Professor  Suzanne Snodgrass

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Professor

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

Preventing injury through movement-based interventions

Physiotherapist, educator, and researcher Professor Suzanne Snodgrass is helping clinicians improve patient outcomes by showing how just effective movement can be in improving balance and recovering from pain and sports injuries.

An image of Dr Suzanne Snodgrass in her research lab

Professor Snodgrass is leading the way to better understand human movement in order to prevent and treat injury more effectively.

Her team’s current focus is on the relationship between balance and cognition and finding ways to identify age-related balance decline in adults younger than 65.

“Falls are Australia’s number one cause of injury, hospitalisation and death, and the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related deaths worldwide,” says Suzanne.

“Poor balance is a major risk factor for falls, especially in mid-late life. The number of falls in the general population triples between age 40 and 60 years, indicating middle age is a crucial time for prevention.”

Identifying age-related decline is important, as it enables her to implement targeted programs in middle age to prevent future falls and slow the ageing process.

Professor Snodgrass also works on projects to identify movement-related injury risk factors in athletes and people with pain conditions and develop and evaluate interventions to address them.

Bridging the balance knowledge gap

“There’s a fundamental gap in knowledge in the underlying reasons balance problems develop as you get older and why this happens at an earlier age for some people and not others,” says Suzanne.

“Poor balance is linked to lower cognitive ability, and it can be challenging to balance when you’re also engaged in a cognitive task.

“Balance is also affected by your position sense in your foot and ankle, your vision, and sensors in your inner ear and neck.”

To address the balance and falls gap, Professor Snodgrass and her teamcombine physiotherapy, exercise science, psychology and neuroscience expertise to discover why some people develop balance problems early in middle age.

They’re also developing acceptable and effective targeted prevention strategies to reduce fall risk. An example of such prevention strategies includes physical activity and exercise interventions that incorporate dual balance and cognitive tasks.

Passion embedded in clinical practice

Professor Snodgrass’s expertise in preventing and treating injury using movement originated from clinical interests over a decade of working as a physiotherapist in clinical practice.

To help her patients, she analysed why they might have pain or have injured themselves by looking at how their bodies move during the activity related to their pain or injury. She then taught them movement strategies to aid recovery or prevent future injuries.

She has also applied these strategies to herself and finds that changing her movement strategy or posture through exercise just works.

Because of this success, she wanted to teach others about these approaches, and provide scientific evidence to support movement-based interventions, prompting her to move into research.

Much of her work is embedded in clinical practice, investigating the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment approaches.

The power of clinical collaboration

Professor Snodgrass involves international and national collaborators in her research, increasing its global impact.

As well as investigating brain activity, cognition and ankle position sense related to balance (University of Canberra, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), her projects include muscle biomarkers related to neck pain (Stanford, University of Sydney), clinical physiotherapy interventions (Tufts), movement variability related to sports injury (University of Nebraska Omaha), and sports biomechanics (University of Sydney).

“Developing international collaborations with clinical researchers in the US has enabled our research to impact clinical practice in other countries,” says Suzanne.

For these projects, they partner directly with clinicians and often survey or interview patients participating in studies to gain their perspectives on treatment interventions. Because of this, their research has consumers engaged throughout the process, increasing translation.

Positively impacting pain and sports injuries

As well as impacting falls and ageing, the difference Professor Snodgrass and her team are making in pain, sports injury and sports biomechanics is palpable.

“We’ve shown that manual therapy to the spine was effective in reducing certain types of shoulder pain, and dry needling to the neck didn’t improve outcomes better than a regime of manual therapy and exercise for neck pain.”

Their findings have been included in professional development programs for practitioners and generated interest from clinicians by reaching more than 1.1 million people on social media.

“Our program of research on hamstring injuries with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the US has led to an ongoing collaboration where we are analysing movement-based mechanisms for hamstring, ankle and groin injuries in their players, she continues.

“They’ll use our analysis to improve their training and injury prevention programs.”

Being the elite level of sport, the NBA is influential in development programs for young basketball players, so successful strategies for injury prevention that they implement will ultimately help players at the grassroots level, too.

With basketball one of the fastest-growing sports for kids in Australia, their research will also help young Australian players prevent injury and reach their potential.

Potential for people and physiotherapy

Looking forward, Professor Snodgrass is excited about the potential her work has to dramatically improve the health and wellbeing of people as they age.

“Discovering more about why some people have worse balance at a younger age than others, and finding ways to maintain or improve balance skills has great potential to help people stay healthier for longer.”

She also sees her clinical studies as continuing to positively influence how clinicians approach patient management. Ultimately, improvements in rehabilitation will help patients recover from pain and injury.

Through her mentoring, many of her PhD students have gone on to become successful independent researchers or research leaders themselves.

The collective impact of their work on pain and injury mechanisms, physiotherapy rehabilitation approaches, and the future generations of young researchers continue to grow.

Professor Snodgrass remains curious when it comes to finding out how the human body works.

“What drives me is a strong desire to know why and a need to solve problems. For example, why do some people have better balance than others? Can regular exercise improve balance skills as we age?”

These are some of the questions that motivate her to keep trying to find time in her busy professional and family life for research.

An image of Dr Suzanne Snodgrass in her research lab

Preventing injury through movement-based interventions

Professor Snodgrass’ expertise in preventing and treating injury using movement originated from clinical interests over a decade of working as a physiotherapist in clinical practice.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass is a registered physiotherapist, educator, and researcher in movement control, pain and rehabilitation. She holds a number of concurrent leadership roles including Head of the Physiotherapy Discipline at the University of Newcastle and Director of the Biomechanics and Exercise Testing Laboratory at Newcastle’s Callaghan campus. Professor Snodgrass’ research program aims to address gaps in our understanding of pain, movement and balance dysfunction, and discover new was to treat movement dysfunction through exercise and physical activity.

My main research activity currently focuses on strategies to identify age-related balance decline in adults younger than 65, and promote physical activity and exercise interventions to improve balance, prevent falls and slow the ageing process. I also work on projects to identify movement-related injury risk factors in athletes and people with pain conditions, and to develop and evaluate interventions to address these risk factors.

Over the past 20 years I have worked in a teaching and research capacity, following 10 years in clinical practice as a musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapist and certified athletic trainer.

I have specific experience in the use of exercise-based muscle retraining for people and athletes with pain, movement or balance problems. I assess movement problems using laboratory measures of human movement such as 3D motion capture, force sensors, and monitoring brain and muscle activity during movement.

Research Leadership

As a research leader I have a strong focus on mentoring and developing the next generation of researchers, especially clinician-led research in practice.

In the last 10 years I have supervised 23 PhD students, 13 who have completed, including five trials of physiotherapy treatments conducted in clinical practice settings. My students have co-authored 70% of my journal publications. My mentoring extends post-graduation, helping my mentees navigate the research landscape and opportunities.

I currently sit on the Council of Physiotherapy Deans Australia and New Zealand (CPDANZ) that sets policies and professional agendas for Physiotherapy education in Australia and New Zealand. I have contributed to the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) on national scientific conference organising committees, and professional development for APA NSW and the Hunter Regional Group.

I am currently the Deputy Head of School - Research Training for the School of Health Sciences, having served in a similar role as the HDR Convenor for six years (2011-15 & 2021), and also for 7 years as Honours Convenor (2009-15). Our School has 10 unique health disciplines contributing to the complexity of the role. In this role, I have the opportunity to mentor supervisors as well as research students, with my aim to guide new researchers on their research journeys.

I promote awareness of research in the community. I mentored high school girls in the inaugural Biomechanics Research and Innovation Challenge to increase female participation in science and technology. I have organised public research forums for the community to learn about pain and concussion, and presented to community groups. I promote physiotherapy research in physiotherapy at the Hunter Medical Research Open day. I provide invited expert commentaries for radio and print media and written invited articles for The Conversation.

Research Expertise

My main research goal is to better understand human movement in order to prevent and treat injury more effectively. My innovative investigation methods combine pre-clinical “bench” and clinical “bedside” approaches.

I established my Biomechanics Laboratory in 2012, and was the first to objectively measure the forces that physiotherapists apply to the neck when treating people with neck pain. I also developed and validated techniques to measure the stiffness of the joints in the neck.

We are now a multidisciplinary Biomechanics and Exercise Testing Laboratory with research projects across 5 themes; I lead two: balance, cognition and falls; neck and back pain; and collaborate in another: concussion and tackling re-education.

I have unique, specific skills in the assessment of 3D human movement, and exercise and manual physiotherapy treatments designed to improve movement strategies, reduce pain and prevent injury.

I use novel approaches to better understand the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning pain which involve multidisciplinary collaborators. For example, investigating muscle composition and brain structure and function using MRI and fNIRS with colleagues in neuroscience, radiography, exercise science and psychology.

Aiming to improve evidence for physiotherapy care and build research capacity in clinicians, I have conducted numerous trials embedded in practice, that build research capacity in health professionals and the health system, and have immediate relevance to practice.


Research Collaboration

I bring together researchers in physiotherapy, exercise science, radiography, psychology and chiropractic to impact problems with movement, brain and muscle dysfunction in people with chronic pain/injury.

I drive innovation through my established collaborations with international world leaders in:

  • Brain activity, somatosensory processes and cognition decline related to balance (Teo, NTU Singapore; Waddington, UCanberra; Karayanidis, UON): I lead novel methods to explore the impact of cognition on balance and its related somatosensory processes.
  • Physiotherapy treatments for pain (Cleland, Tufts; Cook, Duke): We investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions, including the underlying mechanisms of force-based manual treatments for pain.
  • MRI muscle morphology (Weber, Stanford, Elliott, USYD) and brain structure and function (Stanwell, UON; de Zoete, UAdelaide; Weber, Stanford): I have gathered one of the largest longitudinal data sets of muscle MRIs of individuals with idiopathic neck pain (neck pain without a known cause) and we are currently working on AI for muscle segmentation to develop a clinical test for muscle as a biomarker in pain.
  • Movement variability analysis (Likens, Stergiou, UN-Omaha): I chaired international training course with Stergiou attracting researchers from 3 states to UON 2019.
  • Biomechanics (Edwards, USYD): We are impacting concussion risk in women’s NRL through a better understanding of tackle biomechanics and tackle re-education, and conducting industry-led research with the National Basketball Association to reduce the risk of hamstring and ankle injuries.

Research Awards

Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research Supervision Excellence 2022

College of Health, Medicine & Wellbeing Mid-Career Researcher Award 2022

One of four finalists for Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Research Supervision Excellence 2020

Hunter Medical Research Institute Equal Futures Alumni Award 2018

School of Health Sciences Award for Research Supervision Excellence 2018

Faculty of Health Research Excellence Award (Early Career) 2013

I was the first PhD to be awarded in Physiotherapy at the University of Newcastle in 2008.

Teaching Awards

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Innovation and Impact Award 2020

Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Merit List for Learning and Teaching Excellence for Outstanding Overall Course Performance 2018-2022

Research Goals

My vision is to create world-leading treatments to promote better healthier living, supported by discoveries of neurobiological causes of movement dysfunction (for example, muscle composition, sensory perception, and brain activity). I strive to understand why people have pain and altered movement patterns by investigating the underlying mechanisms of muscle, brain, sensory perception and movement output.

My research is currently focussed on developing strategies for more effective assessment of balance to enable early identification of balance problems and falls risk in middle age. This will support the promotion of physical activity interventions for middle age to reduce falls risk and prevent age-related health decline.

Key words

Human movement
Balance
Biomechanics
Movement control
Posture
Postural sway
Injury prevention
Falls
Ageing
Pain
Physiotherapy
Rehabilitation
Physical activity
Exercise
Manual therapy
Mechanisms
Musculoskeletal
Muscle
Neuromuscular control
Sports injury


Qualifications

  • PhD (Physiotherapy), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Physical Therapy), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Master of Medical Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • cervical spine
  • healthy lifestyle
  • musculoskeletal manipulations
  • musculoskeletal physiotherapy
  • neck pain
  • physical activity
  • physical therapy/physiotherapy
  • physiotherapy
  • spine
  • sports physiotherapy
  • therapeutic exercise

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420106 Physiotherapy 60
420701 Biomechanics 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Professor University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
Member - Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Association Australia Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Association Australia
Australia
Scientific Committee Member - Biennial Conference 2007 Scientific Committee Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia
Australia
Member - Australian Physiotherapy Association Australian Physiotherapy Association

Awards

Recognition

Year Award
2009 Faculty of Health Teaching Excellence Award
Unknown
2009 University of Newcastle Teaching Fellowship
Unknown

Research Award

Year Award
2022 College of Health, Medicine & Wellbeing Mid-Career Researcher Award
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
2022 University of Newcastle Award for Research Supervision Excellence
Office of the Vice-Chancellor, The University of Newcastle
2020 University of Newcastle Research Supervision Excellence Finalist (1 of 4)
Office of the Vice-Chancellor, The University of Newcastle
2018 School of Health Sciences Award for Research Supervision Excellence
School of Health Sciences - University of Newcastle
2018 Hunter Medical Research Institute Equal Futures Alumni Award
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
2015 Hunter Medical Research Institute Equal Futures Award
Hunter Medical Research Centre
2013 Faculty of Health and Medicine Research Excellence Award
Unknown
2008 ANZAME Post-graduate Student Award
Unknown
2007 Best of the Best Research Showcase First Runner-up
Unknown
2005 Faculty of Health Award for Outstanding Oral Presentation
Unknown
2002 OPTP Award for Excellence in a Published Review of the Literature
Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy

Teaching Award

Year Award
2020 University of Newcastle Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Innovation and Impact Award
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), The University of Newcastle
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (133 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2024 McDevitt AW, Young JL, Cleland JA, Hiefield P, Snodgrass SJ, 'Physical therapy interventions used to treat individuals with biceps tendinopathy: a scoping review', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 28 100586-100586 (2024) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2023.100586
2024 Smith SS, Snodgrass SJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Elements of exercise prescription in Randomised controlled trials of musculoskeletal rehabilitation in a one on one setting. A scoping review', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 69 102901-102901 (2024) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2023.102901
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2023 Krause AT, Snodgrass SJ, Edwards S, McNally T, Osmotherly PG, 'Understanding the influences on horizontal jump landing mechanics: A systematic review', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE & COACHING, 18 1867-1881 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/17479541221135736
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Suzi Edwards
2023 Hunter DJ, Snodgrass SJ, 'RESPONSE TO LETTER TO THE EDITOR on "Thoracic Manual Therapy Improves Pain and Disability in Individuals With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Compared With Placebo: A Randomized Controlled Trial With One-Year Follow-up"', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 104 708-708 (2023)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2023.01.003
2023 Blyton SJ, Snodgrass SJ, Pizzari T, Birse SM, Likens AD, Edwards S, 'The impact of previous musculoskeletal injury on running gait variability: A systematic review.', Gait Posture, 101 124-133 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2023.01.018
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Sarah Blyton
2023 Coltman CE, Barzan M, Besomi M, Brackley V, Bousie JA, Choisne J, et al., 'The Biomechanics Research and Innovation Challenge: Development, Implementation, Uptake, and Reflections on the Inaugural Program.', J Appl Biomech, 1-11 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.1123/jab.2023-0056
Co-authors Karen Mickle
2023 Lee R, Akhundov R, James C, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Variations in Concurrent Validity of Two Independent Inertial Measurement Units Compared to Gold Standard for Upper Body Posture during Computerised Device Use.', Sensors (Basel), 23 (2023) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/s23156761
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2022 Burns SA, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'RESPONSE TO THE LETTER TO THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 52 300-302 (2022)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2022.0202-R
2022 Hunter DJ, Rivett DA, McKiernan S, Luton R, Snodgrass SJ, 'Thoracic Manual Therapy Improves Pain and Disability in Individuals With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Compared With Placebo: A Randomized Controlled Trial With 1-Year Follow-up', ARCHIVES OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION, 103 1533-1543 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2022.03.003
Citations Scopus - 3
2022 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass SJ, Walmsley S, Tessier J, Rivett DA, 'Feasibility of Using Detuned Laser as a Placebo In Manual Therapy Research: An Analysis of Participant Perceptions', JOURNAL OF MANIPULATIVE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS, 45 163-169 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2022.04.001
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, John Tessier, Sarah Walmsley, Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage
2022 Snodgrass SJ, Weerasekara I, Edwards S, Heneghan NR, Puentedura EJ, James C, 'Relationships Between the Physical Work Environment, Postures and Musculoskeletal Pain During COVID-19 A Survey of Frequent Computer Users', JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE, 64 E782-E791 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/JOM.0000000000002698
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Suzi Edwards
2022 Akhundov R, Saxby DJ, Diamond LE, Snodgrass S, Clausen P, Drew M, et al., 'Game-play affects hamstring but not adductor muscle fibre mechanics in elite U20 basketball athletes', SPORTS BIOMECHANICS, (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14763141.2022.2133006
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Suzi Edwards
2022 McDevitt AW, Cleland JA, Addison S, Calderon L, Snodgrass S, 'Physical Therapy Interventions for the Management of Biceps Tendinopathy: An International Delphi Study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY, 17 677-694 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.26603/001c.35256
Citations Scopus - 3
2022 Snodgrass SJ, Stanwell P, Weber KA, Shepherd S, Kennedy O, Thompson HJ, Elliott JM, 'Greater muscle volume and muscle fat infiltrate in the deep cervical spine extensor muscles (multifidus with semispinalis cervicis) in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to age and sex-matched asymptomatic controls: a cross-sectional study', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 23 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12891-022-05924-3
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Peter Stanwell
2022 de Zoete RMJ, Stanwell P, Weber KA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Differences in Structural Brain Characteristics Between Individuals with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain and Asymptomatic Controls: A Case Control Study', Journal of Pain Research, 15 521-531 (2022) [C1]

Background: Neck pain is a prevalent and costly problem, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Neuroimaging studies show alterations in brain morphometry in chronic... [more]

Background: Neck pain is a prevalent and costly problem, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Neuroimaging studies show alterations in brain morphometry in chronic musculoskeletal pain, but reports on neck pain are scarce. Objective: This study investigates (1) differences in brain morphometry between individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals and (2) associations between brain morphometry and patient-reported outcomes. Methods: Sixty-three participants (33 pain, 11 female, mean [SD] age 35 [10] years; 30 control, 12 female, age 35 [11] years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Brain regions of interest (ROIs) were determined a priori, outcomes included cortical thickness and volume. Between-group differences were determined using cluster-wise correction for multiple comparisons and analyses of pain-related ROIs. Results: Between-group differences in volume were identified in the precentral, frontal, occipital, parietal, temporal, and paracentral cortices. ROI analyses showed that parahippocampal cortical thickness was larger in the neck pain group (p=0.015, 95% CI: -0.27 to -0.03). Moderate to strong associations between volume and thickness of the cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex, and temporal lobe and neck pain duration, pain intensity, and neck disability were identified (p-values 0.006 to 0.048). Conclusion: Alterations in brain morphology that are associated with clinical characteristics inform the mechanisms underlying chronic nonspecific neck pain and may guide the development of more effective treatment approaches.

