Dr Catherine Johnston

Dr Catherine Johnston

Senior Lecturer

School of Health Sciences (Physiotherapy)

Career Summary

Biography

Catherine is Lecturer and Clinical Education Manager for the Physiotherapy Program at the University of Newcastle. Catherine has a PhD, MAppSc (Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy) and BAppSc (Physiotherapy) from The University of Sydney. Catherine is the Clinical Education Manager for the physiotherapy program and teaches into the physiotherapy program, predominantly in cardiopulmonary physiotherapy. Catherine's research interests include all aspects of clinical education in physiotherapy (student learning on clinical placement, student under performance on clinical placement, student and clinical educator support) and cardiopulmonary physiotherapy (particularly pulmonary rehabilitation).

Research Expertise
Clinical education - clinical education strategies, educator and student teaching and learning on placement, supporting students and educators, underperforming and challenging students, remediation for clinical placement.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation - the use of evidence-based practice, supporting rural and remote healthcare practitioners to deliver pulmonary rehabilitation.

All aspects of cardiopulmonary physiotherapy practice.

Research design: mixed methods research, survey development

Teaching Expertise
Course coordinator: PHTY1020 (co-coordination), PHTY2060 (Physiotherapy Clinical Practice II), PHTY3060 (Physiotherapy Clinical Practice III), PHTY4010 (Physiotherapy Clinical Practice IV), PHTY4040 (Physiotherapy Clinical Practice V).

Teaching and Assessment: Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy content (PHTY2040 CPI, PHTY3020 CPII), general physiotherapy academic content

Administrative Expertise
Physiotherapy Clinical Education Manager - responsible for coordination of all aspects of physiotherapy clinical placement. Catherine is also a leader in the School of Health Sciences with respect to Clinical Education (Discipline Specific and Multiprofessional).

Collaborations
Lung And Heart Physiotherapy Research (LAHPR) Group (The Faculty of Health Science, The University of Sydney)


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Sydney
  • Master of Applied Science, University of Sydney

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy
  • Physiotherapy Clinical Education
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 60
139999 Education not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2003 -  Lecturer, Clinical Coordinator

Physiotherapy

University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/07/1991 - 1/12/2000 Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy Clinical Educator Westmead Hospital WSAHS and the University of Sydney
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2001 - 1/02/2003 Senior Physiotherapist - Pulmonary Rehabilitation WSAHS Western Sydney Area Health Service
Respiratory Medicine
Australia
1/08/1989 - 1/12/1991 Physiotherapist Westmead Hospital WSAHS
Rotating Physiotherapist
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


(64 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Wakely L, Langham J, Johnston CL, Rae K, 'Physical activity of rurally residing children with a disability: A survey of parents and carers.', Disability and Health Journal, (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.dhjo.2017.05.002
Co-authors Kym Rae, Luke Wakely
2017 Johnston C, Newstead C, Sanderson M, Wakely L, Osmotherly P, 'The changing landscape of physiotherapy student clinical placements: An exploration of geographical distribution and¿student performance across settings', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 25 85-93 (2017)

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To describe the geographical distribution of physiotherapy clinical placements and investigate the relationship between geog... [more]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To describe the geographical distribution of physiotherapy clinical placements and investigate the relationship between geographical setting and clinical placement marks in physiotherapy students. Design: A retrospective cohort design was used for this study. Setting: The University of Newcastle, New South Wales. Participants: Data from entry-level Bachelor of Physiotherapy student clinical placements. Main outcome measure(s): Data from all clinical placements in the Physiotherapy program between 2003 and 2014 were included. For all clinical placements, student assessment mark, year of study, type of placement and placement location were collected. Placement location was then classified using the Modified Monash Model (MMM) categories: one (most metropolitan) to seven (most remote). Results: Over the 12¿year period of the study 3964 placements were completed. Between 2003 and 2005 the average proportion of clinical placements occurring in metropolitan areas (MMM1) was 78% and in rural areas (MMM categories 3¿6) was 22%. In 2014 these proportions had changed to 59% (MMM1) and 40% (MMM3-6). There were significant differences in clinical placement grades between MMM1 and all other categories except MMM2, with lower assessment marks in MMM1 than other categories. Conclusions: The changing distribution of physiotherapy clinical placements may be reflective of increasing student numbers and greater efforts to support students completing rural and remote placements. This change may lead to a positive effect on the rural and remote physiotherapy workforce. Further research is required to determine the specific training and support needs of students and clinical educators in rural and remote settings.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12302
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Peter Osmotherly
2017 Newstead CJ, Seaton JA, Johnston CL, 'Australian critical care nursing professionals' attitudes towards the use of traditional ¿chest physiotherapy¿ techniques', Hong Kong Physiotherapy Journal, 36 33-48 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Background Chest physiotherapy techniques, such as percussion, postural drainage, and expiratory vibrations, may be employed in a critical care setting. Physiotherapists a... [more]

