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Concentrations of inorganic forms [arsenite, As(III) and arsenate, As(V) of arsenic (As) present in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments l... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Concentrations of inorganic forms [arsenite, As(III) and arsenate, As(V) of arsenic (As) present in groundwater, agricultural soils and subsurface sediments located in the middle Gangetic plain of Bihar, India were determined. Approximately 73% of the groundwater samples (n¿=¿19) show As(III) as the dominant species while 27% reveals As(V) was the dominant species. The concentration of As(III) in agricultural soil samples varies from not detectable to 40¿µg/kg and As(V) was observed as the major species (ranging from 1050 to 6835¿µg/kg) while the total As concentration varied from 3528 to 14,690¿µg/kg. Total extracted concentration of As was higher in the subsurface sediments (range 9119¿20,056¿µg/kg in Methrapur and 4788¿19,681¿µg/kg in Harail Chapar) than the agricultural soil, indicating the subsurface sediment as a source of As. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) revealed the presence of hematite and goethite throughout the vertical section below while magnetite was observed only in the upper oxidized layer at Methrapur and Harail Chapar. Alteration of Fe-oxides and presence of fibrous goethite indicating presence of diagenetic sediment. Siderite plays a crucial role as sinks to the As in subsurface sediments. The study also concluded that decomposition of organic matter present in dark and grey sections promote the redox conditions and trigger mobilization of As into groundwater.

DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.08.109
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Arsenic accumulation in rice: Consequences of rice genotypes and management practices to reduce human health risk', Environment International, 96 139-155 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Rice is an essential staple food and feeds over half of the world&apos;s population. Consumption of rice has increased from limited intake in Western countries... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Rice is an essential staple food and feeds over half of the world's population. Consumption of rice has increased from limited intake in Western countries some 50¿years ago to major dietary intake now. Rice consumption represents a major route for inorganic arsenic (As) exposure in many countries, especially for people with a large proportion of rice in their daily diet as much as 60%. Rice plants are more efficient in assimilating As into its grains than other cereal crops and the accumulation may also adversely affect the quality of rice and their nutrition. Rice is generally grown as a lowland crop in flooded soils under reducing conditions. Under these conditions the bioavailability of As is greatly enhanced leading to excessive As bioaccumulation compared to that under oxidizing upland conditions. Inorganic As species are carcinogenic to humans and even at low levels in the diet pose a considerable risk to humans. There is a substantial genetic variation among the rice genotypes in grain-As accumulation as well as speciation. Identifying the extent of genetic variation in grain-As concentration and speciation of As compounds are crucial to determining the rice varieties which accumulate low inorganic As. Varietal selection, irrigation water management, use of fertilizer and soil amendments, cooking practices etc. play a vital role in reducing As exposure from rice grains. In the meantime assessing the bioavailability of As from rice is crucial to understanding human health exposure and reducing the risk.

DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2016.09.006
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Ahamed S, Dutta RN, Pati S, Mukherjee SC, 'Arsenic contamination of groundwater and its induced health effects in Shahpur block, Bhojpur district, Bihar state, India: risk evaluation', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 23 9492-9504 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of groundwater arsenic contamination in Shahpur block of Bhojpur district, Bi... [more]

© 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of groundwater arsenic contamination in Shahpur block of Bhojpur district, Bihar state, India and its health effects such as dermal, neurological, obstetric effects, and cancer risk. The School of Environmental Studies (SOES) collected 4704 tube-well water samples from all 88 villages of Shahpur, which were analyzed for arsenic. We found 40.3 and 21.1¿% of the tube-wells had arsenic above 10 and 50¿µg/l, respectively, with maximum concentration of 1805¿µg/l. The study shows that 75,000, 39,000, and 10,000 people could be exposed to arsenic-contaminated water greater than 10, 50, and 300¿µg/l, respectively. Our medical team examined 1422 villagers from Shahpur and registered 161 (prevalence rate, 11.3¿%) with arsenical skin lesions. Arsenical skin lesions were also observed in 29 children of 525 screened. We analyzed 579 biological samples (hair, nail, and urine) from Shahpur and found that 82, 89, and 91¿% of hair, nail, and urine, respectively, had arsenic above the normal levels, indicating many people in the study area are sub-clinically affected. Arsenical neuropathy was observed in 48¿% of 102 arsenicosis patients. The study also found that arsenic exposed women with severe skin lesions had adversely affected their pregnancies. The carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks were also estimated based on the generated data. Safe drinking water supply is urgently required to combat arsenic situation in affected villages of Shahpur.

