Dr Jenni White

Dr Jenni White

Research Fellow

Faculty of Health and Medicine (Occupational Therapy)

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Jennifer White is a Senior Research Fellow with the Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle

Her professional background in occupational therapy and she has worked in research roles within health services, universities and not for profit for over 15 years. She has previously worked for the Hunter Stroke Service, University of Newcastle, Cancer Institute NSW, Monash University and the National Ageing Research Institute.

Her research interest in the mixed methods research to formulate, implement and evaluate health programs (stroke cancer, chronic disease, mental health and older people. This work promotes better health outcomes and the delivery of evidence based and holistic person-centered care that is in line with patients’ own values and needs. She has recently coordinated a large, international randomised control trial exploring knowledge translation strategies in allied health decision making.

Her current research include technological advancements in rehabilitation practice, translation of evidence into practice, and chronic disease research. Notable research projects include exploring the patient and clinician experience of telehealth during the COVID 19 pandemic, a pragmatic trial promoting dementia friendly emergency departments and exploring the experience of interpreter access and health care disparity in people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Qualifications

PhD, University of Newcastle

Masters of Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy, University of Newcastle

Bachelor of Applied Science, Occupational Therapy, University of Sout Australia

Teaching

Supervision of PhD (2 completed PhD supervisions) and Honours (16 completed) level health professionals.

Research Interests

Decision making in health care

Mixed methods research designs

Research driven by health professionals

Health services research


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy), University of South Australia

Keywords

  • Chronic Disease
  • Mixed Methods
  • Person Centred Care
  • Qualitative
  • Rehabilitation
  • Stroke
  • Technology

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
6/5/2019 - 16/5/2020 Reseearch Fellow National Ageing Research Institute
Australia
5/8/2017 - 5/5/2019 Research Fellow Monash University
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (28 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Wu Y, Levis B, Riehm KE, Saadat N, Levis AW, Azar M, et al., 'Equivalency of the diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-8 and PHQ-9: A systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis', Psychological Medicine, 50 1368-1380 (2020) [C1]

Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019. Item 9 of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) queries about thoughts of death and self-harm, but not suicidality. Although it i... [more]

Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019. Item 9 of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) queries about thoughts of death and self-harm, but not suicidality. Although it is sometimes used to assess suicide risk, most positive responses are not associated with suicidality. The PHQ-8, which omits Item 9, is thus increasingly used in research. We assessed equivalency of total score correlations and the diagnostic accuracy to detect major depression of the PHQ-8 and PHQ-9.Methods We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis. We fit bivariate random-effects models to assess diagnostic accuracy.Results 16 742 participants (2097 major depression cases) from 54 studies were included. The correlation between PHQ-8 and PHQ-9 scores was 0.996 (95% confidence interval 0.996 to 0.996). The standard cutoff score of 10 for the PHQ-9 maximized sensitivity + specificity for the PHQ-8 among studies that used a semi-structured diagnostic interview reference standard (N = 27). At cutoff 10, the PHQ-8 was less sensitive by 0.02 (-0.06 to 0.00) and more specific by 0.01 (0.00 to 0.01) among those studies (N = 27), with similar results for studies that used other types of interviews (N = 27). For all 54 primary studies combined, across all cutoffs, the PHQ-8 was less sensitive than the PHQ-9 by 0.00 to 0.05 (0.03 at cutoff 10), and specificity was within 0.01 for all cutoffs (0.00 to 0.01).Conclusions PHQ-8 and PHQ-9 total scores were similar. Sensitivity may be minimally reduced with the PHQ-8, but specificity is similar.