DOI 10.2147/JPR.S345365
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Peter Stanwell
2022 Lee R, James C, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Differences in upper body posture between individuals with and without chronic idiopathic neck pain during computerised device use: A 3D motion analysis study', Gait and Posture, 95 30-37 (2022) [C1]

Background: Computer use is associated with poor postures and increased risk of developing neck pain. Evaluating differences in working posture of individuals with and without chr... [more]

Background: Computer use is associated with poor postures and increased risk of developing neck pain. Evaluating differences in working posture of individuals with and without chronic neck pain may assist the development of strategies to lessen or prevent pain. Objective: To identify if upper body kinematics differs between individuals with and without chronic idiopathic neck pain during four conditions (tablet, laptop, and desktop computer sitting and standing). Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) motion capture measured upper body kinematics in 44 individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain > 90 days (Cases n = 22) and without pain (Control n = 22), during a typing task under four conditions: tablet, laptop, desktop computer (sitting and standing). Differences between groups were evaluated using generalised linear mixed models. Results: Across all conditions and compared to controls, cases had significantly less flexion between their head-neck and upper trunk segments (between group mean difference 7.15°, 2.1, 12.2, p = .006), greater upper trunk flexion relative to the laboratory (-6.15°, -10.9, -1.3, p = .012), greater shoulder flexion bilaterally (left 12.35°, 6.7, 17.9, p < .001; right 13.49°, 7.9, 19.1, p < .001) and less right elbow flexion (-6.87°, -12.1, -1.7, p = .010). Approaching significance, the case group had less left elbow flexion (between group mean difference -5.36°, -10.9, 0.1, p = .056) and a smaller mean craniocervical angle for the seated desktop condition (group x condition interaction -6.37°; 95% CI -12.7, -0.1, p = .052). Significance: Individuals with neck pain consistently used different upper body postures compared to individuals without pain when working on computerised devices under varying workstation conditions. This finding suggests that people with neck pain work in potentially aggravating postures that may be associated with their pain.

DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2022.03.017
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2022 Moghaddas D, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Comparisons of cervical and thoracic spine kinematic joint and body segment angles, timing, and velocity between individuals with and without chronic idiopathic neck pain during functional tasks', Gait and Posture, 92 394-400 (2022) [C1]

Background: Few studies comprehensively analyse 3D neck kinematics in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain during functional tasks considered challenging. This critical k... [more]

Background: Few studies comprehensively analyse 3D neck kinematics in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain during functional tasks considered challenging. This critical knowledge is needed to assist clinicians to recognise and address how altered movement strategies might contribute to pain. Research question: Are there differences in 3D neck kinematics (angles, timing, velocity) during functional tasks in people with chronic neck pain compared to matched asymptomatic control participants? Methods: Participants with chronic idiopathic neck pain (n = 33) and matched asymptomatic controls (n = 30) performed four functional tasks (overhead reach forward, right and left, and putting on a seatbelt) while evaluated using 3D motion capture. Kinematic variables included joint angles, range of motion (ROM,°), velocity (m s-1) and timing (% of movement phase) for joint angles (head-neck [HN joint], head+neck-upper trunk [HNT], and thoracolumbar) and segments (head, neck, head+neck [HN segment], upper trunk, and trunk. Generalised linear mixed models examined between-group differences. Results: There were few between-group differences. The neck pain group had less HN segment extension that controls (mean difference [MD] left -2.06°; 95% CI -3.82, -0.29; p = .023; and right reach -2.52°; -4.67, -0.37; P = .022), and had less total sagittal HNT ROM across all tasks (-1.28; 95% CI -2.25, -0.31; p = .010). Approaching significance was the pain group having less thoracolumbar left rotation than controls (MD -2.14, 95% CI -4.41 to 0.13, p = .064). The pain group had higher neck segment peak flexion velocity than controls across all tasks (MD -3.09; 95% CI -5.21 to -0.10; P = .004). Timing of joint angle peaks did not differ between groups. Significance: When performing an overhead reach task to the left and right and putting on a seatbelt, people with neck pain maintain a more flexed HN segment, use less sagittal ROM and have higher velocity peaks. These findings can assist clinicians in their assessment of patients by identifying possible underlying contributors to neck pain.

DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2021.12.005
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2022 Young JL, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Rhon DI, 'The relationship between knee radiographs and the timing of physical therapy in individuals with patellofemoral pain.', PM R, 14 496-503 (2022) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pmrj.12678
Co-authors Jodi Young Uon, Daniel Rhon Uon
2022 Akhundov R, Saxby DJ, Diamond LE, Edwards S, Clausen P, Dooley K, et al., 'Is subject-specific musculoskeletal modelling worth the extra effort or is generic modelling worth the shortcut?', PLoS ONE, 17 (2022) [C1]

The majority of musculoskeletal modelling studies investigating healthy populations use generic models linearly scaled to roughly match an individual¿s anthropometry. Generic mode... [more]

The majority of musculoskeletal modelling studies investigating healthy populations use generic models linearly scaled to roughly match an individual¿s anthropometry. Generic models disregard the considerable variation in musculoskeletal geometry and tissue properties between individuals. This study investigated the physiological implications of personalizing musculoskeletal model geometry (body segment mass, inertia, joint center, and maximum isometric muscle force). Nine healthy athletes performed ten repetitions of 15 meter sprints at 75¿95% of their maximum sprinting speed and ten repetitions of unanticipated sidestep cut trials with a 4.5¿5.5 m/s approach running speed. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was collected on the lower extremities, from which subject-specific musculoskeletal models were developed. A one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping paired t-test was used to compare generic and subject-specific musculoskeletal models for: lower-limb kinematics, kinetics, torque matching, as well as hamstrings, adductors, and quadriceps muscle activations and fiber dynamics. Percentage change of geometric parameters between generic and subject-specific models were determined. Compared to generic models, subject-specific models showed significantly lower ankle dorsi/plantar flexion angle during sprinting and several significantly different net joint moments during sprint and cut tasks. Additionally, subject-specific models demonstrated better torque matching, more physiologically plausible fiber lengths, higher fiber velocities, lower muscle forces, and lower simulated activations in a subset of investigated muscles and motor tasks. Furthermore, subject-specific models identified between-limb differences that were not identified with generic models. Use of subject-specific modeling, even in healthy populations, may result in more physiologically plausible muscle fiber mechanics. Implementing subject-specific models may be especially beneficial when investigating populations with substantial geometric between-limb differences, or unilateral musculoskeletal pathologies, as these are not captured by a generic model.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0262936
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Sarah Blyton, Suzi Edwards
2021 Zelinski S, Manvell JJ, Manvell N, Callister R, Snodgrass SJ, 'Effect of Match Play on Shoulder Strength in Amateur Rugby Union Players', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 35 2584-2590 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003208
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister
2021 Rhon DI, Cook CE, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'The influence of prior opioid use on healthcare utilization and recurrence rates for non-surgical patients seeking initial care for patellofemoral pain', Clinical Rheumatology, 40 1047-1054 (2021) [C1]

Introduction/objectives: Prior opioid use can influence outcomes for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to compare downstream medical utilizati... [more]

Introduction/objectives: Prior opioid use can influence outcomes for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of this study was to compare downstream medical utilization-based outcomes (costs, visits, recurrent episodes) after an initial diagnosis of patellofemoral pain based on pre-injury utilization of opioids. Method: A total of 85,7880 consecutive patients were followed for a full 12¿months before and 24¿months after an initial diagnosis of patellofemoral pain (January 2009 to December 2013). Data were sourced from the Military Health System Data Repository, a single-payer closed government system. Opioid prescription fills were identified, and medical visits and costs were calculated for all knee-related medical care, to include recurrence rates in the 2-year surveillance period. Results: A relatively small number of individuals filled an opioid prescription in the year prior (n = 1746; 2.0%); however, these individuals had almost twice the mean costs of knee-related medical care ($1557 versus %802) and medical visits (8.4 versus 4.0). Patients with prior opioid use were more likely to have at least 1 recurrent episode of knee pain (relative risk 1.58, 95% CI 1.51, 1.65) with a higher mean number of episodes of knee pain (1.5 vs 1.8). The use of opioids with higher risk of misuse or dependency (Schedule II or III) resulted in greater medical costs (for any reason) and recurrent episodes of knee pain compared to the use of opioids in a lower risk category (Schedule IV). Conclusions: Prior opioid utilization was associated with a greater number of recurrent episodes of knee pain and higher downstream medical costs compared with individuals without prior opioid use. For individuals with prior opioid utilization, opioids with higher risk of misuse or dependency (Schedule II or III) resulted in greater medical costs (for any reason) and recurrent episodes compared to the use of lower-risk opioids (Schedule IV).Key Points¿ Patients with prior opioid use had much greater knee-related medical costs compared to patients without prior opioid use.¿ Patients with prior opioid use were more likely to have additional episodes of knee pain in the following 2¿years compared to patients without prior opioid use.¿ Prior opioid use has predicted higher costs and poor outcomes after surgery, but this is the first study to confirm similar findings in non-surgical patients.

DOI 10.1007/s10067-020-05307-w
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2021 Burns SA, Cleland JA, Rivett DA, O'Hara MC, Egan W, Pandya J, Snodgrass SJ, 'When Treating Coexisting Low Back Pain and Hip Impairments, Focus on the Back: Adding Specific Hip Treatment Does Not Yield Additional Benefits - A Randomized Controlled Trial', JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY, 51 581-601 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2021.10593
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2021 Downs C, Snodgrass SJ, Weerasekara I, Valkenborghs SR, Callister R, 'Injuries in Netball-A Systematic Review', SPORTS MEDICINE-OPEN, 7 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40798-020-00290-7
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Robin Callister, Sarah Valkenborghs
2021 Gattie E, Cleland JA, Pandya J, Snodgrass S, 'Dry needling adds no benefit to the treatment of neck pain: A sham- controlled randomized clinical trial with 1-year follow-up', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 51 37-45 (2021) [C1]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the short- and longterm effectiveness of dry needling on disability, pain, and patient-perceived improvements in patients with mechanical neck pain when adde... [more]

OBJECTIVE: To examine the short- and longterm effectiveness of dry needling on disability, pain, and patient-perceived improvements in patients with mechanical neck pain when added to a multimodal treatment program that includes manual therapy and exercise. U DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. U METHODS: Seventy-seven adults (mean ± SD age, 46.68 ± 14.18 years; 79% female) who were referred to physical therapy with acute, subacute, or chronic mechanical neck pain were randomly allocated to receive 7 multimodal treatment sessions over 4 weeks of (1) dry needling, manual therapy, and exercise (needling group); or (2) sham dry needling, manual therapy, and exercise (sham needling group). The primary outcome of disability (Neck Disability Index score) and secondary outcomes of pain (current and 24-hour average) and patient-perceived improvement were assessed at baseline and follow-ups of 4 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year by blinded assessors. Between-group differences were analyzed with a 2-way, repeated- measures analysis of variance. Global rating of change was analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U test. U RESULTS: There were no group-by-time interactions for disability (Neck Disability Index: F2.37,177.47 = 0.42, P = .69), current pain (visual analog scale: F2.84,213.16 = 1.04, P = .37), or average pain over 24 hours (F2.64,198.02 = 0.01, P = .10). There were no between- group differences for global rating of change at any time point (P=.65). Both groups improved over time for all variables (Neck Disability Index: F2.37,177.47 = 124.70, P<.001; current pain: F2.84,213.16 = 64.28, P<.001; and average pain over 24 hours: F2.64,198.02 = 76.69, P<.001). U CONCLUSION: There were no differences in outcomes between trigger point dry needling and sham dry needling when added to a multimodal treatment program for neck pain. Dry needling should not be part of a first-line approach to managing neck pain.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2021.9864
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
2021 Lee R, James C, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Posture during the use of electronic devices in people with chronic neck pain: A 3D motion analysis project', Work, 68 491-505 (2021) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Non-neutral postures during computerised device use coupled with increased usage may increase the risk of neck pain. Greater knowledge of postures that individuals wit... [more]

BACKGROUND: Non-neutral postures during computerised device use coupled with increased usage may increase the risk of neck pain. Greater knowledge of postures that individuals with neck pain adopt during computerised device use is warranted. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate neck and upper limb posture while using a tablet, laptop and desktop computer (sitting and standing) in individuals with chronic neck pain. METHODS: Differences in three-dimensional kinematic variables were assessed during four conditions: tablet, laptop, desktop computer (sitting and standing) in 22 individuals with chronic neck pain >3 months. Differences between kinematic variables were determined using one-way repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests. RESULTS: Compared to the desktop (sitting), tablet and laptop use resulted in increased neck flexion (mean difference tablet - 14.42°, 95% CI - 19.88, -8.96, P¿<¿0.001; laptop -7.19°, -12.08, -2.31, P¿=¿.020); upper trunk flexion (tablet -14.89°, -20.22, -9.56, P¿<¿0.001; laptop -5.56°, -10.02, -1.09, P¿=¿.009) and tablet bilateral shoulder elevation (left 11.01¿mm, 2.01, 20.04, P¿<¿.016; right 13.08¿mm, 3.09, 23.11, P¿<¿.006). CONCLUSIONS: Tablet and laptop use resulted in greater neck flexion, bilateral shoulder elevation and upper trunk flexion compared to a standard desktop computer, suggesting individuals with chronic neck pain should be mindful of their posture when using these smaller devices. Future research should explore how differences in posture may influence neck pain.

DOI 10.3233/WOR-203245
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2021 Osmotherly PG, Thompson E, Rivett DA, Haskins R, Snodgrass SJ, 'Injuries, practices and perceptions of Australian wheelchair sports participants.', Disability and health journal, 14 101044 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.dhjo.2020.101044
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2021 Schoffl J, Dooley K, Miller P, Miller J, Snodgrass SJ, 'Factors Associated with Hip and Groin Pain in Elite Youth Football Players: A Cohort Study', SPORTS MEDICINE-OPEN, 7 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40798-021-00392-w
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2021 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett DA, 'Is the fibula positioned anteriorly in weight-bearing in individuals with chronic ankle instability? A case control study', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, 29 168-175 (2021) [C1]

Background: Clinically, a discrepancy of fibular position in relation to the tibia has been proposed as a factor in the persistence of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Previous st... [more]

Background: Clinically, a discrepancy of fibular position in relation to the tibia has been proposed as a factor in the persistence of chronic ankle instability (CAI). Previous studies have produced conflicting findings, perhaps due to varying radiological methods and measurement of participants in non-weight-bearing positions. Objectives: To compare normalized-fibular position in weight-bearing in individuals with CAI with healthy controls. Design: A weight-bearing lateral X-ray was taken of the affected ankle of 33 adults with CAI and 33 matched controls. The distance between the anterior edges of the distal fibula and tibia was recorded, and then normalized as a proportion of maximal tibial width. Normalized-fibular position was compared between groups using independent t-tests. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) were calculated to determine reliability of measurements. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine sensitivity, specificity, and a cutoff score to differentiate individuals with CAI from controls using normalized-fibular position. Results: Normalized fibular position was significantly different (CAI, 29.7 (6.6)%; healthy, 26.7 (4.8)%) between the groups. Measurement of intra-rater (0.99, 95%CI¿=¿0.98 to 1.00) and inter-rater (0.98, 95%CI¿=¿0.96 to 0.99) reliability were both excellent. The threshold normalized-fibular position was 27%, with a score more than 27% indicating a greater chance of being in the CAI group. Sensitivity was 69.7% and specificity was 54.5% for this threshold. Conclusion: A slightly anteriorly positioned fibula in relation to the tibia was observed in people with CAI. Specificity/sensitivity scores for normalized-fibular position indicate that it has little ability to predict CAI alone.

