Dr Lisa Mackenzie

Research Associate

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Mental Health
  • Public Health
  • Cancer control
  • Quality of care
  • Health psychology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Health communication
  • Patient-centred care
  • Rural and Remote Health

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 50
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Mansfield E, Mackenzie L, Carey M, Peek K, Shepherd J, Evans TJ, 'Can models of self-management support be adapted across cancer types? A comparison of unmet self-management needs for patients with breast or colorectal cancer', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 823-831 (2018) [C1]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Purpose: There is an increased focus on supporting patients with cancer to actively participate in their healthcare, an approach commonly ter... [more]

© 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany. Purpose: There is an increased focus on supporting patients with cancer to actively participate in their healthcare, an approach commonly termed ¿self-management¿. Comparing unmet self-management needs across cancer types may reveal opportunities to adapt effective self-management support strategies from one cancer type to another. Given that breast and colorectal cancers are prevalent, and have high survival rates, we compared these patients¿ recent need for help with self-management. Method: Data on multiple aspects of self-management were collected from 717 patients with breast cancer and 336 patients with colorectal cancer attending one of 13 Australian medical oncology treatment centres. Results: There was no significant difference between the proportion of patients with breast or colorectal cancer who reported a need for help with at least one aspect of self-management. Patients with breast cancer were significantly more likely to report needing help with exercising more, while patients with colorectal cancer were more likely to report needing help with reducing alcohol consumption. When controlling for treatment centre, patients who were younger, experiencing distress or had not received chemotherapy were more likely to report needing help with at least one aspect of self-management. Conclusions: A substantial minority of patients reported an unmet need for self-management support. This indicates that high-quality intervention research is needed to identify effective self-management support strategies, as well as implementation trials to identify approaches to translating these strategies into practice. Future research should continue to explore whether self-management support strategies could be adapted across cancer types.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3896-0
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Mariko Carey
2018 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Suzuki E, Yoshimura M, Toi M, D'Este C, Sanson-Fisher R, 'A cross-sectional study of agreement between the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patient- and radiation oncologist-reported single-item assessment of depression and anxiety.', Psychooncology, 27 1840-1846 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/pon.4736
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2018 Peek K, Carey M, Mackenzie L, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Patient adherence to an exercise program for chronic low back pain measured by patient-report, physiotherapist-perception and observational data.', Physiother Theory Pract, 1-10 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/09593985.2018.1474402
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2018 Hyde LL, Boyes AW, Evans T-J, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Three-Factor Structure of the eHealth Literacy Scale Among Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography Outpatients: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis.', JMIR human factors, 5 1-11 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/humanfactors.9039
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2018 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Suzuki E, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, Ogura M, et al., 'Agreement between patients¿ and radiation oncologists¿ cancer diagnosis and prognosis perceptions: A cross sectional study in Japan', PLoS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Mackenzie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and r... [more]