DOI 10.1007/s11356-016-6149-8
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
2015 Azizur Rahman M, Hogan B, Duncan E, Doyle C, Rahman MM, Nguyen TV, et al., 'Ecotoxicological Effects of an Arsenic Remediation Method on Three Freshwater Organisms - Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35 and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 226 1-10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Chemical methods have been used for the remediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated water; however, ecological consequences of t... [more]

© 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Chemical methods have been used for the remediation of arsenic (As)-contaminated water; however, ecological consequences of these methods have not been properly addressed. The present study evaluated the effects of the Fe-oxide-coated sand (IOCS) remediation method on As toxicity to freshwater organisms (Lemna disperma, Chlorella sp. CE-35, and Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia). The As removal efficiency by IOCS decreased substantially with time. The IOCS remediation method was less effective at suppressing the toxicity of AsVthan AsIIIto L. disperma but was highly effective in reducing both the AsIIIand AsVtoxicity to C. cf. dubia. The growth of Chlorella sp. was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in remediated and pre-remediated water than in controls (non-As-contaminated filtered Colo River water) for AsIII, while the opposite was observed for AsV, indicating that AsVis more toxic than AsIIIto this microalga. Although the IOCS can efficiently remove As from contaminated water, residual As and other constituents (e.g. Fe, nitrate) in the remediated water had a significant effect on freshwater organisms.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-015-2668-z
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2015 Rahman MM, Dong Z, Naidu R, 'Concentrations of arsenic and other elements in groundwater of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India: Potential cancer risk', Chemosphere, 139 54-64 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.05.051
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2015 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Mukherjee A, Alauddin M, Hassan M, Dutta RN, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh-21 Years of research', JOURNAL OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, 31 237-248 (2015)
DOI 10.1016/j.jtemb.2015.01.003
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 25
2015 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Dong Z, et al., 'Unraveling health risk and speciation of arsenic from groundwater in rural areas of Punjab, Pakistan', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12 12371-12390 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality paramete... [more]

