Dr Heidi Turon

Dr Heidi Turon

Senior Research Assistant

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Heidi Turon is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Newcastle, working within Population Health in the Hunter New England Local Health District. Her current research work is in chronic disease prevention examining the effectiveness of obesity prevention and workplace based programs. She is also collaborating on a number of knowledge translation research initiatives through her involvement with the National Centre of Implementation Science (NCOIS). Dr Turon spent a number of years with the Health Behaviour Research Collaborative, where she managed several state and nation-wide studies investigating psychosocial wellbeing in oncology patients. She also oversaw a large cluster RCT aimed at improving organ donation registration rates amongst vocational education students. More recently, she co-ordinated a CCNSW-funded systems based trial aiming to improve the quality of patient-centred psychosocial care in oncology treatment centres.  

Qualifications

  • PhD (Psychology - Science), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Cancer Control
  • Chronic Disease Prevention
  • Implementation Science
  • Patient-centred Care
  • Psychology
  • Public Health
  • Quality of Care

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420312 Implementation science and evaluation 30
420699 Public health not elsewhere classified 20
420603 Health promotion 50
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (36 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Turon H, Hill D, Watson R, Hobden B, Millar J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'A patient-centred approach to determine optimal supportive care across the cancer trajectory: a cross-sectional study.', Eur J Cancer Care (Engl), e13455 (2021)
DOI 10.1111/ecc.13455
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2021 Clinton-McHarg T, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Butler M, Lindeman R, 'Are the Physical Environments of Treatment Centres Meeting Recommendations for Patient-Centred Care? Perceptions of Haematological Cancer Patients', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18094892
Co-authors Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2020 Turon H, Wall L, Fakes K, Brown SD, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Cancer patient preferences for the provision of information regarding emotional concerns in relation to medical procedures: A discrete choice experiment', Patient Education and Counseling, 103 1439-1443 (2020) [C1]

Objective: To explore the preferences of people with cancer regarding the timing and format of information provision about emotional concerns that may occur when undergoing medica... [more]

Objective: To explore the preferences of people with cancer regarding the timing and format of information provision about emotional concerns that may occur when undergoing medical procedures. Methods: Eligible cancer survivors were mailed a survey containing discrete choice scenarios examining their timing and format preferences for information about potential emotional concerns associated with an upcoming hypothetical medical procedure. Results: Of 356 eligible patients, 271 (76 %) completed the survey. Both face-to-face discussion and written materials were preferred as the mode of information delivery over access to a website. In order of descending preference, participants preferred to receive the information 1 week, 3 days and the day of the procedure. There were no differences in preferences for timing or format between subgroups based on age, gender, education and cancer type. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that cancer patients prefer receiving information about emotional concerns that might be experienced as part of a medical procedure in either written or via face-to-face format, and one week before the procedure. Practice Implications: In order to provide patient-centred care, clinicians and the healthcare system more broadly should consider patient preferences for information delivery about upcoming medical procedures. Information: preparation for medical procedures; discrete choice; oncology; patient preference; emotional response.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2020.02.015
Co-authors Laura Wall, Scott Brown, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Kristy Fakes
2020 Waller A, Hobden B, Bryant J, Shepherd J, Turon H, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Nurses perceptions of open disclosure processes in cancer care: a cross-sectional study', Collegian, 27 506-511 (2020) [C1]

Background: Despite their central role in patient care, few studies have explored cancer nurses¿ perspectives about errors within the health care system. Aims: To determine in a s... [more]

Background: Despite their central role in patient care, few studies have explored cancer nurses¿ perspectives about errors within the health care system. Aims: To determine in a sample of cancer nurses the: (1) perceived accuracy of patient-reported health care error rates in medical oncology and haematology care; (2) extent to which nurses¿ perceive the health care system responds to errors in accord with best-practice disclosure standards; and (3) association between perceived barriers to disclosure of errors and years of experience, number of errors in previous six months and nursing role. Methods: Cross-sectional online survey of members of an oncology nursing society and/or registered or enrolled nurses employed in an oncology setting. Descriptive statistics including frequencies and proportions were calculated for all variables, and chi-square/Fisher's exact test was used to explore the association between perceived barriers to disclosure and several predictor variables. Findings: Ninety-seven nurses across the two cohorts completed the survey. Across the two cohorts, 36% and 27% of nurses perceived medical oncology and haematology patient-reported error rates to be accurate, respectively. Sixty-six percent agreed data should be routinely collected from patients; and 90% agreed data should be reported back to treatment centres. Nurses perceived patients were ¿always¿: given an apology (24%); able to ask questions (20%), told steps taken to prevent future errors (18%), told about errors when they happened (16%) and given honest explanations (17%). Barriers to error disclosure included burden of reporting (75%), fear career damage (74%), lack institutional support (65%), fear legal action (64%), no patient harm (58%) and not nurses¿ responsibility (27%). Discussion: Nurses did not consistently agree that previously-reported patient-reported error rates were accurate. Nurses agreed patient-reported data on health care error rates should be collected and fed back to treatment centres and that there is room for improvement with regard to adherence to open disclosure standards. Conclusion: System-level strategies are required to overcome barriers to disclosure.

DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2020.02.001
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Amy Waller, Bree Hobden, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2020 Sanson-Fisher RW, Hobden BT, Carey ML, Turon HE, Waller AE, Proietto AM, 'The System for Patient Assessment of Cancer Experiences (SPACE): a cross-sectional study examining feasibility and acceptability', Supportive Care in Cancer, 28 1737-1745 (2020) [C1]

Background: Continuous quality improvement in cancer care relies on the collection of accurate data on the quality of care provided. It is suggested that such an approach should: ... [more]

Background: Continuous quality improvement in cancer care relies on the collection of accurate data on the quality of care provided. It is suggested that such an approach should: (i) measure the patient¿s care experience throughout the cancer trajectory; (ii) use items and response scales that measure concrete and specific aspects of care; (iii) minimise recall bias; (iv) minimise the burden placed on patients for providing data; (v) minimise administrative burden; and (vi) collect actionable data. The System for Patient Assessment of Cancer Experiences (SPACE) was developed to meet these objectives. This study describes the feasibility and acceptability of the SPACE in a sample of oncology outpatients. Methods: The SPACE was examined in four medical oncology centres. Adult patients were approached by a research assistant prior to their scheduled consultation. Consenting participants completed the SPACE on a computer tablet. Items were tailored to the patient¿s cancer treatment phase. Results: Of the eligible participants, 1143 consented (83%) and 1056 completed the survey (92%). The average time taken to complete the survey was 6¿min 28¿s. A large proportion of the sample indicated that the survey was acceptable (88¿93% across three acceptability items). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the SPACE can be feasibly administered each time a patient comes to the oncology unit and is acceptable to patients. The SPACE could be used to quantify the care experiences which patients receive during their cancer care. The resulting data could be used to set benchmarks and improve the performance of cancer clinics.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-019-04943-6
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden, Amy Waller, Mariko Carey
2020 Hobden B, Turon H, Waller A, Carey M, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Gaps in patient-centered follow-up cancer care: a cross sectional study', JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOCIAL ONCOLOGY, 39 161-172 (2020)
DOI 10.1080/07347332.2020.1815925
Co-authors Amy Waller, Bree Hobden, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2020 Waller A, Turon H, Bryant J, Shepherd J, Hobden B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Nurses perspectives on healthcare errors in oncology care: A cross-sectional study', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ONCOLOGY NURSING, 45 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ejon.2020.101741
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller, Bree Hobden
2019 Sanson-Fisher R, Hobden B, Watson R, Turon H, Carey M, Bryant J, Freund M, 'The new challenge for improving psychosocial cancer care: shifting to a system-based approach', Supportive Care in Cancer, 27 763-769 (2019) [C1]

Introduction: There is a need to improve the psychosocial well-being of cancer patients. To date, intervention research has primarily focussed on improving psychosocial well-being... [more]

Introduction: There is a need to improve the psychosocial well-being of cancer patients. To date, intervention research has primarily focussed on improving psychosocial well-being through targeting singular aspects of care at the individual patient level. Sustainable, high-quality psychosocial care should address the issues faced by people diagnosed with cancer throughout the care pathway using a system-based approach. Aims: To examine the number of intervention trials attempting to improve psychosocial cancer care that have implemented a system-based approach. Method: Five journals were selected and relevant studies across all years were extracted. Four criteria, argued to be essential characteristics of system-based change, were assessed: (1) establishing a culture change within the healthcare system/organisation, through designated leaders who endorse organisational goals; (2) adopting a multidisciplinary approach to change; (3) mapping the system and identifying points of leverage; and (4) measuring the impact of change and adapting establish feedback loops. Results: The search strategy returned 1174 citations, of which five met the inclusion criteria. Of the intervention studies identified, three met none of the four defined criteria for a systems-based intervention, one study met criterion 2 only, and one study met all four criteria, however, was not a rigorous study design. Conclusions: This review of published psychosocial intervention trials in top-ranking psychosocial cancer care journals only found one study that met our criteria for evaluating system-based change. This is likely to be a consequence of the significant pragmatic and political barriers to conducting system-based intervention research.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4568-4
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Megan Freund, Bree Hobden
2019 Turon H, Carey M, Boyes A, Hobden B, Dilworth S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Agreement between a single-item measure of anxiety and depression and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: A cross-sectional study', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0210111
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Mariko Carey, Allison Boyes, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Hobden B, Turon H, Bryant J, Wall L, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Oncology patient preferences for depression care: A discrete choice experiment', Psycho-Oncology, 28 807-814 (2019) [C1]