DOI 10.1017/S0033291719001314
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2020 Levis B, Benedetti A, Ioannidis JPA, Sun Y, Negeri Z, He C, et al., 'Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores do not accurately estimate depression prevalence: individual participant data meta-analysis.', J Clin Epidemiol, 122 115-128.e1 (2020)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2020.02.002
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2020 He C, Levis B, Riehm KE, Saadat N, Levis AW, Azar M, et al., 'The Accuracy of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 Algorithm for Screening to Detect Major Depression: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis', Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 89 25-37 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel. All rights reserved. Background: Screening for major depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) can be done using a cutoff or the PHQ-9... [more]

© 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel. All rights reserved. Background: Screening for major depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) can be done using a cutoff or the PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithm. Many primary studies publish results for only one approach, and previous meta-analyses of the algorithm approach included only a subset of primary studies that collected data and could have published results. Objective: To use an individual participant data meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of two PHQ-9 diagnostic algorithms for detecting major depression and compare accuracy between the algorithms and the standard PHQ-9 cutoff score of =10. Methods: Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, PsycINFO, Web of Science (January 1, 2000, to February 7, 2015). Eligible studies that classified current major depression status using a validated diagnostic interview. Results: Data were included for 54 of 72 identified eligible studies (n participants = 16,688, n cases = 2,091). Among studies that used a semi-structured interview, pooled sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) were 0.57 (0.49, 0.64) and 0.95 (0.94, 0.97) for the original algorithm and 0.61 (0.54, 0.68) and 0.95 (0.93, 0.96) for a modified algorithm. Algorithm sensitivity was 0.22-0.24 lower compared to fully structured interviews and 0.06-0.07 lower compared to the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Specificity was similar across reference standards. For PHQ-9 cutoff of =10 compared to semi-structured interviews, sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) were 0.88 (0.82-0.92) and 0.86 (0.82-0.88). Conclusions: The cutoff score approach appears to be a better option than a PHQ-9 algorithm for detecting major depression.

DOI 10.1159/000502294
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2020 Wu Y, Levis B, Sun Y, Krishnan A, He C, Riehm KE, et al., 'Probability of major depression diagnostic classification based on the SCID, CIDI and MINI diagnostic interviews controlling for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression subscale scores: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 73 primary studies', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 129 (2020)

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objective: Two previous individual participant data meta-analyses (IPDMAs) found that different diagnostic interviews classify different proportions of people... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objective: Two previous individual participant data meta-analyses (IPDMAs) found that different diagnostic interviews classify different proportions of people as having major depression overall or by symptom levels. We compared the odds of major depression classification across diagnostic interviews among studies that administered the Depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). Methods: Data accrued for an IPDMA on HADS-D diagnostic accuracy were analysed. We fit binomial generalized linear mixed models to compare odds of major depression classification for the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID), Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), controlling for HADS-D scores and participant characteristics with and without an interaction term between interview and HADS-D scores. Results: There were 15,856 participants (1942 [12%] with major depression) from 73 studies, including 15,335 (97%) non-psychiatric medical patients, 164 (1%) partners of medical patients, and 357 (2%) healthy adults. The MINI (27 studies, 7345 participants, 1066 major depression cases) classified participants as having major depression more often than the CIDI (10 studies, 3023 participants, 269 cases) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.70 (0.84, 3.43)) and the semi-structured SCID (36 studies, 5488 participants, 607 cases) (aOR = 1.52 (1.01, 2.30)). The odds ratio for major depression classification with the CIDI was less likely to increase as HADS-D scores increased than for the SCID (interaction aOR = 0.92 (0.88, 0.96)). Conclusion: Compared to the SCID, the MINI may diagnose more participants as having major depression, and the CIDI may be less responsive to symptom severity.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109892
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2019 Wu Y, Levis B, Riehm KE, Saadat N, Levis AW, Azar M, et al., 'Erratum: Equivalency of the diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-8 and PHQ-9: A systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis (Journal of Physical Chemistry (2019) DOI: 10.1017/S0033291719001314)', Psychological Medicine, (2019)

© 2019 Cambridge University Press. This article was published in Psychological Medicine with incorrect author information. MD Inagaki should be Masatoshi Inagaki and MD Stafford s... [more]

© 2019 Cambridge University Press. This article was published in Psychological Medicine with incorrect author information. MD Inagaki should be Masatoshi Inagaki and MD Stafford should be Lesley Stafford. This has since been updated as per the above.