© 2018 Mackenzie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This study assessed agreement between radiation oncologist- and cancer patient-reported perceptions about cancer diagnosis, time since diagnosis, treatment purpose, and whether life expectancy had been discussed; and described preferences for prognosis discussions. Adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy at a Japanese hospital were invited to complete a touchscreen tablet survey. Patient survey responses were linked and comparisons made with a survey completed by their radiation oncologist. Among 146 cancer patient-oncologist dyads, there was almost perfect agreement on cancer diagnosis (¿ = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.82¿0.94), substantial agreement on time since diagnosis (¿ = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.57¿0.83) and moderate agreement on whether treatment goal was curative or palliative (¿ = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.28¿0.57; all p¿s < 0.0001). Agreement about whether a life expectancy discussion had occurred was less than expected by chance (¿ = -0.06, p = 0.9). Radiation oncologists reported that they had spoken to over two thirds of patients about this, whilst less than one third of patients stated that this discussion had occurred with their radiation oncologist. Over half of the patients who had not discussed life expectancy wanted to. Patients had variable preferences for whether they (80%), their radiation oncologist (78%) or their partner/family (52%) should decide whether they discuss their life expectancy. Although patient self-reported information about diagnosis and time since diagnosis appears to be reasonably accurate (compared with clinician-reported information), limitations of self-reported data about prognostic discussions were highlighted by poor agreement between patient- and clinician-reported information about whether prognostic discussions have occurred. Additional support is needed to improve prognosis communication and understanding in radiation oncology settings.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0198437
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste
2018 Hyde L, Mackenzie L, Boyes AW, Evans T-J, Symonds M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prevalence and correlates of patient-centred preparatory information provision to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging outpatients: A cross-sectional study.', Patient Educ Couns, (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2018.05.025
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2017 Okuyama T, Akechi T, Mackenzie L, Furukawa TA, 'Psychotherapy for depression among advanced, incurable cancer patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Cancer Treatment Reviews, 56 16-27 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background There is a high prevalence of depressive disorder and depressive symptoms among advanced, incurable cancer patients. Patients commonly report a pref... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Background There is a high prevalence of depressive disorder and depressive symptoms among advanced, incurable cancer patients. Patients commonly report a preference for non-pharmacological treatments such as psychotherapy over pharmacological treatments for depression. The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression in people with advanced, incurable cancer via a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods We searched research databases and clinical trial registries for studies published prior to June 2015. No language restrictions were applied when selecting studies. Cochrane Collaboration meta-analysis review methodology was used. All relevant RCTs comparing psychotherapy with control conditions on depression outcomes for adults with advanced cancer were eligible for inclusion. We calculated pooled effect sizes using Hedges g and a standardized mean difference (SMD) of change between baseline and post-treatment scores. Quality of evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Results Of 13 studies included in the review, 12 reported data suitable for meta-analysis. Psychotherapy was associated with moderate decrease in depression score (SMD -0.67, 95% confidence interval -1.06 to -0.29, P¿=¿0.0005). Few studies focused on people with clinically diagnosed depression. Overall, quality of evidence across the included studies was rated as low, and heterogeneity was high. Conclusions Low quality evidence suggests that psychotherapy is moderately more effective for the amelioration of symptoms of depression among advanced, incurable cancer patients than the control conditions. There is insufficient high-quality evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychotherapy for patients with clinically diagnosed depression.

DOI 10.1016/j.ctrv.2017.03.012
Citations Scopus - 2
2017 Peek K, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, 'Physiotherapists¿ perceptions of patient adherence to prescribed self-management strategies: a cross-sectional survey of Australian physiotherapists', Disability and Rehabilitation, 39 1932-1938 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor &amp; Francis Group. Purpose: Physiotherapists often prescribe self-management strategies for their patients. However, the effective... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Purpose: Physiotherapists often prescribe self-management strategies for their patients. However, the effectiveness of these strategies in improving patient outcome is related to the rate of patient adherence. The aims of this study were to explore physiotherapists¿ views on the importance and perceived rates of patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies; the perceived importance of methods physiotherapists can employ to aid patient adherence and the barriers to employing these methods. Method: A cross-sectional web-based survey was emailed to 808 physiotherapist members of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. To maximize response rates, two reminder emails were utilized. Results: In total, 352 physiotherapists completed the survey (response rate 44%). A majority of physiotherapists (89%) believed that patient self-management strategies were important in improving patient outcomes; however, the mean perceived rate of patient adherence across all strategies was only 67%. Physiotherapists reported that there were a number of important methods that can be employed to aid patient adherence such as providing patient education and allowing time for patient practice; with minimal perceived barriers to employing these methods. Conclusions: Results indicate that physiotherapists perceive that patient outcomes can be positively impacted by patient adherence to a range of self-management strategies. Physiotherapists should be encouraged to implement into their routine clinical practice evidence-based methods to aid patient adherence.Implications for Rehabilitation Physiotherapists believe that patient self-management strategies are important for improving patient outcomes, however, the perceived rates of patient adherence could be improved. Physiotherapists should adopt a collaborative approach with their patients to address any barriers to adherence to positively impact on patient outcome. Physiotherapists perceive that there are a number of modifiable characteristics which determine patient adherence including patient self-efficacy, physiotherapist communication skills and the complexity of the self-management strategy. Methods that physiotherapists can employ to positively influence patient adherence may include individualizing the strategy to the patient, education and supplementary written information.