Objective: Using a vignette-style DCE in a sample of oncology patients, this study explored: (1) the relative influence of the patient's level of concern about their depressi... [more]

Objective: Using a vignette-style DCE in a sample of oncology patients, this study explored: (1) the relative influence of the patient's level of concern about their depression on preferences for care, (2) the relative influence of depression severity according to a mental health checklist on preferred treatment-seeking options, and (3) whether patient age and gender were associated with depression care preference. Methods: A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey of cancer patients was conducted. Hypothetical vignettes to elicit care preferences were created using two attributes: the cancer patient's level of concern about depression (a little or a great deal) and results of a mental health checklist (not depressed or very depressed). Three response options for care preferences were presented, including a self-directed approach, shared care approach, and clinician-directed referral approach. Participants chose their most and least preferred options. Results: A total of 281 cancer patients completed the survey. There was a significant association between level of concern and the most preferred option. Those with a great deal of concern about depression preferred to receive referral from their clinician more than those with a little concern about depression. Males were significantly more likely to select a self-directed approach as their most preferred option. Conclusions: An oncology patient's level of concern about depression may influence the type of care they want to receive from their cancer doctor for depression. This finding has implications for depression screening in clinical practice.

DOI 10.1002/pon.5024
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Scott Brown, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant, Bree Hobden, Laura Wall
2019 Mansfield E, Bryant J, Carey M, Turon H, Henskens F, Grady A, 'Getting the right fit: Convergence between preferred and perceived involvement in treatment decision making among medical oncology outpatients.', Health science reports, 2 e101 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/hsr2.101
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey, Elise Mansfield, Alice Grady, Frans Henskens
2019 Bryant J, Turon H, Mansfield E, Cameron E, Dodd N, 'Discussions About Lifestyle Risk Factors Following a Cancer Diagnosis: Findings from a Sample of Australian Cancer Outpatients', Journal of Cancer Education, 35 1170-1176 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13187-019-01575-6
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Jamie Bryant
2019 Carey M, Boyes AW, Bryant J, Turon H, Clinton-Mcharg T, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The Patient Perspective on Errors in Cancer Care: Results of a Cross-Sectional Survey', Journal of Patient Safety, 15 322-327 (2019) [C1]

Objective The objective of this study was to explore medical oncology outpatients' perceived experiences of errors in their cancer care. Methods A cross-sectional survey was ... [more]

Objective The objective of this study was to explore medical oncology outpatients' perceived experiences of errors in their cancer care. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted. English-speaking medical oncology outpatients aged 18 years or older were recruited from 9 Australian cancer treatment centers. Participants completed 2 paper-and-pencil questionnaires: An initial survey on demographic, disease and treatment characteristics upon recruitment; and a second survey on their experiences of errors in cancer care 1 month later. Results A total of 1818 patients (80%) consented to participate, and of these, 1136 (62%) completed both surveys. One hundred forty-eight participants (13%) perceived that an error had been made in their care, of which one third (n = 46) reported that the error was associated with severe harm. Of those who perceived an error had been made, less than half reported that they had received an explanation for the error (n = 65, 45%) and only one third reported receiving an apology (n = 50, 35%) or being told that steps had been taken to prevent the error from reoccurring (n = 52, 36%). Patients with university or vocational level education (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6 [1.09-2.45], P = 0.0174) and those who received radiotherapy (OR = 1.72 [1.16-2.57]; P = 0.0076) or "other" treatments (OR = 3.23 [1.08-9.63]; P = 0.0356) were significantly more likely to report an error in care. Conclusions There is significant scope to improve communication with patients and appropriate responses by the healthcare system after a perceived error in cancer care.

DOI 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000368
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Allison Boyes, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2019 Freund M, Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Milat A, Mackenzie L, Turon H, 'Barriers to the evaluation of evidence-based public health policy', Journal of Public Health Policy, 40 114-125 (2019) [C1]

Public health policy has the potential to produce great benefits for individuals and communities. There is growing demand that such efforts be rigorously evaluated to ensure that ... [more]

Public health policy has the potential to produce great benefits for individuals and communities. There is growing demand that such efforts be rigorously evaluated to ensure that the expected benefits are, in fact, realised. Commonly, public health policy is evaluated by consumer acceptability, reach, or changes in knowledge and attitudes. Non-robust research designs are often used. But these approaches to evaluation do not answer three critical questions: Has a change in the desired outcome occurred? Was it a consequence of the policy and not some extraneous factor? Was the size of the change considered significant and cost-effective? We, a team of government and academic scholars working in research and evaluation, have examined some of the more common impediments to robust evaluation: political impediments, a lack of investment in evaluation capacity within bureaucracy, and the failure of academic researchers to understand the need for the evaluation of public health policy.

