Dr Jodi Young

Research student

Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Jodi Young, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT is a physiotherapist based in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. She earned her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from the University of North Dakota in 2005. She completed her Fellowship in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy in 2013 from Regis University in Denver, CO, USA and is a board certified Orthopaedic Clinical Specialist. She is an Associate Professor at AT Still University in Mesa, Arizona, USA where she teaches musculoskeletal and differential diagnosis content. The focus of her PhD work is the investigation of the dosing of physiotherapy and how it relates to overall healthcare utilisation and subsequent costs in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders. 


Keywords

  • healthcare costs
  • healthcare utilisation
  • lower extremity
  • musculoskeletal
  • physical therapy
  • physiotherapy

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110317 Physiotherapy 100
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Young JL, 'Postoperative Management of the Knee: Ligamentous, meniscal and total joint replacement', Manual Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain Syndromes of the Upper and Lower Quadrants: An Evidence and Clinical-Informed Approach, Elsevier, London (2014)

Journal article (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Rhon DI, Clewley D, Young JL, Sissel CD, Cook CE, 'Leveraging healthcare utilization to explore outcomes from musculoskeletal disorders: Methodology for defining relevant variables from a health services data repository', BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 18 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Large healthcare databases, with their ability to collect many variables from daily medical practice, greatly enable health services research. Th... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Large healthcare databases, with their ability to collect many variables from daily medical practice, greatly enable health services research. These longitudinal databases provide large cohorts and longitudinal time frames, allowing for highly pragmatic assessment of healthcare delivery. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the methodology related to the use of the United States Military Health System Data Repository (MDR) for longitudinal assessment of musculoskeletal clinical outcomes, as well as address challenges of using this data for outcomes research. Methods: The Military Health System manages care for approximately 10 million beneficiaries worldwide. Multiple data sources pour into the MDR from multiple levels of care (inpatient, outpatient, military or civilian facility, combat theater, etc.) at the individual patient level. To provide meaningful and descriptive coding for longitudinal analysis, specific coding for timing and type of care, procedures, medications, and provider type must be performed. Assumptions often made in clinical trials do not apply to these cohorts, requiring additional steps in data preparation to reduce risk of bias. The MDR has a robust system in place to validate the quality and accuracy of its data, reducing risk of analytic error. Details for making this data suitable for analysis of longitudinal orthopaedic outcomes are provided. Results: Although some limitations exist, proper preparation and understanding of the data can limit bias, and allow for robust and meaningful analyses. There is the potential for strong precision, as well as the ability to collect a wide range of variables in very large groups of patients otherwise not captured in traditional clinical trials. This approach contributes to the improved understanding of the accessibility, quality, and cost of care for those with orthopaedic conditions. Conclusion: The MDR provides a robust pool of longitudinal healthcare data at the person-level. The benefits of using the MDR database appear to outweigh the limitations.

DOI 10.1186/s12911-018-0588-8
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Daniel Rhon Uon
2018 Young JL, Rhon DI, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'The influence of exercise dosing on outcomes in patients with knee disorders: A systematic review', Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 48 146-161 (2018) [C1]

Copyright © 2018 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®. All rights reserved. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. BACKGROUND: Therapeutic exercise is commonly used t... [more]

Copyright © 2018 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®. All rights reserved. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. BACKGROUND: Therapeutic exercise is commonly used to treat individuals with knee disorders, but dosing parameters for optimal outcomes are unclear. Large variations exist in exercise prescription, and research related to specific dosing variables for knee osteoarthritis, patellar tendinopathy, and patellofemoral pain is sparse. OBJECTIVES: To identify specific doses of exercise related to improved outcomes of pain and function in individuals with common knee disorders, categorized by effect size. METHODS: Five electronic databases were searched for studies related to exercise and the 3 diagnoses. Means and standard deviations were used to calculate effect sizes for the exercise groups. The overall quality of evidence was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. RESULTS: Five hundred eighty-three studies were found after the initial search, and 45 were included for analysis after screening. Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale scores were "fair" quality and ranged from 3 to 8. For knee osteoarthritis, 24 total therapeutic exercise sessions and 8- and 12-week durations of exercise were parameters most often associated with large effects. An exercise frequency of once per week was associated with no effect. No trends were seen with exercise dosing for patellar tendinopathy and patellofemoral pain. CONCLUSION: This review suggests that there are clinically relevant exercise dosing variables that result in improved pain and function for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but optimal dosing is still unclear for patellar tendinopathy and patellofemoral pain. Prospective studies investigating dosing parameters are needed to confirm the results from this systematic review.