DOI 10.1080/09638288.2016.1212281
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2017 Peek K, Carey M, Mackenzie L, Sanson-Fisher R, 'An observational study of Australian private practice physiotherapy consultations to explore the prescription of self-management strategies', Musculoskeletal Care, 15 356-363 (2017) [C1]

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the types of self-management strategies prescribed; the number of strategies and the ... [more]

Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the types of self-management strategies prescribed; the number of strategies and the overall length of time allocated to self-management prescription, by consultation type and by injury location, in physiotherapy consultations. Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study of 113 physiotherapist¿patient consultations was undertaken. Regression analyses were used to determine whether consultation type and injury location were associated with the number of strategies prescribed and the length/fraction of time spent on self-management. Results: A total of 108 patients (96%) were prescribed at least one self-management strategy ¿ commonly exercise and advice. The mean length of time spent on self-management was 5.80¿min. Common injury locations were the neck (n¿=¿40) and lower back (n¿=¿39). No statistically significant associations were observed between consultation type or injury location for either outcome (number of strategies and the length/fraction of time allocated to self-management prescription). Conclusion: Physiotherapists regularly spend time prescribing self-management strategies such as exercise, advice, and the use of heat or ice to patients receiving treatment linked to a range of injury locations. This suggests that self-management is considered to be an important adjunct to in-clinic physiotherapy. The practice implications of this are that clinicians should reflect on how self-management strategies can be used to maximize patient outcomes, and whether the allocation of consultation time to self-management is likely to optimize patient adherence to each strategy.

DOI 10.1002/msc.1181
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2016 Suzuki E, Mackenzie L, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, D Este C, Asada H, Toi M, 'Acceptability of a Touch Screen Tablet Psychosocial Survey Administered to Radiation Therapy Patients in Japan', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23 485-491 (2016) [C1]

© 2015, International Society of Behavioral Medicine. Background: Studies in western clinical settings suggest that touch screen computer surveys are an acceptable mode of collect... [more]

© 2015, International Society of Behavioral Medicine. Background: Studies in western clinical settings suggest that touch screen computer surveys are an acceptable mode of collecting information about cancer patients¿ wellbeing Purpose: We examined the acceptability of a touch screen tablet survey among cancer patients in Japan. Methods: Eligible patients (n = 262) attending a university hospital radiation therapy (RT) department were invited to complete a touch screen tablet survey about psychosocial communication and care. Survey consent and completion rates, the proportion and characteristics of patients who completed the touch screen survey unassisted, and patient-reported acceptability were assessed. Results: Of 158 consenting patients (consent rate 60¿% [95¿% CI 54, 66¿%] of eligible patients), 152 completed the touch screen computer survey (completion rate 58¿% [95¿% CI 52, 64¿%] of eligible patients). The survey was completed without assistance by 74¿% (n = 113; 95¿% CI 67, 81¿%) of respondents. Older age was associated with higher odds of having assistance with survey completion (OR 1.09; 95¿% CI 1.04, 1.14¿%). Ninety-two percent of patients (95¿% CI 86, 96¿%) felt that the touch screen survey was easy to use and 95¿% (95¿% CI 90, 98¿%) agreed or strongly agreed that they were comfortable answering the questions. Overall, 65¿% (95¿% CI 57, 73¿%) of respondents would be willing to complete such a survey more than once while waiting for RT treatment. Conclusions: Although patient self-reported acceptability of the touch screen survey was high, self-administered touch screen tablet surveys may not be entirely appropriate for older cancer patients or possibly for patients with lower educational attainment.