© 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This study determined the total and speciated arsenic (As) concentrations and other health-related water quality parameters for unraveling the health risk of As from drinking water to humans. Groundwater samples (n = 62) were collected from three previously unexplored rural areas (Chichawatni, Vehari, Rahim Yar Khan) of Punjab in Pakistan. The mean and median As concentrations in groundwater were 37.9 and 12.7 µg¿L-1 (range = 1.5¿201 µg¿L-1). Fifty three percent groundwater samples showed higher As value than WHO safe limit of 10 µg¿L-1. Speciation of As in groundwater samples (n = 13) showed the presence of inorganic As only; arsenite (As(III)) constituted 13%¿67% of total As and arsenate (As(V)) ranged from 33% to 100%. For As health risk assessment, the hazard quotient and cancer risk values were 11¿18 and 46¿600 times higher than the recommended values of US-EPA (i.e., 1.00 and 10-6, respectively). In addition to As, various water quality parameters (e.g., electrical conductivity, Na, Ca, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Fe, Mn, Pb) also enhanced the health risk. The results show that consumption of As-contaminated groundwater poses an emerging health threat to the communities in the study area, and hence needs urgent remedial and management measures.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph121012371
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 45
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Reichman SM, Lim RP, Naidu R, 'Arsenic speciation in australian-grown and imported rice on sale in Australia: Implications for human health risk', Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 62 6016-6024 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jf501077w
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2014 Rahman MA, Rahman MM, Reichman SM, Lim RP, Naidu R, 'Heavy metals in Australian grown and imported rice and vegetables on sale in Australia: Health hazard', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 100 53-60 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.11.024
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2014 Rahman MA, Hogan B, Duncan E, Doyle C, Krassoi R, Rahman MM, et al., 'Toxicity of arsenic species to three freshwater organisms and biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by freshwater phytoplankton (Chlorella sp CE-35)', ECOTOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, 106 126-135 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2014.03.004
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2014 Rahman MM, Mondal D, Das B, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, et al., 'Status of groundwater arsenic contamination in all 17 blocks of Nadia district in the state of West Bengal, India: A 23-year study report', Journal of Hydrology, 518 363-372 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2013.10.037
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2014 Goswami R, Rahman MM, Murrill M, Sarma KP, Thakur R, Chakraborti D, 'Arsenic in the groundwater of Majuli - The largest river island of the Brahmaputra: Magnitude of occurrence and human exposure', Journal of Hydrology, 518 354-362 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2013.09.022
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
2013 Hossain MA, Rahman MM, Murrill M, Das B, Roy B, Dey S, et al., 'Water consumption patterns and factors contributing to water consumption in arsenic affected population of rural West Bengal, India', Science of the Total Environment, 463-464 1217-1224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.06.057
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 26
2013 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Murrill M, Das R, Siddayya, Patil SG, et al., 'Environmental arsenic contamination and its health effects in a historic gold mining area of the Mangalur greenstone belt of Northeastern Karnataka, India', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 262 1048-1055 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.10.002
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27
2013 Rahman MM, Asaduzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Consumption of arsenic and other elements from vegetables and drinking water from an arsenic-contaminated area of Bangladesh', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 262 1056-1063 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2012.06.045
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2013 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Das B, Nayak B, Pal A, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain, its health effects and an approach for mitigation', ENVIRONMENTAL EARTH SCIENCES, 70 1993-2008 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/s12665-013-2699-y
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
2013 Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Mitra S, Chatterjee A, Das D, Das B, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in India: A review of its magnitude, health, social, Socio-economic effects and approaches for arsenic mitigation', Journal of the Indian Society of Agricultural Statistics, 67 236-266 (2013)
2013 Rahman M, Chakraborti D, 'Comment on ¿High arsenic in rice is associated with elevated genotoxic effects in humans¿', Scientific Reports, 3 (2013)
DOI 10.1038/srep02195
2012 Sarkar B, Naidu R, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Xi Y, 'Organoclays reduce arsenic bioavailability and bioaccessibility in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF SOILS AND SEDIMENTS, 12 704-712 (2012)
DOI 10.1007/s11368-012-0487-z
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2010 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Das B, Murrill M, Dey S, Mukherjee SC, et al., 'Status of groundwater arsenic contamination in Bangladesh: A 14-year study report', WATER RESEARCH, 44 5789-5802 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2010.06.051
Citations Scopus - 119Web of Science - 110
2009 Chakraborti D, Das B, Rahman MM, Chowdhury UK, Biswas B, Goswami AB, et al., 'Status of groundwater arsenic contamination in the state of West Bengal, India: A 20-year study report', MOLECULAR NUTRITION & FOOD RESEARCH, 53 542-551 (2009)
DOI 10.1002/mnfr.200700517
Citations Scopus - 125Web of Science - 105
2009 Das B, Rahman MM, Nayak B, Pal A, Chowdhury UK, Mukherjee SC, et al., 'Groundwater Arsenic Contamination, Its Health Effects and Approach for Mitigation in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh', WATER QUALITY EXPOSURE AND HEALTH, 1 5-21 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s12403-008-0002-3
Citations Web of Science - 26
2009 Rahman MM, Naidu R, Bhattacharya P, 'Arsenic contamination in groundwater in the Southeast Asia region', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 9-21 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9233-2
Citations Scopus - 83Web of Science - 71
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2009 Rahman MM, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Extraction of arsenic species in soils using microwave-assisted extraction detected by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 93-102 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9227-0
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu
2009 Rahman MM, Owens G, Naidu R, 'Arsenic levels in rice grain and assessment of daily dietary intake of arsenic from rice in arsenic-contaminated regions of Bangladesh-implications to groundwater irrigation', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 179-187 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9238-x
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 56
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2009 Rahman MM, Ng JC, Naidu R, 'Chronic exposure of arsenic via drinking water and its adverse health impacts on humans', ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY AND HEALTH, 31 189-200 (2009)
DOI 10.1007/s10653-008-9235-0
Citations Scopus - 186Web of Science - 162
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2009 Guo Z, Megharaj M, Beer M, Ming H, Rahman MM, Wu W, Naidu R, 'Heavy metal impact on bacterial biomass based on DNA analyses and uptake by wild plants in the abandoned copper mine soils', BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, 100 3831-3836 (2009)
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2009.02.043
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2008 Chen Z, Akter KF, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'The separation of arsenic species in soils and plant tissues by anion-exchange chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry using various mobile phases', MICROCHEMICAL JOURNAL, 89 20-28 (2008)
DOI 10.1016/j.microc.2007.10.007
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Zuliang Chen
2007 Chen Z, Rahman MM, Naidu R, 'Speciation of vanadium by anion-exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and con. rmation of vanadium complex formation using electrospray mass spectrometry', JOURNAL OF ANALYTICAL ATOMIC SPECTROMETRY, 22 811-816 (2007)
DOI 10.1039/b705481e
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Zuliang Chen
2006 Chen Z, Akter KF, Mahmudur M, Rahman, Naidu R, 'Speciation of arsenic by ion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using ammonium eluents', JOURNAL OF SEPARATION SCIENCE, 29 2671-2676 (2006)
DOI 10.1002/jssc.200500304
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Zuliang Chen
2006 Hossam MA, Mukharjee A, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Das B, Nayak B, et al., 'Million dollar arsenic removal plants in West Bengal, India: Useful or not?', WATER QUALITY RESEARCH JOURNAL OF CANADA, 41 216-225 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
2006 Ahamed S, Sengupta MK, Mukherjee SC, Pati S, Mukherjee A, Rahman MM, et al., 'An eight-year study report on arsenic contamination in groundwater and health effects in Eruani village, Bangladesh and an approach for its mitigation', JOURNAL OF HEALTH POPULATION AND NUTRITION, 24 129-141 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 30
2006 Mukherjee A, Sengupta MK, Hossain MA, Ahamed S, Das B, Nayak B, et al., 'Arsenic contamination in groundwater: A global perspective with emphasis on the Asian scenario', JOURNAL OF HEALTH POPULATION AND NUTRITION, 24 142-163 (2006)
Citations Scopus - 264Web of Science - 235
2005 Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Hossain MA, et al., 'Status of groundwater arsenic contamination and human suffering in a Gram Panchayet (cluster of villages) in Murshidabad, one of the nine arsenic affected districts in West Bengal, India', Journal of Water and Health, 3 283-296 (2005)