DOI 10.1057/s41271-018-0145-9
Co-authors Megan Freund, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca, Lisa Mackenzie
2019 Watson R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Hyde L, Herrmann A, 'Do haematological cancer patients get the information they need about their cancer and its treatment? Results of a cross-sectional survey', Supportive Care in Cancer, 27 1509-1517 (2019) [C1]

Purpose: To explore the experiences of haematological cancer outpatients in obtaining information about their cancer and its treatment. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of adult ... [more]

Purpose: To explore the experiences of haematological cancer outpatients in obtaining information about their cancer and its treatment. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of adult haematological cancer outpatients was conducted. Participants completed two pen-and-paper questionnaires: the first examined demographics and disease characteristics; the second, completed four weeks later, asked about the cancer information received. Participants indicated whether they received the information they needed about medical procedures and self-management, experiences regarding doctor-patient communication, and self-efficacy in seeking information and support. Where possible, items were derived from Australian psychosocial cancer care guidelines. Results: Two hundred and ninety-three (84%) patients consented to participate, with 170 (58%) completing both questionnaires. Most participants reported receiving information in accordance with guidelines. Areas identified as requiring improvement included difficulty recalling information (28%); information overload (26%); insufficient opportunity to ask questions (23%); and insufficient information about managing anxiety related to medical procedures (20%). Conclusion: While many haematological cancer patients report receiving adequate information, there is room for improvement. Implementation of evidence-based strategies, such as decision aids or audiotapes of the consultation, may help to improve information experiences. Practice implications: A patient-centred approach to information provision is essential for ensuring information addresses the needs and preferences of the patient.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4525-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2019 Bryant J, Turon H, Waller A, Freund M, Mansfield E, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions to increase participation in advance care planning for people with a diagnosis of dementia: A systematic review', Palliative Medicine, 33 262-273 (2019) [C1]

Background: Advance care planning involves considering, discussing and documenting future wishes in case a person is unable to make or communicate decisions. Given people with dem... [more]

Background: Advance care planning involves considering, discussing and documenting future wishes in case a person is unable to make or communicate decisions. Given people with dementia are at high risk of future decisional incapacity, it is critical that advance care planning occurs early in the illness trajectory. Aim: To determine (1) the number of intervention studies published between 1997 and July 2017 that aimed to increase advance care planning for persons with dementia, (2) the methodological quality of studies and (3) the effectiveness of interventions in increasing advance care planning for persons with dementia. Design: Systematic review. Data sources: Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched for articles published from 1997 to July 2017. Studies were included if they utilised a methodologically robust study design and reported on an intervention designed to increase participation in advance care planning for persons with dementia that was targeted at the person with dementia and/or a carer/family member. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two authors. Results: Four studies met the criteria for inclusion. Methodological quality was variable. Two studies did not report analyses comparing advance care planning outcomes for intervention and control participants. A third study found no effect for a nurse-facilitator intervention. The fourth study found that a structured conversation about end-of-life care with a family member increased the likelihood of advance care orders being listed in residents¿ records. Conclusion: There is little evidence about effective strategies to improve participation in advance care planning for persons with dementia. Methodologically rigorous intervention trials are needed to test interventions that encourage timely participation.

DOI 10.1177/0269216318801750
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Megan Freund, Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield, Jamie Bryant
2019 Waller A, Turon H, Bryant J, Zucca A, Evans T-J, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Medical oncology outpatients' preferences and experiences with advanced care planning: a cross-sectional study', BMC CANCER, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12885-019-5272-6
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Amy Waller, Alison Zucca, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2018 Bryant J, Smits R, Turon H, Sanson-Fisher R, Engel J, 'Optimal cancer care: what essential elements of care would help haematological cancer patients obtain and understand information about their disease and its treatment and impact?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 2843-2849 (2018) [C1]

Purpose: To describe the perceptions of haematological cancer patients about the components of care deemed essential to supporting them to obtain and understand information about ... [more]