DOI 10.1007/s12529-015-9502-2
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey
2016 Peek K, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, 'Aiding patient adherence to physiotherapist-prescribed self-management strategies: an evidence-based behavioural model in practice', Physical Therapy Reviews, 21 124-130 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10833196.2016.1226537
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2016 Daly JB, Mackenzie LJ, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Roseby R, Wiggers JH, 'Interventions by Health care professionals who provide routine child health care to reduce tobacco smoke exposure in children a review and meta-Analysis', JAMA Pediatrics, 170 138-147 (2016) [C1]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health... [more]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health care professionals in child health settings should address tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in children. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care in reducing TSE in children. DATA SOURCES A secondary analysis of 57 trials included in a 2014 Cochrane review and a subsequent extended searchwas performed. Controlled trials (published through June 2015) of interventions that focused on reducing child TSE, with no restrictions placed on who delivered the interventions,were identified. Secondary data extractionwas performed in August 2015. STUDY SELECTION Controlled trials of routine child health care delivered by health care professionals (physicians, nurses, medical assistants, health educators, and dieticians) that addressed the outcomes of interest (TSE reduction in children and parental smoking behaviors) were eligible for inclusion in this review and meta-Analysis. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Study details and quality characteristicswere independently extracted by 2 authors. If outcome measures were sufficiently similar, meta-Analysis was performed using the random-effects model by DerSimonian and Laird. Otherwise, the results were described narratively. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome measurewas reduction in child TSE. Secondary outcomes of interest were parental smoking cessation, parental smoking reduction, and maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention. RESULTS Sixteen studiesmet the selection criteria. Narrative analysis of the 6 trials that measured child TSE indicated no intervention effects relative to comparison groups. Similarly, meta-Analysis of 9 trials that measured parental smoking cessation demonstrated no overall intervention effect (n = 6399) (risk ratio 1.05; 95%CI, 0.74-1.50; P = .78). Meta-Analysis of the 3 trials that measured maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention demonstrated a significant overall intervention effect (n = 1293) (risk ratio 1.53; 95%CI, 1.10-2.14; P = .01). High levels of study heterogeneity likely resulted from variability in outcome measures, length of follow up, intervention strategies, and unknown intervention fidelity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care may be effective in preventing maternal smoking relapse. Further research is required to improve the effectiveness of such interventions in reducing child TSE and increasing parental smoking cessation. The findings of this meta-Analysis have policy and practice implications relating to interventions by routine pediatric health care professionals that aim to reduce child exposure to tobacco smoke.

DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3342
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Peek K, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, Carey M, 'Interventions to aid patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies: A systematic review', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 102 127-135 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Background: Physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies are an important adjunct to &apos;hands on&apos; treatment. However, t... [more]

© 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Background: Physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies are an important adjunct to 'hands on' treatment. However, treatment outcomes are likely to be related to whether patients adhere to the prescribed strategy. Therefore, physiotherapists should be aware of adherence aiding interventions designed to maximise patient outcomes underpinned by quality research studies. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the interventions used to aid patient adherence to all physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies. Data sources: The search included the databases CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PUBMED, PSYCINFO, SPORTSDiscus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro and Mednar for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in a peer reviewed journal from inception to November 2014. Data extraction and synthesis: Data were extracted using a standardised form from twelve included RCTs for patient adherence rates to self-management strategies for interventions used to aid patient adherence and usual care. Two independent reviewers conducted methodological quality assessment. Results: Twelve different interventions to aid patient adherence to exercise were recorded from twelve fair to high quality RCTs. Potential adherence aiding interventions include an activity monitor and feedback system, written exercise instructions, behavioural exercise programme with booster sessions and goal setting. Conclusion and implications of key findings: Despite a number of studies demonstrating interventions to positively influence patient adherence to exercise, there is insufficient data to endorse their use in clinical practice. No RCTs examining adherence aiding interventions to self-management strategies other than exercise were identified, indicating a significant gap in the literature. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO CRD42015014516.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.10.003
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2015 Mackenzie LJ, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'A cross-sectional study of radiation oncology outpatients' concern about, preferences for, and perceived barriers to discussing anxiety and depression.', Psycho-oncology, 24 1392-1397 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.3806
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong
2015 Zucca AC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Waller A, Carey M, Grady A, Mackenzie L, 'Life expectancy discussions in a multisite sample of australian medical oncology outpatients', Medical Journal of Australia, 203 405.e1-405.e7 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of informat... [more]

