Dr Jodie Marquez

Dr Jodie Marquez

Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise

Jodie Marquez is a physiotherapist with over 20 years of experience in neurological rehabilitation. It is this clinical background that drives her research to further our understanding of brain dysfunction and emerging rehabilitation techniques. This includes work using EEG and MRI techniques to study physiological effects of therapeutic interventions. The main area of research focus to date has been electrical brain stimulation, particularly direct current stimulation (tDCS), and its potential applications in stroke rehabilitation. Other areas of interest include mood disorders and fatigue post stroke, and adjunct therapies such as mirror therapy, exercise therapy and hippotherapy.



Teaching Expertise

Jodie attained a Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Teaching in 2010 and teaches predominately in the neurological courses of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy Program which is built on previous experience of teaching English as a second language for 5 years in a school in Mexico. She is the Coordinator and Lecturer for several Physiotherapy courses and  supervises numerous honours students each year and RHD students.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate in Health Promotion, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Applied Management (Health), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • electric brain stimulation
  • neurology
  • physiotherapy
  • rehabilitation
  • robotics
  • stroke

Languages

  • Spanish (Fluent)
  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Gallagher R, Marquez J, Osmotherly P, 'Gait and Balance Measures Can Identify Change From a Cerebrospinal Fluid Tap Test in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.', Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 99 2244-2250 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.03.018
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Ryan Gallagher Uon
2018 Cumming TB, Yeo AB, Marquez J, Churilov L, Annoni JM, Badaru U, et al., 'Investigating post-stroke fatigue: An individual participant data meta-analysis', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 113 107-112 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Objective: The prevalence of post-stroke fatigue differs widely across studies, and reasons for such divergence are unclear. We aimed to collate individual da... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Objective: The prevalence of post-stroke fatigue differs widely across studies, and reasons for such divergence are unclear. We aimed to collate individual data on post-stroke fatigue from multiple studies to facilitate high-powered meta-analysis, thus increasing our understanding of this complex phenomenon. Methods: We conducted an Individual Participant Data (IPD) meta-analysis on post-stroke fatigue and its associated factors. The starting point was our 2016 systematic review and meta-analysis of post-stroke fatigue prevalence, which included 24 studies that used the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Study authors were asked to provide anonymised raw data on the following pre-identified variables: (i) FSS score, (ii) age, (iii) sex, (iv) time post-stroke, (v) depressive symptoms, (vi) stroke severity, (vii) disability, and (viii) stroke type. Linear regression analyses with FSS total score as the dependent variable, clustered by study, were conducted. Results: We obtained data from 14 of the 24 studies, and 12 datasets were suitable for IPD meta-analysis (total n = 2102). Higher levels of fatigue were independently associated with female sex (coeff. = 2.13, 95% CI 0.44¿3.82, p = 0.023), depressive symptoms (coeff. = 7.90, 95% CI 1.76¿14.04, p = 0.021), longer time since stroke (coeff. = 10.38, 95% CI 4.35¿16.41, p = 0.007) and greater disability (coeff. = 4.16, 95% CI 1.52¿6.81, p = 0.010). While there was no linear association between fatigue and age, a cubic relationship was identified (p < 0.001), with fatigue peaks in mid-life and the oldest old. Conclusion: Use of IPD meta-analysis gave us the power to identify novel factors associated with fatigue, such as longer time since stroke, as well as a non-linear relationship with age.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.08.006
Co-authors Coralie English
2018 Robinson T, Wakely L, Marquez J, Rae K, 'Surviving, not thriving: a qualitative analysis of parents' perceptions of physical activity participation for rurally residing children with a disability.', Rural and remote health, 18 4536 (2018)
DOI 10.22605/rrh4536
Co-authors Kym Rae, Luke Wakely
2018 Postol N, Marquez J, Spartalis S, Bivard A, Spratt NJ, 'Do powered over-ground lower limb robotic exoskeletons affect outcomes in the rehabilitation of people with acquired brain injury?', Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol, 1-12 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/17483107.2018.1499137
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Andrew Bivard
2018 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Marquez J, de Zoete R, Rivett DA, 'Clinical Benefits of Joint Mobilization on Ankle Sprains: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 99 1395-1412.e5 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, ... [more]

© 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Dissertations and Theses were searched from inception to June 2017. Study Selection: Studies investigating humans with grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathologic state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilization were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full-text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data Extraction: Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes, and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short-term, and long-term follow-up points. Data Synthesis: Methodological quality was assessed independently by 2 reviewers, and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilization compared with comparators on improving posteromedial dynamic balance (P=.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (P=.16), static balance (P=.96), or pain intensity (P=.45). Joint mobilization was beneficial in the short-term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (P=.003) compared with a control. Conclusions: Joint mobilization appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application, and dorsiflexion range in the short-term. Long-term benefits have not been adequately investigated.

DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.019
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Suzanne Snodgrass, Rutger Dezoete, Darren Rivett
2018 Gallagher RM, Marquez J, Osmotherly P, 'Cognitive and upper limb symptom changes from a tap test in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus', Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery, 174 92-96 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objectives: To determine which cognitive and upper limb assessments can identify change in patients undergoing a Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test (TT) diagn... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objectives: To determine which cognitive and upper limb assessments can identify change in patients undergoing a Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test (TT) diagnosed with idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH). Patients and methods: Prospective observational study of 74 iNPH patients undergoing a CSF TT for consideration of a ventricular peritoneal shunt. Patients who were offered surgical intervention were classified as responders. Patients were assessed with a battery of cognitive and upper limb assessments prior to and following a CSF TT. The Timed up and go cognition (TUG-C), Montreal Cognitive assessment (MoCA) and 9-hole peg test were utilised. Results: 40 patients were classified responders. Significant differences were identified for responders for the MoCA (0.62 points) and TUG-C (-6.02 s). Only the executive function and orientation sub scores of the MoCA showed significant changes for responders. The 9 hole peg test mean change of 4.33 s for responders was not significant. Non-responder change scores for the MoCA (0.22 points), TUG-C (0.3 s) and 9 hole peg test (2.58 s) were not significant. Conclusion: The TUG-C has the potential to identify change in patients resulting from a CSF TT. While statistically significant change was found for the MoCA, a mean change of less than 1 point on this scale is unlikely to be clinically relevant. Similarly, the 9 hole peg test cannot be endorsed as an assessment tool for identifying changed performance in iNPH.

DOI 10.1016/j.clineuro.2018.09.015
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Ryan Gallagher Uon
2018 Hamilton A, Wakely L, Marquez J, 'Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation on Motor Function in Pediatric Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review', Pediatric physical therapy : the official publication of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association, 30 291-301 (2018) [C1]

METHODS: Six electronic databases were searched using terms related to tDCS, combined with functional deficits/associated clinical measures. Results were filtered, including rando... [more]

METHODS: Six electronic databases were searched using terms related to tDCS, combined with functional deficits/associated clinical measures. Results were filtered, including randomized controlled trials in English and children with cerebral palsy. Data were extracted using standardized procedures, and the PEDro scale was used to assess quality and meta-analyses conducted.RESULTS: From 135 articles, 9 studies with moderate quality met inclusion criteria. Six were included in 7 separate meta-analyses supporting a benefit of tDCS for static balance, only at follow-up. Benefits of tDCS on dynamic balance, step length, and mobility were not established.CONCLUSIONS: The findings from meta-analyses suggest that tDCS may provide improvements in static balance at follow-up in children with cerebral palsy and positive effects on gait velocity; however, there was heterogeneity. Further research is needed before this therapy can be endorsed.PURPOSE: To determine effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on motor function for children with cerebral palsy.

DOI 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000535
Co-authors Luke Wakely
2018 Gallagher R, Marquez J, Osmotherly P, 'Clinimetric Properties and Minimal Clinically Important Differences for a Battery of Gait, Balance, and Cognitive Examinations for the Tap Test in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.', Neurosurgery, (2018)
DOI 10.1093/neuros/nyy286
Co-authors Ryan Gallagher Uon
2018 Marquez J, Weerasekara I, Chambers L, 'Hippotherapy in adults with acquired brain injury: A systematic review.', Physiother Theory Pract, 1-12 (2018)
DOI 10.1080/09593985.2018.1494233
2017 Marquez JL, Conley AC, Karayanidis F, Miller J, Lagopoulos J, Parsons MW, 'Determining the benefits of transcranial direct current stimulation on functional upper limb movement in chronic stroke', International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 40 138-145 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed as a tool to enhance stroke rehabilitation; however, evide... [more]