© 2017 Background Chest physiotherapy techniques, such as percussion, postural drainage, and expiratory vibrations, may be employed in a critical care setting. Physiotherapists are primarily responsible for their provision; however, nurses have also traditionally implemented these treatments. It is unclear whether nurses consider chest physiotherapy to be a part of their role, or how they perceive their knowledge and confidence pertaining to these techniques. Objective To investigate the attitudes of nurses towards traditional chest physiotherapy techniques. Method A total of 1222 members of the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Results There were 142 respondents (12%) with the majority (n = 132, 93%) having performed chest physiotherapy techniques in clinical practice. Most of them considered that the provision of chest physiotherapy was a part of nurse's role. Commonly cited factors influencing nurses' use of chest physiotherapy techniques were the availability of physiotherapy services, adequacy of nursing staff training and skill, and perceptions of professional roles. Conclusions Nurses working in critical care commonly utilised traditional chest physiotherapy techniques. Further research is required to investigate the reasons why nursing professionals might assume responsibility for the provision of chest physiotherapy techniques, and if their application of these techniques is consistent with evidence-based recommendations.

DOI 10.1016/j.hkpj.2016.08.001
2017 Wakely LT, Marquez J, Rae K, Johnston C, Robinson T, Freeman J, 'Surviving not thriving: Parents' perceptions of physical activity for rurally residing children with a disability' (2017)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Kym Rae, Jodie Marquez
2016 Francis A, Hills C, MacDonald-Wicks L, Johnston C, James D, Surjan Y, Warren-Forward H, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from practice educators in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy and physiotherapy and radiation therapy', Radiography, 22 287-294 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of... [more]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a compulsory component of health programs with practice educators playing a critical role in the education of students. Practice educator characteristics may positively or negatively affect student learning in practice settings. This study aimed to identify characteristics of the ideal practice educator that lead to successful practical experiences as perceived by current practice educators working in the Australian context of diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods All practice educators (n = 1063) on the University of Newcastle Practice Educator Database were invited to participate in this prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study via online link or paper format. Results There was a 52% response rate. The five most valued characteristics were feedback skills, non-judgemental, professionalism, clarity and listening skills. The five least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, respect for students' autonomy, well-prepared, availability and being a role model. Comparisons between disciplines, genders, ages, years in practice and levels of supervisory experience indicated some statistically significant differences, though actual differences were small. Discussion Overall there was a high degree of agreement within and between disciplines on the characteristics of the ideal practice educator. The top five skills could be classed as generic skills and not specific clinical and practice skills, thus formal training and certification schemes may enhance practice educator competence.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2016.04.001
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Yolanda Surjan, Caroline Hills, Lesley Wicks, Daphne James
2016 Snodgrass SJ, Rivett D, Farrell S, Ball K, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, et al., 'Clinical Educator and Student Perceptions of iPad T Technology to Enhance Clinical Supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', INTERNET JOURNAL OF ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES AND PRACTICE, 14 (2016) [C1]
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Samantha Ashby, Darren Rivett
2016 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Alison JA, 'Establishing and delivering pulmonary rehabilitation in rural and remote settings: The opinions, attitudes and concerns of health care professionals', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 24 106-114 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended for people with chronic lung disease however access remains limited in rural and rem... [more]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended for people with chronic lung disease however access remains limited in rural and remote settings. The aim of this project was to explore the perspectives of rural and remote health care professionals regarding the establishment and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation. Setting: Rural (NSW) and remote (NT) Australian healthcare settings. Participants: Health care professionals (n=25) who attended a training program focussing on the delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation. Main outcome measure(s): Surveys with open written questions were completed by participants following the training program. Key informants also participated in face-to-face interviews. Thematic analysis was undertaken of data collected on participant opinions, attitudes and concerns regarding the establishment and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation in their individual situation. Results: Participating health care professionals (predominantly nurses and physiotherapists) identified a number of issues relating to establishing and delivering pulmonary rehabilitation; including staffing, time and case load constraints, patient and community attitudes, lack of professional knowledge and confidence and inability to ensure sustainability. The practicalities of delivering pulmonary rehabilitation, particularly exercise prescription and training, were also important concerns raised. Conclusions: Lack of health care professional staffing, knowledge and confidence were reported to be factors impacting the establishment and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation. This study has facilitated a greater understanding of the issues surrounding the establishment and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation in rural and remote settings. Further research is required to investigate the contribution of health professional training and associated factors to improving the availability and delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation in rural and remote settings.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12202
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Perram A, Hills C, Johnston C, MacDonald-Wicks L, Surjan Y, James D, Warren-Forward H, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from undergraduate students in diagnostic radiography, nuclear medicine, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and radiation therapy', Radiography, 22 295-305 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a core component of undergraduate health programs, with the characteristics of the practice educator reported... [more]