© 2015 AMPCo Pty Ltd. Produced with Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Objectives: The study examined: 1) the proportion of patients who received their preferred level of information about life expectancy; and 2) sociodemographic, clinical and psychological factors associated with patients¿ perceptions of whether they received too little, too much, or the right amount of information about life expectancy. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Eleven large Australian medical oncology treatment centres. Participants: A total of 1431 medical oncology outpatients participated (81% consent rate). Eligible patients were approached between September 2012 and May 2014. Main outcome measures: Patients indicated whether the information about life expectancy they received aligned with their preferences. Results: Almost one in four patients (24%) received too little information, 4% received too much, and 50% received all the information they wanted; 22% of patients neither wanted nor received information about life expectancy. Patients were more likely to receive too little information if they were not in remission (odds ratio [OR], 1.77), did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 3.64), or were anxious (OR, 1.48) or depressed (OR, 1.48). Patients had greater odds of receiving too much information if they were younger (OR, 1.45), had more advanced cancer (OR, 2.01) or did not know their cancer stage at diagnosis (OR, 4.42). Conclusions: That fact that 28% of cancer patients did not receive their desired level of information about life expectancy highlights the difficulties associated with discussing this sensitive topic. To ensure that life expectancy discussions correspond with patient preferences, clinicians should routinely ask patients whether they want to know this information, in what format, and at which level of detail.

DOI 10.5694/mja15.00596
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Amy Waller, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca
2015 Peek K, Sanson-Fisher R, Mackenzie L, Carey M, 'Patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies: A critical review', International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 22 535-543 (2015) [C1]

� 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. Aims: To examine the published literature on patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies in order to describe: changes i... [more]

� 2015 MA Healthcare Ltd. Aims: To examine the published literature on patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies in order to describe: changes in the proportion of publications over time; methodological quality of non-intervention and intervention-based studies; types of measures used to assess patient adherence and the reported accuracy of those measures. Methods: A comprehensive search of eight electronic databases was conducted, covering the period from January 1995 to November 2014. Data were extracted and coded for the number and proportion of articles that were: i) non data-based; ii) data-based, no new data (reviews); iii) data-based, new data. The methodological quality of non-intervention and intervention publications was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool, and data were extracted regarding the type and accuracy of adherence measures reported in these publications. Results: A total of 80 relevant papers were identified. Of these, 49 non-intervention and intervention quantitative study designs underwent methodological assessment, with only 14 studies (29%) assessed as being of at least moderate quality. Fifty-three different measures of patient adherence were recorded from the 49 included studies, with only 5 of the 49 included studies (10%) reporting statistical evidence to support accuracy of the adherence measures applied. Conclusions: The results indicate that despite a trend towards intervention-based studies and reviews over the last 20 years, the methodological quality of studies on patient adherence could be improved. Accurate and standardised measures of patient adherence are needed for any future research involving patient adherence to physiotherapist prescribed self-management strategies.