© 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed as a tool to enhance stroke rehabilitation; however, evidence to support its use is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of anodal and cathodal tDCS on upper limb function in chronic stroke patients. Twenty five participants were allocated to receive 20 min of 1 mA of anodal, cathodal or sham cortical stimulation in a random, counterbalanced order. Patients and assessors were blinded to the intervention at each time point. The primary outcome was upper limb performance as measured by the Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function (total score, fine motor subtest score and gross motor subtest score) as well as grip strength. Each outcome was assessed at baseline and at the conclusion of each intervention in both upper limbs. Neither anodal nor cathodal stimulation resulted in statistically significantly improved upper limb performance on any of the measured tasks compared with sham stimulation (P>0.05). When the data were analysed according to disability, participants with moderate/severe disability showed significantly improved gross motor function following cathodal stimulation compared with sham (P=0.014). However, this was accompanied by decreased key grip strength in the unaffected hand (P=0.003). We are unable to endorse the use of anodal and cathodal tDCS in the management of upper limb dysfunction in chronic stroke patients. Although there appears to be more potential for the use of cathodal stimulation in patients with severe disability, the effects were small and must be considered with caution as they were accompanied by unanticipated effects in the unaffected upper limb.

DOI 10.1097/MRR.0000000000000220
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Frini Karayanidis, Mark Parsons
2016 Conley AC, Fulham WR, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Karayanidis F, 'No Effect of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Motor Cortex on Response-Related ERPs during a Conflict Task (vol 10, 384, 2016)', FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 10 (2016)
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00584
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2016 Conley AC, Fulham WR, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Karayanidis F, 'No effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the motor cortex on response-related ERPs during a conflict task', Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10 13 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Conley, Fulham, Marquez, Parsons and Karayanidis. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the motor cortex is considered a potential treatment for motor ... [more]

© 2016 Conley, Fulham, Marquez, Parsons and Karayanidis. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the motor cortex is considered a potential treatment for motor rehabilitation following stroke and other neurological pathologies. However, both the context under which this stimulation is effective and the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which anodal tDCS may affect motor performance by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) during a cued go/nogo task after anodal tDCS over dominant primary motor cortex (M1) in young adults (Experiment 1) and both dominant and non-dominant M1 in older adults (Experiment 2). In both experiments, anodal tDCS had no effect on either response time (RT) or response-related ERPs, including the cue-locked contingent negative variation (CNV) and both target-locked and response-locked lateralized readiness potentials (LRP). Bayesian model selection analyses showed that, for all measures, the null effects model was stronger than a model including anodal tDCS vs. sham. We conclude that anodal tDCS has no effect on RT or response-related ERPs during a cued go/nogo task in either young or older adults.

DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00384
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2015 Marquez J, van Vliet P, Mcelduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): Does it have merit in stroke rehabilitation? A systematic review', International Journal of Stroke, 10 306-316 (2015) [C1]

© 2013 World Stroke Organization. Transcranial direct current stimulation has been gaining increasing interest as a potential therapeutic treatment in stroke recovery. We performe... [more]

© 2013 World Stroke Organization. Transcranial direct current stimulation has been gaining increasing interest as a potential therapeutic treatment in stroke recovery. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to collate the available evidence in adults with residual motor impairments as a result of stroke. The primary outcome was change in motor function or impairment as a result of transcranial direct current stimulation, using any reported electrode montage, with or without adjunct physical therapy. The search yielded 15 relevant studies comprising 315 subjects. Compared with sham, cortical stimulation did not produce statistically significant improvements in motor performance when measured immediately after the intervention (anodal stimulation: facilitation of the affected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·05, P=0·71; cathodal stimulation: inhibition of the nonaffected cortex: standardized mean difference=0·39, P=0·08; bihemispheric stimulation: standardized mean difference=0·24, P=0·39). When the data were analyzed according to stroke characteristics, statistically significant improvements were evident for those with chronic stroke (standardized mean difference=0·45, P=0·01) and subjects with mild-to-moderate stroke impairments (standardized mean difference=0·37, P=0·02). Transcranial direct current stimulation is likely to be effective in enhancing motor performance in the short term when applied selectively to patients with stroke. Given the range of stimulation variables and heterogeneous nature of stroke, this modality is still experimental and further research is required to determine its clinical merit in stroke rehabilitation.