© 2016 The College of Radiographers Background Practice education is a core component of undergraduate health programs, with the characteristics of the practice educator reported to have an influence on student experience during practical. This study analyses Australian student perceptions from six allied health professional undergraduate programs, to identify the characteristics of the ideal practice educator leading to successful placement experiences. Methods An existing survey developed for medical students was modified to incorporate both quantitative and qualitative responses. Participants included all students enrolled in six undergraduate health professions in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Newcastle, Australia (n = 1485). Students were invited to complete the survey via hard copy or online. Results There was a 54% response rate. The most valued characteristics were non-judgemental, clarity and feedback. The three least valued characteristics were scholarly activity, role model and practices evidence base practice. Students identified the importance of their relationship (respectful, inspirational and supportive) with the practice educator as being fundamental to a productive placement. Conclusion The characteristics identified by respondents were common to all six professions, with little differences between gender, year of program or number of placements completed. This study suggests that the attitude of the practice educator towards the student is one of the key factors that underpin the success of practice experience across allied health professions.

DOI 10.1016/j.radi.2016.04.007
Co-authors Helen Warren-Forward, Yolanda Surjan, Lesley Wicks, Caroline Hills, Daphne James
2016 Johnston C, Newstead C, Sanderson M, Wakely LT, Osmotherly P, 'Physiotherapy clinical placements: describing geographical distribution and relationship to assessment mark' (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Peter Osmotherly
2016 Hunter S, Johnston CL, Rasiah R, Roberts E, O'Toole G, MacDonald- Wicks L, Newstead C, 'Healthcare students learning together to promote the health of older people' (2016)
Co-authors Elysa Roberts, Sharyn Hunter, Rohan Rasiah, Gjyn Otoole, Lesley Wicks
2016 Hunter S, Johnston C, Rasiah, Roberts E, O'Toole G, MacDonald-Wicks L, Newstead C, 'Healthy ageing as a vehicle for interprofessional education: Nursing Students' expereince' (2016)
Co-authors Sharyn Hunter, Gjyn Otoole, Elysa Roberts, Rohan Rasiah, Lesley Wicks
2015 Waters A, Hill K, Jenkins S, Johnston C, Mackney J, 'Discordance between distance ambulated as part of usual care and functional exercise capacity in survivors of critical illness upon intensive care discharge: Observational study', Physical Therapy, 95 1254-1263 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Physical Therapy Association. Background. People who have had a prolonged admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) commonly have profound debilitation and weakne... [more]

