Dr Girish Choppala

Dr Girish Choppala

Research Associate

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation

Career Summary

Biography

Girish conducts research in the broad fields of environmental geochemistry, mineralogy, and toxicology. In particular, he is interested in

  • Understanding the fundamental processes of iron minerals and associated toxic metals and metalloids in soils and sediments.
  • Cycling of trace elements and nutrients in estuarine sediments. 
  • Dissolution kinetics of toxic metals bearing iron minerals under variable environmental conditions.
  • Development of ecological guideline values and ligand models for toxic metals and metalloids.
  • Application of synchrotron-based XAS techniques in resolving biogeochemical transformation of iron, sulfur, and trace metals at the mineral-water interface.



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Contamination
  • Environmental Geochemistry
  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Mineralogy

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
Research Associate University of Newcastle
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan NS, Chowdhury S, Park JH, Kim HS, Choppala G, et al., 'Dynamics of heavy metal(loid)s in mine soils', Spoil to Soil: Mine Site Rehabilitation and Revegetation 259-288 (2017)

Mine sites can be a potential threat to public health due to the risk of polluting nearby groundwater and soils. During the early mining period, mining companies had less strict r... [more]

Mine sites can be a potential threat to public health due to the risk of polluting nearby groundwater and soils. During the early mining period, mining companies had less strict remediation codes than those in place now, and waste material was customarily disposed in heaps (tailings) in the direct vicinity of the mine (Johnson et al. 2016; Pascaud et al. 2015). Once the ore was exhausted, companies either closed down or moved out, many of them leaving their mining waste behind. These abandoned wastes are considered among the worst environmental problems and a serious hazard to ecosystems and human health (Anawar 2015; Fields 2003; Hudson-Edwards et al. 2011). Tailing deposits generated from mining activities pose a potential risk for the soil and aquatic environments through the release of potentially toxic metal(loid)s occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings (Anawar 2015; Hudson-Edwards et al. 2011). Heavy metal(loid)s include both biologically essential (e.g., cobalt [Co], copper [Cu], chromium [Cr], manganese [Mn], and zinc [Zn]) and nonessential (e.g., arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], lead [Pb], and mercury [Hg]) elements. The nonessential elements are highly toxic; however, at excessive concentrations, both groups are toxic to plants, animals, and/or humans (Adriano 2001; Alloway 1990)

DOI 10.1201/9781351247337-15
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Seshadri B, Park JH, Mbene K, Yan Y, Bolan NS, 'Biotransformation of heavy metal(loid)s in relation to the remediation of contaminated soils', Handbook of Metal-Microbe Interactions and Bioremediation 67-86 (2017)

The dynamics of trace elements in soils is dependent on both their physicochemical interactions with inorganic and organic soil constituents and their biological interactions link... [more]

The dynamics of trace elements in soils is dependent on both their physicochemical interactions with inorganic and organic soil constituents and their biological interactions linked to the microbial activities of soil-plant systems. Microorganisms control the transformation (microbial or biotransformation) of trace elements by several mechanisms that include oxidation, reduction, methylation, demethylation, complex formation, and biosorption. Microbial transformation plays a major role in the behavior and fate of toxic elements, especially arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in soils and sediments. Biotransformation processes can alter the speciation and redox state of these elements and hence control their solubility and subsequent mobility. These processes play an important role in the bioavailability, mobility, ecotoxicity, and environmental health of these trace elements. A greater understanding of biotransformation processes is necessary to efficiently manage and utilize them for contaminant removal and to develop in situ bioremediation technologies. In this chapter, the key microbial transformation processes, including biosorption, redox reactions, and methylation/demethylation reactions controlling the fate and behavior of As, Cr, Hg, and Se, are addressed. The factors affecting these processes in relation to the bioavailability and remediation of trace elements in the environment are also examined, and possible future research directions are recommended.