DOI 10.12968/ijtr.2015.22.11.535
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2015 Coombe J, Rich JL, Booth A, Rowlands A, Mackenzie L, Reddy P, 'Supporting Rural Australian Communities after Disaster: The Warrumbungle Bushfire Support Coordination Service', PLOS Current Disasters, Edition 1 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/currents.dis.6a4ee241c389755ad6f6f1c8688c0fb5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Angela Booth, Jane Rich
2015 Coombe J, Mackenzie L, Munro R, Hazell T, Perkins D, Reddy P, 'Teacher-mediated interventions to support child mental health following a disaster: A systematic review', PLoS Currents, 7 (2015) [C1]

© 2015, Public Library of Science. All Rights Reserved. Objectives: This review sought to identify, describe and assess the effectiveness of teacher-mediated interventions that ai... [more]

© 2015, Public Library of Science. All Rights Reserved. Objectives: This review sought to identify, describe and assess the effectiveness of teacher-mediated interventions that aim to support child and adolescent recovery after a natural or man-made disaster. We also aimed to assess intervention applicability to rural and remote Australian school settings. Method: A systematic search of the academic literature was undertaken utilising six electronic databases (EBSCO, Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and CINAHL) using terms that relate to: teacher-mediated and school-based interventions; children and adolescents; mental health and wellbeing; natural disasters and man-made disasters. This was supplemented by a grey literature search. Results: A total of 20 articles reporting on 18 separate interventions were identified. Nine separate interventions had been evaluated using methodologically adequate research designs, with findings suggesting at least short-term improvement in student wellbeing outcomes and academic performance. Conclusions: Although none of the identified studies reported on Australian-based interventions, international interventions could be adapted to the Australian rural and remote context using existing psychosocial programs and resources available online to Australian schools. Future research should investigate the acceptability, feasibility and effectiveness of implementing interventions modelled on the identified studies in Australian schools settings.

DOI 10.1371/currents.dis.466c8c96d879e2663a1e5e274978965d
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Perkins
2014 Yoong SL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, 'A cross-sectional study examining Australian general practitioners' identification of overweight and obese patients', Journal of General Internal Medicine, 29 328-334 (2014) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such a... [more]

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obese patients attempt weight loss when advised to do so by their physicians; however, only a small proportion of these patients report receiving such advice. One reason may be that physicians do not identify their overweight and obese patients. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the extent that Australian general practitioners (GP) recognise overweight or obesity in their patients, and to explore patient and GP characteristics associated with non-detection of overweight and obesity. METHODS: Consenting adult patients (n = 1,111) reported weight, height, demographics and health conditions using a touchscreen computer. GPs (n = 51) completed hard-copy questionnaires indicating whether their patients were overweight or obese. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GP detection, using patient self-reported weight and height as the criterion measure for overweight and obesity. For a subsample of patients (n = 107), we did a sensitivity analysis with patient-measured weight and height. We conducted an adjusted, multivariable logistic regression to explore characteristics associated with non-detection, using random effects to adjust for correlation within GPs. RESULTS: Sensitivity for GP assessment was 63 % [95 % CI 57-69 %], specificity 89 % [95 % CI 85-92 %], PPV 87 % [95 % CI 83-90 %] and NPV 69 % [95 % CI 65-72 %]. Sensitivity increased by 3 % and specificity was unchanged in the sensitivity analysis. Men (OR: 1.7 [95 % CI 1.1-2.7]), patients without high blood pressure (OR: 1.8 [95 % CI 1.2-2.8]) and without type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.4 [95 % CI 1.2-8.0]) had higher odds of non-detection. Individuals with obesity (OR: 0.1 [95 % CI 0.07-0.2]) or diploma-level education (OR: 0.3 [95%CI 0.1-0.6]) had lower odds of not being identified. No GP characteristics were associated with non-detection of overweight or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: GPs missed identifying a substantial proportion of overweight and obese patients. Strategies to support GPs in identifying their overweight or obese patients need to be implemented. © 2013 Society of General Internal Medicine.