A detailed study was carried out in a cluster of villages known as Sagarpara Gram Panchayet (GP), covering an area of 20km2 and population of 24,419 to determine the status of gro... [more]

A detailed study was carried out in a cluster of villages known as Sagarpara Gram Panchayet (GP), covering an area of 20km2 and population of 24,419 to determine the status of groundwater arsenic contamination and related health effects. The arsenic analysis of all hand tubewells (n = 565) in working condition showed, 86.2% and 58.8% of them had arsenic above 10, and 50 µgl-1, respectively. The groundwater samples from all 21 villages in Sagarpara GP contained arsenic above 50 µgl-1. In our preliminary clinical survey across the 21 villages, 3,302 villagers were examined and 679 among them (20.6%) were registered with arsenical skin lesions. A total of 850 biological samples (hair, nail and urine) were analysed from the affected villages and, on average, 85% of them contained arsenic above the normal level. Thus, many people of Sagarpara might be sub-clinically affected. Our data was compared with the international one to estimate population in Sagarpara GP at risk from arsenical skin lesions and cancer. Proper watershed management and economical utilization of available surface water resources along with the villagers' participation is urgently required to combat the present arsenic crisis. © IWA Publishing 2005.

DOI 10.2166/wh.2005.038
Citations Scopus - 13
2005 Hossain MA, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Rahman MM, Mondal D, Lodh D, et al., 'Ineffectiveness and poor reliability of arsenic removal plants in West Bengal, India', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 39 4300-4306 (2005)
DOI 10.1021/es048703u
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 64
2005 Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Hossain A, et al., 'Arsenic contamination of groundwater and its health impact on residents in a village in West Bengal, India', BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION, 83 49-57 (2005)
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 42
2005 Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Chowdhury UK, Hossain MA, Das B, et al., 'The magnitude of arsenic contamination in groundwater and its health effects to the inhabitants of the Jalangi - one of the 85 arsenic affected blocks in West Bengal, India', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 338 189-200 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2004.06.022
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 55
2005 Basu A, Som A, Ghoshal S, Mondal L, Chaubey RC, Bhilwade HN, et al., 'Assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals susceptible to arsenic induced toxicity in West Bengal, India', TOXICOLOGY LETTERS, 159 100-112 (2005)
DOI 10.1016/j.toxlet.2005.05.001
Citations Scopus - 40Web of Science - 36
2005 Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Lodh D, Das B, Hossain MA, et al., 'Murshidabad - One of the nine groundwater arsenic-affected districts of West Bengal, India. Part I: Magnitude of contamination and population at risk', CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, 43 823-834 (2005)
DOI 10.1080/15563650500357461
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 19
2005 Mukherjee SC, Saha KC, Pati S, Dutta RN, Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Murshidabad - One of the nine groundwater arsenic-affected districts of West Bengal, India. Part II: Dermatological, neurological, and obstetric findings', CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, 43 835-848 (2005)
DOI 10.1080/15563650500357495
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 65
2004 Acharyya SK, Shah BA, Chakraborti D, Ahamed S, Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, et al., 'Risk of arsenic contamination in groundwater affecting the Ganga Alluvial Plain, India (multiple letters) [3]', Environmental Health Perspectives, 112 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 21
2004 Oller A, Bates H, Chakraborti D, Sengupta MK, Rahman MM, Ahamed S, et al., 'Metals in perspective: Groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain', Journal of Environmental Monitoring, 6 (2004)
DOI 10.1039/b406573p
Citations Scopus - 49
2004 Oller A, Bates H, 'Metals in perspective - Introduction', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, 6 74N-74N (2004)
DOI 10.1039/b406573p
Citations Scopus - 150Web of Science - 2
2003 Sengupta MK, Mukherjee A, Hossain MA, Ahamed S, Rahman MM, Lodh D, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in the Ganga-Padma-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain of India and Bangladesh', ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, 58 701-702 (2003)
DOI 10.3200/AEOH.58.11.701-702
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
2003 Chakraborti D, Mukherjee SC, Pati S, Sengupta MK, Rahman MM, Chowdhury UK, et al., 'Arsenic groundwater contamination in Middle Ganga Plain, Bihar, India: A future danger?', ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PERSPECTIVES, 111 1194-1201 (2003)
DOI 10.1289/ehp.5966
Citations Scopus - 332Web of Science - 269
2003 Chakraborti D, Mukherjee SC, Saha KC, Chowdhury UK, Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, 'Arsenic toxicity from homeopathic treatment', JOURNAL OF TOXICOLOGY-CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, 41 963-967 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/CLT-120026518
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 25
2003 Rahman MM, Mandal BK, Chowdhury TR, Sengupta MK, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, et al., 'Arsenic groundwater contamination and sufferings of people in North 24-Parganas, one of the nine arsenic affected districts of West bengal, India', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 38 25-59 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/ESE-120016658
Citations Scopus - 92Web of Science - 60
2003 Chowdhury UK, Rahman MM, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, Chanda CR, Roy S, et al., 'Pattern of excretion of arsenic compounds [arsenite, arsenate, MMA(V), DMA(V)] in urine of children compared to adults from an arsenic exposed area in Bangladesh', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 38 87-113 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/ESE-120016883
Citations Scopus - 70Web of Science - 61
2003 Mukherjee SC, Rahman MM, Chowdhury UK, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, Chanda CR, et al., 'Neuropathy in arsenic toxicity from groundwater arsenic contamination in West Bengal, India', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND HEALTH PART A-TOXIC/HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, 38 165-183 (2003)
DOI 10.1081/ESE-120016887
Citations Scopus - 97Web of Science - 84
2002 Rahman MM, Mukherjee D, Sengupta MK, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Chanda CR, et al., 'Effectiveness and reliability of arsenic field testing kits: Are the million dollar screening projects effective or not?', Environmental Science Technology, 36 5385-5394 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 138Web of Science - 126
2002 Chakraborti D, Rahman MM, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, et al., 'Arsenic calamity in the Indian subcontinent - What lessons have been learned?', TALANTA, 58 3-22 (2002)
DOI 10.1016/S0039-9140(02)00270-9
Citations Scopus - 335Web of Science - 286
2002 Saha KC, Mukherjee SC, Rahman MM, Chakraborti D, 'Arsenic exposure and health effects - Authors' reply', JOURNAL OF TOXICOLOGY-CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, 40 529-530 (2002)
2002 Saha KC, Mukherjee SC, Rahman M, Chakraborti D, 'Arsenic exposure and health effects', Journal of Toxicology: Clinical Toxicology, 40 529-530 (2002)
2002 Mazumder DNG, Saha KC, Mukherjee SC, Rahman MM, Chakraborti D, 'Arsenic exposure and health effects [6] (multiple letters)', Journal of Toxicology - Clinical Toxicology, 40 527-530 (2002)
2001 Rahman MM, Chowdhury UK, Mukherjee SC, Mondal BK, Paul K, Lodh D, et al., 'Chronic arsenic toxicity in Bangladesh and West Bengal, India - A review and commentary', JOURNAL OF TOXICOLOGY-CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY, 39 683-700 (2001)
DOI 10.1081/CLT-100108509
Citations Scopus - 321Web of Science - 229
2001 Chowdhury UK, Rahman M, Mandal BK, Paul K, Lodh D, Basu GK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and human suffering in West Bengal - India and Bangladesh', Environmental Sciences, 8 393-415 (2001)
1999 Chakraborti D, Biswas BK, Basu GK, Chowdhury UK, Roy Chowdhury T, Lodh D, et al., 'Possible arsenic contamination free groundwater source in Bangladesh', Journal of Surface Science and Technology, 15 180-188 (1999)
Citations Scopus - 15
Show 86 more journal articles

