Mr Matthew Mclaughlin

Mr Matthew Mclaughlin

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Physical activity, it's more than an individuals choice.

His research and advocacy for physical activity is helping to improve the opportunities and places for us to get active. That's good not just for our health, but also global wealth.  

Physical activity is a best-buy for governments around the world. Not only does it improve population health, it's good for the economy too. 

Matthew 'Tepi' Mclaughlin is a passionate advocate for physical activity. Tepi's research and advocacy acknowledges that there is no single solution to getting people to be more active. Physical activity is more than an individuals choice, the places we live, who we socialise with, and the opportunities we have access to, all play a role in how active we'll be. 

Tepi's currently finishing up a PhD (due to complete in 2021) at the University of Newcastle. Tepi's PhD work is embedded within the Government Health Service, as a research-practice partnership that is designed to accelerate the translation of research into practice. As one of #8Investments that work for physical activity, Tepi is exploring ways to scale-up effective school-based efforts to increase teenagers physical activity.  You can read more about that work, in plain language and as scientific output, here

Advocating in the media

Are you a journalist looking to engage with Tepi on a story? As a passionate advocate and articulate writer, Tepi would be more than happy to speak to you. His areas of interest span exercise, cycling, walking, sport, obesity and anything else that involves movement of the body!

As a snapshot of his recent media work, Tepi has spoken on the radio, written for the Conversation and the regional newspaper. Especially passionate about how the design of cities and transport networks influence our health. 

Tepi is very active on Twitter (@HealthTepi), reach out!


A bit more about Tepi

Tepi has authored 10 publications in scientific journals and holds a board position on the International Society for Physical Activity and Health.

Tepi is a local advocate for better infrastructure for cycling and walking, as a member of Newcastle Cycleways Movement. 

In 2017, Tepi completed his Sport and Exercise Science BSc (Hons) at Loughborough University. Tepi explored Australia for a year while on study exchange at the University of Western Australia. 


Keywords

  • Children and Adolescents
  • Dissemination
  • Health
  • Health Promotion
  • Implementation
  • Obesity
  • Physical Activity
  • Population Health
  • Preventative Medicine
  • Public Health
  • Scale-up
  • Scaling
  • Sedentary Behaviour

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Professional Experience

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
28/11/2019 -  Secretary Newcastle Cycleways Movement
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2018 - 1/10/2020 Chair of the Early Career Network The International Society for Physical Activity and Health
Australia
15/8/2017 -  Research Assistant The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/9/2016 - 1/9/2017 Research Assistant Loughborough University
School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
United Kingdom

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
5/2/2019 -  Tutor School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia
Health and Physical Education
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PUBH1010 Public Health
University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/4/2019 - 30/4/2019
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Wyse R, Jackson JK, Delaney T, Grady A, Stacey F, Wolfenden L, et al., 'The effectiveness of interventions delivered using digital food environments to encourage healthy food choices: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

Digital food environments are now commonplace across many food service and retail set-tings, influencing how the population orders and accesses foods. As such, digital food enviro... [more]

Digital food environments are now commonplace across many food service and retail set-tings, influencing how the population orders and accesses foods. As such, digital food environments represent a novel platform to deliver strategies to improve public health nutrition. The purpose of this review was to explore the impact of dietary interventions embedded within online food ordering systems, on user selection and purchase of healthier foods and beverages. A systematic search of eight electronic databases and grey literature sources was conducted up to October 2020. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials and controlled trials, designed to encourage the selection and purchase of healthier products and/or discourage the selection and purchase of less-healthy products using strategies delivered via real-world online food ordering systems. A total of 9441 articles underwent title and abstract screening, 140 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and 11 articles were included in the review. Meta-analysis of seven studies indicated that interventions delivered via online food ordering systems are effective in reducing the energy content of online food purchases (standardized mean difference (SMD): -0.34, p = 0.01). Meta-analyses including three studies each suggest that these interventions may also be effective in reducing the fat (SMD: -0.83, p = 0.04), saturated fat (SMD: -0.7, p = 0.008) and sodium content (SMD: -0.43, p = 0.01) of online food purchases. Given the ongoing growth in the use of online food ordering systems, future research to determine how we can best utilize these systems to support public health nutrition is warranted.