Purpose: To describe the perceptions of haematological cancer patients about the components of care deemed essential to supporting them to obtain and understand information about their cancer, its treatment and its impact on their life. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with individuals diagnosed with haematological cancer. Eligible patients presenting for a scheduled outpatient appointment were invited to complete a pen-and-paper survey in the clinic waiting room while waiting for their appointment. Those who completed the survey were mailed a second survey approximately 4¿weeks later. Participants provided data about their demographic and disease characteristics and perceptions of optimal care for haematological cancer patients. Results: A total of 170 patients completed both surveys and were included in the analysis. The items endorsed as essential components of care by the highest number of participants were being able to share accurate information about their disease, treatment and ongoing care with their GP/family doctor (49%); being able to obtain up-to-date information specific to their circumstances (43%); being able to obtain information in the amount of detail that they want (34%); being able to call a health care professional at the treatment centre where they are receiving care (34%) and being able to call an experienced health care professional who has knowledge of their disease and its treatment (34%). Conclusions: Further research is needed to determine ways of meeting the preferences of haematological cancer patients and determining the associated impact on patient outcomes.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-018-4140-2
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2018 Herrmann A, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Zdenkowski N, Watson R, Turon H, 'Not asking cancer patients about their preferences does make a difference. A cross-sectional study examining cancer patients preferred and perceived role in decision-making regarding their last important cancer treatment', European Journal of Cancer Care, 27 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ecc.12871
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alix Hall, Nick Zdenkowski
2018 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Watson R, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Preferences for models of peer support in the digital era: A cross-sectional survey of people with cancer.', Psycho-oncology, 27 2148-2154 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.4781
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2017 Bryant J, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Wei A, Kuss B, 'The Patients Perspective: Hematological Cancer Patients Experiences of Adverse Events as Part of Care', Journal of Patient Safety, (2017)

OBJECTIVE: To describe in a sample of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer: (a) the proportion who self-report experiencing an unexpected adverse event as... [more]

OBJECTIVE: To describe in a sample of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer: (a) the proportion who self-report experiencing an unexpected adverse event as part of their care; (b) how the adverse event was handled by the health-care organization; and (c) the sociodemographic, disease, and treatment characteristics associated with experiencing an adverse event. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. SETTING: Three Australian hematological oncology treatment centers. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of a hematological cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants were asked if they had ever experienced an adverse event in their cancer care. Those who did were asked about their perceptions concerning what the adverse event was related to, how much harm the event caused, who identified the adverse event, and how the health-care organization responded to the adverse event. RESULTS: Forty-two participants (26.4%) perceived that they had experienced an unexpected adverse event as part of their care. Most were told about the event as soon as it happened (62%) and were given an explanation about why the event occurred (75%). Fewer were given information about how to take the matter further if they wished (43%). Participants who were unemployed, retired, disabled, or performed home duties and those whose employment status was ¿other¿ had higher odds of reporting an adverse event than those in full- or part-time employment. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for routinely querying patients during their treatment regarding the occurrence of unexpected adverse events. In addition, there is a need for improvement in the responses of health-care providers and the health-care system to these events in regard to full disclosure, apology, and options available to the patient for resolution.

DOI 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000347
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Jamie Bryant
2016 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, 'The impact of loss of income and medicine costs on the financial burden for cancer patients in Australia', Journal of Community and Supportive Oncology, 14 307-313 (2016) [C1]

Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fully deliver best practice care. Objective... [more]

Background The cost of medicines may prove prohibitive for some cancer patients, potentially reducing the ability of a health system to fully deliver best practice care. Objective To identify nonuse or nonpurchase of cancer-related medicines due to cost, and to describe the perceived financial burden of such medicines and associated patient characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional pen- And-paper questionnaire was completed by oncology outpatients at 2 hospitals in Australia; 1 in regional New South Wales and 1 in metropolitan Victoria. Results Almost 1 in 10 study participants had used over- The-counter medicines rather than prescribed medicines for cancer and obtained some but not all of the medicines prescribed in relation to their cancer. 63% of the sample reported some level of financial burden associated with obtaining these medicines, with 34% reporting a moderate or heavy financial burden. 11.8% reported using alternatives to prescribed medicines. People reporting reduced income after being diagnosed with cancer had almost 4 times the odds (OR, 3.73; 95% CI, 1.1-12.1) of reporting a heavy or extreme financial burden associated with prescribed medicines for cancer. Limitations Study response rate, narrow survey population, self-reported survey used. Conclusion This study identifies that a number of cancer patients, especially those with a reduced income after their diagnosis, experience financial burden associated with the purchase of medicines and that some go as far as to not use or to not purchase medicines. It seems likely that limiting the cost of medicines for cancer may improve patient ability to fully participate in the intended treatment. Funding Cancer Council NSW, National Health and Medical Research Council, and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Australia.