DOI 10.1080/10669817.2020.1844852
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Peter Osmotherly, John Tessier
2021 Gattie E, Cleland JA, Pandya J, Snodgrass S, 'AUTHOR RESPONSE TO "ARE FINDINGS FROM A PRAGMATIC DRY NEEDLING TRIAL ALWAYS APPLICABLE IN THE REAL WORLD?"', JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC & SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY, 51 471-472 (2021)
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2021.0202-R
2021 Young JL, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Rhon DI, 'Timing of physical therapy for individuals with patellofemoral pain and the influence on healthcare use, costs and recurrence rates: an observational study', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 21 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-021-06768-8
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jodi Young Uon, Daniel Rhon Uon
2021 Lee R, James C, Edwards S, Skinner G, Young JL, Snodgrass SJ, 'Evidence for the effectiveness of feedback from wearable inertial sensors during work-related activities: A scoping review', Sensors, 21 (2021) [C1]

Background: Wearable inertial sensor technology (WIST) systems provide feedback, aim-ing to modify aberrant postures and movements. The literature on the effects of feedback from ... [more]

Background: Wearable inertial sensor technology (WIST) systems provide feedback, aim-ing to modify aberrant postures and movements. The literature on the effects of feedback from WIST during work or work-related activities has not been previously summarised. This review examines the effectiveness of feedback on upper body kinematics during work or work-related activities, along with the wearability and a quantification of the kinematics of the related device. Methods: The Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, Scopus, Sportdiscus and Google Scholar databases were searched, including reportsfrom January 2005 to July 2021. The included studies were summarised descriptively and the evidence was assessed. Results: Fourteen included studies demonstrated a ¿limited¿ level of evidence supporting posture and/or movement behaviour improvements using WIST feedback, with no improvements in pain. One study assessed wearability and another two investigated comfort. Studies used tri-axial accelerometers or IMU integration (n = 5 studies). Visual and/or vibrotactile feedback was mostly used. Most studies had a risk of bias, lacked detail for methodological reproducibility and displayed inconsistent reporting of sensor technology, with validation provided only in one study. Thus, we have proposed a minimum ¿Technology and Design Checklist¿ for reporting. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that WIST may improve posture, though not pain; however, the quality of the studies limits the strength of this conclusion. Weara-bility evaluations are needed for the translation of WIST outcomes. Minimum reporting standards for WIST should be followed to ensure methodological reproducibility. Précis: This review summa-rises studies reporting on feedback from wearable inertial sensor technology (WIST) devices that aim to improve posture and/or movement behaviour during workplace-related tasks. The included studies lacked methodological reproducibility; therefore, a ¿Technology and Design Checklist¿ was proposed. A ¿limited¿ level of evidence supported changes in posture/movement behaviour using WIST, with no improvements in pain, though the study quality limits the strength of these findings.

DOI 10.3390/s21196377
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jodi Young Uon, Suzi Edwards, Geoff Skinner
2021 Christopher SM, Cook CE, Snodgrass SJ, 'What are the biopsychosocial risk factors associated with pain in postpartum runners? Development of a clinical decision tool', PLOS ONE, 16 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0255383
Citations Scopus - 3
2021 Young JL, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Rhon DI, 'Usual medical care for patellofemoral pain does not usually involve much care: 2-year follow-up in the military health system', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 51 305-313 (2021) [C1]

OBJECTIVES: To identify the most common type and timing of interventions used to initially manage patellofemoral pain (PFP), and whether exercise therapy as an initial treatment w... [more]

OBJECTIVES: To identify the most common type and timing of interventions used to initially manage patellofemoral pain (PFP), and whether exercise therapy as an initial treatment was associated with a decreased likelihood of recurrence of PFP. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. METHODS: Active-duty military service members (n = 74 408) aged 18 to 50 years and diagnosed with PFP between 2010 and 2011 were included. We identified the type and timing of interventions from electronic medical records and insurance payer claims, and studied the influence of early exercise therapy use on injury recurrence rates. RESULTS: In this cohort of patients with PFP, 62.3% (n = 46 338) sought no additional care after the initial visit. The most common initial pharmacological interventions were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (4.1%), corticosteroid injections (0.4%), and muscle relaxers (0.3%). The most common initial nonpharmacological treatments were exercise therapy (7.6%), passive modalities (eg, hot packs, electrical stimulation, ultrasound; 0.6%), and manual therapy (joint manipulation and mobilization; 0.5%). Common specialty referrals were to physical therapy (3.3%) and orthopaedic providers (0.8%). If patients received at least 6 exercise therapy visits during the initial episode of care, they were less likely to have a recurrence of knee pain (odds ratio = 0.46; 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 0.49). CONCLUSION: Two in every 3 patients did not seek additional care after PFP diagnosis. For those who sought additional care, exercise therapy was the most common intervention, and higher doses of exercise therapy were associated with a reduced likelihood of having a recurrent episode of knee pain.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2021.10076
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jodi Young Uon, Daniel Rhon Uon
2021 Dooley K, Drew MK, Snodgrass SJ, Schultz A, McGann T, Blyton S, et al., 'Male basketball players who report hip and groin pain perceive its negative impact both on- and off-court: A cross-sectional study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 24 660-664 (2021) [C1]

Objectives: To identify if basketball players aged &lt;20 years (U20) self-report hip and/or groin pain and if they perceive this as a problem. To determine potential differences ... [more]

Objectives: To identify if basketball players aged <20 years (U20) self-report hip and/or groin pain and if they perceive this as a problem. To determine potential differences in self-reported playing (training and match play) loads and Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) between those with and without hip/groin pain. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Fifty-one pre-elite (state/national representative level) male U20 basketball players (Australian n = 38; Italian n = 13) self-reported current/historical hip/groin ¿discomfort/pain¿ and ¿problems¿, and playing loads. A two-factor regression model was fitted including main effects for hip/groin pain and Cohort and their interaction, with outcome variables playing loads and HAGOS subscale scores and dependent variable hip/groin pain. Results: Twenty-one players (41%) self-reported hip/groin ¿discomfort/pain¿, of which nine perceived no ¿problems¿. Two of these nine players reported training/playing time loss due to pain. Those self-reporting hip/groin discomfort/pain scored lower than those without in HAGOS subscales Symptoms (mean difference in score 8.94; 95%CI -25.24, -5.97), Pain (5.00; -16.42, -2.81), Function in daily living (0.00; -26.72 to -5.59), Function in sport and recreation (6.25; -21.24, -5.33), and hip and/or groin Quality of Life (5.00; -28.63, -8.10), indicating worse hip/groin problems. Participation subscale scores were different only for Italian players (36.25; -51.25, -20.00), with players self-reporting hip/groin discomfort/pain scoring lower. Conclusion: Most players who perceive both hip/groin ¿discomfort/pain¿ and ¿problems¿ also report training/playing time loss, suggesting players¿ perceptions of problematic symptoms and time-loss are associated. Adolescent basketball players perceive hip/groin pain to negatively impact their daily lives and sporting function.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2021.02.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Sarah Blyton
2021 Hunter DJ, Rivett DA, McKiernan S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Acromiohumeral distance and supraspinatus tendon thickness in people with shoulder impingement syndrome compared to asymptomatic age and gender-matched participants: a case control study', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 22 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12891-021-04885-3
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
2021 Snodgrass SJ, Ryan KE, Miller A, James D, Callister R, 'Relationship between Posture and Non-Contact Lower Limb Injury in Young Male Amateur Football Players: A Prospective Cohort Study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph18126424
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Daphne James, Andrew Miller, Robin Callister
2020 Hunter DJ, Rivett DA, McKeirnan S, Smith L, Snodgrass SJ, 'Relationship between Shoulder Impingement Syndrome and Thoracic Posture', Physical Therapy, 100 677-686 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ptj/pzz182
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 11
2020 Gattie E, Cleland JA, Snodgrass S, 'A survey of American physical therapists current practice of dry needling: Practice patterns and adverse events', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 50 1-6 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2020.102255
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2020 Dooley K, Snodgrass SJ, Stanwell P, Birse S, Schultz A, Drew MK, Edwards S, 'Spatial muscle activation patterns during different leg exercise protocols in physically active adults using muscle functional MRI: a systematic review', Journal of Applied Physiology, 129 934-946 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.00290.2020
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Peter Stanwell
2020 Rhon DI, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Cook CE, 'The Risk of Prior Opioid Exposure on Future Opioid Use and Comorbidities in Individuals With Non-Acute Musculoskeletal Knee Pain', Journal of Primary Care and Community Health, 11 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/2150132720957438
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2020 Blyton SJ, Edwards S, Moghaddas D, de Zoete RMJ, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'A Pilot Longitudinal Study of 3-Dimensional Head and Neck Kinematics During Functional Tasks in Individuals With Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain Either Wait-Listed for or Receiving Chiropractic Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Exercise', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 43 490-505 (2020) [C1]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between pain and movement kinematics during functional tasks, evaluated over time, in individuals ... [more]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between pain and movement kinematics during functional tasks, evaluated over time, in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain. Methods: Ten participants with chronic idiopathic neck pain performed 2 functional tasks (overhead reach to the right and putting on a seatbelt) while evaluated using 8 Oqus 300+ cameras. Kinematic variables included joint angles and range of motion (ROM) (°), head segment relative to neck segment (head-neck [HN]); and head/neck segment relative to upper thoracic segment (head/neck-trunk), velocity (m/s), and time (% of movement phase). Pain was quantified using a 100-mm visual analog scale. Linear mixed effects regression models were used to analyze associations between pain and kinematic variables adjusting for treatment group. Results: For overhead reach, higher pain was associated with less HN peak rotation at baseline (ß = ¿0.33; 95% CI -0.52 to ¿0.14, P = .003) and less HN total rotation ROM at 6 months (ß = ¿0.19; 95% CI ¿0.38 to ¿0.003, P = .048). For the seatbelt task, higher pain was associated with less HN peak rotation (ß = ¿0.52; 95% CI -0.74 to ¿0.30 to ¿0.74, P < .001) and less HN total rotation ROM at baseline (ß = ¿0.32; 95% CI ¿0.53 to ¿0.10, P = .006). No other movement variables demonstrated meaningful relationships with pain for the reach or seatbelt tasks. Conclusion: Higher pain is associated with less HN peak and total rotation during functional reaching tasks requiring head rotation. Recognizing altered functional kinematics in individuals with chronic neck pain may assist patient management.

DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2019.01.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Philip Bolton, Suzi Edwards, Sarah Blyton, Christopher Oldmeadow
2020 McDevitt AW, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Leibold MBR, Krause LA, Mintken PE, 'Treatment of individuals with chronic bicipital tendinopathy using dry needling, eccentric-concentric exercise and stretching; a case series', Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 36 397-407 (2020) [C1]

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of 10 patients with chronic biceps tendinopathy treated by physical therapy with the novel approach of dry needling (DN), eccentric-concentric... [more]

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of 10 patients with chronic biceps tendinopathy treated by physical therapy with the novel approach of dry needling (DN), eccentric-concentric exercise (ECE), and stretching of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT). Methods: Ten individuals reporting chronic anterior shoulder symptoms (> 3¿months), pain with palpation of the LHBT, and positive results on a combination of tests including active shoulder flexion, Speed¿s, Hawkins Kennedy, Neer, and Yergason¿s tests participated in this case series. Validated self-reported outcome measures including the mean numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) were taken at baseline. Participants were treated with two to eight sessions of DN to the LHBT and an ECE program and stretching of the biceps muscle. At discharge, patients completed the global rating of change (GROC), QuickDASH and NPRS. Results: Patients had an improved mean NPRS of 3.9 (SD, 1.3; p¿<¿0.001), QuickDASH of 19.01% (SD, 10.8; p¿<¿0.02) and GROC +5.4 (SD, 1.3). Conclusion: Findings from this case series suggest that DN and ECE may be beneficial for the management of patients with chronic LHBT tendinopathy. Further research on the efficacy of this novel treatment approach is warranted.

DOI 10.1080/09593985.2018.1488023
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
2020 De Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Cervical Sensorimotor Control Does Not Change over Time and Is Not Related to Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain Characteristics: A 6-Month Longitudinal Observational Study', Physical Therapy, 100 268-282 (2020) [C1]

Background: Cervical sensorimotor control (CSMC) outcomes have been suggested to be important in the assessment of individuals with neck pain, despite the lack of consistent suppo... [more]

Background: Cervical sensorimotor control (CSMC) outcomes have been suggested to be important in the assessment of individuals with neck pain, despite the lack of consistent supporting evidence that CSMC skills are related to neck pain. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether CSMC changes over time in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain and whether neck pain characteristics are associated with CSMC. Design: A longitudinal observational study was performed. Methods: A total 50 participants with chronic idiopathic neck pain and 50 matched participants who were healthy (controls) completed 7 CSMC tests (including 14 test conditions): joint position error, postural balance, subjective visual vertical, head tilt response, The Fly, smooth pursuit neck torsion, and head steadiness. Neck pain characteristics included pain intensity (visual analog scale), pain duration, and neck disability (Neck Disability Index). Linear mixed models were used to investigate whether any factors were associated with changes in CSMC. Results: Neck pain intensity was associated with 1 of 14 CSMC test conditions (balance with torsion and eyes open), and neck disability was associated with balance with eyes open and high-load head steadiness. Other factors, including sex, age, body mass index, physical activity levels, and neck pain duration, showed no association with CSMC. Limitations: Although all other tests involved computerized data collection, the joint position error test was administered manually, introducing the risk of researcher bias. Conclusions: The few associations between test conditions and neck pain characteristics were at best weak; hence, these are likely to be chance findings. These results suggest that CSMC may not be associated with improvement/worsening of chronic idiopathic neck pain, spawning debate on the clinical usefulness of CSMC tests.

DOI 10.1093/ptj/pzz167
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2020 Christopher SM, Garcia AN, Snodgrass SJ, Cook C, 'Common musculoskeletal impairments in postpartum runners: an international Delphi study.', Archives of physiotherapy, 10 19-30 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40945-020-00090-y
Citations Scopus - 7
2020 Falkenmire A, Manvell J, Callister R, Snodgrass S, 'Injury incidence, characteristics and timing in amateur male rugby union: A prospective cohort study', Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 15 559-569 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.14198/jhse.2020.153.08
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Robin Callister
2020 McDevitt AW, Cleland JA, Strickland C, Mintken P, Leibold MB, Borg M, et al., 'Accuracy of long head of the biceps tendon palpation by physical therapists; an ultrasonographic study.', Journal of physical therapy science, 32 760-767 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1589/jpts.32.760
2020 de Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Seven cervical sensorimotor control tests measure different skills in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 24 69-78 (2020) [C1]

Background: Sensorimotor control is commonly reported in neck pain research and rapidly gaining interest in clinical practice. Joint position error (conventional and torsion), pos... [more]

Background: Sensorimotor control is commonly reported in neck pain research and rapidly gaining interest in clinical practice. Joint position error (conventional and torsion), postural balance, subjective visual vertical, head tilt response, The Fly®, smooth pursuit neck torsion and head steadiness are tests that have been reported to assess cervical sensorimotor control. However, it is unknown whether clinicians could use one test, or a test battery, to appropriately assess cervical sensorimotor control and improve efficiency. Our main research question is: Do seven cervical sensorimotor control tests measure unique or similar characteristics of sensorimotor control in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain? Methods: Principle components factor analysis. Data from seven cervical sensorimotor control tests of 50 participants with chronic idiopathic neck pain were included. Individual factors, potentially related to sensorimotor control, were determined by Eigen values >1.00 and inspection of a loading plot. Items with loadings =0.40 were considered satisfactory for inclusion in a factor. Results: All cervical sensorimotor control tests were found to measure unique skills. Four factors were isolated with two, postural balance and head steadiness, accounting for most of the variance across tests. The remaining two factors, continuous movement accuracy and perceived verticality, contributed less to the observed variance. Conclusion: Postural balance and head steadiness were the major underlying factors explaining cervical sensorimotor control in the current sample. However, our results imply that all seven tests are independent and measure different skills. It is not possible to recommend a test battery for clinical practice, as all tests measure unique skills which appear to be independent of each other.

DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.10.013
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2020 de Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'No Differences Between Individuals With Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain and Asymptomatic Individuals on Seven Cervical Sensorimotor Control Tests: A Cross-Sectional Study.', The Journal of orthopaedic and sports physical therapy, 50 33-43 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2019.8846
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2020 Moghaddas D, Snodgrass S, Young JL, Callister R, 'Evaluation of Community Exercise Classes for Cardiovascular Diseases', Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology, 9 52-58 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.31189/2165-7629-9.2.52
Co-authors Jodi Young Uon, Robin Callister
2019 Hando BR, Rhon D, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Dry needling in addition to standard physical therapy treatment for sub-acromial pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial protocol', BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, 23 355-363 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.10.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2019 Dyer CS, Callister R, Sanctuary CE, Snodgrass SJ, 'Functional Movement Screening and injury risk in elite adolescent rugby league players', International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching, 14 498-506 (2019) [C1]

Research is limited as to whether Functional Movement Screen scores relate to non-contact injury risk in rugby league players. This cohort study investigates whether the Functiona... [more]

Research is limited as to whether Functional Movement Screen scores relate to non-contact injury risk in rugby league players. This cohort study investigates whether the Functional Movement Screen score predicts non-contact injuries in elite adolescent rugby league players. Australian adolescent rugby league players (n = 52; mean age 16.0 ± 1.0 years) from one club participated in this study. Functional Movement Screen scores, height, and mass were collected at the beginning of the preseason. Training, match exposure, and injury incidence data (non-contact match and training injuries with three levels of severity) were recorded for each individual athlete throughout the season. Linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the association between Functional Movement Screen score (continuous score, = 14 or > 14, and three subscores) and injury risk, whilst controlling for exposure time. The mean Functional Movement Screen score for the sample was 13.4 (95% CI: 11.0¿14.0). A total of 72 non-contact injuries were recorded (incidence rate: 18.7 per 1000 exposure hours; 95% CI: 11.6¿24.8). There were no statistically significant associations between non-contact injury and Functional Movement Screen score for any of the analyses conducted. Our results suggest that the Functional Movement Screen does not reflect non-contact injury risk in elite adolescent rugby league players. Further research should investigate whether a more sport-specific movement screen in the preseason can more effectively predict injury risk in this population.

DOI 10.1177/1747954119853650
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Robin Callister, Colin Sanctuary
2019 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass SJ, Tessier J, Rivett DA, 'Effects of mobilisation with movement (MWM) on anatomical and clinical characteristics of chronic ankle instability: a randomised controlled trial protocol', BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, 20 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12891-019-2447-x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, John Tessier, Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage
2019 Knox GM, Snodgrass SJ, Southgate E, Rivett DA, 'A Delphi study to establish consensus on an educational package of musculoskeletal clinical prediction rules for physiotherapy clinical educators', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 44 1-8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2019.102053
Co-authors Erica Southgate
2019 Akhundov R, Saxby DJ, Edwards S, Snodgrass S, Clausen P, Diamond LE, 'Development of a deep neural network for automated electromyographic pattern classification', The Journal of Experimental Biology, 222 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1242/jeb.198101
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Suzi Edwards
2019 Christopher SM, McCullough J, Snodgrass SJ, Cook C, 'Do alterations in muscle strength, flexibility, range of motion, and alignment predict lower extremity injury in runners: a systematic review.', Archives of physiotherapy, 9 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40945-019-0054-7
Citations Scopus - 10
2019 Snodgrass S, Croker C, Yerrapothu M, Shepherd S, Stanwell P, Holder C, et al., 'Cervical muscle volume in individuals with idiopathic neck pain compared to asymptomatic controls: a cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging study', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 44 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2019.102050
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Christopher Oldmeadow
2019 Moghaddas D, de Zoete RMJ, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Differences in the kinematics of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional movement in individuals with or without chronic neck pain: a systematic review', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 105 421-433 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2019.01.007
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2019 Burns SA, Cleland JA, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Examination procedures and interventions for the hip in the management of low back pain: a survey of physical therapists', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 23 419-427 (2019) [C1]

Objectives: The main research aims were to investigate whether physical therapists are examining the hip(s) in individuals with a primary complaint of low back pain (LBP) and if s... [more]

Objectives: The main research aims were to investigate whether physical therapists are examining the hip(s) in individuals with a primary complaint of low back pain (LBP) and if so, the interventions being provided that target the hip(s). Methods: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to the membership of the American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic and Sports Sections, as well as that of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists. Participant demographics and survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Associations between variables were examined using chi-square analysis. Results: The estimated response rate was 18.4% (n = 1163, mean age 40.5 ± 11.4 years). The majority of respondents (91%, n = 1059) reported they always or most of the time examined the hip(s) in individuals with LBP. The most common examination items utilized were hip strength testing (94%, n = 948), passive range of motion (91%, n = 921) and muscle flexibility testing (90%, n = 906). The most common interventions included hip strengthening (94%, n = 866) and hip flexibility exercises (90%, n = 814). Respondents enrolled in or having completed a post-professional fellowship were more likely to utilize hip joint manual therapy techniques (x2 = 25.3, p = <0.001) and less likely to prescribe hip flexibility exercises (x2 = 7.9, p = 0.005) or use electrophysical modalities (x2 = 4.3, p = 0.039). Conclusions: Physical therapists commonly examine and provide interventions directed at the hip(s) for individuals with LBP. Post-professional fellowship training appears to influence the intervention selection of the physical therapist, with an increase in usage of hip joint manual therapy and a decrease in hip muscle flexibility and modality usage.

DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.09.007
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
2019 Langdon E, Snodgrass SJ, Young JL, Miller A, Callister R, 'Posture of rugby league players and its relationship to non-contact lower limb injury: A prospective cohort study', Physical Therapy in Sport, 40 27-32 (2019) [C1]

Objective: This study aimed to identify posture deviations in rugby league players, and to observe relationships between posture and the incidence of non-contact lower limb injury... [more]

Objective: This study aimed to identify posture deviations in rugby league players, and to observe relationships between posture and the incidence of non-contact lower limb injury. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: Laboratory and on-field. Participants: Junior representative, semi-professional and professional rugby league players (n = 207). Main outcome measures: Static posture scores from photographs (Watson and MacDonncha tool) in pre-season; non-contact lower limb injury surveillance and exposure data. Methods: Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were used to observe relationships between postural components and the incidence of non-contact lower limb injury. Results: 8.7% of players sustained a quadriceps injury; 7.2% sustained a calf injury. Semi-professional and professional players had the highest injury rates. The most common posture deviations were having a forward shoulder position (46.9%), a forward head position (33.3%), a varus knee interspace (32.9%) or a lumbar lordosis (30.9%). A moderate C-scoliosis deviation was associated with a decrease in injury risk (OR 1.57 95% CI 1.00-2.46 p = 0.052). Included in the model was player weight, which was associated with an increased risk of injury (OR 1.04 95% CI 1.01-1.07 p = 0.010). Conclusions: Although postural deviations are common in rugby league players, given the lack of association with injury, they may not warrant intervention.

DOI 10.1016/j.ptsp.2019.08.006
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Jodi Young Uon, Robin Callister
2019 Avman MA, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass S, Rivett DA, 'Is there an association between hip range of motion and nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 42 38-51 (2019) [C1]

Objective: To systematically review whether there is an association between hip range of motion (ROM) and nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP). Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochran... [more]

Objective: To systematically review whether there is an association between hip range of motion (ROM) and nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP). Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, PsychINFO, CINAHL and AMED databases were searched from year of inception until October 31st, 2018, using a combination of LBP and hip joint search terms. Commonly cited journals were also hand searched within the previous two years. Study selection: Two reviewers independently screened identified articles, by title and abstract and then by full-text. After first round screening of 2908 identified records, 248 progressed to full-text screening. Due to the heterogeneity of studies identified, post hoc inclusion criteria of English language, studies comparing subjects with NSLBP and healthy controls, cross-sectional design, and clinical measures of hip ROM were applied. Twenty-four records were finally included. Data extraction: Extracted data included population characteristics, duration and severity of NSLBP, hip movement direction, testing position, measurement tool and between-group difference. The Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies was used to assess for study bias. Data synthesis: Hip flexion ROM was measured in seven studies, extension in 13, internal rotation (IR) in 14, external rotation (ER) in 13, abduction in six, and adduction in only two studies. Among all directions tested, IR ROM was reported in more studies as significantly reduced in NSLBP subjects compared to healthy individuals. Overall the quality of evidence was very low. Common sources of study bias included lack of sample size justification, blinding of outcome assessors, adjusting for key confounders, and poor reporting. Conclusion: There is very low-quality evidence to support an association between limited hip ROM and NSLBP. Limited hip IR ROM was the only movement impairment found to be significantly associated with NSLBP, however this should be viewed with caution due to the low-quality supportive evidence. Further studies are needed.

DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2019.03.002
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2019 Rhon DI, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Cook CE, 'Comorbid Insomnia and Sleep Apnea are Associated with Greater Downstream Health Care Utilization and Chronic Opioid Use after Arthroscopic Hip Surgery.', Pain physician, 22 E351-E360 (2019) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2019 Knox GM, Snodgrass SJ, Southgate E, Rivett DA, 'The preferences of physiotherapy clinical educators on a learning package for teaching musculoskeletal clinical prediction rules A qualitative study', Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 39 16-23 (2019) [C1]

Background: There is a growing number of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) relevant to physiotherapy, particularly in the musculoskeletal area, but many students are not learning a... [more]

Background: There is a growing number of clinical prediction rules (CPRs) relevant to physiotherapy, particularly in the musculoskeletal area, but many students are not learning about them due to lack of awareness or understanding by clinical educators. An educational package specifically designed for physiotherapy clinical educators would aid their understanding of CPRs and ability to utilise them clinically, and also to be able to teach them to students. Objectives: To determine the desired content and preferred methods of delivery of an educational package for clinical educators on musculoskeletal CPRs. Design: A qualitative descriptive approach using semi-structured group and individual interviews with clinical educators. Method: Educators working in the clinical area of musculoskeletal physiotherapy who had an awareness of or interest in CPRs were recruited and interviewed on their views regarding the content and delivery of an educational package on musculoskeletal CPRs. Audio files were transcribed and analysed using framework analysis to explore and develop themes and subthemes. Findings: Content of an educational package should include general information on CPRs to improve familiarity and understanding, including a brief description, purpose, stages of development, application, limitations, and Information to dispel common myths and misunderstandings, as well as some specific examples of commonly-used CPRs. The package should be available in multiple formats to allow for different learning styles, both online via video, webinars, and podcasts, and face-to-face in practical sessions. Conclusions: Clinical educators would find an educational package useful in assisting them to learn about musculoskeletal CPRs and to teach them to students.

DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2018.10.005
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Erica Southgate
2019 Snodgrass SJ, Rutger DZMJ, Croker C, Yerrapothu M, Elliott JM, 'Reliability of cervical muscle volume quantification using magnetic resonance imaging', MUSCULOSKELETAL SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, 44 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.msksp.2019.102056
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2018 Burns SA, Cleland JA, Cook CE, Bade M, Rivett DA, Snodgrass S, 'Variables Describing Individuals With Improved Pain and Function With a Primary Complaint of Low Back Pain: A Secondary Analysis', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 41 467-474 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.11.006
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2018 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Marquez J, de Zoete R, Rivett DA, 'Clinical Benefits of Joint Mobilization on Ankle Sprains: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 99 1395-1412.e5 (2018) [C1]

Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PE... [more]

Objective: To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilization for ankle sprains. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and Dissertations and Theses were searched from inception to June 2017. Study Selection: Studies investigating humans with grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathologic state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilization were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full-text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data Extraction: Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes, and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short-term, and long-term follow-up points. Data Synthesis: Methodological quality was assessed independently by 2 reviewers, and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilization compared with comparators on improving posteromedial dynamic balance (P=.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (P=.16), static balance (P=.96), or pain intensity (P=.45). Joint mobilization was beneficial in the short-term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (P=.003) compared with a control. Conclusions: Joint mobilization appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application, and dorsiflexion range in the short-term. Long-term benefits have not been adequately investigated.

DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.019
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Peter Osmotherly, Jodie Marquez
2018 Snodgrass SJ, Osmotherly PG, Reid SA, Milburn PD, Rivett DA, 'Physical characteristics associated with neck pain and injury in rugby union players', Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 58 1474-1481 (2018) [C1]

Background: neck pain and injury are common in rugby union. physical characteristics predisposing players to neck injury are largelyunknown. This study aimed to determine physical... [more]

Background: neck pain and injury are common in rugby union. physical characteristics predisposing players to neck injury are largelyunknown. This study aimed to determine physical characteristics associated with neck pain and injury in rugby union players.MeThodS: Semi-professional rugby union players (n.=142) underwent pre-season measurements including cervical active range of motion(aroM), strength, sensorimotor proprioception (joint position error), and anthropometry. a structured interview established previous neckinjury history, current symptoms, playing position, competition level, age, and years playing rugby. Team physiotherapists and player telephoneinterviews identifed players sustaining a neck injury during the competitive season (defned as any reported neck pain or neck injury). T-tests orMann-Whitney u tests determined differences between neck injured and non-injured players. logistic regression determined factors associatedwith neck injury history and incidence.RESULTS: Sixty-fve (46%) players reported a previous neck injury; 11 (8%) sustained a neck injury during the competitive season. Player age(OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.03-1.25, P=0.009) was associated with neck injury history. Pre-season lateral flexion AROM was less in players sustaininga neck injury or reporting neck pain during the season (median left 23.6°, IQR 21.8-26.2°; right 27.9°, 23.6-32.5°) than in other players (left34.8°, 28.8-41.0°, P<0.01; right 39.1°, 28.9-48.1°, P=0.03). Lateral flexion AROM was associated with increased risk of neck pain or injury (OR0.82, 95%ci 0.71-0.94, p=0.005).CONCLUSIONS: Decreased cervical lateral flexion AROM may contribute to neck injury risk in rugby union players. However, few physicalcharacteristics predicted neck injury incidence, suggesting additional factors should be explored to determine injury risk.

DOI 10.23736/S0022-4707.17.07255-3
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2018 Snodgrass SJ, Farrell SF, Tsao H, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Chipchase LS, Schabrun SM, 'Shoulder taping and neuromuscular control', Journal of Athletic Training, 53 395-403 (2018) [C1]

Context: Scapular taping can offer clinical benefit to some patients with shoulder pain; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Understanding these mechanisms may guide t... [more]

Context: Scapular taping can offer clinical benefit to some patients with shoulder pain; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Understanding these mechanisms may guide the development of treatment strategies for managing neuromusculoskeletal shoulder conditions. Objective: To examine the mechanisms underpinning the benefits of scapular taping. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age ¼ 31.0 6 12.4 years, height ¼ 170.9 6 7.6 cm, mass ¼ 73.8 6 14.4 kg) with no history of shoulder pain. Intervention(s): Scapular taping. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the (1) magnitude and onset of contraction of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior relative to the contraction of the middle deltoid during active shoulder flexion and abduction and (2) corticomotor excitability (amplitude of motor-evoked potentials from transcranial magnetic stimulation) of these muscles at rest and during isometric abduction. Active shoulder-flexion and shoulder-abduction range of motion were also evaluated. All outcomes were measured before taping, immediately after taping, 24 hours after taping with the original tape on, and 24 hours after taping with the tape removed. Results: Onset of contractions occurred earlier immediately after taping than before taping during abduction for the UT (34.18 6 118.91 milliseconds and 93.95 6 106.33 milliseconds, respectively, after middle deltoid contraction; P ¼ .02) and during flexion for the LT (110.02 6 109.83 milliseconds and 5.94 6 92.35 milliseconds, respectively, before middle deltoid contraction; P ¼ .06). These changes were not maintained 24 hours after taping. Mean motor-evoked potential onset of the middle deltoid was earlier at 24 hours after taping (tape on ¼ 7.20 6 4.33 milliseconds) than before taping (8.71 6 5.24 milliseconds, P ¼ .008). We observed no differences in peak root mean square EMG activity or corticomotor excitability of the scapular muscles among any time frames. Conclusions: Scapular taping was associated with the earlier onset of UT and LT contractions during shoulder abduction and flexion, respectively. Altered corticomotor excitability did not underpin earlier EMG onsets of activity after taping in this sample. Our findings suggested that the optimal time to engage in rehabilitative exercises to facilitate onset of trapezius contractions during shoulder movements may be immediately after tape application.