DOI 10.1007/s11606-013-2637-4
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes, Serene Yoong
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Paul CL, Yoong SL, 'Agreement between HADS classifications and single-item screening questions for anxiety and depression: a cross-sectional survey of cancer patients.', Ann Oncol, 25 889-895 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu023
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Serene Yoong
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Psychological distress in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment', SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, 21 1043-1051 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1624-3
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2013 MacKenzie LJ, Carey ML, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Do we get it right? Radiation oncology outpatients' perceptions of the patient centredness of life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, 22 2720-2728 (2013) [C1]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patien... [more]

Objective A patient-centred approach to discussing life expectancy with cancer patients is recommended in Western countries. However, this approach to eliciting and meeting patient preferences can be challenging for clinicians. The aims of this study were the following: (i) to examine cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure; and (ii) to explore agreement between cancer patients' preferences for, and perceived experiences of, life expectancy disclosure. Methods Cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment in metropolitan Australia completed a cross-sectional touchscreen computer survey including optional questions about their life expectancy disclosure preferences and experiences. Results Of the 208 respondents, 178 (86%) indicated that they would prefer their clinician to ask them before discussing life expectancy, and 30 (14%) indicated that they would prefer others (i.e. clinicians, family) to decide whether they were given life expectancy information. Of the 175 respondents who were classified as having a self- determined or other-determined disclosure experience, 105 (60%) reported an experience of life expectancy disclosure that was in accordance with their preferences. Cohen's ¿ was -0.04 (95% CI, -0.17, 0.08), indicating very poor agreement between patients' preferences for and perceived experiences of life expectancy disclosure (p = 0.74). Conclusions In light of patient-centred prognosis disclosure guidelines, our findings of a majority preference for, and experience of, a self-determined approach to life expectancy disclosure amongst radiation oncology patients are encouraging. However, poor agreement between preferences and experiences highlights that additional effort from clinicians is required in order to achieve a truly patient-centred approach to life expectancy disclosure. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3337
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, D'Este CA, 'Radiation oncology outpatient perceptions of patient-centred care: a cross-sectional survey', BMJ OPEN, 3 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001265
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, Hall AE, 'Cancer patients' willingness to answer survey questions about life expectancy', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 3335-3341 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1477-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Cameron EC, 'Do cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes and perceptions of quality of care vary across radiation oncology treatment centres?', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 384-389 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2011.01299.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2012 Paul CL, Carey ML, Anderson AE, Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Courtney RJ, Clinton-Mcharg TL, 'Cancer patients' concerns regarding access to cancer care: Perceived impact of waiting times along the diagnosis and treatment journey', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 321-329 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2011.01311.x
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey
2012 Carey ML, Noble NE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Mackenzie LJ, 'Identifying psychological morbidity among people with cancer using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: Time to revisit first principles?', Psycho-Oncology, 21 229-238 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.2057
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2012 Sanson-Fisher RW, Mackenzie LJ, Butow P, Rankin N, Paul CL, 'Advancing the evidence base in cancer: Psychosocial multicenter trials', Trials, 13 171 (2012) [C2]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2010 Mackenzie LJ, Nalivaiko E, Beig MI, Day TA, Walker FR, 'Ability of predator odour exposure to elicit conditioned versus sensitised post traumatic stress disorder-like behaviours, and forebrain dFosB expression, in rats', Neuroscience, 169 733-742 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2010.05.005
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Eugene Nalivaiko, Rohan Walker
2009 Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey M, Mackenzie LJ, Hill D, Campbell S, Turner D, 'Reducing inequities in cancer care: The role of cancer registries', Cancer, 115 3597-3605 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cncr.24415
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Mackenzie L, Noble N, Carey M, Proietto A, Sanson-Fisher R, Walker G, Silcock J, 'Cross-Sectional Survey to Inform the Development of a Telehealth Support Model for Women Undergoing Breast Cancer Surgery', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Natasha Noble, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2017 MacKenzie L, Kelly M, Lawson S, Grady A, McSkimming A, Kelly B, Waller A, 'Perceptions and Enablers of Psychosocial Care Guideline Implementation in a Radiation Oncology Setting: A Pilot Study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Amy Waller
2017 Hyde L, Mackenzie L, Boyes A, Evans T-J, Symonds M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Are we Meeting Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Medical Imaging Outpatients' Preferences for Preparatory Information? A Cross-Sectional Study', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Allison Boyes
2016 Mackenzie L, Kelly M, Waller A, Grady A, Leigh L, Moylan R, Kelly B, 'EXPLORING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE GUIDELINES IN A RADIATION ONCOLOGY TREATMENT CENTRE', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Amy Waller, Brian Kelly
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Asada H, et al., 'JAPANESE CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR DISCUSSING LIFE EXPECTANCY WITH THEIR RADIATION ONCOLOGIST', ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, Fukuoka, JAPAN (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1093/annonc/mdu435.35
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher R, Carey M, D'Este C, 'CANCER PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR INVOLVEMENT IN RESEARCH AND CONSUMER ACTIVITIES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Mackenzie L, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, Yoong SL, 'RADIATION ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS' CONCERN ABOUT, PREFERENCES FOR, AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO DISCUSSING ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Serene Yoong, Mariko Carey
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Agreement between cancer patients and their radiation oncologist regarding diagnosis and prognosis disclosure experiences in Japan', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Suzuki E, Mackenzie LJ, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Acceptability of touch screen computer psychosocial survey to Japanese radiation therapy patients', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld. (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Paul CL, D'Este CA, 'Anxiety and depression during radiotherapy treatment: a comparison of touchscreen computer administration of the hospital anxiety and depression scale and single-item self-report measures', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, D'Este CA, 'Perceptions of patient-centred cancer care during radiotherapy treatment: A cross sectional survey', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Asada H, et al., 'Perceptions of psychological distress in Japanese cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2012 Mackenzie LJ, Suzuki E, Ogura M, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Asada H, et al., 'Japanese cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy discussions', Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Brisbane, Qld (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Mariko Carey
2011 Mackenzie LJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Carey ML, Hall AE, 'Who should make disclosure decisions? Cancer patients' preferences for life expectancy disclosure', Psycho-Oncology, Antalya, Turkey (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
Show 11 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $1,204,089