Conference (50 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Lamb D, Wang L, Abbasi S, Rahman M, Kader M, Sanderson P, et al., 'Towards a coherent toxicity prediction framework for metals and metalloids: competitive, multi-species and other models for terrestrial environments.', Athens, USA (2018)
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Liang Wang, Peter Sanderson, Megh Mallavarapu, Ravi Naidu
2016 Shakoor MB, Niazi NK, Bibi I, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Shahid M, et al., 'Speciation and health risk assessment of arsenic in groundwater of Punjab, Pakistan', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, Sweden (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1201/b20466-215
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Kumar M, Ramanathan AL, Rahman MM, Naidu R, Bhattacharya P, 'Arsenic and trace elements in groundwater, vegetables and selected food grains from middle gangetic plain¿human health perspective', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016, Stockholm, Sweden (2016) [E1]
DOI 10.1201/b20466-154
Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2016 Islam S, Rahman MM, Islam MR, Nuruzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Can irrigation practice for rice cultivation reduce the risk of arsenic to human?', Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (2016)

© 2016 Taylor &amp; Francis Group, London. Arsenic bioaccumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many parts of the world. Rice is one of... [more]

© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London. Arsenic bioaccumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in Bangladesh and many parts of the world. Rice is one of the crops affected by arsenic due to its semiaquatic nature. A field study was conducted to investigate the effect of variety and water management on the bioaccumulation of arsenic within the rice plants in different rice cultivars. Ten of the most popularly grown BRRI, BINA and local rice cultivars were screened for susceptibility to arsenic under varying irrigation options. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with conventional irrigation practice. Results showed that appropriate water management practice and suitable variety resulted in a reduction of grain arsenic level around 39% in addition to increase grain yield around 38%.

Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Md Nuruzzaman
2015 Nuruzzaman M, Rahman M, Liu Y, Islam S, Naidu R, 'Nano-encapsulated pesticides: dream or nightmare, an environmental aspect', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Usese A, Chukwu OL, Naidu R, Rahman M, Islam S, Oyewo EO, 'Human health implications of arsenic levels in a tropical open lagoon', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Concentration of arsenic in home grown vegetables: health implications', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Islam S, Rahman M, Islam MR, Naidu R, 'Total arsenic levels in rice from Bangladesh and human health implications', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2015 Islam S, Rahman M, Duan L, Islam MR, Nuruzzaman M, Naidu M, 'Bioavailability of arsenic from rice: significance of rice genotypes', Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment (As2016), Stockholm, Sweden (2015)
2015 Rahman M, 'Geographical variation of arsenic in rice grain from Bangladesh', Fukuoka, Japan (2015)
2015 Islam S, Rahman M, Islam MR, Nuruzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Water management practices impacts arsenic toxicity and yield in rice', Melbourne, Australia (2015)
2014 Nuruzzaman M, Islam MS, Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Effect of heat on particle size distribution of nano calcium carbonate', Adelaide, South Australia (2014)
2014 Nuruzzaman M, Islam MS, Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Dispersion of nanoparticles in aqueous suspension as influenced by pH and ultrasonication', Adelaide, South Australia (2014)
2013 Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Potential human exposure to arsenic and other toxic elements in contaminated regions of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India', Georgia, USA (2013)
2013 Krehel A, Sankar MS, Bednar A, Hettiarachchi G, Rahman M, Attanayake C, et al., 'Groundwater-Sediment sorption mechanisms and bioaccumulation of arsenic in rice within West Bengal, India', Denver, Colorado USA (2013)
2013 Islam MM, Rahman M, Naidu R, 'Effect of nano-zeolite and biosolids on plants grown in saline soils', Melbourne, Australia (2013)
2012 Rahman M, Asaduzzman M, Naidu R, 'Concentration of arsenic, cadmium and lead in home grown vegetables', Cairns (2012)
2012 Rahman M, Asaduzzman M, Naidu R, 'Arsenic intake from water, rice and vegetables in Bangladesh', Houston (2012)
2012 Rahman MM, Asaduzzaman M, Naidu R, 'Concentration of arsenic, cadmium and lead in home garden vegetables of Bangladesh', Understanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2012)

The study assesses the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in home-garden vegetables from a severely As-contaminated area of Bangladesh. The mean concentrat... [more]

The study assesses the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in home-garden vegetables from a severely As-contaminated area of Bangladesh. The mean concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in 87 vegetables were 113 %mu;g/kg, 134 %mu;g/kg and 3100 %mu;g/kg, respectively. The daily total consumption of As, Cd and Pb from vegetables alone for adult was 18 %mu;g, 22 %mu;g and 440 %mu;g, respectively. Vegetables alone did not contribute sufficiently enough to exceed Provisional Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI) values for Cd except for Pb. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group.