© 2015 American Physical Therapy Association. Background. People who have had a prolonged admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) commonly have profound debilitation and weakness. For the delivery of effective exercise training, an accurate assessment of exercise capacity is essential. Objective. The study objectives were to investigate how much ground-based walking is undertaken by inpatients recovering from critical illness within 1 week of discharge from an ICU and to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) for this population. Design. This was an observational study. Methods. Within 1 week of discharge from the ICU, functional exercise capacity was measured with the 6MWT. The maximum distance ambulated on the ward in a single session as part of usual clinical management was extracted from the medical notes. The distance achieved during the 6MWT and the maximum distance ambulated on the ward were compared. Results. The participants (N=23) were survivors of a critical illness; their mean age was 57 years (SD = 11). The median length of ICU stay was 11 days (interquartile range [IQR]=7). The mean 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) was 179 m (SD = 101), and the maximum distance ambulated on the ward was 30 m (IQR=65). There was a moderate association between the distanc e participants ambulated on the ward and the 6MWD (r=.54). The maximum distance ambulated on the ward, expressed as a percentage of the 6MWD, was 29% (IQR=34%). Five participants (22%) experienced oxygen desaturation (oxygen saturation of < 85%) and recovered within 1 minute of resting. Limitations. The maximum distance ambulated on the ward was estimated with premeasured distances. Conclusions. Most participants ambulated at a low percentage of their measured exercise capacity. The 6MWT appears to be a safe and useful test for inpatients recently discharged from the ICU.

DOI 10.2522/ptj.20140282
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2015 Langham J, Wakely L, Johnston CL, Rae K, 'Physical activity of rural residing children with disabilities: Perceptions of parents/carers', 13th National Rural Health Conference.Handbook (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Kym Rae
2015 Hunter SM, Johnston CL, Rasiah R, Roberts E, O'Toole G, MacDonald-Wicks L, et al., 'Using healthy ageing as a vehicle for interprofessional education', 6th International Clinical Skills Conference. Abstracts (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Elysa Roberts, Sharyn Hunter, Gjyn Otoole, Rohan Rasiah, Lesley Wicks
2015 Robins D, Egan M, Johnston C, Newstead C, Mackney J, 'Pressures generated using an improvised PEP device in a COPD and healthy population', European Respiratory Journal 46: Suppl 59 (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1183/13993003.congress-2015.PA982
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2015 Hunter S, Johnston C, Rasiah, Roberts E, O'Toole, MacDonald-Wicks, Newstead C, 'Promoting healthy ageing with interprofessional education' (2015)
Co-authors Rohan Rasiah, Elysa Roberts, Lesley Wicks, Gjyn Otoole, Sharyn Hunter
2015 Barry R, Johnston C, Newstead C, Osmotherly PG, 'Performance In Clinical Exit Examinations: Is It Related To Academic Or Clinical Placement Assessment In Physiotherapy Students?', ANZAHPE/AMEA 2015 Conference (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2015 Johnston C, Wakely LT, Brown L, 'The use of iPads by undergraduate allied healthe professional students on clinical placement', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Luke Wakely
2015 Colman ZE, Johnston CL, Ashby S, Mackney JH, 'Experiences of fatigue following critical illness: a mixed methods study', Physiotherapy (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.442
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney, Samantha Ashby
2015 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'The electronically facilitated feedback initiative: enhancing student feedback during clinical supervision using iPad technology', Physiotherapy (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2015.03.1366
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Darren Rivett, Samantha Ashby
2015 MacDonald-Wicks LK, Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, ''Failure to fail' in physiotherapy clinical education', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference Abstract E-Book (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2015 Ashby SE, Colman Z, Johnston C, Mackney J, 'Experiences of fatigue following critical illness: a mixed methods study', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference E-book and Program (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Samantha Ashby, Jennifer Mackney
2015 Johnston CL, Newstead C, MacDonald-Wicks LK, 'The impact of supervising challenging students on clinical placement', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference E-book and Program (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2015 Barry RK, Newstead CJ, Osmotherly PG, Johnston CL, 'Performance in physiotherapy clinical exit examinations: the relationship to academic and clinical placement assessment', Connect Physiotherapy Conference 2015: Conference E-book and Program (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2014 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Maguire GP, Alison JA, 'Does delivery of a training program for healthcare professionals increase access to pulmonary rehabilitation and improve outcomes for people with chronic lung disease in rural and remote Australia?', Australian Health Review, 38 387-395 (2014) [C1]