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $503,181

A randomised controlled trial of an online peer support intervention for reducing symptoms of depression among community-dwelling older adults living in rural Australia$503,181

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Allison Boyes, Professor Sally Chan, Dr ALIX Hall, Conjoint Associate Professor Frans Henskens, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Simon Deeming, Ms Indra Arunachalam
Scheme Targeted Call for Research - Depression, anxiety and suicide among elderly Australians
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700853
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20161 grants / $400,000

Teleoncology support for rural women before and after breast cancer resection: A randomised controlled trial$400,000

Funding body: National Breast Cancer Foundation

Funding body National Breast Cancer Foundation
Project Team Doctor Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Postdoctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1500710
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20151 grants / $270,908

Evaluating the Quit for New Life $270,908

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Mr Justin Walsh, Doctor Josephine Gwynn, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Professor Peter Radoll, Professor Ian Symonds, Professor Sandra Eades
Scheme Evaluation of Quit for New Life
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1401375
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20141 grants / $30,000

End-of-life care: An investigation of advance care planning amongst haematological cancer patients$30,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Lisa Mackenzie, Doctor Amy Waller, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301373
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Assessing the utility of eHealth to address patient information needs prior to potentially threatening medical procedures PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Patient Adherence to Physiotherapist-Prescribed Self-Management Strategies PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Weighty Problem

November 1, 2013

Research has found GPs are falling short in detecting obesity, which may lead to poor weight management support.

Dr Lisa Mackenzie

Position

Research Associate
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email lisa.mackenzie@newcastle.edu.au
Phone +61 2 4042 0710
Fax +61 2 4042 0040
Link Research and Innovation Cluster

Office

Room W4 HMRI
Building HMRI
Location John Hunter Hospital Campus

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