Ms Rebecca Hodder

Ms Rebecca Hodder

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Rebecca is a registered psychologist, population health research practitioner and an early career researcher with a Bachelors Degree in Psychology, a Masters in Psychology and is a currently completing a PhD at the University of Newcastle. 

Rebecca has 45 publications, 40 of which are in peer-reviewed journals and 16 of which she is first author. She has published in leading journals such as Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the International Journal of Behavioural Medicine, and published invited submission in a number of journals, including a special edition of Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology journal for low back pain and a special issue on declining youth drinking in the Drug and Alcohol Review.

Rebecca has 223 citations (Google Scholar 4/10/2017), a rate that has tripled over the past 5 years. She has presented her work on more than 20 occasions (14 international conferences) and has already established a successful track record of research funding having been awarded just under $1 million from competitive funding schemes. She has received multiple awards for her work including an Early Career Award from the International Society of Behavioural Medicine.

Rebecca currently supervises 3 PhD students and numerous health service and research staff. She is a member of numerous research groups including the University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour, Hunter New England Population Health Research Group, the Centre for Pain Health and Lifestyle, and the Implementation and Scalability Special Interest Group for the International Behaviour Nutrition and Physical Activity Society. Rebecca holds numerous professional memberships including the Psychology Board of Australia and the Cochrane Living Systematic Review Network). She participates regularly in peer review, including 2017 NHMRC project grant review, grant review panels (PRCHB) and journals such as the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Addiction.

For her PhD Rebecca led a large (>10,000 students) cluster-randomised controlled trial of a school-based resilience intervention to reduce adolescent tobacco, alcohol and illicit substance use which also included assessment of pain outcomes. She was Research and Evaluation Manager on Australia’s largest childhood obesity trial, Good for Kids. Good for Life which has been awarded multiple awards including the National Preventive Health Agency Research Translation Awards and is the basis of NSW child obesity policy. 

Rebecca’s research interests include public health interventions to address preventable risk factors for chronic diseases; understanding the intersection between musculoskeletal pain and health risk behaviours in children and adolescents; the potential for resilience interventions in children and adults, including chronic pain populations; implementation science and the translation of evidence-based guidelines into routine practice; and systematic review approaches and methods, including living systematic reviews. 

Rebecca's current projects include a NHMRC funded musculoskeletal outpatient program at the John Hunter Hospital, aiming to improve disability and reduce tobacco use for low back pain patients awaiting orthopaedic consultations via the implementation of a healthy lifestyle program; an evaluation of a state-wide substance use prevention program in NSW primary schools; and a pilot program utilising Cochrane Collaboration ‘next generation’ evidence systems to transition an existing Cochrane Review she leads into living mode.

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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 McLaren N, Kamper SJ, Hodder RK, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, et al., 'Increased Substance Use and Poorer Mental Health in Adolescents With Problematic Musculoskeletal Pain', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 47 705-711 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2017.7441
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Williams CM, Gilligan C, Regan T, Daly J, et al., 'Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectiv... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectives of this review are to assess the following, across community, healthcare or other settings. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling delivered individually or to a group for increasing smoking cessation. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling on increasing the number of quit attempts. The effect of real-time video counselling on intervention adherence and duration of consultations. The effect of real-time video counselling on satisfaction, including ease of use. The effect of real-time video counselling on therapeutic alliance. To provide a brief economic commentary of real-time video counselling.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012659
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, Timothy Regan, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers
2017 Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, 'Comparison of online and paper survey participation rates in a child health survey by parents of secondary school students', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 41 547-548 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12682
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2017 Nathan N, Elton B, Babic M, McCarthy N, Sutherland R, Presseau J, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of physical activity policies in schools: A systematic review', Preventive Medicine, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.012
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, O'Brien KM, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub3
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Erica James, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Kate Bartlem, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal intervention targeting student resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents', Journal of Adolescence, 57 74-89 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approa... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach for reducing mental health problems in adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal, school-based intervention targeting resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 20 intervention and 12 control secondary schools located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas of NSW, Australia. Data were collected from 3115 students at baseline (Grade 7, 2011), of whom 2149 provided data at follow up (Grade 10, 2014; enrolments in Grades 7 to 10 typically aged 12¿16 years; 50% male; 69.0% retention). There were no significant differences between groups at follow-up for three mental health outcomes: total SDQ, internalising problems, and prosocial behaviour. A small statistically significant difference in favour of the control group was found for externalising problems. Findings highlight the continued difficulties in developing effective, school-based prevention programs for mental health problems in adolescents. Trial registration ANZCTR (Ref no: ACTRN12611000606987).