Objective Access to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), an effective management strategy for people with chronic respiratory disease, is often limited particularly in rural and remote ... [more]

Objective Access to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), an effective management strategy for people with chronic respiratory disease, is often limited particularly in rural and remote regions. Difficulties with establishment and maintenance of PR have been reported. Reasons may include a lack of adequately trained staff. There have been no published reports evaluating the impact of training programs on PR provision. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of an interactive training and support program for healthcare professionals (the Breathe Easy, Walk Easy (BEWE) program) on the delivery of PR in rural and remote regions. Methods The study was a quasi-experimental before-after design. Data were collected regarding the provision of PR services before and after delivery of the BEWE program and patient outcomes before and after PR. Results The BEWE program was delivered in one rural and one remote region. Neither region had active PR before the BEWE program delivery. At 12-month follow-up, three locally-run PR programs had been established. Audit and patient outcomes indicated that the PR programs established broadly met Australian practice recommendations and were being delivered effectively. In both regions PR was established with strong healthcare organisational support but without significant external funding, relying instead on the diversion of internal funding and/or in-kind support. Conclusions The BEWE program enabled the successful establishment of PR and improved patient outcomes in rural and remote regions. However, given the funding models used, the sustainability of these programs in the long term is unknown. Further research into the factors contributing to the ability of rural and remote sites to provide ongoing delivery of PR is required. What is known about the topic? PR including exercise training, education, and psychosocial support, is an effective and well evidenced management strategy for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that improves exercise capacity and quality of life, and reduces hospital admissions and length of stay. Despite the fact that participation in PR is seen as an essential component in the management of COPD, access remains limited, particularly in rural and remote regions. Difficulties with establishing and maintaining PR have been attributed to lack of physical and financial resources and adequately trained and skilled staff. There have been no published reports evaluating the impact of training programs for healthcare professionals in the provision of PR. What does this paper add? This paper is the first to demonstrate that the delivery of a well supported, interactive healthcare professional training program may facilitate the establishment of PR in rural and remote regions. Following delivery of the BEWE program, PR which broadly met the Australian recommendations for practice in terms of program content and structure, was established. Factors influencing the establishment of PR were related to the characteristics of the healthcare setting, such as remoteness, and to issues around staff retention. The settings where PR was not established were in less well-staffed, community-based, more remote settings. People with COPD who participated in these programs showed significant improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life. What are the implications for practitioners? One of the factors limiting the delivery of PR may be a lack of appropriately trained and skilled staff. Healthcare professionals' participation in locally provided education and training programs targeted at developing skills for providing PR may enable effective PR programs to be established and maintained in rural and remote regions. © AHHA 2014.

DOI 10.1071/AH14009
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2014 Chiarelli PE, Johnston C, Osmotherly PG, 'Introducing palliative care into entry-level physical therapy education', Journal of Palliative Medicine, 17 152-158 (2014) [C1]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the... [more]

Background and Objective: There is a paucity of information related to teaching palliative care to entry-level physical therapy students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an undergraduate course in palliative care on the preparedness of entry-level physical therapy students to practice within the palliative care setting. Methods: Participants were all entry-level undergraduate students enrolled in the third year of a 4-year undergraduate degree. All students enrolled in the course, "Physiotherapy Through Lifestages" took part in the learning modules relating to the care of patients undergoing palliative care. A survey instrument was used in the study, a modified version of an existing unpublished written questionnaire previously used to evaluate palliative care education in other allied health professions. Results and Conclusions: Participation in the course resulted in an increase in self-rated knowledge and confidence for working in the palliative care setting for entry-level physical therapy students and is considered to provide a useful ongoing resource for the presentation of this topic material. Although the impact of the delivery of this education module may be considered successful in this regard, it would appear that some of the underlying attitudes and emotional responses to this area of physiotherapy practice were less easily influenced. Further research is required to understand the influences on emotional preparedness of students to undertake this area of study and practice and to determine the optimal stage of study for delivery of this content. © Copyright 2014, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