DOI 10.1017/S0033291719002137
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2018 Levis B, Benedetti A, Riehm KE, Saadat N, Levis AW, Azar M, et al., 'Probability of major depression diagnostic classification using semi-structured versus fully structured diagnostic interviews', BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 212 377-385 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1192/bjp.2018.54
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2016 White J, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm J, McElduff P, Carter G, 'Predictors of health-related quality of life in community-dwelling stroke survivors: A cohort study', Family Practice, 33 382-387 (2016) [C1]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) post stroke is common, though prevalence ... [more]

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Background. Impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) post stroke is common, though prevalence estimates vary considerably. Few longitudinal studies explore post-stroke patterns of HRQoL and factors contributing to their change over time. Accurately identifying HRQoL after stroke is essential to understanding the extent of stroke effects. Objectives. This study aimed to assess change in levels of, and identify independent predictors of, HRQoL over the first 12-months post-stroke. Methods. Design. A prospective cohort study. Setting and participants. Community-dwelling stroke survivors in metropolitan Newcastle, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Consecutively recruited stroke patients (n = 134) participated in face-to-face interviews at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Outcome measure. HRQoL (measured using the Assessment Quality-of-life).Independent measures. Physical and psycho-social functioning, including depression and anxiety (measured via Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), disability (Modified Rankin Scale), social support (Multi-dimensional Scale Perceived Social Support) and community participation (Adelaide Activities Profile).Analyses. A linear mixed model was used to establish the predictors of, change in HRQoL over time. Results. On multivariable analysis, HRQOL did not change significantly with time post-stroke. Higher HRQoL scores were independently associated with higher baseline HRQoL (P = 0.03), younger age (P = 0.006), lower disability (P = 0.003), greater community participation (P = 0.001) and no history of depression (P = 0.03). Conclusion. These results contribute to an understanding of HRQoL in the first year post-stroke. Community participation and stroke-related disability are potentially modifiable risk factors affecting post-stroke HRQoL. Interventions aimed at addressing participation and disability post-stroke should be developed and tested.

DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmw011
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Gregory Carter, Parker Magin, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia
2016 Ward SK, Turner A, Hambridge JA, Halpin SA, Valentine ME, Sweetapple AL, et al., 'Group cognitive behavioural therapy for stroke survivors with depression and their carers', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 23 358-365 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Depression in stroke survivors is common, leads to poorer outcomes and often not treated. A group c... [more]

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Background: Depression in stroke survivors is common, leads to poorer outcomes and often not treated. A group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) program (Brainstorm) for stroke survivors with depression, and their carers has been running as part of usual care since 2007. Objective: To evaluate the implementation and acceptability of Brainstorm, a closed group intervention consisting of up to 10 sessions of education, activity planning, problem solving and thought challenging. Methods: Participating stroke survivors and their carers complete assessment measures at baseline, posttreatment and 1-month and 6-months follow-up. A mixed models for repeated measures data was conducted with depression and anxiety scores for stroke survivors (Beck Depression Inventory-II; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and the assessment of depression, anxiety and carer burden for carers. Acceptability was assessed by session attendance and written and open participant feedback upon completion of the program. Results: Forty-eight community dwelling stroke survivors and 34 carers attended Brainstorm, with a median attendance of 88% of sessions. Follow-up assessments were completed by 77% (post-treatment), 46% (1-month) and 38% (6-month) of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors¿ depression scores decreased from baseline to posttreatment (p<.001); maintained at 1-month (p<.001) but not at 6-month (p=.056). Anxiety scores decreased between baseline and 1-month (p=.013). Carer burden, depression and anxiety scores at 1-month and 6-month follow-up, for carers, were all reduced when compared with baseline (p<.05). Conclusion: The Brainstorm group intervention for depression in stroke survivors appears to have been effectively implemented and is acceptable to stroke survivors and carers.