Co-authors Ravi Naidu
2011 Chakraborti D, Das B, Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Hossain MA, Ahamed S, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra Plain: health effects, arsenic in food chain, social, socio-economic effects, future cancer risk and approach for mitigation', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2011)
2011 Rahman M, Asaduzzman M, Naidu R, 'Concentration of arsenic in home grown vegetables', Adelaide, South Australia (2011)
2011 Naidu R, Rahman M, 'Identification and treatment of arsenicosis patients, arsenic in food chain and mitigation issues: experience from arsenic contaminated regions', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2011)
2011 Rahman M, 'Ingestion of arsenic from drinking water, rice and vegetables: A case study. International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements', Florence, Italy (2011)
2011 Rahman M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'Extraction of arsenic species in soils using microwave assisted extraction detected by IC-ICP-MS', Adelaide, South Australia (2011)
2010 Naidu R, Rahman M, 'Concentration of arsenic and other metals in agricultural soils of Bangladesh', Brisbane, Australia (2010)
2010 Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, Asaduzzaman M, 'Arsenic exposure from drinking water and rice in the Noakhali district of Bangladesh', Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases, As 2010 - 3rd International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment (2010)
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Megh Mallavarapu
2009 Chan Z, Rahman M, Mallavarapu M, Naidu R, 'Speciation study of metals and metal complexes using IC-ICPMS technique', Adelaide, Australia (2009)
2007 Rahman M, 'A survey of arsenic in foodstuffs and an estimation of daily dietary intake of arsenic by the villagers from an arsenic affected police station of Bangladesh', Adelaide, Australia (2007)
2006 Rahman M, 'Potential arsenic exposure pathways in Bangladesh', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2006)
2006 Mukherjee A, Chakraborti D, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Rahman M, et al., 'Major issues to be addressed to combat arsenic crisis in Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra (GMB) plain', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2006)
2004 Hossain MA, Mandal D, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Rahman M, Lodh D, et al., 'Effectiveness and usefulness of arsenic removal plants: an experience in West Bengal, India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Chowdhury UK, Das B, Hossain MA, et al., 'Status of groundwater arsenic contamination and human suffering in Murshidabad, one of the nine arsenic affected district of West Bengal, India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Ahamed S, Das B, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and health effects in Bangladesh-eight years study report', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Rahman M, Lodh D, Das B, et al., 'Increasing trend in hand tubewells and arsenic concentration in affected areas of West Bengal, India: A future danger', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Pati S, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Rahman M, Lodh D, et al., 'Pregnancy outcome associated with chronic arsenic exposure: A preliminary study in the states of West Bengal and Bihar of India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Ahamed S, Sengupta MK, Hossain MA, Rahman M, Lodh D, Das B, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and suffering of people in Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and Jharkhand states of India in Ganga plain', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Lodh D, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and its health effects in Ganga- Meghna-Brahmaputra plain', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2004 Mukherjee SC, Sengupta MK, Ahamed S, Hossain MA, Rahman M, Lodh D, et al., 'Arsenic neuropathy from groundwater arsenic contamination in India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2004)
2003 Ahamed S, Rahman M, Sengupta MK, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Hossain MA, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in middle Ganga plain: health effects of chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water in Bihar-India', Calcutta, India (2003)
2003 Grant TD, Vela NP, Heitkemper DT, Chowdhury UK, Rahman M, Samanta G, et al., 'Speciation of arsenic in rice, vegetables, and soil samples from areas irrigated with arsenic contaminated groundwater in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh', Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (2003)
2002 Paul K, Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Basu GK, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and sufferings of people in North 24-Parganas, one of the nine arsenic affected districts of West Bengal, India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2002)
2002 Mukherjee SC, Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury K, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, et al., 'Neuropathy in chronic arsenic toxicity due to groundwater arsenic contamination in West Bengal, India', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2002)
2002 Rahman M, 'Key issues for arsenic crisis and an approach for its remediation: West Bengal (India) experience', United Nation University, Tokyo, Japan (2002)
2002 Chowdhury UK, Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Paul K, Lodh D, Chanda CR, et al., 'Speciation of arsenic compounds [As(V), As(III), MMA, DMA] in human urine from an arsenic exposed area in Bangladesh', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2002)
2002 Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Chowdhury UK, Paul K, Sengupta MK, Lodh D, Basu GK, 'Present groundwater arsenic contamination status in West Bengal, India', San Diego, CA, USA (2002)
2001 Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Lodh D, Chanda CR, Saha KC, et al., 'Magnitude of groundwater arsenic contamination in Murshidabad, one of the nine arsenic affected districts in West Bengal, India', Book of Abstract, Adelaide, South Australia (2001)
2001 Biswas BK, Basu GK, Chowdhury UK, Chowdhury TR, Mandal BK, Rahman M, et al., 'Arsenic distribution in underground aquifer water in Bangladesh', Adelaide, South Australia (2001)
2001 Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Biswas BK, Lodh D, Basu GK, Roy S, 'Current status of arsenic pollution and health impacts in West Bengal and Bangladesh', Ohsaki, Tokyo, Japan (2001)
2001 Chakraborti D, Rahman M, Paul K, Chowdhury UK, Chanda CR, Lodh D, et al., 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in South East Asia, with special reference to Bangladesh and West Bengal, India', Adelaide, South Australia (2001)
2001 Das D, Chatterjee A, Samanta G, Chowdhury TR, Mandal BK, Dhar RK, et al., 'A simple household device to remove arsenic from groundwater and two years performance report of arsenic removal plant for treating groundwater with community participation', Dhaka, Bangladesh (2001)
Show 47 more conferences

Report (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and consequent health effects in a historic gold mining area of Gulbarga district, Karnataka: Preliminary study', Preliminary study (2010)
2010 Rahman M, 'Are millions in Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra plain already exposed to arsenic contaminated water potentially at risk from cancer?', preliminary follow up study (2010)
2009 Rahman M, 'Pathways of arsenic transfer in soils irrigated with arsenic contaminated groundwater of Bangladesh', ACIAR (2009)
2009 Rahman M, 'Uptake of heavy metals in plants grown in contaminated soils from metal smelter in South Australia', University of South Australia (2009)
2008 Rahman M, 'Investigation on stability and preservation of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater', University of South Australia (2008)
2006 Rahman M, 'Monitoring of heavy metals in soils and groundwater of a CCA treated site in South Australia', CRC-CARE (2006)
2005 Rahman M, 'Million-dollar arsenic project in Bangladesh: Arsenic situation deteriorated in Eruani village of Laksam Police Station, Comilla district from 1997 to 2005', . (2005)
2004 Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination in Assam: The latest findings in the Ganga¿Meghna¿Brahmaputra Plain', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
2004 Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenicosis patients in Uttar Pradesh (UP)-India', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
2004 Rahman M, 'Many million dollar projects for arsenic issue in Bangladesh', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
2004 Rahman M, 'Bangladesh Arsenic Mitigation Project', AusAID (2004)
2004 Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and health effects in Maner block of Patna district, Bihar-India', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
2004 Rahman M, 'Groundwater arsenic contamination and people suffering from arsenicosis from Jharkhand state in Middle Ganga Plain, India', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
2004 Rahman M, '6th report on Arsenic Removal Plants (ARPs) installed in arsenic affected villages of West Bengal', School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India (2004)
Show 11 more reports
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 18
Total funding $418,950