DOI 10.4085/1062-6050-68-17
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2018 Rhon DI, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Sissel CD, Cook CE, 'Predictors of chronic prescription opioid use after orthopedic surgery: derivation of a clinical prediction rule', PERIOPERATIVE MEDICINE, 7 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13741-018-0105-8
Citations Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2018 Rhon D, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Greenlee TA, Sissel CD, Cook CE, 'Comparison of downstream health care utilization, costs, and long-term opioid use for physical therapist management versus opioid therapy management after arthroscopic hip surgery (vol 98, pg 348, 2018)', PHYSICAL THERAPY, 98 902-902 (2018)
DOI 10.1093/ptj/pzy088
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2018 Yu Z, James C, Edwards S, Snodgrass SJ, 'Differences in posture kinematics between using a tablet, a laptop, and a desktop computer in sitting and in standing.', Work, 61 257-266 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3233/wor-182796
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2018 Rhon DI, Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Greenlee TA, Sissel CD, Cook CE, 'Comparison of Downstream Health Care Utilization, Costs, and Long-Term Opioid Use: Physical Therapist Management Versus Opioid Therapy Management After Arthroscopic Hip Surgery.', Phys Ther, 98 348-356 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ptj/pzy019
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2018 Young JL, Rhon DI, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'The influence of exercise dosing on outcomes in patients with knee disorders: A systematic review', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 48 146-161 (2018) [C1]

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. BACKGROUND: Therapeutic exercise is commonly used to treat individuals with knee disorders, but dosing parameters for optimal outcomes are unclear... [more]

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. BACKGROUND: Therapeutic exercise is commonly used to treat individuals with knee disorders, but dosing parameters for optimal outcomes are unclear. Large variations exist in exercise prescription, and research related to specific dosing variables for knee osteoarthritis, patellar tendinopathy, and patellofemoral pain is sparse. OBJECTIVES: To identify specific doses of exercise related to improved outcomes of pain and function in individuals with common knee disorders, categorized by effect size. METHODS: Five electronic databases were searched for studies related to exercise and the 3 diagnoses. Means and standard deviations were used to calculate effect sizes for the exercise groups. The overall quality of evidence was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. RESULTS: Five hundred eighty-three studies were found after the initial search, and 45 were included for analysis after screening. Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale scores were "fair" quality and ranged from 3 to 8. For knee osteoarthritis, 24 total therapeutic exercise sessions and 8- and 12-week durations of exercise were parameters most often associated with large effects. An exercise frequency of once per week was associated with no effect. No trends were seen with exercise dosing for patellar tendinopathy and patellofemoral pain. CONCLUSION: This review suggests that there are clinically relevant exercise dosing variables that result in improved pain and function for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but optimal dosing is still unclear for patellar tendinopathy and patellofemoral pain. Prospective studies investigating dosing parameters are needed to confirm the results from this systematic review.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2018.7637
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon, Jodi Young Uon
2018 West N, Snodgrass SJ, James C, 'The effect of load on biomechanics of the back and upper limb in a bench to shoulder lift during the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation', Work, 59 201-210 (2018) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Limited literature exists investigating biomechanical changes during a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE). OBJECTIVE: To determine change in joint angle measurement ... [more]

BACKGROUND: Limited literature exists investigating biomechanical changes during a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE). OBJECTIVE: To determine change in joint angle measurement between minimum load to safe maximum load in the bench to shoulder lift of the WorkHab FCE. METHODS: Dartfish ProSuite was used to analyse bench to shoulder lift video from 28 subjects. Measurements of joint angle at lumbar spine, thoracic spine, elbow and shoulder at four points in the ascending and descending lift phases (0/3, 1/3, 2/3, 3/3) in the minimum load and safe maximum lift were collected. Paired t-tests were used to analyse differences in joint angles between lifts. RESULTS: Significant differences in joint angles were identified in the thoracic spine, elbow and shoulder at maximal weight. Increased extension occurred: Thoracic spine at 3/3 ascending [2.922, 95% CI 0.8, 3.8, p=0.004]. Increased flexion occurred: elbow ascending [1/3:6.405, 95% CI -11.8, 1.8, p=0.008],[3/3:15.575, 95% CI 4.2, 27.0, p=0.009]; elbow descending [0/3:18.446, 95% CI 9.5, 27.4, p=0.000]; shoulder ascending [3/3:16.785, 95% CI 11.8, 21.8, p<0.001]; shoulder descending [0/3:16.647, 95% CI 10.6, 22.7, p<0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insight into the biomechanical changes during a bench to shoulder lift and support observations and clinical reasoning used in determining the safe maximal lift.

DOI 10.3233/WOR-172677
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2018 Burns SA, Cleland JA, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Effectiveness of physical therapy interventions for low back pain targeting the low back only or low back plus hips: a randomized controlled trial protocol', BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, 22 424-430
DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.08.014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2018 Young JL, Rhon DI, de Zoete RMJ, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'The influence of dosing on effect size of exercise therapy for musculoskeletal foot and ankle disorders: a systematic review', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 22 20-32 (2018) [C1]

Objective: The purpose of this review was to identify doses of exercise therapy associated with greater treatment effect sizes in individuals with common musculoskeletal disorders... [more]

Objective: The purpose of this review was to identify doses of exercise therapy associated with greater treatment effect sizes in individuals with common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot and ankle, namely, achilles tendinopathy, ankle sprains and plantar heel pain. Methods: AMED, EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched from 2005 to August 2017 for randomized controlled trials related to exercise for these three diagnoses. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used for methodological quality assessment. Exercise dosing variables and outcome measures related to pain and function were extracted from the studies, and standardized mean differences were calculated for the exercise groups. Results: Fourteen studies met the final inclusion. A majority of the studies showed large effects and two small trends were identified. Patients with plantar heel pain may benefit more from a daily home exercise program than two supervised visits per week (SMD = 3.82), but this recommendation is based on weak evidence. In achilles tendinopathy, a relationship was also seen when sets and repetitions of eccentric exercise were performed as tolerated (SMD = 1.08 for function, -1.29 for pain). Conclusions: Session duration, frequency, total number of visits, and overall length of care may all be dosing variables with limited value for determining effective exercise prescription. However, the limited number of studies prevents any definitive conclusions. Further investigation is warranted to improve our understanding of the influence exercise dosing has on treatment effect sizes. Future randomized controlled trials comparing specific exercise dose variables should be conducted to clarify the impact of these variables.

DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.10.001
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon, Jodi Young Uon
2018 Hunter D, Rivett D, Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, McKiernan S, Snodgrass S, 'Is the inclinometer a valid measure of thoracic kyphosis? A cross-sectional study', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 22 310-317 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.02.005
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage
2018 James C, James D, Nie V, Schumacher TL, Guest M, Tessier J, et al., 'Musculoskeletal discomfort and use of computers in the university environment', APPLIED ERGONOMICS, 69 128-135 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2018.01.013
Citations Scopus - 33Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Joanna Bohatko-Naismith, John Tessier, Daphne James
2017 Gattie E, Cleland JA, Snodgrass S, 'The effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for musculoskeletal conditions by physical therapists: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 47 133-149 (2017) [C1]

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and metaanalysis. BACKGROUND: An increasing number of physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to t... [more]

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and metaanalysis. BACKGROUND: An increasing number of physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain. OBJECTIVE: To examine the short- and longterm effectiveness of dry needling delivered by a physical therapist for any musculoskeletal pain condition. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched. Eligible randomized controlled trials included those with human subjects who had musculoskeletal conditions that were treated with dry needling performed by a physical therapist, compared with a control or other intervention. The overall quality of the evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. RESULTS: The initial search returned 218 articles. After screening, 13 were included. Physiotherapy Evidence Database quality scale scores ranged from 4 to 9 (out of a maximum score of 10), with a median score of 7. Eight meta-analyses were performed. In the immediate to 12-week follow-up period, studies provided evidence that dry needling may decrease pain and increase pressure pain threshold when compared to control/sham or other treatment. At 6 to 12 months, dry needling was favored for decreasing pain, but the treatment effect was not statistically significant. Dry needling, when compared to control/sham treatment, provides a statistically significant effect on functional outcomes, but not when compared to other treatments. CONCLUSION: Very low-quality to moderatequality evidence suggests that dry needling performed by physical therapists is more effective than no treatment, sham dry needling, and other treatments for reducing pain and improving pressure pain threshold in patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain in the immediate to 12-week follow-up period. Low-quality evidence suggests superior outcomes with dry needling for functional outcomes when compared to no treatment or sham needling. However, no difference in functional outcomes exists when compared to other physical therapy treatments. Evidence of long-term benefit of dry needling is currently lacking.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2017.7096
Citations Scopus - 154Web of Science - 141
2017 Gattie ER, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Dry Needling for Patients With Neck Pain: Protocol of a Randomized Clinical Trial', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 6 (2017)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.7980
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2017 Knox GM, Snodgrass SJ, Stanton TR, Kelly DH, Vicenzino B, Wand BM, Rivett DA, 'Physiotherapy students perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 103 296-303 (2017) [C1]

Objectives Clinical reasoning can be difficult to teach to pre-professional physiotherapy students due to their lack of clinical experience. It may be that tools such as clinical ... [more]

Objectives Clinical reasoning can be difficult to teach to pre-professional physiotherapy students due to their lack of clinical experience. It may be that tools such as clinical prediction rules (CPRs) could aid the process, but there has been little investigation into their use in physiotherapy clinical education. This study aimed to determine the perceptions and experiences of physiotherapy students regarding CPRs, and whether they are learning about CPRs on clinical placement. Design Cross-sectional survey using a paper-based questionnaire. Participants Final year pre-professional physiotherapy students (n¿=¿371, response rate 77%) from five universities across five states of Australia. Results Sixty percent of respondents had not heard of CPRs, and a further 19% had not clinically used CPRs. Only 21% reported using CPRs, and of these nearly three-quarters were rarely, if ever, learning about CPRs in the clinical setting. However most of those who used CPRs (78%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and none (0%) was opposed to the teaching of CPRs to students. The CPRs most commonly recognised and used by students were those for determining the need for an X-ray following injuries to the ankle and foot (67%), and for identifying deep venous thrombosis (63%). Conclusions The large majority of students in this sample knew little, if anything, about CPRs and few had learned about, experienced or practiced them on clinical placement. However, students who were aware of CPRs found them helpful for their clinical reasoning and were in favour of learning more about them.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2016.04.001
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
2017 de Zoete R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Farrell SF, Snodgrass SJ, 'Sensorimotor control in individuals with idiopathic neck pain and healthy individuals. A systematic review and meta-analysis', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 98 1257-1271 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.09.121
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2017 Storberget M, Grødahl LHJ, Snodgrass S, van Vliet P, Heneghan N, 'Verbal augmented feedback in the rehabilitation of lower extremity musculoskeletal dysfunctions: a systematic review.', BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, 3 e000256 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000256
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet
2016 Henry T, Evans K, Snodgrass SJ, Miller A, Callister R, 'Risk Factors for Noncontact Ankle Injuries in Amateur Male Soccer Players: A Prospective Cohort Study', Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 26 251-258 (2016) [C1]

Objective: To determine whether nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors [ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), lower limb power output, and balance], as identified in presea... [more]

Objective: To determine whether nonmodifiable and modifiable risk factors [ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), lower limb power output, and balance], as identified in preseason screening, predict the risk of sustaining a noncontact ankle injury in amateur male soccer players during the training and competitive season. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Amateur soccer competition (club and area representative teams). Participants: Amateur soccer players (n = 210) aged =15 years. Assessment of Risk Factors (Independent Variables): Height, weight, ankle dorsiflexion ROM, power (vertical jump) and balance (time of double-leg balanced stance on an electronic wobble board, maximum 20 seconds) measured in preseason screening. Main Outcome Measures (Dependent Variable): Incidence of noncontact ankle injury and exposure to both training and games, monitored during the competitive season following baseline measurement. Noncontact ankle injury was defined as any ankle injury not caused by a collision (with another player or object) resulting in a participant missing at least 1 game or training session. Results: Fourteen of the 210 participants (6.7%) sustained a noncontact ankle injury yielding an injury rate of 0.484 injuries per 1000 player hours. Lower limb power output scores <30 W/kg [odds ratio (OR), 9.20, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-75.09, P = 0.038] and poorer balance scores (OR, 0.43, 95% CI, 0.21-0.89, P = 0.024) were associated with higher odds of injury. Conclusions: Poorer lower limb power output and balance are risk factors for noncontact ankle injury among amateur soccer players. These deficits can potentially be identified by screening, providing opportunities to investigate prevention strategies.

DOI 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000240
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Andrew Miller, Robin Callister
2016 Ashby SE, Snodgrass SH, Rivett DA, Russell T, 'Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations', Nursing and Health Sciences, 18 362-369 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley &amp; Sons Australia, Ltd The development of student-practitioners&apos; practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Str... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12279
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2016 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett D, Farrell S, Ball K, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, et al., 'Clinical Educator and Student Perceptions of iPad T Technology to Enhance Clinical Supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', INTERNET JOURNAL OF ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES AND PRACTICE, 14 (2016) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Cath Johnston
2016 Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable AK, James C, Ashby SE, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, 'Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey.', Healthcare (Basel), 4 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare4040085
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Ashley Kable, Samantha Ashby, Clare Collins
2016 Hebert O, Schlueter K, Hornsby M, Van Gorder S, Snodgrass S, Cook C, 'The diagnostic credibility of second impact syndrome: A systematic literature review.', J Sci Med Sport, 19 789-794 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.517
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 8
2015 Manvell N, Manvell JJ, Snodgrass SJ, Reid SA, 'Tension of the ulnar, median, and radial nerves during ulnar nerve neurodynamic testing: Observational cadaveric study', Physical Therapy, 95 891-900 (2015) [C1]

Background. The ulnar nerve upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT3) uses upper limb positioning to investigate symptoms arising from the ulnar nerve. It is proposed to selectively in... [more]

Background. The ulnar nerve upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT3) uses upper limb positioning to investigate symptoms arising from the ulnar nerve. It is proposed to selectively increase tension of the nerve; however, this property of the test is not well established. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the ulnar nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the ulnar nerve and the other 2 major nerves of the upper limb: median and radial. Design. This was an observational cadaver study. Methods. Tension (in newtons) of the ulnar, median, and radial nerves was measured simultaneously using 3 buckle force transducers in 5 upper limb positions in 10 embalmed human cadavers (N=20 limbs). Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post hoc tests determined differences in tension among nerves and among limb positions. Results. The addition of shoulder horizontal abduction (H.Abd; 12.62 N; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=10.76, 14.47) and combined shoulder abduction and internal rotation (H.Abd+IR; 11.86 N; 95% CI=9.96, 13.77) to ULNT3 (scapular depression, shoulder abduction and external rotation, elbow flexion, forearm pronation, and wrist and finger extension) produced significantly greater ulnar nerve tension compared with the ULNT3 alone (8.71 N; 95% CI=7.25, 10.17). The ULNT3+H.Abd test demonstrated the greatest difference in tension among nerves (mean difference between ulnar and median nerves=11.87 N; 95% CI=9.80, 13.92; mean difference between ulnar and radial nerves=8.47 N; 95% CI=6.41, 10.53). Limitations. These results pertain only to the biomechanical plausibility of the ulnar nerve neurodynamic test and do not account for other factors that may affect the clinical application of this test. Conclusions. The ULNT3+H.Abd is a biomechanically plausible test for detecting peripheral neuropathic pain related to the ulnar nerve. In situations where the shoulder complex will not tolerate the combination of shoulder external rotation in abduction, performing upper limb neurodynamic tests with internal rotation instead of external rotation is a biomechanically plausible alternative.

DOI 10.2522/ptj.20130536
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 6
2015 Ingram L, Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, 'Comparison of cervical spine stiffness in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 45 162-169 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2015.5711
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2015 Reid SA, Callister R, Snodgrass SJ, Katekar MG, Rivett DA, 'Manual therapy for cervicogenic dizziness: Long-term outcomes of a randomised trial', Manual Therapy, 20 148-156 (2015) [C1]

Manual therapy is effective for reducing cervicogenic dizziness, a disabling and persistent problem, in the short term. This study investigated the effects of sustained natural ap... [more]

Manual therapy is effective for reducing cervicogenic dizziness, a disabling and persistent problem, in the short term. This study investigated the effects of sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) and passive joint mobilisations (PJMs) on cervicogenic dizziness compared to a placebo at 12 months post-treatment. Eighty-six participants (mean age 62 years, standard deviation (SD) 12.7) with chronic cervicogenic dizziness were randomised to receive SNAGs with self-SNAGs (n=29), PJMs with range-of-motion (ROM) exercises (n=29), or a placebo (n=28) for 2-6 sessions over 6 weeks. Outcome measures were dizziness intensity, dizziness frequency (rated between 0 [none] and 5 [>once/day]), the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), pain intensity, head repositioning accuracy (HRA), cervical spine ROM, balance, and global perceived effect (GPE). At 12 months both manual therapy groups had less dizziness frequency (mean difference SNAGs vs placebo-0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI)-1.3,-0.2, p=0.01; PJMs vs placebo-0.7,-1.2,-0.1, p=0.02), lower DHI scores (mean difference SNAGs vs placebo-8.9, 95% CI-16.3,-1.6, p=0.02; PJMs vs placebo-13.6,-20.8,-6.4, p<0.001) and higher GPE compared to placebo, whereas there were no between-group differences in dizziness intensity, pain intensity or HRA. There was greater ROM in all six directions for the SNAG group and in four directions for the PJM group compared to placebo, and small improvements in balance for the SNAG group compared to placebo. There were no adverse effects. These results provide evidence that both forms of manual therapy have long-term beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic cervicogenic dizziness.

DOI 10.1016/j.math.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Robin Callister
2015 Farmer PK, Snodgrass SJ, Buxton A, Rivett DA, 'An Investigation of Cervical Spinal Posture in Cervicogenic Headache', Physical Therapy, 95 212-222 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20140073
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 11
2015 Macdonald-Wicks LK, Gallagher LM, Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable A, James C, et al., 'Difference in perceived knowledge, confidence and attitudes between dietitians and other health professionals in the provision of weight management advice', Nutrition and Dietetics, 72 114-121 (2015) [C1]

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of... [more]

Aim: The aim of this analysis is to establish if dietitians have the knowledge, skills and attitude to provide support to other health professional (HP) groups in the provision of weight management advice to overweight/obese patients. Methods: A secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of HPs was undertaken to perform a gap analysis with regard to practices, knowledge, confidence and attitudes in the provision of weight management advice. Survey responses and additional measures (practice, knowledge, confidence and attitude scores) were compared between dietitians and other HPs. Descriptive statistics were undertaken, and differences between group ¿2 tests were performed for nominal data and the Wilcoxon rank sum test for ordinal and non-parametric data. Results: About 100% of dietitians had received initial weight management training and 85% had participated in professional development training, compared with 18 and 19% of HPs, respectively, although 70% believed it was within their scope of practice to provide evidence-based advice. Dietitian respondents achieved a higher median score (maximum 10) in the following areas (practice = 6.5, knowledge = 8.0, confidence = 8.3) when compared with HP respondents (practice = 4.2, knowledge = 7.0, confidence = 5.4). The median attitude score for both groups was 6.0. Conclusions: HPs are receptive to providing evidence-based weight loss messages to overweight/obese clients in their current practice. However, weight management training is required to enhance HPs' knowledge and skills in order to increase confidence and improve practice skills. Dietitians can assist HPs to ensure that clear, consistent, evidence-based messages are delivered to overweight clients throughout the health-care system.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12115
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Clare Collins, Samantha Ashby, Lesley Wicks, Ron Plotnikoff, Ashley Kable
2015 Kable A, James C, Snodgrass S, Plotnikoff R, Guest M, Ashby S, et al., 'Nurse provision of healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese', Nursing and Health Sciences, 17 451-459 (2015) [C1]

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a regional area in Australia to measure nurses&apos; perceptions, practices, and knowledge in regard to providing healthy lifestyle advic... [more]

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a regional area in Australia to measure nurses' perceptions, practices, and knowledge in regard to providing healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese. Responses were compared between geographic regions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Of the 79 nurse participants, 68% considered that provision of healthy lifestyle advice was within their scope of practice. Only 28% reported frequently estimating body mass index in the practice setting. Nurses often recommended increasing activity levels (44%), but recommended reducing daily caloric intake less often (25%). Nurses' knowledge about weight management was variable and the proportion of correct answers to knowledge items ranged from 33-99%. Nurses have many opportunities to deliver healthy lifestyle advice in a range of practice settings. The variation in practices and knowledge of nurses indicates a need for improved healthy lifestyle education for undergraduate and practicing nurses.