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.03.009
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, Kamper SJ, Lee H, Williams A, O'Brien KM, Williams CM, 'Developing implementation science to improve the translation of research to address low back pain: A critical review', Best Practice and Research: Clinical Rheumatology, 30 1050-1073 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.05.002
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2017 Thomas J, Noel-Storr A, Marshall I, Wallace B, McDonald S, Mavergames C, et al., 'Living systematic reviews: 2. Combining human and machine effort', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 91 31-37 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors New approaches to evidence synthesis, which use human effort and machine automation in mutually reinforcing ways, can enhance the feasibility and sustainabilit... [more]

© 2017 The Authors New approaches to evidence synthesis, which use human effort and machine automation in mutually reinforcing ways, can enhance the feasibility and sustainability of living systematic reviews. Human effort is a scarce and valuable resource, required when automation is impossible or undesirable, and includes contributions from online communities (¿crowds¿) as well as more conventional contributions from review authors and information specialists. Automation can assist with some systematic review tasks, including searching, eligibility assessment, identification and retrieval of full-text reports, extraction of data, and risk of bias assessment. Workflows can be developed in which human effort and machine automation can each enable the other to operate in more effective and efficient ways, offering substantial enhancement to the productivity of systematic reviews. This paper describes and discusses the potential¿and limitations¿of new ways of undertaking specific tasks in living systematic reviews, identifying areas where these human/machine ¿technologies¿ are already in use, and where further research and development is needed. While the context is living systematic reviews, many of these enabling technologies apply equally to standard approaches to systematic reviewing.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.011
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2017 Akl EA, Meerpohl JJ, Elliott J, Kahale LA, Schünemann HJ, Agoritsas T, et al., 'Living systematic reviews: 4. Living guideline recommendations', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 91 47-53 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. While it is important for the evidence supporting practice guidelines to be current, that is often not the case. The advent of living systematic reviews has ... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. While it is important for the evidence supporting practice guidelines to be current, that is often not the case. The advent of living systematic reviews has made the concept of ¿living guidelines¿ realistic, with the promise to provide timely, up-to-date and high-quality guidance to target users. We define living guidelines as an optimization of the guideline development process to allow updating individual recommendations as soon as new relevant evidence becomes available. A major implication of that definition is that the unit of update is the individual recommendation and not the whole guideline. We then discuss when living guidelines are appropriate, the workflows required to support them, the collaboration between living systematic reviews and living guideline teams, the thresholds for changing recommendations, and potential approaches to publication and dissemination. The success and sustainability of the concept of living guideline will depend on those of its major pillar, the living systematic review. We conclude that guideline developers should both experiment with and research the process of living guidelines.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.009
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2017 Simmonds M, Salanti G, McKenzie J, Elliott J, Agoritsas T, Hilton J, et al., 'Living systematic reviews: 3. Statistical methods for updating meta-analyses', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 91 38-46 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. A living systematic review (LSR) should keep the review current as new research evidence emerges. Any meta-analyses included in the review will also need upd... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. A living systematic review (LSR) should keep the review current as new research evidence emerges. Any meta-analyses included in the review will also need updating as new material is identified. If the aim of the review is solely to present the best current evidence standard meta-analysis may be sufficient, provided reviewers are aware that results may change at later updates. If the review is used in a decision-making context, more caution may be needed. When using standard meta-analysis methods, the chance of incorrectly concluding that any updated meta-analysis is statistically significant when there is no effect (the type I error) increases rapidly as more updates are performed. Inaccurate estimation of any heterogeneity across studies may also lead to inappropriate conclusions. This paper considers four methods to avoid some of these statistical problems when updating meta-analyses: two methods, that is, law of the iterated logarithm and the Shuster method control primarily for inflation of type I error and two other methods, that is, trial sequential analysis and sequential meta-analysis control for type I and II errors (failing to detect a genuine effect) and take account of heterogeneity. This paper compares the methods and considers how they could be applied to LSRs.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.008
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2017 Elliott JH, Synnot A, Turner T, Simmonds M, Akl EA, McDonald S, et al., 'Living systematic review: 1. Introduction¿the why, what, when, and how', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 91 23-30 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a nov... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Systematic reviews are difficult to keep up to date, but failure to do so leads to a decay in review currency, accuracy, and utility. We are developing a novel approach to systematic review updating termed ¿Living systematic review¿ (LSR): systematic reviews that are continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available. LSRs may be particularly important in fields where research evidence is emerging rapidly, current evidence is uncertain, and new research may change policy or practice decisions. We hypothesize that a continual approach to updating will achieve greater currency and validity, and increase the benefits to end users, with feasible resource requirements over time.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.08.010
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'Systematic review of universal school-based ¿resilience¿ interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use: A meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 100 248-268 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous syst... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous systematic reviews have not examined the effectiveness of such an intervention approach. A systematic review was undertaken to 1) assess whether universal school-based ¿resilience¿ interventions are effective in reducing the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use by adolescents, and 2) describe such effectiveness per intervention characteristic subgroups. Eligible studies were peer-reviewed reports (1994¿2015) of randomised controlled trials including participants aged 5¿18¿years that reported adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use, and implemented a universal school-based ¿resilience¿ intervention (i.e. those addressing both individual (e.g. self-esteem) and environmental (e.g. school connectedness) protective factors of resilience). Trial effects for binary outcomes were synthesised via meta-analyses and effect sizes reported as odds ratios. Subgroup (by intervention type, prevention approach, setting, intervention duration, follow-up length) and sensitivity analyses (excluding studies at high risk of bias) were conducted. Nineteen eligible studies were identified from 16,619 records (tobacco: n¿=¿15, alcohol: n¿=¿17, illicit: n¿=¿11). An overall intervention effect was found for binary measures of illicit substance use (n¿=¿10; OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.6¿0.93, p¿=¿0.007,Tau 2 ¿=¿0.0, I 2 ¿=¿0%), but not tobacco or alcohol use. A similar result was found when studies assessed as high risk of bias were excluded. Overall intervention effects were evident for illicit substance use within multiple intervention characteristic subgroups, but not tobacco and alcohol. Such results support the implementation of universal school-based interventions that address ¿resilience¿ protective factors to reduce adolescent illicit substance use, however suggest alternate approaches are required for tobacco and alcohol use. PROSPERO registration: CRD42014004906.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal resilience intervention in reducing tobacco, alcohol and illicit substance use in a population of adolescents: cluster-randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016060
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, et al., 'Systematic Review of Universal Resilience-Focused Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 56 813-824 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems ... [more]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems in children and adolescents. Method Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of universal, school-based interventions that included strategies to strengthen a minimum of 3 internal resilience protective factors, and included an outcome measure of mental health problems in children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years. Six databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Results were pooled in meta-analyses by mental health outcome (anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, hyperactivity, conduct problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress), for all trials (5-18 years). Subgroup analyses were conducted by age (child: 5-10 years; adolescent: 11-18 years), length of follow-up (short: post-=12 months; long: > 12 months), and gender (narrative). Results A total of 57 included trials were identified from 5,984 records, with 49 contributing to meta-analyses. For all trials, resilience-focused interventions were effective relative to a control in reducing 4 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. For child trials (meta-analyses for 6 outcomes), interventions were effective for anxiety symptoms and general psychological distress. For adolescent trials (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. For short-term follow-up, interventions were effective for 2 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. For long-term follow-up (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. Conclusion The findings may suggest most promise for using universal resilience-focused interventions at least for short-term reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms for children and adolescents, particularly if a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based approach is used. The limited number of trials providing data amenable for meta-analysis for some outcomes and subgroups, the variability of interventions, study quality, and bias mean that it is not possible to draw more specific conclusions. Identifying what intervention qualities (such as number and type of protective factor) achieve the greatest positive effect per mental health problem outcome remains an important area for future research. Systematic review protocol and registration Systematic Review of Universal Resilience Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting; http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6; PROSPERO CRD42015025908.