DOI 10.1089/jpm.2013.0158
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2014 Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, Walmsley S, MacDonald L, 'Allied Health Student Clinical Placements in Residential Aged Care Facilities: Staff Opinions, Attitudes, and Support Needs.', The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice., 12 1-13 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Sarah Walmsley
2014 Johnston C, Brown LJ, Wakely L, 'Would iPads Assist Students on Clinical Placement?', ANZAHPE 2014 Conference Handbook & Program (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Lesley Wicks, Leanne Brown
2014 Johnston CL, MacDonald L, Newstead CJ, Walmsley S, 'Allied Health student clinical placements in residential aged care facilities: Staff attitudes and support needs.', ANZAHPE 2014 Conference Handbook & Program (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Sarah Walmsley
2014 Johnston C, Osmotherly PG, Newstead C, Baldwin Z, 'The relationship between academic and clinical performance in physiotherapy students', Anzahpe 2014 Conference Handbook (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly
2013 Johnston CL, James R, Mackney JH, 'The current use of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy by public hospital physiotherapists in New South Wales', New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 41 88-93 (2013) [C1]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2013 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Boyle E, Maguire GP, Alison JA, 'Improving chronic lung disease management in rural and remote Australia: The Breathe Easy Walk Easy programme', RESPIROLOGY, 18 161-169 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2012.02269.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2013 Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, MacDonald-Wicks L, 'Supervising failing students on clinical placement.', ANZAHPE 2013 Conference Handbook & Program (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', Hunter and Coast Interdisciplinary Clinical Training Network Local Project Forum. Abstract Book (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Darren Rivett, Samantha Ashby, Suzanne Snodgrass
2013 Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, Walmsley S, MacDonald-Wicks L, Chiarelli P, 'Physiotherapy student clinical placements in the aged care setting: practitioner attitudes and support needs.', Journal of Physiotherapy (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Lesley Wicks, Sarah Walmsley
2013 Snodgrass SJ, Ball K, Rivett DA, Ashby SE, Johnston CL, Nguyen K, Russell T, 'Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)', Journal of Physiotherapy eSupplement 2013 APA Conference Abstracts (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Suzanne Snodgrass, Samantha Ashby, Darren Rivett
2013 Ricardo A, Hill K, Jenkins S, Johnston C, Mackney JH, 'Discordance between distance ambulated as part of usual care and functional exercise capacity in critical illness survivors', Proceedings of the Australia Physiotherapy Association Conference 2013 (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2013 Johnston CL, Newstead CJ, MacDonald-Wicks L, 'Supervising challenging students on clinical placement.', ( pp.186): ANZAHPE (2013)
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2012 Tuyl LJ, Mackney JH, Johnston CL, 'Management of sternal precautions following median sternotomy by physical therapists in Australia: A web-based survey', Physical Therapy, 92 83-97 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.2522/ptj.20100373
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2012 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Maguire GP, Alison JA, 'How prepared are rural and remote health care practitioners to provide evidence-based management for people with chronic lung disease?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 200-207 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2012 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Boyle E, Maguire G, Alison JA, 'An evaluation of the Breathe Easy Walk Easy programme for rural and remote healthcare practitioners', Respirology (2012) [E3]
2012 Francis A, Hills CM, Buxton AJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Johnston CL, 'Characteristics of an ideal practice educator: Perspectives from five health professions', British Journal of Occupational Therapy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Caroline Hills
2011 Johnston CL, Maxwell LJ, Alison JA, 'Pulmonary rehabilitation in Australia: A national survey', Physiotherapy, 97 284-290 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physio.2010.12.001
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20
2011 Johnston CL, Alison J, Boyle E, Maguire G, 'An evaluation of the Breathe Easy Walk Easy training program to improve lung health in rural and remote Australia', 4th Annual Chronic Care for Aboriginal People State Forum (2011) [E3]
2011 Jones CL, Mackney JH, Johnston CL, 'Factors affecting physiotherapy service provision in Australian level 3 intensive care units', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2011 Jones CL, Johnston CL, Mackney JH, 'Physiotherapy in Australian level 3 lntensive care units: A survey of current practice', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2011 James RP, Johnston CL, Mackney JH, 'Positive Expiratory Pressure (PEP) therapy: A survey of current physiotherapy clinical practice in New South Wales', APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 Abstract Presentations (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2011 Johnston CL, James R, Mackney JH, 'The current clinical use of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) by physiotherapists in New South Wales, Australia', Physiotherapy: Abstracts, World Physical Therapy 2011 (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2011 Tuyl L, Johnston CL, Mackney JH, Boylson B, Zachner P, McMahon C, 'Current physiotherapy management of post-operative median sternotomy patients - A national web-based questionnaire', Physiotherapy: Abstracts, World Physical Therapy 2011 (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2011 Mackney JH, Johnston CL, Lyndon M, 'Sternal precautions post median sternotomy - The effect of change of practice on patient outcomes', Physiotherapy: Abstracts, World Physical Therapy 2011 (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2010 Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, Chiarelli PE, 'Physiotherapy student preparedness for working with patients with life limiting illnesses undergoing palliative care: The impact of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Peter Osmotherly, Pauline Chiarelli
2010 Chiarelli PE, Johnston CL, Osmotherly PG, 'An evaluation of the palliative care curriculum for undergraduates (PCC4U) resources by undergraduate physiotherapy students', ANZAME 2010: Overcoming Barriers, Re(E)Forming Professional Practice (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Pauline Chiarelli, Peter Osmotherly
2009 Johnston CL, Alison J, Maxwell L, 'The use of evidence-based practice in pulmonary rehabilitation in Australia', APA Conference Week Abstracts (2009) [E3]
2009 Johnston CL, Boyle E, Barrack C, Alison J, Maguire G, 'Pilot evaluation of a pulmonary rehabilitation training package for rural and remote primary and allied health care workers', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2009: Program Book (2009) [E3]
2009 Findlay NA, Haracz K, Johnston CL, MacDonald-Wicks LK, 'Interprofessional teaching of reflection in undergraduate health science programs', ANZAME09 Handbook (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Kirsti Haracz
2009 Johnston CL, Mackney JH, 'The use of standardised patients in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy education', ANZAME09 Handbook (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jennifer Mackney
2008 Johnston CL, Alison J, Maxwell L, 'Pulmonary rehabilitation: A survey of current practice in Australia', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements (2008) [E3]
2008 Johnston CL, Alison J, Maxwell L, 'Exercise training in pulmonary rehabilitation: A survey of current Australian practice', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy: eSupplements (2008) [E3]
2005 Mackay MR, Ellis E, Johnston C, 'Randomised clinical trial of physiotherapy after open abdominal surgery in high risk patients', Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 51 151-159 (2005)