DOI 10.1179/10.1080/10749357.2016.1143706
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Sean Halpin
2015 White JH, Bartley E, Janssen H, Jordan LA, Spratt N, 'Exploring stroke survivor experience of participation in an enriched environment: A qualitative study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 37 593-600 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Background: Data highlight the importance of undertaking intense and frequent repetition of activities within stroke rehabilitation to ... [more]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Background: Data highlight the importance of undertaking intense and frequent repetition of activities within stroke rehabilitation to maximise recovery. An enriched environment (EE) provides a medium in which these activities can be performed and enhanced recovery achieved. An EE has been shown to promote neuroplasticity in animal models of stroke, facilitating enhanced recovery of motor and cognitive function. However, the benefit of enriching the environment of stroke survivors remains unknown. Aim: To qualitatively explore stroke survivors' experience of implementation of exposure to an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting, in order to identify facilitators and barriers to participation. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 10 stroke survivors (7 females and 3 males, mean age of 70.5 years) exposed to an EE for a 2-week period following exposure to routine rehabilitation within a stroke rehabilitation ward. An inductive thematic approach was utilised to collect and analyse data. Results: Qualitative themes emerged concerning the environmental enrichment paradigm including: (1) "It got me moving"-perceived benefits of participation in an EE; (2) "You can be bored or you can be busy."-Attenuating factors influencing participation in an EE; (3) "I don't like to make the staff busier"-limitations to use of the EE. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary support for the implementation of an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting from a patient perspective. Reported benefits included (1) increased motor, cognitive and sensory stimulation, (2) increased social interaction, (3) alleviation of degree of boredom and (4) increased feelings of personal control. However, participants also identified a number of barriers affecting implementation of the EE. We have previously published findings on perceptions of nursing staff working with stroke survivors in this enriched rehabilitation environment who identified that patients benefited from having better access to physical, cognitive and social activities. Together, results contribute to valuable evidence for future implementation of an EE in stroke rehabilitation settings.Implications for RehabilitationStroke survivor access to an enriched environment (EE):Results identified that participation in both individual and communal forms of environment enrichment within the stroke rehabilitation ward resulted in increased access to activities providing increased opportunities for enhanced motor, cognitive and sensory stimulation.Increased access to and participation in activities of the environmental enrichment (individual and communal) interrupted the ongoing cycle of boredom and inactivity experienced by many participants.This study provides preliminary support for the implementation of an EE within a typical stroke rehabilitation setting from a patient perspective.

DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.935876
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Neil Spratt
2015 White JH, Janssen H, Jordan L, Pollack M, 'Tablet technology during stroke recovery: A survivor's perspective', Disability and Rehabilitation, 37 1186-1192 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Background: Clinician interest in the role of tablet technology in commercially available tablet devices (i.e. iPads) following stroke ... [more]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved. Background: Clinician interest in the role of tablet technology in commercially available tablet devices (i.e. iPads) following stroke is rising. Tablets have the potential to encourage engagement in therapeutic activities. We aimed to explore stroke survivor acceptability of and experience of tablet use during the first three months of stroke recovery. Design: A qualitative study using an inductive thematic approach incorporating the process of constant comparison was utilized to collect and analyse data. Setting: Community dwelling stroke survivors in metropolitan Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Twelve stroke survivors (8 male, 4 female; median age of 73 (IQR 58-83) years). Main outcome measures: Qualitative outcomes were participants' perceptions using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Results: Participants' found tablets easy to use and beneficial. Most stroke survivors used the tablet to engage in therapeutic and leisure activities on most days during the three months. Three key themes emerged: (1) Getting established on the iPad: "It just became easier and easier", (2) Technology as a means for increased stimulation: "Something to keep me interested", and (3) Personal experiences of access to an iPad: "It's been very helpful". Conclusions: Incorporating tablet technology into the delivery of stroke rehabilitation appears to be feasible and acceptable at a patient level. This process has the potential to improve participation in therapeutic and or leisure; however further evaluation towards the impact of tablet technology on patient outcome and quality of life is required.

DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.958620
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Heidi Janssen
2014 White JH, Patterson K, Jordan L-A, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm JW, 'The experience of urinary incontinence in stroke survivors: A follow-up qualitative study', CANADIAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY-REVUE CANADIENNE D ERGOTHERAPIE, 81 124-134 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0008417414527257
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin
2014 White J, Dickson A, Magin P, Tapley A, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, 'Exploring the experience of psychological morbidity and service access in community dwelling stroke survivors: a follow-up study', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 36 1600-1607 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2013.859748
Citations Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, Gregory Carter
2014 White JH, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, Magin P, 'Predictors of depression and anxiety in community dwelling stroke survivors: A cohort study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 36 1975-1982 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. Purpose: Few longitudinal studies explore post-stroke patterns of psychological morbidity and factors contributing to their change over time. We aimed to ex... [more]

© 2014 Informa UK Ltd. Purpose: Few longitudinal studies explore post-stroke patterns of psychological morbidity and factors contributing to their change over time. We aimed to explore predictors of post-stroke depression (PSD) and post-stroke anxiety over a 12-month period. Methods: A prospective cohort study. Consecutively recruited stroke patients (n=134) participated in face-to-face interviews at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Primary outcome measures were depression and anxiety (measured via Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Independent variables included disability (Modified Rankin Scale), Quality-of-life (Assessment Quality-of-life), social support (Multi-dimensional Scale Perceived Social Support) and community participation (Adelaide Activities Profile (AAP)). Secondary outcomes were predictors of resolution and development of PSD and anxiety. Results: Anxiety (47%) was more common than depression (22%) at baseline. Anxiety (but not depression) scores improved over time. Anxiety post-stroke was positively associated with baseline PSD (p<0.0001), baseline anxiety (p<0.0001) and less disability (p=0.042). PSD was associated with baseline anxiety (p<0.0001), baseline depression (p=0.0057), low social support (p=0.0161) and low community participation (p<0.0001). The only baseline factor predicting the resolution of PSD (if depressed at baseline) was increased social support (p=0.0421). Factors that predicted the onset of depression (if not depressed at baseline) were low community participation (p=0.0015) and higher disability (p=0.0057). Conclusion: While more common than depression immediately post-stroke, anxiety attenuates while the burden of depression persists over 12 months. Clinical programs should assess anxiety and depression, provide treatment pathways for those identified, and address modifiable risk factors, especially social support and social engagement.Implications for RehabilitationPsychological distress post stroke is persisting.Multi-disciplinary teams that establish goals with patients promoting social and community engagement could assist in managing psychological morbidity.A shift towards promoting longer-term monitoring and management of stroke survivors must be undertaken, and should consider the factors that support and hinder psychological morbidity.

DOI 10.3109/09638288.2014.884172
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, Gregory Carter
2014 White JH, Alborough K, Janssen H, Spratt N, Jordan L, Pollack M, 'Exploring staff experience of an "enriched environment" within stroke rehabilitation: a qualitative sub-study.', Disabil Rehabil, 36 1783-1789 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2013.872200
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Neil Spratt
2013 White JH, Towers SE, Turner A, Hambridge J, 'Electronic Screening and Decision Support for Poststroke Depression: An Exploration of Doctors' and Patients' Perceptions of Acceptability', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 94 788-790 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.09.009
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2013 White JH, Bynon BL, Marquez J, Sweetapple A, Pollack M, ''Masterstroke: a pilot group stroke prevention program for community dwelling stroke survivors'', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 35 931-938 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2012.717578
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Jodie Marquez
2012 Turner A, Hambridge J, White JH, Carter GL, Clover K, Nelson LJ, Hackett M, 'Depression screening in stroke: A comparison of alternative measures with the structured diagnostic interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Major Depressive Episode) as criterion standard', Stroke, 43 1000-1005 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Gregory Carter
2012 White JH, Gray KR, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter G, Pollack M, 'Exploring the experience of post-stroke fatigue in community dwelling stroke survivors: A prospective qualitative study', Disability and Rehabilitation, 34 1376-1384 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 33
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, Gregory Carter
2012 White JH, Miller B, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Pollack M, 'Access and participation in the community: A prospective qualitative study of driving post-stroke', Disability and Rehabilitation, 34 831-838 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Pollack M, 'Trajectories of psychological distress after stroke', Annals of Family Medicine, 10 435-442 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 23
Co-authors John Attia, Gregory Carter, Parker Magin
2012 Janssen H, Ada L, Karayanidis F, Drysdale K, McElduff P, Pollack MR, et al., 'Translating the use of an enriched environment poststroke from bench to bedside: study design and protocol used to test the feasibility of environmental enrichment on stroke patients in rehabilitation', International Journal of Stroke, 7 521-526 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Patrick Mcelduff, Heidi Janssen, Michael Nilsson, Neil Spratt, Karen Drysdale
2011 Beesley K, White JH, Alston MK, Sweetapple AL, Pollack M, 'Art after stroke: The qualitative experience of community dwelling stroke survivors in a group art programme', Disability and Rehabilitation, 33 2346-2355 (2011)