DOI 10.12788/jcso.0273
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Andrew Searles, Allison Boyes
2016 Turon H, Waller A, Clinton-McHarg T, Boyes A, Fleming J, Marlton P, et al., 'The Perspectives of Haematological Cancer Patients on Tissue Banking', Oncology and Therapy, 4 91-102 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s40487-016-0019-x
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Waller A, Turon H, Mansfield E, Clark K, Hobden B, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Assisting the bereaved: A systematic review of the evidence for grief counselling', Palliative Medicine, 30 132-148 (2016) [C1]

Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous evidence-base. Aim: To ... [more]

Background: Supporting people after bereavement is a priority area for many health services. Investment in bereavement care must be supported by a rigorous evidence-base. Aim: To examine the (1) relative proportion of descriptive, measurement and intervention research in grief counselling and (2) quality and effectiveness of intervention studies. Design: Systematic review of studies published in the area of grief counselling. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO databases were searched for studies published between 2000 and 2013. Eligible papers were categorised into descriptive, measurement, review, commentaries and intervention studies. Intervention studies were assessed against the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care methodological criteria, and papers meeting criteria were assessed for quality. The impact of interventions on grief, psychological morbidity and quality of life was examined. Results: A total of 126 data-based papers, including 47 descriptive, 3 measurement and 76 grief counselling intervention studies were included. Only 59% (n = 45) of intervention studies met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care design criteria. Overall, study quality was poor, with the majority of interventions showing a risk of bias in several key areas. The three studies that met all criteria showed mixed effectiveness. Conclusion: Grief counselling interventions require a strong rationale for design, and a systematic approach to development and evaluation. Descriptive research efforts should inform this process, focusing on homogeneity in sample, identification of risk factors for complicated grief and the impact of extraneous factors on intervention effects. Interventions should include comparisons to usual care, as well as replication to confirm positive findings.

DOI 10.1177/0269216315588728
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2016 Noble N, Paul C, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Turner N, Conigrave K, 'Ready, set, go: a cross-sectional survey to understand priorities and preferences for multiple health behaviour change in a highly disadvantaged group', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1701-2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Natasha Noble
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Turon H, Oldmeadow C, 'Which modifiable health risk behaviours are related? A systematic review of the clustering of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol and Physical activity ('SNAP') health risk factors', Preventive Medicine, 81 16-41 (2015) [C1]

Objective: There is a growing body of literature examining the clustering of health risk behaviours, but little consensus about which risk factors can be expected to cluster for w... [more]

Objective: There is a growing body of literature examining the clustering of health risk behaviours, but little consensus about which risk factors can be expected to cluster for which sub groups of people. This systematic review aimed to examine the international literature on the clustering of smoking, poor nutrition, excess alcohol and physical inactivity (SNAP) health behaviours among adults, including associated socio-demographic variables. Method: A literature search was conducted in May 2014. Studies examining at least two SNAP risk factors, and using a cluster or factor analysis technique, or comparing observed to expected prevalence of risk factor combinations, were included. Results: Fifty-six relevant studies were identified. A majority of studies (81%) reported a 'healthy' cluster characterised by the absence of any SNAP risk factors. More than half of the studies reported a clustering of alcohol with smoking, and half reported clustering of all four SNAP risk factors. The methodological quality of included studies was generally weak to moderate. Males and those with greater social disadvantage showed riskier patterns of behaviours; younger age was less clearly associated with riskier behaviours. Conclusion: Clustering patterns reported here reinforce the need for health promotion interventions to target multiple behaviours, and for such efforts to be specifically designed and accessible for males and those who are socially disadvantaged.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.07.003
Citations Scopus - 161Web of Science - 159
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Chris Paul, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Noble NE, Paul CL, Turner N, Blunden SV, Oldmeadow C, Turon HE, 'A cross-sectional survey and latent class analysis of the prevalence and clustering of health risk factors among people attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C1]

Background: Indigenous Australians are a socially disadvantaged group who experience significantly poorer health and a higher prevalence of modifiable health behaviours than other... [more]

Background: Indigenous Australians are a socially disadvantaged group who experience significantly poorer health and a higher prevalence of modifiable health behaviours than other Australians. Little is known about the clustering of health risks among Indigenous Australians. The aims of this study were to describe the clustering of key health risk factors, such as smoking, physical inactivity and alcohol consumption, and socio-demographics associated with clusters, among a predominantly Aboriginal sample. Methods: Participants (n = 377) attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) in regional/rural New South Wales, Australia, in 2012-2013 completed a self-report touch screen health risk survey. Clusters were identified using latent class analysis. Results: Cluster 1 ('low fruit/vegetable intake, lower risk'; 51 %) consisted of older men and women; Cluster 2 ('risk taking'; 22 %) included younger unemployed males with a high prevalence of smoking, risky alcohol, and illicit drug use. Cluster 3 ('inactive, overweight, depressed'; 28 %) was characterised by younger to mid aged women likely to have experienced emotional or physical violence. Conclusions: If future research identifies similar stable clusters of health behaviours for this population, intervention approaches targeting these clusters of risk factors should be developed and tested for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2015-8
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natasha Noble, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Noble N, Paul C, Conigrave K, Lee K, Blunden S, Turon H, et al., 'Does a retrospective seven-day alcohol diary reflect usual alcohol intake for a predominantly disadvantaged Australian aboriginal population', Substance Use and Misuse, 50 308-319 (2015) [C1]

Background: Alcohol disproportionately affects socially disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Methods to assess alcohol intake for disa... [more]