DOI 10.2519/jospt.2018.7637
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Daniel Rhon Uon
2018 Young JL, Rhon DI, de Zoete RMJ, Cleland JA, Snodgrass SJ, 'The influence of dosing on effect size of exercise therapy for musculoskeletal foot and ankle disorders: a systematic review', Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy, 22 20-32 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia Objective: The purpose of this review was to identify doses of exercise therapy associated with greater tr... [more]

© 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia Objective: The purpose of this review was to identify doses of exercise therapy associated with greater treatment effect sizes in individuals with common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot and ankle, namely, achilles tendinopathy, ankle sprains and plantar heel pain. Methods: AMED, EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched from 2005 to August 2017 for randomized controlled trials related to exercise for these three diagnoses. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale was used for methodological quality assessment. Exercise dosing variables and outcome measures related to pain and function were extracted from the studies, and standardized mean differences were calculated for the exercise groups. Results: Fourteen studies met the final inclusion. A majority of the studies showed large effects and two small trends were identified. Patients with plantar heel pain may benefit more from a daily home exercise program than two supervised visits per week (SMD = 3.82), but this recommendation is based on weak evidence. In achilles tendinopathy, a relationship was also seen when sets and repetitions of eccentric exercise were performed as tolerated (SMD = 1.08 for function, -1.29 for pain). Conclusions: Session duration, frequency, total number of visits, and overall length of care may all be dosing variables with limited value for determining effective exercise prescription. However, the limited number of studies prevents any definitive conclusions. Further investigation is warranted to improve our understanding of the influence exercise dosing has on treatment effect sizes. Future randomized controlled trials comparing specific exercise dose variables should be conducted to clarify the impact of these variables.

DOI 10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.10.001
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Daniel Rhon Uon
2016 Morihisa R, Eskew J, McNamara A, Young J, 'DRY NEEDLING IN SUBJECTS WITH MUSCULAR TRIGGER POINTS IN THE LOWER QUARTER: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.', International journal of sports physical therapy, 11 1-14 (2016)
2015 McDevitt A, Young J, Mintken P, Cleland J, 'Regional interdependence and manual therapy directed at the thoracic spine', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, 23 139-146 (2015)

© W. S. Maney and Son Ltd 2015. Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretic... [more]

© W. S. Maney and Son Ltd 2015. Thoracic spine manipulation is commonly used by physical therapists for the management of patients with upper quarter pain syndromes. The theoretical construct for using thoracic manipulation for upper quarter conditions is a mainstay of a regional interdependence (RI) approach. The RI concept is likely much more complex and is perhaps driven by a neurophysiological response including those related to peripheral, spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Recent evidence suggests that thoracic spine manipulation results in neurophysiological changes, which may lead to improved pain and outcomes in individuals with musculoskeletal disorders. The intent of this narrative review is to describe the research supporting the RI concept and its application to the treatment of individuals with neck and/or shoulder pain. Treatment utilizing both thrust and non-thrust thoracic manipulation has been shown to result in improvements in pain, range of motion and disability in patients with upper quarter conditions. Research has yet to determine optimal dosage, techniques or patient populations to which the RI approach should be applied; however, emerging evidence supporting a neurophysiological effect for thoracic spine manipulation may negate the need to fully answer this question. Certainly, there is a need for further research examining both the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of manual therapy interventions utilized in the RI model as well as the neurophysiological effects resulting from this intervention.