DOI 10.1201/9781315153353
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2016 Niazi NK, Murtaza B, Bibi I, Shahid M, White JC, Nawaz MF, et al., 'Removal and Recovery of Metals by Biosorbents and Biochars Derived From Biowastes', Environmental Materials and Waste: Resource Recovery and Pollution Prevention 149-177 (2016)

The production of biosorbents and biochars from various biowastes (such as the agricultural and food industries and algal and fungal biomass) has received considerable attention b... [more]

The production of biosorbents and biochars from various biowastes (such as the agricultural and food industries and algal and fungal biomass) has received considerable attention because of their potential use in the removal and recovery of elements, such as precious metals and heavy metals from water and wastewater. Recovery of these metals from their aqueous solutions has emerged as an exciting area of research as a result of increasing or fluctuating prices of metals (eg, precious metals), limited availability of their deposits, and the ever-increasing demand and time- and energy-consuming processes needed to mine metal deposits. This review will summarize the various sources of metals, the available biowastes of the agricultural and food industries, and preparation methods for biosorbents and biochars from biowastes. We will focus on metal and heavy metal removal and recovery from waste and wastewater, methods for metal recovery, pretreatment and modification of biosorbents and biochars for enhanced metal sequestration, and strategies to provide stability to biosorbents and biochars to maximize resource recovery.

DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-803837-6.00007-X
Citations Scopus - 25

Journal article (40 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hoang SA, Lamb D, Seshadri B, Sarkar B, Choppala G, Kirkham MB, Bolan NS, 'Rhizoremediation as a green technology for the remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 401 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123282
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
2021 Gerdelidani AF, Towfighi H, Shahbazi K, Lamb DT, Choppala G, Abbasi S, et al., 'Arsenic geochemistry and mineralogy as a function of particle-size in naturally arsenic-enriched soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 403 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123931
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu
2021 Lamb D, Choppala G, Yeasmin M, Abbasi S, Wang L, Naidu R, et al., 'Are root elongation assays suitable for establishing metallic anion ecotoxicity thresholds?', Journal of Hazardous Materials Letters, 2 100024-100024 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.hazl.2021.100024
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Ravi Naidu, Liang Wang
2020 Fazle Bari ASM, Lamb D, Choppala G, Bolan N, Seshadri B, Rahman MA, Rahman MM, 'Geochemical fractionation and mineralogy of metal(loid)s in abandoned mine soils: Insights into arsenic behaviour and implications to remediation', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 399 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123029
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Mahmud Rahman, Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri, Dane Lamb
2019 Burton ED, Choppala G, Vithana CL, Karimian N, Hockmann K, Johnston SG, 'Chromium(VI) formation via heating of Cr(III)-Fe(III)-(oxy)hydroxides: A pathway for fire-induced soil pollution', CHEMOSPHERE, 222 440-444 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.172
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2019 Karimian N, Burton ED, Johnston SG, Hockmann K, Choppala G, 'Humic acid impacts antimony partitioning and speciation during iron(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation', Science of The Total Environment, 683 399-410 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.305
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
2019 Burton ED, Choppala G, Karimian N, Johnston SG, 'A new pathway for hexavalent chromium formation in soil: Fire-induced alteration of iron oxides', ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, 247 618-625 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2019.01.094
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2019 Shilpi S, Lamb D, Bolan N, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Waste to watt: Anaerobic digestion of wastewater irrigated biomass for energy and fertiliser production', Journal of Environmental Management, 239 73-83 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.02.122
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu, Sonia Shilpi
2018 Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Park JH, Bush R, Bolan N, 'Comparative sorption of chromium species as influenced by pH, surface charge and organic matter content in contaminated soils', Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 184 255-260 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2016.07.012
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Balaji Seshadri, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2018 Bibi I, Niazi NK, Choppala G, Burton ED, 'Chromium(VI) removal by siderite (FeCO3) in anoxic aqueous solutions: An X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 640 1424-1431 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.06.003
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
2018 Tripathi N, Choppala G, Singh RS, Hills CD, 'Impact of modified chitosan on pore water bioavailability of zinc in contaminated soils', Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 186 94-99 (2018)

The present work examines the utilisation potential of the bio-waste, chitosan for the remediation of soils contaminated with zinc (Zn). The mechanism involved was elucidated via ... [more]

The present work examines the utilisation potential of the bio-waste, chitosan for the remediation of soils contaminated with zinc (Zn). The mechanism involved was elucidated via a study of Zn sorption kinetics on pure and modified chitosan beads, the latter containing molybdate and phosphate compounds. The effect of equilibration time on adsorption was explained with reference to chemical sorption and intra-particle diffusion mechanisms. The findings showed that chitosan acts upon freely dissolved zinc in soil pore water. The use of modified chitosan beads resulted in a significant decrease in Zn bioavailability, which may be attributed to a combination of Zn complexation, the sorbent's high surface area and cation exchange capacity (CEC). This study provides an insight into issues associated with zinc contaminated soils and the amelioration of nutrient-deficient soil through modified chitosan amendments. Capsule abstract Modified chitosan has potential to remediate Zn-contaminated soil. The bioavailability of zinc in the pore water of contaminated soils decreased upon the application of chitosan beads.

DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2017.12.005
2018 Choppala G, Burton ED, 'Chromium(III) substitution inhibits the Fe(II)-accelerated transformation of schwertmannite', PLOS ONE, 13 (2018)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0208355
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2018 Choppala G, Moon E, Bush R, Bolan N, Carroll N, 'Dissolution and redistribution of trace elements and nutrients during dredging of iron monosulfide enriched sediments', Chemosphere, 201 380-387 (2018) [C1]

The increased use of estuarine waters for commercial and recreational activities is one consequence of urbanisation. Western Australia's Peel-Harvey Estuary highlights the im... [more]

The increased use of estuarine waters for commercial and recreational activities is one consequence of urbanisation. Western Australia's Peel-Harvey Estuary highlights the impacts of urbanisation, with a rapidly developing boating industry and periodic dredging activity. The aim of this research is to evaluate the potential mobility of nutrients and trace elements during dredging, and the influence of flocculation on iron and sulfur partitioning in iron monosulfide enriched sediments. Our findings indicate a short-term increase in nitrate, phosphate and ammonium, during dredging through the resuspension of sediments. However, no increase in metal mobilisation during dredging was observed except copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Flocculant addition increased the release of nutrients, zinc (Zn) and arsenic (As) from sediments, had no effect on acid volatile sulfides and pyritic sulfur, but corresponded with an initial sharp rise in elemental sulfur concentrations. The run-off water from geofabric bags should be treated to decrease the concentrations of Zn and As to their background levels before releases into the estuary. Long-term impact of dredging on organic matter mineralisation and its subsequent effect on nutrients and trace elements dynamics needs further investigation.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.01.164
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2018 Qi F, Lamb D, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Yan Y, Ok YS, et al., 'Cadmium solubility and bioavailability in soils amended with acidic and neutral biochar', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 610 1457-1466 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.228
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Dane Lamb, Fangjie Qi, Nanthi Bolan, Mahmud Rahman, Ravi Naidu
2017 Tripathi N, Choppala G, Singh RS, 'Evaluation of modified chitosan for remediation of zinc contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF GEOCHEMICAL EXPLORATION, 182 180-184 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.gexplo.2016.08.011
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
2017 Qi F, Naidu R, Bolan NS, Dong Z, Yan Y, Lamb D, et al., 'Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils', SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, 586 849-857 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.064
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb, Luchun Duan, Fangjie Qi
2017 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Sanderson P, Wang H, et al., 'Potential value of phosphate compounds in enhancing immobilization and reducing bioavailability of mixed heavy metal contaminants in shooting range soil', Chemosphere, 184 197-206 (2017) [C1]

Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, pa... [more]