DOI 10.1111/nhs.12214
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ashley Kable, Samantha Ashby, Christopher Oldmeadow, Ron Plotnikoff
2015 Knox GM, Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, 'Physiotherapy clinical educators' perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), (2015) [C1]

Objectives: Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are widely used in medicine, but their application to physiotherapy practice is more recent and less widespread, and their implementat... [more]

Objectives: Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are widely used in medicine, but their application to physiotherapy practice is more recent and less widespread, and their implementation in physiotherapy clinical education has not been investigated. This study aimed to determine the experiences and perceptions of physiotherapy clinical educators regarding CPRs, and whether they are teaching CPRs to students on clinical placement. Design: Cross-sectional observational survey using a modified Dillman method. Participants: Clinical educators (n = 211, response rate 81%) supervising physiotherapy students from 10 universities across 5 states and territories in Australia. Results: Half (48%) of respondents had never heard of CPRs, and a further 25% had never used CPRs. Only 27% reported using CPRs, and of these half (51%) were rarely if ever teaching CPRs to students in the clinical setting. However most respondents (81%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and few (9%) were opposed to teaching CPRs to students. Users of CPRs were more likely to be male (p <. 0.001), have post-professional qualifications (p = 0.020), work in private practice (p <. 0.001), and work in the area of musculoskeletal physiotherapy (p <. 0.001) compared with non-users. The CPRs most commonly known, used and taught were the Ottawa Ankle Rule, the Ottawa Knee Rule, and Wells' Rule for Deep Vein Thrombosis. Conclusions: Students are unlikely to be learning about CPRs on clinical placement, as few clinical educators use them. Clinical educators will require training in CPRs and assistance in teaching them if students are to better learn about implementing CPRs in physiotherapy clinical practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.001
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2015 Cook CE, Moore TJ, Learman K, Showalter C, Snodgrass SJ, 'Can experienced physiotherapists identify which patients are likely to succeed with physical therapy treatment?', Archives of Physiotherapy, 5 (2015)

Background: The purpose of the study was to determine if clinician predicted prognosis is associated with patient outcomes. Methods: The study was a secondary analysis of data tha... [more]

Background: The purpose of the study was to determine if clinician predicted prognosis is associated with patient outcomes. Methods: The study was a secondary analysis of data that were collected in 8 physiotherapy outpatient clinics. Nine physiotherapists with post-graduate training in manual therapy (mean 20.3¿years of experience) were asked at baseline to project the outcome of the patients evaluated. In total, 112 patients with low back (74¿%) or neck (26¿%) pain were treated pragmatically with interventions consisting of manual therapy, strengthening, and patient-specific education. Outcomes measures consisted of percent change in disability (Oswestry or Neck Disability Index), self-reported rate of recovery (0¿100¿%), and percent change in pain (numerical pain rating scale). Hierarchical logistic regression determined potential factors (clinician predicted prognosis score (1¿10) at baseline, dichotomised as poor (1¿6) and good (7¿10); symptom duration categorised as acute, subacute or chronic; same previous injury (yes/no); baseline pain and disability scores; within-session improvement at initial visit (yes/no); and presence of = one psychological factor) associated with meaningful changes in each of the three outcomes at discharge (disability and pain > 50¿% improvement, rate of recovery =82.5¿% improvement). Results: Clinician predicted prognosis (OR 4.15, 95%CI = 1.31, 13.19, p = 0.02) and duration of symptoms (OR subacute 0.24, 95%CI = 0.07, 0.89, p = 0.03; chronic 0.21, 95%CI = 0.05, 0.90, p = 0.04) were associated with rate of recovery, whereas only clinician predicted prognosis was associated with disability improvement (OR 4.28, 95¿% CI 1.37, 13.37, p = 0.01). No variables were associated with pain improvement. Conclusions: Clinician predicted prognosis is potentially valuable for patients, as a good predicted prognosis is associated with improvements in disability and rate of recovery.

DOI 10.1186/s40945-015-0003-z
Citations Scopus - 10
2015 Nugent EP, Snodgrass SJ, Callister R, 'The effect of velocity and familiarisation on the reproducibility of isokinetic dynamometry', Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 23 205-214 (2015) [C1]

BACKGROUND: The reproducibility of the HUMAC-NORM isokinetic dynamometer has not yet been established for the muscles around the knee. Previous research suggests practice-based im... [more]

BACKGROUND: The reproducibility of the HUMAC-NORM isokinetic dynamometer has not yet been established for the muscles around the knee. Previous research suggests practice-based improvement (PBI) may impact upon the reproducibility of isokinetic testing. OBJECTIVE: To investigate test-retest reproducibility of knee flexion and extension isokinetic findings at different velocities, including the influence of familiarisation. METHODS: Seventy physically active, healthy participants with no experience in isokinetic dynamometry performed five repetitions of continuous concentric knee flexion and extension at 60, 120, 180 and 240°/s on four occasions. Peak moment, angle of peak moment, total work and average power were recorded. Reproducibility was determined using percentage change in the mean, typical error and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). RESULTS: For knee flexion and extension, group data met desirable reproducibility criteria for most outcomes and velocities after Trial 2. Within-subject reproducibility generally met acceptable reliabilty criteria after Trial 2 for knee extension, but was predominantly unacceptable for knee flexion. ICC's were acceptable from Trial 2, except for angle of peak moment which did not achieve an acceptable level of reliabilty across any trials, outcomes or velocities. CONCLUSIONS: The HUMAC-NORM demonstrates excellent reproducibility for peak moment, average power and total work parameters for the major knee muscles after one trial. One familiarisation session is recommended prior to testing to minimise the impact of PBI. Additional familiarisation is beneficial when testing individuals, higher velocities and knee flexion.

DOI 10.3233/IES-150582
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Robin Callister
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Sterling M, Vicenzino B, 'Dose optimization for spinal treatment effectiveness: a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of high and low mobilization forces in patients with neck pain.', J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 44 141-152 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2014.4778
Citations Scopus - 47Web of Science - 38
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Carter AE, Guest M, Collins CE, James C, Kable AK, et al., 'Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.', Physiother Theory Pract, 30 409-420 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/09593985.2013.877112
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Ashley Kable, Samantha Ashby
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Cleland JA, Haskins R, Rivett DA, 'The clinical utility of cervical range of motion in diagnosis, prognosis, and evaluating the effects of manipulation: A systematic review', Physiotherapy (United Kingdom), 100 290-304 (2014) [C1]

Background: Clinicians commonly assess cervical range of motion (ROM), but it has rarely been critically evaluated for its ability to contribute to patient diagnosis or prognosis,... [more]

Background: Clinicians commonly assess cervical range of motion (ROM), but it has rarely been critically evaluated for its ability to contribute to patient diagnosis or prognosis, or whether it is affected by mobilisation/manipulation. Objectives: This review summarises the methods used to measure cervical ROM in research involving patients with cervical spine disorders, reviews the evidence for using cervical ROM in patient diagnosis, prognosis, and evaluation of the effects of mobilisation/manipulation on cervical ROM. Data sources and study selection: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED and ICL databases was conducted, addressing one of four constructs related to cervical ROM: measurement, diagnosis, prognosis, and the effects of mobilisation/manipulation on cervical ROM. Study appraisal and synthesis: Two independent raters appraised methodological quality using the QUADAS-2 tool for diagnostic studies, the QUIPS tool for prognostic studies and the PEDro scale for interventional studies. Heterogeneity of studies prevented meta-analysis. Results: Thirty-six studies met the criteria and findings showed there is limited evidence for the diagnostic value of cervical ROM in cervicogenic headache, cervical radiculopathy and cervical spine injury. There is conflicting evidence for the prognostic value of cervical ROM, though restricted ROM appears associated with negative outcomes while greater ROM is associated with positive outcomes. There is conflicting evidence as to whether cervical ROM increases or decreases following mobilisation/manipulation. Conclusion and implications of key findings: Cervical ROM has value as one component of assessment, but clinicians should be cautious about making clinical judgments primarily on the basis of cervical ROM. Funding: This collaboration was supported by an internal grant from the Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle.

DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2014.04.007
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 29
2014 Summers KM, Snodgrass SJ, Callister R, 'Predictors of Calf Cramping in Rugby League', JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH, 28 774-783 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31829f360c
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Robin Callister
2014 Melino NL, James C, Snodgrass SJ, 'The effect of load in a floor-to-bench lift during the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation', Work, 49 585-596 (2014)
DOI 10.3233/WOR-141915
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Heneghan NR, Tsao H, Stanwell PT, Rivett DA, Van Vliet PM, 'Recognising neuroplasticity in musculoskeletal rehabilitation: A basis for greater collaboration between musculoskeletal and neurological physiotherapists', Manual Therapy, 19 614-617 (2014) [C3]

Evidence is emerging for central nervous system (CNS) changes in the presence of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain. Motor control exercises, and potentially manual therapy, can... [more]

Evidence is emerging for central nervous system (CNS) changes in the presence of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain. Motor control exercises, and potentially manual therapy, can induce changes in the CNS, yet the focus in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice is conventionally on movement impairments with less consideration of intervention-induced neuroplastic changes. Studies in healthy individuals and those with neurological dysfunction provide examples of strategies that may also be used to enhance neuroplasticity during the rehabilitation of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction, improving the effectiveness of interventions. In this paper, the evidence for neuroplastic changes in patients with musculoskeletal conditions is discussed. The authors compare and contrast neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapy clinical paradigms in the context of the motor learning principles of experience-dependent plasticity: part and whole practice, repetition, task-specificity and feedback that induces an external focus of attention in the learner. It is proposed that increased collaboration between neurological and musculoskeletal physiotherapists and researchers will facilitate new discoveries on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning sensorimotor changes in patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. This may lead to greater integration of strategies to enhance neuroplasticity in patients treated in musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice.

DOI 10.1016/j.math.2014.01.006
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 41
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Peter Stanwell
2014 Snodgrass SJ, Ashby SE, Rivett DA, Russell T, 'Implementation of an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Exam for assessing practical skills in pre-professional physiotherapy and occupational therapy programs: Examiner and course coordinator perspectives', AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, 30 152-166 (2014) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2014 Snodgrass SM, Ashby SE, Onyango L, Russell T, Rivett DA, 'Electronic practical skills assessments in the health professions: a review', The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice, 12 1-10 (2014) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2013 Manvell JJ, Manvell N, Snodgrass SJ, Reid SA, 'Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning', Manual Therapy, (2013) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n=20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p<0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p<0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p<0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p<0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve.

DOI 10.1016/j.math.2015.03.007
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
2013 Lang J, James C, Ashby S, Plotnifkoff R, Guest M, Kable A, et al., 'The provision of weight management advice: An investigation into occupational therapy practice', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 60 387-394 (2013) [C1]

Background/aim: Obesity affects more than half the Australian population and has become epidemic throughout the world. Little is known regarding occupational therapy interventions... [more]

Background/aim: Obesity affects more than half the Australian population and has become epidemic throughout the world. Little is known regarding occupational therapy interventions with clients who are overweight or obese. This study aimed to identify occupational therapy practice in relation to the provision of weight management. This was part of a larger study investigating health professional practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study design using a self-administered, purpose-designed survey was employed to identify the current practices of occupational therapists working in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were recruited via email or mail as publically available. Results: Fifty-one occupational therapists anonymously completed the survey. Results revealed that 53% (n = 26) of respondents did not consider weight management to be within their scope of practice or their workplace role description. The most common intervention was the provision of physical activity advice (65.2%; n = 30). Dietary advice was provided by 20.8% (n = 10), while 77% (n = 32) referred onto dietitian services. During entry-level occupational therapy education, only 7.8% (n = 4) had received weight management advice education. Completion of postgraduate professional development training in this area was reported by 14% (n = 7) of respondents. Conclusion: This study provides insight into the current practices of Australian occupational therapists in relation to the provision of weight management advice. This research displays a need to acknowledge both a generic and a discipline-specific role for the provision of healthy lifestyle interventions. This may be achieved through better access to education during entry-level programmes and in the workplace. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12073
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Ashley Kable, Samantha Ashby
2013 Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass S, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus of feedback and instructions in the treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', MANUAL THERAPY, 18 458-467 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2013.07.002
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Jodie Marquez, Paulette Vanvliet
2013 Melino NL, James C, Snodgrass SJ, 'The effect of load in a floor-to-bench lift during the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation', Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, ePub (2013)
DOI 10.3233/WOR-131698
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 5
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Odelli RA, 'Objective concurrent feedback on force parameters improves performance of lumbar mobilisation, but skill retention declines rapidly', Physiotherapy, 98 47-56 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2012 Sheaves EG, Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, 'Learning lumbar spine mobilization: The effects of frequency and self-control of feedback', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 42 114-121 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Haskins R, Rivett DA, 'A structured review of spinal stiffness as a kinesiological outcome of manipulation: Its measurement and utility in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment decision-making', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 22 708-723 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jelekin.2012.04.015
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Rhodes HR, 'Cervical spine posteroanterior stiffness differs with neck position', Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 22 829-834 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
2012 Allen JL, James CL, Snodgrass SJ, 'The effect of load on biomechanics during an overhead lift in the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation', Work, 43 487-496 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.3233/WOR-2012-1386
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
2012 Ashby SE, James CL, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE, Guest M, Kable AK, Snodgrass SJ, 'Survey of Australian practitioners' provision of healthy lifestyle advice to clients who are obese', Nursing & Health Sciences, 14 189-196 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-2018.2012.00677.x
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Clare Collins, Samantha Ashby, Ashley Kable, Ron Plotnikoff
2011 Hunter AJ, Snodgrass SN, Quain D, Parsons MW, Levi CR, 'HOBOE (head-of-bed optimization of elevation) study: Association of higher angle with reduced cerebral blood flow velocity in acute ischemic stroke', Physical Therapy, 91 1503-1512 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20100271
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Mark Parsons
2011 Snodgrass SN, 'Wiki activities in blended learning for health professional students: Enhancing critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills', Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 27 563-580 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.14742/ajet.938
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 19
2011 Burrows TL, Findlay NA, Killen CG, Dempsey SE, Hunter S, Chiarelli PE, Snodgrass SN, 'Using nominal group technique to develop a consensus derived model for peer review of teaching across a multi-school faculty', Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 8 1-9 (2011) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Chloe Killen
2011 Snodgrass SN, 'Posteroanterior thoracic spinal stiffness does not change after manipulation in asymptomatic subjects: Authors reply', Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 16 153-154 (2011) [C3]
2010 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Cervical spine mobilisation forces applied by physiotherapy students', Physiotherapy, 96 120-129 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2009.08.008
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2010 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'A comparison of cervical spine mobilization forces applied by experienced and novice physiotherapists', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 40 392-401 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2010.3274
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2010 Campbell BD, Snodgrass SN, 'The effects of thoracic manipulation on posteroanterior spinal stiffness', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 40 685-693 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.2519/jospt.2010.3271
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 24
2010 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Real-time feedback improves accuracy of manually applied forces during cervical spine mobilisation', Manual Therapy, 15 19-25 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2009.05.011
Citations Scopus - 36Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2010 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Real-time feedback in manual therapy training', Focus on Health Professional Education, 12 86-89 (2010) [C3]
2010 Surjan Y, Chiarelli PE, Dempsey SE, Lyall DG, O'Toole G, Snodgrass SN, Tessier JW, 'The experience of implementing an interprofessional first year course for undergraduate health science students: The value of acting on student feedback', Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, 7 1-17 (2010) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors David Lyall, Yolanda Surjan, John Tessier
2009 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Forces applied to the cervical spine during posteroanterior mobilization', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 32 72-83 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2008.09.012
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 39
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Calibration of an instrumented treatment table for measuring manual therapy forces applied to the cervical spine', Manual Therapy, 13 171-179 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2007.04.002
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Measuring the posteroanterior stiffness of the cervical spine', Manual Therapy, 13 520-528 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2007.07.007
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
2007 Snodgrass SJ, 'Latest edition of a classic text', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 53 292 (2007) [C3]
2007 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Manual forces applied during cervical mobilization', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 30 17-25 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2006.11.008
2006 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Manual forces applied during posterior-to-anterior spinal mobilization: A review of the evidence (Literature review)', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 29 316-329 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2006.03.006
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 69
2005 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Mackenzie LA, 'Perceptions of older people about falls injury prevention and physical activity', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 24 114-118 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00086.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
2003 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Chiarelli PE, Bates A, Rowe LJ, 'Factors related to thumb pain in physiotherapists', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 49 243-250 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 37
2002 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, 'Thumb Pain in Physiotherapists: Potential Risk Factors and Proposed Prevention Strategies', The Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 10 206-217 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25
Show 130 more journal articles