Postoperative physiotherapy has been shown to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications after open abdominal surgery. This study aimed to determine if the addi... [more]

Postoperative physiotherapy has been shown to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications after open abdominal surgery. This study aimed to determine if the addition of deep breathing exercises and secretion clearing techniques to a standardised physiotherapist-directed program of early mobilisation improved clinical outcomes in patients undergoing open abdominal surgery. Fifty-six patients undergoing open abdominal surgery, at high risk of developing postoperative pulmonary complications, were randomised before operation to an early mobilisation-only group or an early mobilisation-plus-deep breathing and coughing group. Mobility duration, frequency and intensity of breathing interventions were quantified for both groups. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded outcomes researcher using a standardised outcomes measurement tool developed specifically for this population. Outcomes included incidence of clinically significant postoperative pulmonary complications, fever, length of stay, and restoration of mobility. There were no significant differences between groups in mean age, anaesthetic time, perioperative morbidity, or postoperative mobility. Outcome data were available for 89% of enrolled subjects. Overall incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications was 16%. The incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in the non-deep breathing and coughing group was 14%, and the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in the deep breathing and coughing group was 17%, (absolute risk reduction -3%, 95% C1 -22 to 19%). There was no significant difference between groups in the incidence of fever, physiotherapist time, or the number of treatments. This study suggests that, in this clinical setting, the addition of deep breathing and coughing exercises to a physiotherapist-directed program of early mobilisation does not significantly reduce the incidence of clinically significant postoperative pulmonary complications in high risk open abdominal surgery subjects.