DOI 10.1179/2042618615Y.0000000005
Citations Scopus - 10
2014 Young JL, Walker D, Snyder S, Daly K, 'Thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: A systematic review', Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy, 22 141-153 (2014)

Objectives: Thoracic manipulation is widely used in physical therapy and has been shown to be effective at addressing mechanical neck pain. However, thoracic mobilization may prod... [more]

Objectives: Thoracic manipulation is widely used in physical therapy and has been shown to be effective at addressing mechanical neck pain. However, thoracic mobilization may produce similar effects. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods: ProQuest, NCBI-PubMed, APTA's Hooked on Evidence, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus were searched to identify relevant studies. Fourteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the GRADE approach. Results: The literature as assessed by the PEDro scale was fair and the GRADE method showed overall quality ranging from very low to moderate quality. The 14 included studies showed positive outcomes on cervical pain levels, range of motion, and/or disability with the use of thoracic manipulation or mobilization. There was a paucity of literature directly comparing thoracic manipulation and mobilization. Discussion: Current limitations in the body of research, specifically regarding the use of thoracic mobilization, limit the recommendation of its use compared to thoracic manipulation for patients with mechanical neck pain. There is, however, a significant amount of evidence, although of varied quality, for the short-term benefits of thoracic manipulation in treating patients with this condition. Further high quality research is necessary to determine which technique is more effective in treating patients with mechanical neck pain. © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2014.

DOI 10.1179/2042618613Y.0000000043
Citations Scopus - 15
2014 Brown K, Luszeck T, Nerdin S, Yaden J, Young JL, 'The effectiveness of cervical versus thoracic thrust manipulation for the improvement of pain, disability, and range of motion in patients with mechanical neck pain', Physical Therapy Reviews, 19 381-391 (2014)
DOI 10.1179/1743288x14y.0000000155
2011 Young J, 'The effects of core and lower extremity strengthening in pregnancy-related low back and pelvic girdle pain: a systematic review.', Journal of Women's Health Physical Therapy, 16 201-209 (2011)
2011 Moore C, Young J, 'Effectiveness of silver in wound care treatment', Physical Therapy Reviews, 16 201-209 (2011)

© 2011, © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2011. Background: Topical treatments impregnated with silver are being increasingly used in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds; howeve... [more]

© 2011, © W. S. Maney & Son Ltd 2011. Background: Topical treatments impregnated with silver are being increasingly used in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds; however, the evidence on the effectiveness of silver wound care treatment is in question. Objectives: To systematically review the literature examining the effectiveness of silver in wound care treatment. Methods: Research databases were consulted including the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ProQuest, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for relevant clinical trials from 2000 to 2009. Studies deemed to have met inclusion criteria were scored using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and those scoring 4/10 or higher were included in this review. Results: Five clinical trials were identified including three randomized control trials including a total of 410 subjects. Methodological quality ranged from 4 to 10 out of 10. All five research studies showed positive effects of the use of silver dressings or topical agents. Conclusion: This literature review analyzed the effectiveness of sliver hydroalginate, Contreet foam, hydrofiber Ag dressings along with hyaluronic acid plus silver sulfadiazine and silver sulfadiazine topical agents in wound care. Second degree burns, venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and open surgical and traumatic wounds were analyzed in the included studies. The results of this literature review demonstrate that silver dressings and topical agents are promising as safe and effective treatment methods for wound care patients throughout the treatment period in the selected studies. However, further research should be conducted to provide additional evidence on the effectiveness of silver dressings and topical agents.

DOI 10.1179/1743288X11Y.0000000017
Citations Scopus - 5
2010 Young JL, 'Effects of whole-body vibration exercise on prevention of the negative effects of prolonged bed rest-a systematic review.', Physical Therapy Reviews, 15 391-398 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 1
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Dr Jodi Young

Contact Details

Email jodi.young@uon.edu.au
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