Background: Alcohol disproportionately affects socially disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Methods to assess alcohol intake for disadvantaged communities need to be able to capture variable or episodic drinking. The ability of a seven-day diary to capture typical consumption for a predominantly Aboriginal sample has not been assessed. Objective: One aim of this paper was to examine agreement between a seven-day retrospective diary and 'usual' drinking assessed by a modified version of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test question 3 (AUDIT-3m; two questions). Other aims were to describe drinking patterns as reported in the seven-day diary. Method: In 2012, consecutive adults attending an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service completed a cross-sectional health risk survey on a touch screen laptop (n = 188). Alcohol consumption questions included the retrospective diary and AUDIT-3m. Agreement was assessed using weighted kappa analysis. Results: There was good agreement between the two measures of consumption; however, the AUDIT-3m questions identified more current drinkers. Respondents who were drinkers (54%) tended to consume large amounts per drinking occasion: almost half (46%) of diary completers reported nine or more standard drinks on at least one occasion in the last week. Conclusions: The seven-day diary did not adequately capture variability in alcohol consumption common among this sample. Although the AUDIT-3m appeared acceptable, alternative approaches to assess usual or risky alcohol consumption, such as asking about specific drinking occasions, or allowing participants to respond in non-standard drink sizes, also need to be considered for indigenous and other disadvantaged communities.

DOI 10.3109/10826084.2014.980951
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Patrick Mcelduff, Natasha Noble
2015 Carey M, Turon H, Goergen S, Sanson-Fisher R, Yoong SL, Jones K, 'Patients experiences of the management of lower back pain in general practice: use of diagnostic imaging, medication and provision of self-management advice', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 21 342-346 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/PY14057
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul CL, Bryant J, Turon H, Brozek I, Noble N, Zucca A, 'A narrative review of the potential for self- tanning products to substitute for solaria use among people seeking a tanned appearance', PHOTODERMATOLOGY PHOTOIMMUNOLOGY & PHOTOMEDICINE, 30 160-166 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/phpp.12103
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natasha Noble, Alison Zucca, Jamie Bryant
2014 Eades S, Paul C, Ishiguchi P, Zimmet P, Shaw J, Forshaw K, et al., 'Baseline evidence practice gap for type 2 diabetes care among Aboriginal Australians in a cluster randomised controlled trial', BMC health services research, 14 P33-P33 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-s2-p33
Co-authors Kristy Fakes
2013 Paul CL, Turon H, Bonevski B, Bryant J, McElduff P, 'A cross-sectional survey of experts' opinions about the relative effectiveness of tobacco control strategies for the general population versus disadvantaged groups: What do we choose in the absence of evidence?', BMC Public Health, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1144
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Chris Paul, Patrick Mcelduff, Billie Bonevski, Jamie Bryant
2013 Paul CL, McLennan J, Baxendale A, Schnelle B, Rawson J, Turon HE, Tzelepis F, 'Implementation of a personalized workplace smoking cessation programme.', Occup Med (Lond), 63 568-574 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/occmed/kqt121
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2013 Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Houlcroft LE, Turon HE, 'The impact of web-based approaches on psychosocial health in chronic physical and mental health conditions', Health Education Research, 28 450-471 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyt053
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 30
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Paul CL, Bonevski B, Turon HE, Bryant JL, 'The balancing act: Experts' opinions about the relative resourcing of tobacco control efforts for the general population versus disadvantaged populations', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 602-607 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Jamie Bryant, Billie Bonevski
2012 Gilligan C, Sanson-Fisher RW, Turon HE, 'The organ donation conundrum', Progress in Transplantation, 22 312-316 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.7182/pit2012216
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 33 more journal articles