DOI 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.780
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, Christopher Oldmeadow, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2017 Lee H, Wiggers J, Kamper SJ, Williams A, O'Brien KM, Hodder RK, et al., 'Mechanism evaluation of a lifestyle intervention for patients with musculoskeletal pain who are overweight or obese: protocol for a causal mediation analysis', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-014652
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2016 Kingsland M, Wiggers JH, Vashum KP, Hodder RK, Wolfenden L, 'Interventions in sports settings to reduce risky alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm: a systematic review.', Systematic reviews, 5 12 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-016-0183-y
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Lee H, Mansell G, McAuley JH, Kamper SJ, Hübscher M, Moseley GL, et al., 'Causal mechanisms in the clinical course and treatment of back pain.', Best practice & research. Clinical rheumatology, 30 1074-1083 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.berh.2017.04.001
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Gilligan C, Wolfenden L, Foxcroft DR, Kingsland M, Williams AJ, Hodder RK, et al., 'Family-based prevention programs for alcohol use in young people', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2016 (2016)

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness of universal, selective ... [more]

© 2016 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness of universal, selective and indicated family-based prevention programs in preventing alcohol use, or problem drinking, in school-aged children (up to 18 years of age). Specifically, on these outcomes, the review aims: To assess the effectiveness of universal family-based prevention programs for all children up to 18 years ('universal interventions'). To assess the effectiveness of selective family-based prevention programs for children up to 18 years at elevated risk of alcohol use or problem drinking ('selective interventions'). To assess the effectiveness of indicated family-based prevention programs for children up to 18 years currently consuming alcohol ('indicated interventions').