DOI 10.3390/nu13072255
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden, Courtney Barnes
2021 Shilton T, Mclaughlin M, Reece L, Foster C, Milton K, Chalkley A, et al., 'Infographic. ISPAH's Eight Investments That Work for Physical Activity: infographic, animation and call to action', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 55 759-760 (2021)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2020-103635
Citations Web of Science - 1
2021 Ooi JY, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, Nathan N, Oldmeadow C, Mclaughlin M, et al., 'A Systematic Review of the Recent Consumption Levels of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages in Children and Adolescents From the World Health Organization Regions With High Dietary-Related Burden of Disease.', Asia Pac J Public Health, 10105395211014642 (2021)
DOI 10.1177/10105395211014642
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alix Hall, Courtney Barnes
2021 Mclaughlin M, Delaney T, Hall A, Byaruhanga J, Mackie P, Grady A, et al., 'Associations Between Digital Health Intervention Engagement, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.', J Med Internet Res, 23 e23180 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/23180
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alix Hall, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Rachel Sutherland, Kathryn L Reilly
2021 Mclaughlin M, Duff J, McKenzie T, Campbell E, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Evaluating Digital Program Support for the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) School Program: Mixed Methods Study.', JMIR Pediatr Parent, 4 e26690 (2021)
DOI 10.2196/26690
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jed Duff
2021 Milton K, Cavill N, Chalkley A, Foster C, Gomersall S, Hagstromer M, et al., 'Eight Investments That Work for Physical Activity.', J Phys Act Health, 18 625-630 (2021)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2021-0112
Citations Scopus - 1
2021 Delaney T, McLaughlin M, Hall A, Yoong SL, Brown A, O brien K, et al., 'Associations between digital health intervention engagement and dietary intake: A systematic review', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in... [more]

There has been a proliferation of digital health interventions (DHIs) targeting dietary in-take. Despite their potential, the effectiveness of DHIs are thought to be dependent, in part, on user engagement. However, the relationship between engagement and the effectiveness of dietary DHIs is not well understood. The aim of this review is to describe the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake. A systematic search of four electronic databases and grey literature for records published before December 2019 was conducted. Studies were eligible if they examined a quantitative association between objective measures of engagement with a DHI (subjective experience or usage) and measures of dietary intake in adults (aged = 18 years). From 10,653 citations, seven studies were included. Five studies included usage measures of engagement and two examined subjective experiences. Narrative synthesis, using vote counting, found mixed evidence of an association with usage measures (5 of 12 associations indicated a positive relationship, 7 were in-conclusive) and no evidence regarding an association with subjective experience (both studies were inconclusive). The findings provide early evidence supporting an association between measures of usage and dietary intake; however, this was inconsistent. Further research examining the association between DHI engagement and dietary intake is warranted.

DOI 10.3390/nu13093281
Co-authors Courtney Barnes, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray, Rachel Sutherland, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Jenna Hollis
2020 Byaruhanga J, Atorkey P, McLaughlin M, Brown A, Byrnes E, Paul C, et al., 'Effectiveness of individual real-time video counseling on smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity, and obesity health risks: Systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 1-17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/18621
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis, Prince Atorkey Uon, John Wiggers, Emma Byrnes
2020 Mclaughlin M, Duff J, Sutherland R, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Wiggers J, 'Protocol for a mixed methods process evaluation of a hybrid implementation-effectiveness trial of a scaled-up whole-school physical activity program for adolescents: Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1)', TRIALS, 21 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-020-4187-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jed Duff, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers
2020 Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of technology-enabled knowledge translation strategies in improving the use of research in public health: Systematic review', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 22 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/17274
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Courtney Barnes, Rebecca Hodder
2020 Mclaughlin M, Atkin AJ, Starr L, Hall A, Wolfenden L, Sutherland R, et al., 'Worldwide surveillance of self-reported sitting time: a scoping review.', The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01008-4
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Sutherland R, Campbell E, McLaughlin M, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Lubans DR, et al., 'Scale-up of the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) intervention in secondary schools: 12-month implementation outcomes from a cluster randomized controlled trial.', Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act, 17 100 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01000-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Lubans, Rachel Sutherland, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan, Andrew Searles, Luke Wolfenden, Jenna Hollis, Christopher Oldmeadow, Nicole Nathan
2019 Direito A, Murphy JJ, McLaughlin M, Mair J, Mackenzie K, Kamada M, et al., 'Early career professionals (researchers, practitioners, and policymakers) role in advocating, disseminating, and implementing the global action plan on physical activity: ISPAH early career network view', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 16 940-944 (2019) [C1]