DOI 10.1111/ijs.12169
Citations Scopus - 50Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Paulette Vanvliet, Mark Parsons
2015 Marquez J, Conley A, Karayanidis F, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Anodal direct current stimulation in the healthy aged: Effects determined by the hemisphere stimulated', Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, 33 509-519 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Purpose: Research popularity and scope for the application of transcranial direct current stimulation have been steadily i... [more]

© 2015 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved. Purpose: Research popularity and scope for the application of transcranial direct current stimulation have been steadily increasing yet many fundamental questions remain unanswered. We sought to determine if anodal stimulation of either hemisphere leads to improved performance of the contralateral hand and/or altered function of the ipsilateral hand, or affects movement preparation, in older subjects. Method: In this cross-over, double blind, sham controlled study, 34 healthy aged participants (age range 40-86) were randomised to receive 20 minutes of stimulation to either the dominant or non-dominant motor cortex. The primary outcome was functional performance of both upper limbs measured by the Jebsen Taylor Test and hand grip strength. Additionally, we measured motor preparation using electrophysiological (EEG) recordings. Results: Anodal stimulation resulted in statistically significantly improved performance of the non-dominant hand (p < 0.01) but did not produce significant changes in the dominant hand on any measure (p > 0.05). This effect occurred irrespective of the hemisphere stimulated. Stimulation did not produce significant effects on measures of gross function, grip strength, reaction times, or electrophysiological measures on the EEG data. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the hemispheres respond differently to anodal stimulation and the response appears to be task specific but not mediated by age.

DOI 10.3233/RNN-140490
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2015 Conley AC, Marquez J, Parsons MW, Fulham WR, Heathcote A, Karayanidis F, 'Anodal tDCS over the motor cortex on prepared and unprepared responses in young adults', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Conley et al. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) has been proposed as a possible therapeutic rehabilitation technique ... [more]

© 2015 Conley et al. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) has been proposed as a possible therapeutic rehabilitation technique for motor impairment. However, despite extensive investigation into the effects of anodal tDCS on motor output, there is little information on how anodal tDCS affects response processes. In this study, we used a cued go/nogo task with both directional and non-directional cues to assess the effects of anodal tDCS over the dominant (left) primary motor cortex on prepared and unprepared motor responses. Three experiments explored whether the effectiveness of tDCS varied with timing between stimulation and test. Healthy, right-handed young adults participated in a double-blind randomised controlled design with crossover of anodal tDCS and sham stimulation. In Experiment 1, twenty-four healthy young adults received anodal tDCS over dominant M1 at least 40 mins before task performance. In Experiment 2, eight participants received anodal tDCS directly before task performance. In Experiment 3, twenty participants received anodal tDCS during task performance. In all three experiments, participants responded faster to directional compared to non-directional cues and with their right hand. However, anodal tDCS had no effect on go/nogo task performance at any stimulation - test interval. Bayesian analysis confirmed that anodal stimulation had no effect on response speed. We conclude that anodal tDCS over M1 does not improve response speed of prepared or unprepared responses of young adults in a go/nogo task.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0124509
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Andrew Heathcote, Frini Karayanidis
2014 Hubbard IJ, Evans M, McMullen-Roach S, Marquez J, Parsons MW, 'Five years of acute stroke unit care: Comparing ASU and non-ASU admissions and allied health involvement', Stroke Research and Treatment, (2014) [C1]

Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter H... [more]

Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525) and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826). The study's primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days), and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016). There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=-8.233; P=0.0000) and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall's ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall's Stroke Unit and allied healthcare. © 2014 Isobel J. Hubbard et al.

DOI 10.1155/2014/798258
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Isobel Hubbard
2014 Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: a randomised controlled trial.', Contemporary nurse, 5231-5255 (2014)
DOI 10.5172/conu.2014.5231
Co-authors Isabel Higgins, Pamela Vanderriet
2014 Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, van der Riet PJ, Marquez J, Sibbritt D, 'The influence of tai chi and yoga on balance and falls in a residential care setting: A randomised controlled trial', Contemporary nurse, 48 76-87 (2014) [C1]

Abstract Falls amongst older people is a global public health concern. Whilst falling is not a typical feature of ageing, older people are more likely to fall. Fall injuries among... [more]

Abstract Falls amongst older people is a global public health concern. Whilst falling is not a typical feature of ageing, older people are more likely to fall. Fall injuries amongst older people are a leading cause of death and disability. Many older people do not do regular exercise so that they lose muscle tone, strength, and flexibility which affect balance and predispose them to falls. The management of falls in residential care settings is a major concern with strategies for prevention and monitoring a focus in this setting. Yoga and tai chi have shown potential to improve balance and prevent falls in older adults. They also have potential to improve pain and quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting a three-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT) with frail older people in a residential care setting to test the hypothesis that a 14-week modified tai chi or yoga programme is more effective than usual care activity in improving balance function, quality of life, pain experience and in reducing number of falls. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups in the occurrence of falls. Yoga demonstrated a slight decrease in fall incidence; quality of life improved for the tai chi group. Only the yoga group experienced a reduction in average pain scores though not statistically significant. The findings of the study suggest it is possible to safely implement modified yoga and tai chi in a residential care setting and evaluate this using RCT design. They show positive changes to balance, pain and quality of life and a high level of interest through attendance amongst the older participants. The results support offering tai chi and yoga to older people who are frail and dependent with physical and cognitive limitations.