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012287
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Conor Gilligan
2016 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Hodder R, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, 'Mental health problems in a regional population of Australian adolescents: association with socio-demographic characteristics', Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 10 32-43 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0120-9
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon
2015 Dray J, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal resilience interventions targeting child and adolescent mental health in the school setting: Review protocol', Systematic Reviews, (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience m... [more]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience may act as a protective mechanism towards the development of mental health problems. Resilience refers to the ability to employ a collection of protective factors to return to or maintain positive mental health following disadvantage or adversity. Schools represent a potential setting within which protective factors of all children and adolescents may be fostered through resilience-focussed interventions. Despite this potential, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. The objective of the present review is to assess the effects of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions, relative to a comparison group, on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. Methods/design: Eligible studies will be randomised (including cluster-randomised) controlled trials of universal interventions explicitly described as resilience-focussed or comprising strategies to strengthen a minimum of three internal protective factors, targeting children aged 5 to 18 years, implemented within schools, and reporting a mental health outcome. Screening for studies will be conducted across six electronic databases: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Two reviewers will retrieve eligible articles, assess risk of bias, and extract data. Where studies are sufficiently homogenous and reported outcomes are amenable for pooled synthesis, meta-analysis will be performed. Narrative description will be used to synthesise trial outcome data where data cannot be combined or heterogeneity exists. Discussion: This review will aid in building an evidence base for the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions and in doing so provide an opportunity to better inform the development of interventions to potentially prevent mental health problems in child and adolescent populations. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015025908

DOI 10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2015 Williams C, Nathan N, Wyse R, yoong S, delaney T, Wiggers JH, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease (protocol)', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (2015)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2014 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, 'Improving adolescent mental health and resilience through a resilience-based intervention in schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 289 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-289
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug use: review protocol.', BMJ Open, 4 e004718 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004718
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman
2013 Bell AC, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Coggan L, Young K, Fitzgerald M, et al., 'Harnessing the power of advertising to prevent childhood obesity', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-114
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2012 Wolfenden L, Wyse RJ, Britton BI, Campbell KJ, Hodder RK, Stacey FG, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged 5 years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub2
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Erica James, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse
2012 Hodder RK, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wye PM, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use in secondary school students: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 12 1009 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Hodder RK, Daly JB, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Hazell T, Wiggers JH, 'A school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and marijuana use in high school students', BMC Public Health, 11 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-722
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2009 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: A guide for researchers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 270-275 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00387.x
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Luke Wolfenden
Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, Wyse RJ, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease.', Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 11 CD011677
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677.pub2
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Christopher M Williams, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden
Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Association between adolescent tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use and individual and environmental resilience protective factors.', BMJ Open, 6 e012688 [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012688
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Exploring the Potential Effectiveness of a School-based Intervention on Mental Health Problems and Resilience in Australian Adolescents', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2017)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Hodder R, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Investigating Differences in Prevalence of Risk of Current Mental Health Problems of Australian Adolescents by Socio-demographic Characteristic', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2017)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder R, et al., 'Systematic review of the effect of school-based, resilience-focussed interventions on child and adolescent mental health', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2016)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem
2016 Hodder RK, Freund N, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'ARE UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTIONS EFFECTIVE IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT SUBSTANCE USE? RESULTS FROM A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A SCHOOL-BASED PROTECTIVE FACTOR INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia
2016 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Dray J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS OF A UNIVERSAL SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTION IN REDUCING ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT SUBSTANCE USE WITHIN STUDENT SUBGROUPS: EXPLORATORY ASSESSMENT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, John Attia
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'ADOLESCENT TOBACCO, ALCOHOL AND ILLICIT DRUG USE: DOES RESILIENCE MATTER?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Brainerd, MN (2014)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2014 Dray J, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Wollenden L, et al., 'MENTAL HEALTH AND RESILIENCE IN ADOLESCENCE: A RESILIENCE-BASED INTERVENTION', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2014)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2014 Dray J, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Mental Health and Resilience in Adolescence: A resilience-based intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203., Groningen, The Netherlands (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
2014 Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Hodder R, Wiggers J, Gillham K, Gillham K, 'The Mental Health of Adolescents: What Differences Exist?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203., Groningen, The Netherlands (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $27,885

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $27,885

RWJF Living Systematic Review pilot study$27,885

Funding body: The Cochrane Collaboration

Funding body The Cochrane Collaboration
Project Team Ms Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Luke Wolfenden
Scheme Cochrane Evidence Crowds & Machine Reading
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701200
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.25

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Prognosis and Management of Musculoskeletal Pain and Health Behavioural Risks in Adolescents. PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Telephone-based weight management for patients with osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Ms Rebecca Hodder

Position

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email rebecca.hodder@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6297

Office

Room 1190
Building Booth Building, Wallsend Campus
Location Hunter New England Population Health, Longworth Avenue Wallsend NSW 2287

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