Increasing population levels of physical activity (PA) can assist in achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals, benefiting multiple sectors and contributing to gl... [more]

Increasing population levels of physical activity (PA) can assist in achieving the United Nations sustainable development goals, benefiting multiple sectors and contributing to global prosperity. Practices and policies to increase PA levels exist at the subnational, national, and international levels. In 2018, the World Health Organization launched the first Global Action Plan on Physical Activity (GAPPA). The GAPPA provides guidance through a framework of effective and feasible policy actions for increasing PA, and requires engagement and advocacy from a wide spectrum of stakeholders for successful implementation of the proposed actions. Early career professionals, including researchers, practitioners, and policymakers, can play a major role with helping ¿all people being regularly active¿ by contributing to 4 overarching areas: (1) generation¿of evidence, (2) dissemination¿of key messages and evidence, (3) implementation¿of the evidence-based actions proposed in the GAPPA, and (4) contributing to advocacy for robust national action plans on PA. The contribution of early career professionals can be achieved through 5 pathways: (1) research, (2) workplace/practice, (3) business, (4) policy, and (5) professional and public opinion. Recommendations of how early career professionals can contribute to the generation, dissemination, and implementation of the evidence and actions proposed by the GAPPA are provided.

DOI 10.1123/jpah.2019-0450
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland
2019 Sutherland R, Campbell E, Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Lubans DR, Morgan PJ, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of physical activity practices in secondary schools: study protocol for scaling up the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) program', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 19 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-019-6965-0
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Andrew Searles, David Lubans, Christopher Oldmeadow, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers
Brown A, Barnes C, Byaruhanga J, McLaughlin M, Hodder RK, Booth D, et al., 'Effectiveness of Technology-Enabled Knowledge Translation Strategies in Improving the Use of Research in Public Health: Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.17274
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Courtney Barnes, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder
Byaruhanga J, Atorkey P, McLaughlin M, Brown A, Byrnes E, Paul C, et al., 'Effectiveness of Individual Real-Time Video Counseling on Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical Activity, and Obesity Health Risks: Systematic Review (Preprint)
DOI 10.2196/preprints.18621
Co-authors Chris Paul, Prince Atorkey Uon, John Wiggers, Emma Byrnes
Show 13 more journal articles

Other (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
Mclaughlin M, Duff J, McKenzie T, Campbell E, Sutherland R, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Evaluating Digital Program Support for the Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1) School Program: Mixed Methods Study (Preprint)', JMIR Publications Inc. [O1]
DOI 10.2196/preprints.26690
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rachel Sutherland, Jed Duff
Mclaughlin M, Campbell E, Sutherland R, McKenzie T, Davies L, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, 'Extent, Type and Reasons for Adaptation and Modification When Scaling-Up an Effective Physical Activity Program: Physical Activity 4 Everyone (PA4E1)', Research Square Platform LLC [O1]
DOI 10.21203/rs.3.rs-519998/v1
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $16,500

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20194 grants / $11,670

Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour $4,940

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
Scheme Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour 2019 | Small Grant Funds$4,940

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour
Scheme Small Grant Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The International Society for Physical Activity and Health$1,490

Funding body: The International Society for Physical Activity and Health

Funding body The International Society for Physical Activity and Health
Project Team

Direito, A, Murphy, J, Mclaughlin, M, Mair, J, Mackenzie, K, Kamada, M, Sutherland, R, Montgomery, S, Shilton,

Scheme Open Access
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON N

Hunter Cancer Research Alliance 2019$300

Awarded to attend ISBNPA 2019.

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Scheme Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON N

20182 grants / $4,830

Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour$4,580

For travel to and from the ISPAH conference to present work relating to scaling up efficacious interventions.

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (CHB)
Scheme Conference and Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Hunter Cancer Research Alliance 2018$250

Awarded to attend ISBNPA 2018, Hong Kong.

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Scheme Conference Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N
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Mr Matthew Mclaughlin

Contact Details

Email matthew.mclaughlin@uon.edu.au
Link Twitter
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