Shooting range soils contain mixed heavy metal contaminants including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). Phosphate (P) compounds have been used to immobilize these metals, particularly Pb, thereby reducing their bioavailability. However, research on immobilization of Pb's co-contaminants showed the relative importance of soluble and insoluble P compounds, which is critical in evaluating the overall success of in situ stabilization practice in the sustainable remediation of mixed heavy metal contaminated soils. Soluble synthetic P fertilizer (diammonium phosphate; DAP) and reactive (Sechura; SPR) and unreactive (Christmas Island; CPR) natural phosphate rocks (PR) were tested for Cd, Pb and Zn immobilization and later their mobility and bioavailability in a shooting range soil. The addition of P compounds resulted in the immobilization of Cd, Pb and Zn by 1.56¿76.2%, 3.21¿83.56%, and 2.31¿74.6%, respectively. The reactive SPR significantly reduced Cd, Pb and Zn leaching while soluble DAP increased their leachate concentrations. The SPR reduced the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and Zn in earthworms by 7.13¿23.4% and 14.3¿54.6% in comparison with earthworms in the DAP and control treatment, respectively. Bioaccessible Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations as determined using a simplified bioaccessibility extraction test showed higher long-term stability of P-immobilized Pb and Zn than Cd. The differential effect of P-induced immobilization between P compounds and metals is due to the variation in the solubility characteristics of P compounds and nature of metal phosphate compounds formed. Therefore, Pb and Zn immobilization by P compounds is an effective long-term remediation strategy for mixed heavy metal contaminated soils.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.05.172
Citations Scopus - 66Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Peter Sanderson, Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Seshadri B, Wijesekara H, Bolan NS, Mbene K, Kim W-I, 'Impact of wastewater derived dissolved organic carbon on reduction, mobility, and bioavailability of As(V) and Cr(VI) in contaminated soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, 186 183-191 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.08.020
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Balaji Seshadri
2017 Choppala G, Bush R, Moon E, Ward N, Wang Z, Bolan N, Sullivan L, 'Oxidative transformation of iron monosulfides and pyrite in estuarine sediments: Implications for trace metals mobilisation', Journal of Environmental Management, 186 158-166 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.06.062
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Zhaohui Wang
2017 Bolan S, Kunhikrishnan A, Seshadri B, Choppala G, Naidu R, Bolan NS, et al., 'Sources, distribution, bioavailability, toxicity, and risk assessment of heavy metal(loid)s in complementary medicines', ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 108 103-118 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envint.2017.08.005
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Balaji Seshadri, Ravi Naidu
2016 Lamb DT, Kader M, Wang L, Choppala G, Rahman MM, Megharaj M, Naidu R, 'Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil', ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, 50 13062-13069 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.6b03195
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dane Lamb, Liang Wang, Mahmud Rahman, Megh Mallavarapu
2016 Mandal S, Sarkar B, Bolan N, Novak J, Ok YS, Van Zwieten L, et al., 'Designing advanced biochar products for maximizing greenhouse gas mitigation potential', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 46 1367-1401 (2016) [C1]

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural operations continue to increase. Carbon (C)-enriched char materials like biochar have been described as a mitigation strategy. Uti... [more]

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agricultural operations continue to increase. Carbon (C)-enriched char materials like biochar have been described as a mitigation strategy. Utilization of biochar material as a soil amendment has been demonstrated to provide potentially greater soil GHG suppression due to its interactions in the soil system. However, these effects are variable and the duration of the impact remains uncertain. Various (nano)materials can be used to modify chars to obtain surface functionality to mitigate GHG emissions. This review critically focusses on the innovative methodologies for improving char efficiency, underpinning GHG mitigation and C sequestration.

DOI 10.1080/10643389.2016.1239975
Citations Scopus - 46Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan
2016 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Bush R, 'Differential effect of biochar upon reduction-induced mobility and bioavailability of arsenate and chromate', Chemosphere, 144 374-381 (2016) [C1]

Heavy metals such as chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) occur in ionic form in soil, with chromate [Cr(VI)] and arsenate As(V) being the most pre-dominant forms. The application of bi... [more]

Heavy metals such as chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) occur in ionic form in soil, with chromate [Cr(VI)] and arsenate As(V) being the most pre-dominant forms. The application of biochar to Cr(VI) and As(V) spiked and field contaminated soils was evaluated on the reduction processes [(Cr(VI) to Cr(III)] and [As(V) to As(III))], and subsequent mobility and bioavailability of both As(V) and Cr(VI). The assays used in this study included leaching, soil microbial activity and XPS techniques. The reduction rate of As(V) was lower than that of Cr(VI) with and without biochar addition, however, supplementation with biochar enhanced the reduction process of As(V). Leaching experiments indicated Cr(VI) was more mobile than As(V). Addition of biochar reversed the effect by reducing the mobility of Cr and increasing that of As. The presence of Cr and As in both spiked and contaminated soils reduced microbial activity, but with the addition of biochar to these soils, the microbial activity increased in the Cr(VI) contaminated soils, while it was further decreased with As(V) contaminated soils. The addition of biochar was effective in mitigating Cr toxicity by reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). In contrast, the conversion process of As(V) to As(III) hastened by biochar was not favourable, as As(III) is more toxic in soils. Overall, the presence of functional groups on biochar promotes reduction by providing the electrons required for reduction processes to occur as determined by XPS data.

DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.08.043
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 59
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2016 Tripathi N, Choppala G, Singh RS, Srivastava P, Seshadri B, 'Sorption kinetics of zinc and nickel on modified chitosan', ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT, 188 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10661-016-5499-5
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri
2015 Choppala G, Bolan N, Kunhikrishnan A, Skinner W, Seshadri B, 'Concomitant reduction and immobilization of chromium in relation to its bioavailability in soils', Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 22 8969-8978 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1653-6
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 42
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Lamb DT, Venkatraman K, Bolan N, Ashwath N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Phytocapping: An alternative technology for the sustainable management of landfill sites', Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 44 561-637 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10643389.2012.728823
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Dane Lamb, Nanthi Bolan
2014 Seshadri B, Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Effect of coal combustion products in reducing soluble phosphorus in soil II: Leaching study', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 225 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1777-9
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Balaji Seshadri
2014 Choppala G, Saifullah, Bolan N, Bibi S, Iqbal M, Rengel Z, et al., 'Cellular Mechanisms in Higher Plants Governing Tolerance to Cadmium Toxicity', Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, 33 374-391 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07352689.2014.903747
Citations Scopus - 157Web of Science - 152
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Lamb D, Kunhikrishnan A, 'Comparative sorption and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) species in a range of soils: Implications to bioavailability topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two env... [more]

The sorption of chromium (Cr) species to soil has become the focus of research as it dictates the bioavailability and also the magnitude of toxicity of Cr. The sorption of two environmentally important Cr species [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)] was examined using batch sorption, and the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The effects of soil properties such as pH, CEC, organic matter (OM), clay, water-extractable SO and PO , surface charge, and different iron (Fe) fractions of 12 different Australian representative soils on the sorption, and mobility of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were examined. The amount of sorption as shown by K was higher for Cr(III) than Cr(VI) in all tested soils. Further, the amount of Cr(III) sorbed increased with an increase in pH, CEC, clay, and OM of soils. Conversely, the chemical properties of soil such as positive charge and Fe (crystalline) had a noticeable influence on the sorption of Cr(VI). Desorption of Cr(VI) occurred rapidly and was greater than desorption of Cr(III) in soils. The mobility of Cr species as estimated by the retardation factor was higher for Cr(VI) than for Cr(III) in all tested soils. These results concurred with the results from leaching experiments which showed higher leaching of Cr(VI) than Cr(III) in both acidic and alkaline soils indicating the higher mobility of Cr(VI) in a wide range of soils. This study demonstrated that Cr(VI) is more mobile and will be bioavailable in soils regardless of soil properties and if not remediated may eventually pose a severe threat to biota. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 4 4 f 2- 3-

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1699-6
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2013 Bolan N, Mahimairaja S, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala G, 'Phosphorus-arsenic interactions in variable-charge soils in relation to arsenic mobility and bioavailability', Science of the Total Environment, 463-464 1154-1162 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.04.016
Citations Scopus - 87Web of Science - 81
Co-authors Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Bolan NS, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Park J, Naidu R, 'Microbial Transformation of Trace Elements in Soils in Relation to Bioavailability and Remediation', REVIEWS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY, VOL 225, 225 1-56 (2013)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-6470-9_1
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2013 Seshadri B, Bolan N, Choppala G, Naidu R, 'Differential effect of coal combustion products on the bioavailability of phosphorus between inorganic and organic nutrient sources', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 817-825 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.04.051
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ravi Naidu, Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Seshadri B, 'Chemodynamics of chromium reduction in soils: Implications to bioavailability', JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, 261 718-724 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2013.03.040
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Balaji Seshadri, Nanthi Bolan
2013 Park JH, Choppala G, Lee SJ, Bolan N, Chung JW, Edraki M, 'Comparative sorption of Pb and Cd by biochars and its implication for metal immobilization in soils', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 1-12 (2013)

Biochar has great potential as a soil amendment to immobilize heavymetals, thereby reducing their bioavailability. In this study, biochars derived from chicken manure and green wa... [more]