Conference (92 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2023 Abady Avman M, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, 'Hip joint assessment in chronic non-specific low back pain. A Delphi study.', Dubai, UAE (2023)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2022 Blyton S, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Birse S, Dooley K, Donnan L, Edwards S, 'Overground running biomechanics and movement variability in sub-elite male athletes with and without a history of hamstring injury', Brisbane (2022)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Sarah Blyton
2022 Blyton S, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Birse S, Edwards S, 'Movement variability in runners with a current or recent musculoskeletal injury: a systematic review', Gold Coast (2022)
Co-authors Sarah Blyton, Suzi Edwards
2022 Blyton S, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Likens A, Birse S, Dooley K, Edwards S, 'Nonlinear running dynamics differ in male sub-elite athletes with a history of hamstring injury', Brisbane (2022)
Co-authors Sarah Blyton, Suzi Edwards
2022 Dooley K, Snodgrass S, Drew M, Donnan L, Blyton S, Pizzari T, et al., '(O100115)| Volume 25, SUPPLEMENT 2, S59-S60, November 2022 PDF [60 KB] Save Share Reprints Request Are we failing athletes with recurrent groin pain by focusing on group-level biomechanical analysis of their movement strategies?', Gold Coast (2022)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2022.09.067
Co-authors Sarah Blyton
2021 Cochrane L, Schultz A, Bourne M, Pizzan T, Edwards S, Dooley K, et al., 'Hip adductor spatial activation patterns after multidirectional running of athletic men with and without hip/groin pain history: a pilot study', Melbourne, Australia (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2021.09.125
Co-authors Peter Stanwell, Suzi Edwards
2020 Blyton S, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Edwards S, 'Associations between running kinematics and kinetics, and previous hamstring strain injury: Preliminary findings', Sydney (2020)
Co-authors Sarah Blyton, Suzi Edwards
2020 McGann T, Snodgrass S, Schultz A, Dooley K, Donnan L, Pizzari T, et al., 'Game Demands In Male Elite U20 Basketball', Las Vegas, USA (2020)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2019 Akhundov R, Saxby D, Edwards S, Snodgrass S, Clausen P, Diamond L, 'Development and validation of a deep neural network for automated electromyographic pattern classification', Calgary, Canda (2019)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Philip Clausen
2019 Edwards S, Dooley K, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Rio E, Schultz A, et al., 'Trunk Control is Altered After Playing an Elite U20s Basketball Game', Calgary, Canada (2019)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2019 Dooley K, Drew M, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Rio E, Schultz A, et al., 'Youth Elite Basketball Game Alters Lower Limb Agility Technique Assessment', Calgary, Canda (2019)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2019 Akhundov R, Saxby D, McGann T, Donnan L, Schultz A, Rio E, et al., 'Effects of game fatigue on hamstring and adductor muscle dynamics in elite-level athletes', Calgary, Canda (2019)
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Suzi Edwards
2019 Hunter D, Snodgrass S, Rivett D, McKiernan S, 'Reliability of modified Cobb angle measurements', Adelaide (2019)
2019 Blyton S, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, Birse S, Edwards S, 'Differences in running gait variability between individuals with and without musculoskeletal injury: A systematic review', Adelaide (2019)
Co-authors Sarah Blyton
2019 De Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly P, Rivett D, Snodgrass S, 'Cervical sensorimotor control is not associated with chronic idiopathic neck pain: A six-month longitudinal study', Cervical sensorimotor control is not associated with chronic idiopathic neck pain: A six-month longitudinal study, Gold Coast, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2019 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett D, 'Fibular position in chronic ankle instability radiographically measured in weight-bearing', Fibular position in chronic ankle instability radiographically measured in weight-bearing, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2019)
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Peter Osmotherly
2019 De Zoete R, Osmotherly P, Rivett D, Snodgrass S, 'The association between cervical sensorimotor control and chronic idiopathic neck pain: A six-month longitudinal study', The association between cervical sensorimotor control and chronic idiopathic neck pain: A six-month longitudinal study, Adelaide, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2019 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage IM, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Tessier J, Rivett D, 'Fibular position in chronic ankle instability (CAI) and the reliability of weight bearing radiographic measurements of fibular position.', (ACCEPTED), Geneva, Switzerland (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage
2019 De Zoete R, Osmotherly P, Rivett D, Snodgrass S, 'Seven cervical sensorimotor control tests measure different skills in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', Proceedings of World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2019 Abady Avman M, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, Rivett D, 'Is there an association between hip range of motion and non-specific low back pain? A systematic review of the literature.', Proceedings of World Confederation of Physical Therapy Congress 2109, Geneva, Switzerland (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2019 De Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly P, Rivett D, Snodgrass S, 'Cervical Sensorimotor Control is Not Related to Characteristics of Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain: A Six-Month Longitudinal Study', Proceedings of the World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress, Geneva, Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland (2019)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2018 Hunter D, Rivett DA, McKiernan ST, Snodgrass SNJ, 'Relationship between shoulder impingement syndrome and the thoracic posture', Cairns (2018)
2018 James C, West N, Snodgrass S, 'Biomechanics and Load in the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation: An update', Valens, Switzerland. (2018)
2018 De Zoete R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett D, Snodgrass SNJ, 'Cervical sensorimotor control is not correlated with neck pain or neck disability in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2018 Hunter D, Snodgrass SNJ, weerasekara I, Rivett DA, McKiernan ST, 'Thoracic Kyphosis: The Modified Cobb Angle and Inclinometer Measurement.', Canberra (2018)
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage
2018 Hunter D, Snodgrass SNJ, Rivett DA, McKiernan ST, 'Shoulder impingement syndrome: Is there a relationship with subacromial space?', Sydney (2018)
2018 McGann T, Drew M, Pizzari T, Dooley K, Snodgrass S, Rio E, et al., 'Monitoring Players Thigh Injury Risk in Response to Game Loading During an Elite U20s Basketball Camp', Monitoring players thigh injury risk in response to game loading during an elite U20s basketball camp, Perth, Australia (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2018.09.043
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2018 Dooley K, Drew M, Schultz A, Snodgrass S, Pizzari T, McGann T, et al., 'High Prevalence of Groin Pain Identi!ed in Elite Basketball U20s Athletes and its Impact on Function and Quality of Life', Perth, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Suzi Edwards
2018 Akhundov R, Diamond L, Edwards S, Snodgrass S, Clausen P, Saxby D, 'Development of a deep neural network for automated electromyographic pattern classification', Auckland, New Zealand (2018)
Co-authors Philip Clausen, Suzi Edwards
2017 Hunter D, Snodgrass S, Buxton A, Rivett D, McKiernan S, 'Shoulder impingement syndrome and acromio-humeral distance; is there a relationship?', Brisbane (2017)
2017 Hunter D, Snodgrass S, buxton A, rivett D, McKiernan S, 'Shoulder impingement syndrome and the thoracic spine; Is there a relationship?', Perth (2017)
2017 Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage I, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass S, Marquez J, de Zoete R, Rivett DA, 'A systematic review and meta analysis of the clinical benefits of passive joint mobilisation on ankle sprains.', Momentum 2017. Proceedings of Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Peter Osmotherly, Jodie Marquez
2017 de Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'Head tilt response: A novel method to test spatial orientation in individuals with idiopathic neck pain', Momentum 2017. Proceedings of Australian Physiotherapy Association Biennial Conference, Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2017 Blyton SJ, Edwards S, Moghaddas D, de Zoete RMJ, Palazzi K, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Associations between neck kinematics and pain in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', Sydney, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Sarah Blyton, Suzi Edwards, Philip Bolton, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 De Zoete R, Osmotherly PG, Rivett D, Snodgrass S, 'No difference in cervical sensorimotor control between individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain and healthy individuals', Sydney (2017)
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2016 Snodgrass S, Cooper R, Edwards S, Moghaddas D, Blyton S, de Zoete R, Rivett D, 'Altered movement strategies during functional tasks in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain', MANUAL THERAPY (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2016.05.107
Co-authors Suzi Edwards, Sarah Blyton
2016 Weerasekara I, Osmotherly P, Snodgrass S, de Zoete R, Rivett D, 'Clinical Benefits of Passive Joint Mobilisation on Ankle Sprains', Melbourne (2016)
Co-authors Ishanka Rajapakshamudiyanselage, Peter Osmotherly
2016 Snodgrass S, de Zoete R, Rivett D, Stanwell PT, 'Assessment of cerebral biochemistry in individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain and healthy individuals: evidence for central changes in the presence of chronic neck pain', Glasgow, Scotland (2016)
Co-authors Peter Stanwell
2016 Burns S, Snodgrass SNJ, Cleland J, Cook C, Bade M, Rivett D, 'Predictors of response to manual therapy and exercise for individuals with a primary complaint of low back pain: a secondary analysis', American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists Annual Conference, St. Louis, MO (2016)
2015 de Zoete RMJ, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Farrell SF, Snodgrass SJ, 'Sensorimotor control in people with insidious onset neck pain and healthy individuals: a systematic review', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference E-book and Program, Gold Coast, Qld. (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Snodgrass SJ, Osmotherly PG, Reid SA, Milburn PD, Rivett DA, 'Physical characteristics predisposing rugby players to neck injuries', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Thompson ER, Snodgrass SJ, Osmotherly PG, 'Wheelchair sports participation; injuries, benefits and barriers', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Snodgrass SJ, Farrell SF, Tsao H, Osmotherly PG, Rivett DA, Chipchase L, Schabrun S, 'The effects of shoulder taping on scapulothoracic muscle contraction and corticomotor excitability of scapular and shoulder muscles', Proceedings of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2015, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Sterling M, Vicenzino B, 'Determining the effective dose of mobilisation for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (the dose study)', Physiotherapy (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.1367
2015 Freeman P, Miller A, Snodgrass S, Callister R, 'Predisposing risk factors for hamstring and quadriceps strain injury in male football and rugby league players', Physiotherapy (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.2682
Co-authors Robin Callister
2015 Snodgrass SNJ, Thompson ER, Osmotherly PG, 'Injuries, Practices and Perceptions of Wheelchair Sports Participants', Physiotherapy: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015 Abstracts, Singapore (2015) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Moghaddas D, Snodgrass SNJ, Callister R, 'Evaluation of Community Exercise Classes', Physiotherapy: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015 Abstracts, Singapore (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2015 Knox GM, Snodgrass SNJ, Rivett DA, 'Clinical Educators' Experiences and Perceptions of Clinical Prediction Rules', Physiotherapy: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015 Abstracts, Singapore (2015) [E3]
2015 Snodgrass SNJ, Knox GM, Stanton TR, Kelly DH, Vicenzino B, Wand BM, Rivett DA, 'Students' Experiences and Perceptions of Clinical Prediction Rules', Physiotherapy: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015 Abstracts, Singapore (2015) [E3]
2015 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'The electronically facilitated feedback initiative: enhancing student feedback during clinical supervision using iPad technology', Physiotherapy, Sinagpore (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.1366
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Cath Johnston
2013 Lang J, James C, Ashby S, Kable A, Guest M, Snodgrass S, et al., 'An Investigation into Current Occupational Therapy Practice in the Provision of Weight Management Advice', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Adelaide (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Ashley Kable, Ron Plotnikoff, Samantha Ashby
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', Hunter and Coast Interdisciplinary Clinical Training Network Local Project Forum. Abstract Book, Newcastle (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Cath Johnston
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Cath Johnston
2013 Carter A, Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, 'The provision of weight management and healthy lifestyle advice by physical therapists', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013 Manvell J, Thompson N, Snodgrass SJ, Reid SR, 'Upper limb neurodynamic testing: an observation of median, radial and ulnar nerve strain during variations of upper limb positioning', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Freeman PA, MIller A, Callister R, 'Risk factors for hamstring and quadriceps strain injury in soccer and rugby league players', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2013 Sturmberg C, Marquez J, Heneghan N, Snodgrass SJ, van Vliet P, 'Attentional focus in motor learning for musculoskeletal dysfunction: A systematic review', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jodie Marquez, Paulette Vanvliet
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Sterling M, Vicenzino B, 'Investigation of the effective dose of mobilisation for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain (The DOSE Study)', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2013 Harrison JL, Osmotherly PG, Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Reid S, 'The relationship between cervical spine anthropometrics, range of movement and strength in elite rugby players', Proceeding of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2013 Ashby S, Snodgrass S, Russell T, Rivett DA, 'Using new technology in education - turning osces into e-osces using ipad and specialised software', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Special Issue: Occupational Therapy Australia, 25th National Conference and Exhibition (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12061
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2013 Freeman PA, Miller A, Snodgrass SJ, Callister R, 'Predisposing risk factors for hamstring and quadriceps strain injury in male soccer and rugby league players', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Phuket, Thailand (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Russel T, Ashby SE, Rivett DA, 'New tricks using new technology turning OSCEs into e-OSCEs using iPad and specialised software', Australian Physiotherapy Association National Business and Leadership Symposium, Adelaide, SA (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
2012 Manvell J, Thompson N, Snodgrass SJ, Reid S, 'Improving the mechanical validity of radial and ulnar nerve neurodynamic testing: An observation of strain during upper limb positioning', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Ingram L, 'A pilot study comparing cervical spine stiffness in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and asymptomatic individuals', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
2012 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Vicenzino B, 'Dose optimization for spinal treatment effectiveness (The DOSE Study): Higher applied mobilization force associated with reduced pain and spinal stiffness in patients with chronic neck pain', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, Quebec City, Canada (2012) [E3]
2011 Hunter AJ, Snodgrass SN, Quain DA, Parsons MW, Levi CR, 'Orthostatic variation in transcranial Doppler measured cerebral blood flow velocity 24 hours post acute ischaemic stroke', International Journal of Stroke, Adelaide, SA (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi
2011 Callister R, Evans K, Snodgrass SJ, 'Poor balance is a risk factor for noncontact ankle injuries in amateur male football players', 16th Annual Congress of the European College of Sports Science, Liverpool, UK (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2011 Collins CE, Snodgrass SN, Kable AK, James CL, Ashby SE, Plotnikoff RC, 'The Community Healthy Adults Project: A survey of health professionals knowledge and practice in client weight management', 2011 Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) eProceedings, Melbourne, VIC (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Samantha Ashby
2011 Sheaves EG, Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, 'Learning lumbar spine mobilisation: the effects of frequency and self-control of real-time objective feedback', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
2011 Evans KL, Snodgrass SN, Callister R, 'Risk factors for noncontact ankle injuries in amateur male soccer players', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations, Brisbane (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2011 Summers K, Snodgrass SN, Callister R, Drew M, 'An initial prospective exploratory investigation to identify predictors of calf cramping in rugby league players', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Robin Callister
2010 James CL, Guest M, Snodgrass SN, 'Quantifying risk assessment: Biomechanical analysis of musculoskeletal injury risk in an industrial setting', 15th World Federation of Occupational Therapists Conference, Santiago, Chile (2010) [E3]
2010 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Real-time objective feedback during cervical spine passive joint mobilization increases consistency of manually applied forces', Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, San Diego, USA (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2009 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Students apply more accurate cervical mobilisation forces when provided with real-time objective feedback', APA Conference Week Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2009 Snodgrass SN, Guest M, James CL, Wilkinson R, Viljoen D, 'Comprehensive evidence-based assessment of musculoskeletal injury risk in the industrial setting', APA Conference Week Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 Odelli RA, Snodgrass SN, 'Lumbar mobilisation skill acquisition and retention using objective real-time feedback on three force parameters', APA Conference Week Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 Campbell BD, Snodgrass SJ, 'Manipulation decreases thoracic spine stiffness in subjects with stiff spines', APA Conference Week Abstracts, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 Farmer P, Rivett DA, Snodgrass SJ, 'An investigation of the association between C2 spinal alignment and cervicogenic headache.', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2009 APA Conference Abstracts, Sydney, Australia (2009) [E3]
2009 James CL, Guy S, Snodgrass SJ, 'The effect of load on kinematics of the waist to shoulder lift during the WorkHab Functional Capacity Evaluation', Inaugural Conference for OT Australia NSW-ACT 2009: Conference Abstract Handbook, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 James C, Guest M, Snodgrass SJ, Viljeon D, Wilkinson R, 'A novel evidence-based risk assessment tool for quantifying musculoskeletal injury risk', Hunter Valley, NSW Australia (2009) [E3]
2009 James CL, Guest M, Snodgrass SN, Wilkinson R, Viljoen D, 'Biomechanical analysis of musculoskeletal injury risk in an industrial setting', Queensland Safety Conference 2009, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
2008 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Accuracy of applied forces during cervical mobilisation improves with real-time objective feedback', 9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT) Abstracts CD., Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Measurement of manual forces applied by physiotherapy students learning cervical spine mobilisation skills', 9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT). Abstracts, Rotterdam, The Netherlands (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rhodes HR, 'The effect of neck position on cervical spine stiffness', AAOMPT 2009 Annual Conference. Abstracts, Seattle, USA (2008) [E3]
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Innovative technology accelerates learning of hands-on physiotherapy treatment skills', ANZAME Conference 2008. Conference Program, Abstracts and Papers, Sydney, NSW (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2008 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Differences in cervical mobilisation force application between students and physiotherapists: Implications for teaching manual therapy skills', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements, Cairns, QLD (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2007 Snodgrass SN, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, Stojanovski E, 'Factors associated with manual forces applied during cervical mobilization', Physiotherapy (World Physical Therapy 2007 - Abstracts), Vancouver, Canada (2007) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2006.11.008
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2006 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Manual Forces Applied by Physical Therapists During Cervical Mobilization', The Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy Abstracts: AAOMPT Conference, 2006, Charlotte, NC, USA (2006) [E3]
2005 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'A pilot study investigating the forces physiotherapists apply during posterior-to-anterior mobilisation of the cervical spine', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 14th Biennial Conference, Brisbane, Qld (2005)
2005 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Robertson VJ, 'Manual forces applied during posterior-to-anterior mobilisation of the cervical spine: a systematic review', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 14th Biennial Conference, Brisbane, Qld (2005)
2004 Snodgrass SN, Mackenzie LA, Rivett DA, 'Falls prevention and physical activity: Perceptions of older people', Falls Prevention in Older People: From Research to Practice, Sydney, Australia (2004) [E1]
2003 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Chiarelli P, Bates AM, Rowe LJ, 'Factors related to thumb pain in physiotherapists', Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 13th Biennial Conference, Sydney, NSW (2003)
Show 89 more conferences