DOI 10.5172/conu.2014.48.1.76
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet, Isabel Higgins
2014 Marquez JL, Parsons M, Stoginovsky E, Conley A, Lagopolous J, Karyinidis F, 'Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS): Anodal or cathodal stimulation for chronic stroke - which is better?', CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES, 37 300-300 (2014)
Co-authors Mark Parsons
2014 Downs S, Marquez J, Chiarelli P, 'Normative scores on the Berg Balance Scale decline after age 70 years in healthy community-dwelling people: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 60 85-89 (2014)
DOI 10.1016/j.jphys.2014.01.002
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2013 White JH, Bynon BL, Marquez J, Sweetapple A, Pollack M, ''Masterstroke: a pilot group stroke prevention program for community dwelling stroke survivors'', DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 35 931-938 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2012.717578
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 11
2013 Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass S, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus of feedback and instructions in the treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', MANUAL THERAPY, 18 458-467 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2013.07.002
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Paulette Vanvliet
2013 Downs S, Marquez J, Chiarelli P, 'The Berg Balance Scale has high intra- and inter-rater reliability but absolute reliability varies across the scale: a systematic review', JOURNAL OF PHYSIOTHERAPY, 59 93-99 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S1836-9553(13)70161-9
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2012 Downs S, Marquez JL, Chiarelli PE, 'Balance outcomes from two small rural hospitals', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 275-280 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli
2007 White JH, Alston MK, Marquez JL, Sweetapple AL, Pollack MR, Attia JR, et al., 'Community-Dwelling Stroke Survivors: Function Is Not the Whole Story With Quality of Life', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 88 1140-1146 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2007.06.003
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Christopher Levi, John Attia
Wells H, Marquez J, Wakely L, 'Garment Therapy does not Improve Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.', Phys Occup Ther Pediatr, 38 395-416 [C1]
DOI 10.1080/01942638.2017.1365323
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wakely
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Cumming T, Marquez J, Yeo A-B, Churliov L, English C, 'Investigating post-stroke fatigue: an individual participant data meta-analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2017)
Co-authors Coralie English
2017 Wakely LT, Marquez J, Rae K, Johnston C, Robinson T, Freeman J, 'Surviving not thriving: Parents' perceptions of physical activity for rurally residing children with a disability', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Kym Rae, Cath Johnston
2017 Wakely LT, Marquez J, Wakely K, Little A, Crowley E, Neal M, 'Collaborating to care for country kids: Online education for rural educators and clinicians working with children with special needs', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Katrina Wakely, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely, Elesa Crowley
2017 Gallagher R, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'Can upper limb and cognitive outcome measures identify change in patients undergoing a lumbar puncture tap test with Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH)?', Momentum 2017. Proceedings of Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Ryan Gallagher Uon, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Gallagher R, Marquez JL, Osmotherly PG, 'Can gait and balance measures identify individuals who respond to a lumbar puncture tap test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus?', Momentum 2017. Proceedings of Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Ryan Gallagher Uon, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Gallagher R, Bateman G, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'Is the sagittal sinus involved in iNPH? Analysis of MRI CSF flow studies in patients undergoing a CSF tap test(TT) for idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH).', Kobe, Japan (2017)
Co-authors Ryan Gallagher Uon, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Gallagher R, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'Can upper limb and cognitive outcome measures identify change in patients undergoing a lumbar puncture tap test with Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (iNPH)?', Kobe, Japan (2017)
Co-authors Ryan Gallagher Uon, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Gallagher R, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'Can gait and balance measures identify individuals who respond to a lumbar puncture tap test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus?', Kobe, Japan (2017)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Ryan Gallagher Uon
2015 Gallagher R, Chiarelli PE, Marquez J, Osmotherly PG, 'iNPH QUEST Study: Quantifying a battery of gait, cognitive and radiological examinations to improve shunt response from the lumbar puncture tap test ¿ Interim results', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2015 Smith H, Marquez J, Ada L, Spratt NJ, Nilsson M, Pollack M, et al., 'Quantifying physical, cognitive and social activity early after stroke: How enriched is the acute stroke environment?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Neil Spratt, Patrick Mcelduff, Michael Nilsson
2013 Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass SJ, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus in motor learning for musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Suzanne Snodgrass
2013 Marquez J, Van Vliet P, McElduff P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): is it effective as a stroke therapy?: a systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Mark Parsons, Paulette Vanvliet
2013 Miller J, Marquez J, Van Vliet P, Lagopoulos J, Parsons M, 'Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A randomised controlled trial to investigate the effects on upper limb function in chronic stroke', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STROKE (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Paulette Vanvliet
2012 Marquez JL, Kempton A, Alston M, 'The effect of exercise on mood disturbance in chronic stroke', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
2012 Marquez JL, Hollingsworth SE, Lancaster M, 'It's all just stroke and mirrors! The clinical implementation of mirror therapy to restore lower limb function and mobility following stroke and traumatic brain injury', Abstract E-book. 2012 European Stroke Conference, Lisbon, Portugal (2012) [E3]
2012 Conley A, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Fulham WR, Lagopoulos J, Karayanidis F, 'Sustained effects of anodal tDCS over the dominant motor cortex on response preparation processes', Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: ACNS-2012 Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Conference, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2012 Conley A, Marquez JL, Parsons MW, Lagopoulos J, Karayanidis F, 'Effects of anodal tDCS over the primary motor cortex on response preparation and execution', Combined Abstracts of 2012 Australian Psychology Conferences, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Frini Karayanidis
2012 Saravanakumar P, Higgins IJ, Sibbritt DW, Van Der Riet PJ, Marquez JL, 'Yoga and tai chi for fall prevention in residential care: A feasibility study', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, Glasgow, Scotland (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Pamela Vanderriet, Isabel Higgins
2012 Bynon B, White JH, Marquez J, Pollack MR, 'Master Stroke: A mixed methods study exploring the experience of community dwelling stroke survivors in a pilot, group stroke prevention program', International Journal of Stroke, Darling Harbour, Sydney (2012) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $75,123