Purpose This study aimed to qualitatively explore the experience of community dwelling stroke survivors participation in an arts health group programme and possible health benefit... [more]

Purpose This study aimed to qualitatively explore the experience of community dwelling stroke survivors participation in an arts health group programme and possible health benefits to quality of life (QOL) and wellbeing. Method.Sixteen participants were conveniently sampled to participate in two group art programmes, both held weekly over a period of 8 weeks. Qualitative data were collected through two focus groups (n = 9) and individual interviews (n = 11). Qualitative analysis of the data was undertaken, using a grounded theory approach incorporating constant comparison. Results.Age ranged from 43 to 81 years. Four themes emerged including: experience of stroke, benefit of art, benefit for self and benefit of group experience. Participants experienced improved confidence, self-efficacy, QOL and community participation through involvement in an arts health programme. Conclusions.The implementation of an arts health programme after stroke made a substantial impact on well-being and QOL. Results from this study are promising and this is a model that warrants rigorous investigation regarding the impact of art on QOL and wellbeing. This study also highlighted the need for community resources to address community re-integration and service provision in the form of age appropriate, activity-based groups for stroke survivors. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

DOI 10.3109/09638288.2011.571333
Citations Scopus - 24
2010 Marsden D, Quinn R, Pond N, Golledge R, Neilson C, White J, et al., 'A multidisciplinary group programme in rural settings for community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors and their carers: A pilot randomized controlled trial', Clinical Rehabilitation, 24 328-341 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0269215509344268
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2009 White JH, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, 'Stroke patients' experience with the Australian health system: A qualitative study', Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76 81-89 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Parker Magin
2008 White JH, Mackenzie LA, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, 'The occupational experience of stroke survivors in a community setting', OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 28 160-167 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.3928/15394492-20080901-05
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Parker Magin
2008 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Pollack MR, Sturm J, Levi CR, 'Exploring poststroke mood changes in community-dwelling stroke survivors: A qualitative study', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 89 1701-1707 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.12.048
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 16
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, Christopher Levi
2007 White JH, Pollack M, Nair BR, D'Este C, 'Trends in post-stroke functional independence over a 5-year period: A pilot study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THERAPY AND REHABILITATION, 14 404-407 (2007)
DOI 10.12968/ijtr.2007.14.9.24581
Co-authors Kichu Nair
2007 White JH, Alston MK, Marquez JL, Sweetapple AL, Pollack MR, Attia JR, et al., 'Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors: Function Is Not the Whole Story With Quality of Life', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88 1140-1146 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.06.003
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 29
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Levi, Jodie Marquez
Show 25 more journal articles