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Hobden B, Fakes K, Turon H, Oldmeadow C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Predictors of care quality across the cancer care trajectory', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2020)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Kristy Fakes, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2020 Hobden B, Turon H, Waller A, Carey M, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Gaps in patient-centered follow-up cancer care: A cross-sectional study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2020)
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Amy Waller, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden
2017 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Cancer patients' preferences for models of peer support in the digital age: A cross-sectional survey', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Smits R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Turon H, Herrmann A, Richards L, 'DO HEMATOLOGICAL CANCER PATIENTS GET THE INFORMATION THEY NEED ABOUT THEIR CANCER AND ITS TREATMENT?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Jamie Bryant
2016 Boyes A, Turon H, Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, 'WHAT MODELS OF PEER SUPPORT ARE MOST APPEALING TO CANCER PATIENTS? A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Paul CL, Boyes A, Searles A, Carey M, Turon H, Hall A, Bisquera A, 'CANCER MEDICINE AFFORDABILITY AND FINANCIAL IMPACTS OF CANCER IN AUSTRALIA: IMPACTS ON DECISION-MAKING AND PERCEIVED FINANCIAL BURDEN', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Andrew Searles, Allison Boyes, Alix Hall
2014 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley L, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland S, Turon H, 'ONCOLOGY PATIENTS OVERWHELMINGLY SUPPORT TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Stephen Ackland, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Bree Hobden, Jamie Bryant, Elizabeth Fradgley
2014 Noble N, Paul C, Turner N, Turon H, Blunden S, 'PREVENTIVE SCREENING FOR CANCER AMONG PEOPLE ATTENDING AN ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY CONTROLLED HEALTH SERVICE', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natasha Noble
2014 Turon H, Waller A, Mansfield E, Sanson-Fisher R, 'HOW GOOD IS THE QUALITY OF EVIDENCE FOR GRIEF COUNSELLING? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Amy Waller, Elise Mansfield, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Turon H, Waller A, Clinton-McHarg T, Fleming J, Marlton P, Sanson-Fisher R, 'HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER PATIENTS' VIEWS ON TISSUE BANKING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Amy Waller
2012 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'Source monitoring for color information: Accuracy is higher for intrinsic than extrinsic features', Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society, Minneapolis, Minnesota (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2012 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'Effect of visual cue type and learning instructions on source memory for pictures: Does binding ability explain source-monitoring performance?', Combined Abstracts of 2012 Australian Psychology Conferences, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2009 Turon HE, Chalmers KA, 'How age and cue type affects performance on an external source monitoring task', Combined Abstracts of 2009 Australian Psychology Conferences, Wollongong, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2008 Turon HE, Chalmers KA, 'The development of source monitoring in children: Contributions of working memory and binding ability', International Journal of Psychology, Berlin, Germany (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2007 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'Effects of item familiarity and study duration on the 'testing effect' in recognition memory', Abstracts of the 34th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Canberra, ACT (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2007 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'The 'testing effect' in recognition memory', Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society. 48th Annual Meeting, Long Beach, Calif. (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2006 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'The generality of the pseudoword effect in recognition memory', Abstracts of The Psychonomic Society, V11 (58) Proceedings of the 47th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Houston, Texas (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2006 Chalmers KA, Turon HE, 'The pseudoword effect', Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Memory, Sydney, Australia (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
2006 Turon HE, Chalmers KA, 'The pseudoword effect in recognition memory: effects of word frequency and study duration', Australian Journal of Psychology, V58 Suppl: Proceedings of the 33rd Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Brisbane, Queensland (2006) [E3]
Co-authors Kerry Chalmers
Show 16 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $237,682

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20121 grants / $237,682

Increasing rates of organ donor registration: An RCT to determine the differential effectiveness of electronic and interpersonal information interventions.$237,682

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Conor Gilligan, Doctor Heidi Turon, Doctor Tara Clinton-McHarg, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100421
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Projects

Patient preferences in oncology care 2015 -

Publications

Zdenkowski N, Lynam JF, Wall L, Brown S, Wells K, Sproule V, 'Breast cancer patients' willingness to travel to participate in a clinical trial.', Journal of Clinical Oncology (2017)

Zdenkowski N, Lynam J, Wall L, Brown S, Sproule V, 'Results of a Survey Investigating Cancer Patients' Willingness to Travel to Participate in a Clinical Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Comparing cancer patients' and support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a treatment decision', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Munich, GERMANY (2018)

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'Support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a cancer treatment decision', BMC Research Notes, 11 1-6 (2018) [C1]

Waller A, Sanson-Fisher R, Brown SD, Wall L, Walsh J, 'Quality versus quantity in end-of-life choices of cancer patients and support persons: a discrete choice experiment', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 3593-3599 (2018) [C1]

Herrmann A, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Wall L, Zdenkowski N, Waller A, 'A discrete choice experiment to assess cancer patients preferences for when and how to make treatment decisions', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 1215-1220 (2018) [C1]

Hobden B, Turon H, Bryant J, Wall L, Brown S, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Oncology patient preferences for depression care: A discrete choice experiment', Psycho-Oncology, 28 807-814 (2019) [C1]

Collaborators

Name Organisation
Doctor Amy Elizabeth Waller University of Newcastle
Miss Breanne Hobden
Ms Anne Herrmann University of Newcastle
Mr Justin Robert Walsh University of Newcastle
Doctor Heidi Erin Turon University of Newcastle
Professor Scott David Brown University of Newcastle
Doctor Nick Zdenkowski
Laureate Professor Robert William Sanson-Fisher University of Newcastle
Doctor Jamie Lee Bryant University of Newcastle
Doctor Alix Edna Hall University of Newcastle

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Dr Heidi Turon

Position

Senior Research Assistant
Health Behaviour Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email heidi.turon@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40 420 694

Office

Room 4th Level, West Wing
Building HMRI Building
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