Biochar has great potential as a soil amendment to immobilize heavymetals, thereby reducing their bioavailability. In this study, biochars derived from chicken manure and green waste were compared with commercial activated carbon (AC) and laboratory produced black carbon (BC) for the sorption of Pb and Cd. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium sorption isotherms for Pb and Cd were obtained for the char materials and the data were fitted to kinetic and sorption isotherm models.. Chicken manure-derived biochar (CM) showed the highest sorption capacity for both Pb and Cd, and the Pb sorption by biochars was higher than the Cd sorption because of the precipitation of Pb with various ions released from the biochars such as carbonate, phosphate, and sulfate. The sorption data for both Pb and Cd were better represented by the pseudo-second order kinetic model than the pseudo-first order kinetic model, which indicates chemical sorption between biochar and metals. For the isotherm studies, char materials was mixed with various amount of Pb or Cd solutions and the remaining metal concentration was measured. The equilibrium sorption data followed a Langmuir isotherm with a maximum sorption capacity of 6.8-11 and 1.7-8.0 mg/g by biochars for Pb and Cd, respectively. Furthermore, CM immobilized Pb and Cd up to 93.5 and 88.4 %, respectively, while BC was not effective in the immobilization of Pb in soil. Overall, the sorption experiments in solution and the immobilization experiment in soil showed that biochars are more effective than AC in the sorption of Pb and Cd, and that they have the potential to be used as a soil amendment to remediate metal-contaminated soil. © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013.

DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1711-1
Citations Scopus - 19
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Park JH, Choppala G, Lee SJ, Bolan N, Chung JW, Edraki M, 'Comparative sorption of Pb and Cd by biochars and its implication for metal immobilization in soils topical collection on remediation of site contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1711-1
Citations Scopus - 72Web of Science - 67
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2013 Panneerselvam P, Choppala G, Kunhikrishnan A, Bolan N, 'Potential of novel bacterial consortium for the remediation of chromium contamination', Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 224 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11270-013-1716-9
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Anitha Kunhikrishnan, Nanthi Bolan
2012 Bolan NS, Kunhikrishnan A, Choppala GK, Thangarajan R, Chung JW, 'Stabilization of carbon in composts and biochars in relation to carbon sequestration and soil fertility', Science of the Total Environment, 424 264-270 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.02.061
Citations Scopus - 95Web of Science - 85
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Anitha Kunhikrishnan
2012 Choppala GK, Bolan NS, Megharaj M, Chen Z, Naidu R, 'The Influence of Biochar and Black Carbon on Reduction and Bioavailability of Chromate in Soils', JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY, 41 1175-1184 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.2134/jeq2011.0145
Citations Scopus - 119Web of Science - 108
Co-authors Megh Mallavarapu, Nanthi Bolan, Zuliang Chen, Ravi Naidu
2011 Park JH, Choppala GK, Bolan NS, Chung JW, Chuasavathi T, 'Biochar reduces the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of heavy metals', Plant and Soil, 348 439-451 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s11104-011-0948-y
Citations Scopus - 648Web of Science - 596
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
2011 Park JH, Lamb D, Paneerselvam P, Choppala G, Bolan N, Chung JW, 'Role of organic amendments on enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils', Journal of Hazardous Materials, 185 549-574 (2011) [C1]

As land application becomes one of the important waste utilization and disposal practices, soil is increasingly being seen as a major source of metal(loid)s reaching food chain, m... [more]

As land application becomes one of the important waste utilization and disposal practices, soil is increasingly being seen as a major source of metal(loid)s reaching food chain, mainly through plant uptake and animal transfer. With greater public awareness of the implications of contaminated soils on human and animal health there has been increasing interest in developing technologies to remediate contaminated sites. Bioremediation is a natural process which relies on soil microorganisms and higher plants to alter metal(loid) bioavailability and can be enhanced by addition of organic amendments to soils. Large quantities of organic amendments, such as manure compost, biosolid and municipal solid wastes are used as a source of nutrients and also as a conditioner to improve the physical properties and fertility of soils. These organic amendments that are low in metal(loid)s can be used as a sink for reducing the bioavailability of metal(loid)s in contaminated soils and sediments through their effect on the adsorption, complexation, reduction and volatilization of metal(loid)s. This review examines the mechanisms for the enhanced bioremediation of metal(loid)s by organic amendments and discusses the practical implications in relation to sequestration and bioavailability of metal(loid)s in soils. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2010.09.082
Citations Scopus - 529Web of Science - 476
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan, Dane Lamb
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Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Choppala G, Bolan N, Park JH, 'Chromium Contamination and Its Risk Management in Complex Environmental Settings (2013) [B1]
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-407686-0.00002-6
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Nanthi Bolan
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 PhD Micronutrient Dynamics Under Climate Change: The Atmosphere-Plant-Soil Nexus PhD (Environment Remediation), College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Girish Choppala

Position

Research Associate
Global Centre for Environmental Remediation
College of Engineering, Science and Environment

Contact Details

Email girish.choppala@newcastle.edu.au
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