Report (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Nesbitt KV, Snodgrass S, Tilbrook M, 'Adapting game interfaces to measure neck movements in a clinical physiotherapy application', NA, 16 (2013)
Co-authors Keith Nesbitt
2013 Snodgrass S, Russell T, Rivett D, Ashby S, McLachlan L, Studdert CL, 'The eOSCE: advancing technology to improve students' learning and assessment reliability', Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT), 38 (2013) [R1]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 53
Total funding $2,016,249

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20232 grants / $71,000

Prism Neuro Neurosensory Testing Equipment$66,000

Funding body: College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Suzanne Snodgrass, Jodie Marquez, Wei-Ju Chang, Peter Osmotherly, Peter Stanwell, Mitch Smith, Josh Secomb, Karen Mickle, Frini Karayanidis

Scheme College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing Research and Education Equipment Grant Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2023
Funding Finish 2023
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Neural mechanisms underpinning the effects of cognitive load on postural stability with ageing$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Jodie Marquez, Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Doctor Sarah Blyton, Doctor Ishanka Rajapaksha Mudiyanselage, Doctor Sarah Valkenborghs
Scheme Pilot Funding Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2023
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G2300459
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20225 grants / $88,182

Artinis Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) equipment$52,000

Funding body: College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Peter Stanwell, Professor Coralie English, Dr Jodie Marquez, Dr Dawn Simpson, Dr Jennifer St George, Dr Wei-Ju Chang, Dr Tracy Burrows

Scheme College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing Research and Education Equipment Grant Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Neural mechanisms underpinning the effects of cognitive load on postural stability with ageing$18,229

Funding body: University of Newcastle Cross-College Research Support Scheme

Funding body University of Newcastle Cross-College Research Support Scheme
Project Team

Marquez J, Snodgrass SJ, Karayanidis F, Smith M, Mickle K, Stanwell S, Edwards S, Blyton S, Weerasekara I

Scheme Cross-College Research Support Scheme, The University of Newcastle
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Neural mechanisms underpinning the effects of cognitive load on postural stability with ageing$9,953

Funding body: School of Health Sciences - University of Newcastle

Funding body School of Health Sciences - University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Dr Jodie Marquez, Professor Frini Karayanidis, Professor Sarah Johnson, Dr Sarah Blyton, Dr Ishanka Weerasekara, Dr Sarah Valkenborghs, Dr Suzi Edwards

Scheme School of Health Sciences Strategic Pilot Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Visiting Research Fellow support (A/Prof Wei-Peng Teo)$6,000

Funding body: Active Living & Learning, Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Active Living & Learning, Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Research Support, Active Living & Learning
Role Lead
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Building our Leaders: Development and Empowerment (BOLDE) Program$2,000

Funding body: College of Health, Medicine & Wellbeing - The University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Health, Medicine & Wellbeing - The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Building our Leaders: Development and Empowerment (BOLDE) Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2022
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20212 grants / $809,026

State of the art Biomechanics and Exercise Testing Laboratory$800,000

Funding body: Office of DVC (Research and Innovation), University of Newcastle, Australia

Funding body Office of DVC (Research and Innovation), University of Newcastle, Australia
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Mackney J, Lewthwaite H, Edwards S, Valkenboroughs S, Haslam R, Marquez J, James C

Scheme Research Support Program Stimulus, DVC (Research and Innovation), The University of Newcastle
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2022
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

HIP-LEAP (high intensity physiotherapy-led exercise and activity program) for patients with hip fracture$9,026

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Williams C, English C, Giles M, Nair K, Pollack M, Attia J, Nilsson M, Close J, Russell T, Gallagher R, Wakely L Gallagher R, Wakely L

Scheme CBMHR 2021 Seed Funding Grant Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20204 grants / $30,932

Lifetime software support for Visual 3D motion analysis software$10,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre Brain and Mental Health

Funding body Priority Research Centre Brain and Mental Health
Project Team

A/Prof Suzanne Snodgrass, Dr Suzi Edwards

Scheme Infrastructure Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Development of a Convolutional Neural Network for the quantification of cervical spine muscle volume and composition from MRI of individuals with chronic idiopathic neck pain$8,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor James Elliott, Professor Peter Stanwell, Dr Kenneth Weber

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

3D injury kinematics of hamstring strain and concussion injuries in elite sport via model-based image modelling$7,932

Funding body: Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science | University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Suzi Edwards, Dr Geoffrey Skinner, A/Prof Andrew Gardner, A/Prof Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Faculty Strategic Investment Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Human Movement Variability: Development of novel methods for analysing posture$5,000

Funding body: School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, James C, Edwards S, Likens A

Scheme School of Health Sciences Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20193 grants / $81,107

Kistler force platform DAQ upgrade to include a seat pressure sensor$65,607

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

A/Prof Suzanne Snodgrass, Dr Suzi Edwards, A/Prof Carloe James

Scheme Equipment Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Real-time feedback on posture and movement$9,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

A/Prof Carloe James, A/Prof Suzanne Snodgrass, Dr Suzi Edwards

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine 2019 Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Dry needling and eccentric-concentric exercise versus traditional physical therapy in the treatment of individuals with biceps tendinopathy$6,000

Funding body: American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists

Funding body American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists
Project Team

McDevitt A, Cleland J, Mintken P, Snodgrass SJ

Scheme CARDON Research Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20186 grants / $29,747

Real-time feedback on posture and movement: does it change behaviour and reduce neck pain?$9,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, James C, Edwards E, Skinner G, Lee, R

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Equal Futures Alumni Study Grant$5,877

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Equal Futures Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1801450
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

Musculoskeletal Movement Lab infrastructure support grant: Visual 3D licenses$5,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Centre for Brain and Mental Health Infrastructure Support Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Neck kinematics, muscle volumes and injury prediction$4,643

Funding body: School of Health Science, Faculty of Health & Medicine, The University of Newcastle

Funding body School of Health Science, Faculty of Health & Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Project Support Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

CSIRO Prime 4 HealtheMove$2,727

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Doctor Suzi Edwards, Professor Carole James
Scheme ON Prime
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800888
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y

Neurobiological mechanisms underlying idiopathic, non-traumatic, neck pain$2,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health | The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Scheme Research Support Grant Round Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20171 grants / $320,693

The HAMI Study: Exploring Hamstring and Adductor Myotendinous Injury Risk Factors in Basketball$320,693

Funding body: NBA and GE Healthcare Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Collaboration

Funding body NBA and GE Healthcare Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Collaboration
Project Team Doctor Suzi Edwards, Dr Tania Pizarri, Associate Professor James Welsh, Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Mr Michael Drew, Dr Ebonie Rio, Associate Professor Nicholas O'Dwyer, Doctor Adrian Schultz, Mr Luke Donnan
Scheme Myotendinous Injuries Call for Proposals
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1601104
Type Of Funding C3400 – International For Profit
Category 3400
UON Y

20162 grants / $35,000

PhD Top-Up Scholarship - Rutger de Zoete$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Mr Rutger Marinus Johannes De Zoete, Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Professor Darren Rivett
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601029
Type Of Funding C3300 – Aust Philanthropy
Category 3300
UON Y

Dry needling for patients with neck pain: A randomized controlled trial$15,000

Funding body: American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic Section

Funding body American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic Section
Project Team

Dr Eric Gattie, A/Prof Suzanne Snodgrass, Prof Joshua Cleland

Scheme American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic Section Clinical Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20158 grants / $87,657

Kistler Force Platform$29,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Chuter V, Callister R

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Research Equipment Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Neurolog EMG$24,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Bolton P, Stanwell P, van Vliet P, Rivett DA, Nilsson M

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Research Equipment Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

International Research Visiting Fellowship from Northwestern (A/Prof James Elliott)$10,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Bolton P, Snodgrass SJ

Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Analyze 12.0 Visualization and Analysis Software for Medical Imaging$8,506

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience & Mental Health
Project Team

Stanwell P, Snodgrass SJ, Bolton P, Rivett DA.

Scheme Infrastructure Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

2015 International Visitor from Duke University, USA$6,151

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Chad Cook
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1401280
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Neurobiological mechanisms underlying idiopathic, non-traumatic, neck pain$5,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Elliott JM, Bolton P, Stanwell P

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Equal Futures Award$3,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Equal Futures Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501380
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

World Congress on Physical Therapy, Singapore, 1-4 May 2015$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500335
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20143 grants / $97,182

Establishment of a chronic neck pain research program for the investigation of neural and kinematic biomarkers as new targets for treatment$75,000

Funding body: Ramaciotti Foundations

Funding body Ramaciotti Foundations
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Peter Stanwell, Professor Paulette Van Vliet, Professor Darren Rivett, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Establishment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300857
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Pilot study to discover neural and kinematic biomarkers in chronic non-specific neck pain that provide biological evidence for patient outcomes following chiropractic care$18,182

Funding body: Australian Spinal Research Foundation

Funding body Australian Spinal Research Foundation
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Professor Philip Bolton, Professor Peter Stanwell, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300738
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

Using neuroimaging and motion analysis to better diagnose and treat chronic neck pain$4,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Snodgrass SJ, Rivett DA, Bolton P, Stanwell P, van Vliet P, McElduff P

Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20132 grants / $34,177

Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EEFI)$33,322

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Associate Professor Samantha Ashby, Doctor Catherine Johnston, Mr Kim Nguyen, Dr Trevor Russell
Scheme NSW ICTN Local Project Fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201150
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference, Melbourne 17-20 Oct 13.$855

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301021
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $2,000

IFOMPT 2012, the World Congress of Manual/Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, Convention Centre 30 September - 5 October 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200600
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20114 grants / $69,651

Adult lifestyle incentives for vitality and energy (ALIVE): Supporting health professionals to assist clients with weight management through lifestyle changes$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Carole James, Professor Ashley Kable, Doctor Maya Guest, Associate Professor Samantha Ashby, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1001025
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Injuries, practices and perceptions of wheelchair sports participants in NSW$19,912

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding body NSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project Team Professor Darren Rivett, Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Mr ROBIN Haskins
Scheme Research & Injury Prevention Scheme
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100776
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Physical characteristics predisposing rugby players to neck injuries: A replicable model for acceleration/contact sport$19,740

Funding body: NSW Sporting Injuries Committee

Funding body NSW Sporting Injuries Committee
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Doctor Peter Osmotherly, Mrs Susan Reid
Scheme Research & Injury Prevention Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100796
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Dose Optimisation for Spinal Treatment Effectiveness (The Dose Study): A randomised controlled pilot trial investigating the effects of high and low mobilisation forces in patients with neck pain$9,999

Funding body: Physiotherapy Research Foundation

Funding body Physiotherapy Research Foundation
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000952
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20102 grants / $222,000

The eOSCE: Advancing technology to improve students learning and assessment reliability$220,000

Funding body: Australian Learning and Teaching Council

Funding body Australian Learning and Teaching Council
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Dr IMELDA Burgman, Associate Professor Samantha Ashby
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000787
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting 2010, San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, USA, 17 - 20 February 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000388
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $16,146

Hydro Aluminium Biomechanical Study of the Carbon Plant$14,446

Funding body: Newcastle Innovation

Funding body Newcastle Innovation
Project Team Doctor Maya Guest, Professor Carole James, Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Administered Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189032
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

9th Congress of the International Federation of Orthopaedic Manual Theraposts, IFOMT2008, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 8/6/2008 - 13/6/2008$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0188629
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20071 grants / $1,700

World Physical Therapy 2007, 2-6/6/07$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187407
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20062 grants / $9,500

Cervical spine mobilisation: Investigation of applied forces$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186173
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

12th Annual American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists Conference, The Westin, Charlotte, NC, USA, 20-22 October 2006$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186814
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20051 grants / $400

Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia 14th Biennial Conference, 24-26 November 2005$400

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185662
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20042 grants / $10,149

Cervical spine mobilisation: Investigation of applied forces$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184997
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

2004 Australian Falls Prevention Conference, 21-23 November 2004$149

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Suzanne Snodgrass
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184820
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed16
Current10

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2024 PhD The Development And Validation Of A Preclinical Test For Early Identification Of Increased Falls Risk And Balance Decline In Middle-Aged Individuals. PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2023 PhD Investigation of Measurable Assessment Tool of Total Body Instability as a Singular Predictor Versus Multiple Standardised Tests for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2023 Masters Quantifying Game Demands in Junior Elite Basketball Players M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2022 PhD An Investigation of Elite Female Rugby League Players' Tackle Technique: How can the Risk for In-game Head Injury Assessments (HIA)) and Concussion be Reduced? PhD (Medicine), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2022 PhD Telehealth Breathing Intervention to Improve Patient Outcomes for Adults with Chronic Pain of Working Age PhD (Speech Pathology), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Best Practice in Physiotherapy Exercise Prescription in Individual Patient Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Conservative Management of Subacromial Pain Syndrome PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Dynamical Systems Approach to Movement Variability in Elite Youth Basketball Athletes PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Real-Time Feedback on Posture for Managing Symptoms of Neck Pain Synopsis PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD The Relationship Between the Hip Joint and Chronic Non Specific Low Back Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2023 PhD The Physical Therapy Management of Individuals with Long Head of the Biceps Tendinopathy PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2023 PhD Cervical Spine Kinematics Associated with Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2022 PhD Physical Therapy Interventions Directed at the Hips for Individuals with a Primary Compliant of Low Back Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2022 PhD The Influence of Physical Therapy Use on Outcomes for Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Lower Extremity PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2022 PhD Running Biomechanics and Movement Variability in Male Sub-Elite Athletes with a History of Hamstring Injury PhD (Exercise & Sport Science), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2022 PhD Neuromusculoskeletal Modelling of Myotendinous Dynamics During Sporting Movements of Basketball Athletes: Exploring Injury Mechanisms PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2022 PhD Quantifying Movement Strategies of Male Athletes with Self-Reported Hip-Related and/or Groin Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 PhD The Impact of Opioid Medication on Management, Recovery, and Outcomes of Individuals with Musculoskeletal Disorders PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 PhD Dry Needling Provided by Physical Therapists for the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2021 PhD Risk Factors for Running-Related Pain After Childbirth PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Characteristics of Chronic Ankle Instability and the Role of Joint Mobilisation PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 Masters An Analysis of Injury Databases of Amateur Netball Players M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Clinical Prediction Rules in Physiotherapy Clinical Education PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Cervical Spine Sensorimotor Control in Individuals with Chronic Idiopathic Neck Pain PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD The Effectiveness of Treatment of Cervicogenic Dizziness with Manual Therapy PhD (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 Masters The Association between the Static Posture of the Cervical Spine and Cervicogenic Headache M Philosophy (Physiotherapy), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

Woman typing on laptop

News • 28 Aug 2020

Is your computer a pain in the neck?

With many of us now working from home full-time or part-time, an International consortium of researchers want to explore how this is impacting our health.

Image of basketball player

News • 30 Apr 2018

Findings reveal under-reported groin pain in ballers

An Australian study has revealed the rate of groin injuries among basketball players could be 10 times higher than previously reported, causing significant impact on player performance and quality of life.

News • 23 Jul 2015

Researchers trialling state-of-the-art analysis for neck pain

University of Newcastle researchers are investigating new ways to diagnose and treat patients suffering chronic neck pain, a condition that affects more than 600,000 Australians and costs around $1.14 billion in associated health care.

Professor Suzanne Snodgrass

Position

Professor
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Email suzanne.snodgrass@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 2089
Fax (02) 4921 7902

Office

Room ICT-319
Building ICT Health Education and Research
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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