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $4,000

Assessment and management of arsenic in Punjab-Pakistan$4,000

Funding body: Higher Education Commission, Islamabad

Funding body Higher Education Commission, Islamabad
Project Team Professor Ravi Naidu, Doctor Mahmud Rahman
Scheme International Research Support Initiative Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800896
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON Y

20173 grants / $217,300

50:50 Scholarship$120,000

Funding body: Agilent Technologies Australia Pty Ltd

Funding body Agilent Technologies Australia Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Raja Dharmarajan, Doctor Mahmud Rahman, Doctor Prasath Annamalai, Professor Ravi Naidu
Scheme 50:50 Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1701453
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

HDR support grant$90,000

Funding body: Agilent Technologies

Funding body Agilent Technologies
Project Team

Ravi Naidu, Raja Dharmarajan and Mohammad Rahman

Scheme HDR support scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Concentrations of lead and copper in household tap water and plumbing materials of Hunter regions, New South Wales. $7,300

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme University of Newcastle Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20164 grants / $18,900

Mapping of arsenic and other elements in paddy soils and rice grain using synchrotron based techniques$7,500

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Luchun Duan and Dr Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman

Scheme Faculty Strategic Small Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Effect of biosolids application on plant grown in sodic soils: role of microbial activities$7,400

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty Strategic Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PVC Conference Assistance Grant Scheme$2,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

PVC Conference Assistance Grant Scheme$2,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Scheme PVC Conference Assistance Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20152 grants / $17,500

Can organic matter amendment reduce/enhance arsenic accumulation in vegetables grown in soil irrigated with arsenic contaminated water? $10,000

Funding body: ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia

Funding body ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia
Project Team

Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman, Ravi Naidu and Md. Harunur Rashid

Scheme Crawford Fund Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Nano-encapsulation materials for pesticides delivery: synthesis and control release behaviour. $7,500

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman

Scheme University of Newcastle New Appointee Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20131 grants / $15,800

Analysis of arsenic and other elements in various environmental samples using advanced analytical techniques$15,800

Funding body: ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia

Funding body ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia
Scheme Crawford Fund Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20121 grants / $75,000

Arsenic bioavailability, biomagnification, detoxification in aquatic systems and eco-toxicological validation$75,000

Funding body: CRC-CARE

Funding body CRC-CARE
Project Team

Md. Azizur Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman, Ravi Naidu

Scheme Research project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding CRC - Cooperative Research Centre
Category 4CRC
UON N

20111 grants / $22,900

Arsenic in drinking water, soil and food crops in Southeast Asia$22,900

Funding body: ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia

Funding body ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia
Scheme Crawford Fund Workshop
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20093 grants / $26,650

Pathways of arsenic transfer in soils irrigated with arsenic contaminated groundwater in Bangladesh.$14,150

Funding body: Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)

Funding body Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)
Project Team

Ravi Naidu, Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Uptake of heavy metals in plants grown in contaminated soils from metal smelter in South Australia. $6,500

Funding body: UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)

Funding body UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)
Scheme ECR Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

ECR Travel Award$6,000

Funding body: UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)

Funding body UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)
Scheme ECR Travel Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20082 grants / $20,900

Sampling, assessment and analytical speciation of arsenic in water and biological samples. $10,900

Funding body: ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia

Funding body ATSE Crawford Fund, Australia
Scheme Crawford Fund Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Investigation on stability and preservation of inorganic arsenic species in groundwater$10,000

Funding body: UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)

Funding body UNiversity of SOuth AUstralia (UniSA)
Scheme ECR Research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current10

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Risk Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination and Phytoremediation of Major Farm Land Soil, Plant, and Grain in Australia PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Characterisation of Heavy Metals (As, Cd, Pb) Contaminated Soil and Their Remediation by Using Different Methods PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Degradation of Organic Pollutants from Industrial Dye Waste Water by the Heterogeneous Fenton-like Process PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Implication of Nanotechnology for Water Treatment and Purification PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Effect of Iron and Manganese Plaques on Cadmium Bioaccumulation in Rice PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Biofortification of Mung Bean with Zinc to Alleviate Malnutrition and Minimise Cadmium Uptake PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Effect of Manure and Water Management on Cadmium Availability in Paddy Soil and Accumulation in Rice Grain PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Applicability of Modified Biochar Materials for Remediation of Arsenate and Arsenite Contaminated Waters PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Effectiveness of Nano-Fe-Mn-Sn Ternary Mixed Oxides to Remove Arsenic Ions From Aquatic Solution PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Microbial Community Structure, Functional Diversity and Plant Growth Potential of Diazo-trophic Bacteria and Fungi in Maize Fields Under Heavy Metal Stress PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Nanoencapsulated Pesticide: Insights Of Pesticide Loading To Enhance The Sustainability Of Nanocarriers PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Arsenic in Rice: Genotypic Variation and its Bioavailability with Respect to Human Health Risk Assessment PhD (Environment Remediation), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Mahmud Rahman

Position

Senior Research Fellow
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email mahmud.rahman@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8754

Office

Room ATC-139
Building Advanced Technology Centre
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