Conference (16 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Dickson A, White J, Magin P, Attia J, Sturm J, Carter G, et al., 'Exploring the experience of psychological morbidity and service access in community dwelling stroke survivors: A qualitative follow up study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Parker Magin, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Gregory Carter
2013 Bunnik KJ, White JH, Sweetapple A, Hambridge J, Pollack M, 'Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for the prevention and treatment of depression following stroke in community dwelling stroke survivors: A qualitative exploration.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
2013 Williamson A, White JH, Ashby S, Sweetapple A, Hambridge J, Pollack M, 'Carers experiences of transitioning to a caring role and experience of participation in a cognitive behavioural therapy group (CBT): A narrative inquiry', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2012 Jordan L-A, Quain DA, White JH, 'Practice change: Respecting the barriers', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
2012 Towers S, White JH, Turner A, Mavratzakis AL, Hambridge J, Pollack MR, 'Electronic screening for depression in stroke patients: A qualitative study of doctor and patient perceptions of acceptability', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
2012 Jordan L-A, Quain DA, Marsden D, White JH, Bullen K, Wright S, et al., 'Continence care following stroke: What does it take?', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Trajectories of psychological distress: A longitudinal cohort study', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Gregory Carter, John Attia, Parker Magin
2012 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, McElduff P, Pollack MR, 'Exploring post stroke changes in community dwelling stroke survivors: A mixed methods longitudinal cohort study', Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair: WCNR 2012 Oral Abstracts, Melbourne, VIC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Parker Magin, Gregory Carter
2012 Patterson K, White JH, Jordan L, Pollack M, 'Exploring the experience of incontinence in community-dwelling stroke survivors: A mixed methods study', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
2012 Bartley E, White JH, Janssen H, Spratt NJ, Pollack M, 'Exploring the experience of stroke rehabilitation following exposure to an enriched environment', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Neil Spratt
2012 Alborough K, White JH, Janssen H, Spratt NJ, Jordan L, Pollack MR, 'Exploring staff experience of an 'Enriched Environment' within stroke rehabilitation: A qualitative sub-study', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Heidi Janssen, Neil Spratt
2012 Bynon B, White JH, Marquez J, Pollack MR, 'Master Stroke: A mixed methods study exploring the experience of community dwelling stroke survivors in a pilot, group stroke prevention program', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jodie Marquez
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Fitzgerald MN, et al., 'Post-stroke depression and anxiety: A longitudinal cohort study', Journal of Neurology, Lisbon, Portugal (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Parker Magin, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Gregory Carter
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Fitzgerald MN, et al., 'Post-stroke depression and anxiety: A longitudinal cohort study', Cerebrovascular Diseases, Hamburg, Germany (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Gregory Carter, John Attia, Parker Magin
2011 White JH, Magin PJ, Attia JR, Sturm J, Carter GL, Pollack MR, 'Trajectories of psychological distress after stroke: A longitudinal, mixed methods cohort study', Stroke Society of Australasia Annual Scientific Meeting 2011 (SSA-ASM), Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authors John Attia, Parker Magin, Gregory Carter
2008 White JH, Magin PJ, Pollack MR, Attia JR, Sturm J, 'The long-term experience of altered mood in community dwelling stroke survivors: Methodology and preliminary findings of a longitudinal qualitative study', 2008 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts, Hobart, TAS (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Parker Magin, John Attia
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $57,800

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $20,000

A Preliminary Investigation of Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretative Biases in the Treatment of Post-Stroke Anxiety$20,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Sirous Mobini, Dr Bundy Mackintosh, Dr Neil Spratt, Mr John Hambridge, Dr Toby Cumming, Professor Colin MacLeod, Professor Nadina Lincoln, Ms Hilary Davison, Doctor Jenni White
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201071
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20121 grants / $3,000

Exploring the experience of post stroke depression in community dwelling stroke survivors; a mixed methods study$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Miss Alexandra Dickson, Doctor Jenni White, Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Honours Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200732
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $19,800

Can routine computerised screening for depression symptoms post-stroke reduce the prevalence of depression?$19,800

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Jenni White, Doctor Alyna Turner, Doctor Kerrie Clover, Dr Maree Hackett, Mr John Hambridge
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900069
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20081 grants / $15,000

Implementation of computerised screening for depressive symptoms in CVD$15,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Jenni White, Doctor Alyna Turner
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188588
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Dr Jenni White

Position

Research Fellow
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Occupational Therapy

Contact Details

Email jwhite1@newcastle.edu.au
Phone ####

Office

Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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