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $9,896

Assessment for stroke recovery$9,896

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Lin Kooi Ong, Doctor Gary Crowfoot, Doctor Heidi Janssen, Doctor Dianne Marsden, Doctor Jodie Marquez, Associate Professor Coralie English, Associate Professor Rohan Walker
Scheme Medical Research Support Program (MRSP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701224
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20142 grants / $4,500

Quantifying Physical, Cognitive and Social Activity Early After Stroke$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez, Doctor Heidi Janssen, Miss Hannah Smith, Professor Neil Spratt, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Associate Professor Louise Ada
Scheme Honours Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301144
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

European Stroke Conference, Nice, France, 6-9 May 2014$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400464
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20132 grants / $22,860

ERF Teaching Relief - Marquez - Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and recovery of upper limb function following stroke$21,460

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez, Professor Darren Rivett
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200946
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Australasian Stroke Conference, NT 31 July to 2 Aug 2013.$1,400

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300795
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20123 grants / $21,867

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): A new modality in stroke rehabilitation$17,367

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez, Professor Mark Parsons, Associate Professor Jim Lagopoulos, Professor Frini Karayanidis, Professor Paulette Van Vliet
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1101038
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Exploring the experience of post stroke depression in community dwelling stroke survivors; a mixed methods study$3,000

Funding body: National Stroke Foundation

Funding body National Stroke Foundation
Project Team Miss Alexandra Dickson, Ms Jennifer White, Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Honours Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200732
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

European Stroke Conference, Lisboa Congress Centre, 22 25 May 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200501
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20102 grants / $16,000

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): The potential to improve stroke recovery$9,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez, Professor Mark Parsons, Professor Frini Karayanidis
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000942
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): The potential to improve stroke recovery$6,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez
Scheme Early Career Researcher (Equipment) Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001072
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 Masters Implication of a Quick Balance Screening Tool, the 10 Second Tandem Stance, in the Prescription of Mobility Aid M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Determining the Merits of Powered Overground Robotic Lower Limb Exoskeletons in Neuro-Rehabilitation PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD iNPH QUEST Study: Quantifying a Battery of Gait, Cognitive and Radiological Examinations to Improve identification of Shunt candidates from the Cerebrospinal Fluid Tap Test PhD (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2014 Masters The Berg Balance Scale - Determining its Usefulness in the Elderly M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Jodie Marquez

Position

Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Email jodie.marquez@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 2041
Link Research and Innovation Cluster

Office

Room HC20
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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