Citations Scopus - 47
2005 Mackey MR, Ellis E, Johnston CL, 'McKay, M. R, Ellis, E. and Johnston, C. (2005). Randomised clinical trial of Physiotherapy after open abdominal surgery in high risk patients. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 51, 151-159.', Journal of Physiotherapy, 51 151-159 (2005) [C1]
2003 Heron N, Roberts M, Johnston C, Robinson T, 'Under-utilisation of health care services in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonry disease (COPD) referred for pulmonary rehabilitation', Respirology, 8 (2003) [C3]
2003 Johnston C, Wignell L, Roberts M, Robinson T, 'Non Responders and Responders: characteristics of patients with severe chronic obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) completing an exercise training program.', Respirology, 8 (2003) [C3]
2003 Johnston C, Wignell L, Roberts M, Robinson T, 'Non Completers and Completers: characteristics of patients with severe chronic obstructive Pulmonary Disease referred for Pulmonary Rehabilitation', Respirology, 8 (2003) [C3]
1999 Orfanos P, Ellis E, Johnston C, 'Effects of deep breathing exercises and ambulation on pattern of ventilation in postoperative patients', The Australian journal of physiotherapy, 45 173-182 (1999) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60348-2
Citations Scopus - 10
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 10
Total funding $138,752

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $28,869

Implementing and evaluating an innovative model for introductory physiotherapy clinical placements. $28,869

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston, Mr CLINT Newstead, Mr Rod Hyde Page, Mr Luke Wakely
Scheme Hunter and Coast ICTN Research and Quality Improvement Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500786
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20132 grants / $61,708

Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EEFI)$33,322

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project Team Associate Professor Suzanne Snodgrass, Professor Darren Rivett, Doctor Samantha Ashby, Doctor Catherine Johnston, Mr Kim Nguyen, Dr Trevor Russell
Scheme NSW ICTN Local Project Fund
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201150
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Maximising Allied Health professional placements in aged care: exploring opportunities for future partnerships within the Newcastle and Coast region$28,386

Funding body: HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)

Funding body HETI (Health Education and Training Institute)
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston, Mr CLINT Newstead, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Doctor Lesley MacDonald-Wicks
Scheme NSW ICTN Local Project Fund
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1201146
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20121 grants / $25,000

Supervising the challenging student on clinical placement: the impact on the clinical supervisor, their workplace, willingness to supervise and training needs$25,000

Funding body: Health Workforce Australia

Funding body Health Workforce Australia
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme National Clinical Supervision Fellowship Initiative
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200893
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20111 grants / $9,200

Evaluation of the Breathe Easy Walk Easy (BEWE) Program$9,200

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000953
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $1,150

ANZAME 2010, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 13 - 16 July 2010$1,150

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000654
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20092 grants / $10,100

Breathe easy, walk easy train-the-trainer package: implementation and evaluation pilot$9,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190122
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

ANZAME (Australasian and New Zealand Association for Medical Educators) 2009, Launceston, Tasmania, 30 June - 3 July 2009$1,100

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190367
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20071 grants / $1,655

Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy Conference 2007, Carirns QLD, 4/10/2007 - 6/10/2007$1,655

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0188183
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20031 grants / $1,070

Australian Physiotherapy Association, National Cardiothoracic Special Group Conference and pre conference educators workshop. Brisbane 3-6 September 2003$1,070

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Johnston
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo G0183320
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed21
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 Honours The use of simulation in introductory physiotherapy clinical placements Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2017 Honours Australian critical care nursing professionals' knowledge, practice and attitudes towards the use of traditional 'chest physiotherapy' techniques Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Physiotherapy clinical education in Australia: Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Honours Delivering evidence-based pulmonary rehabilitation: A national survey of healthcare professional knowledge, confidence and training needs. Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Traditional 'chest physiotherapy' techniques: knowledge, practice and attitudes of nursing professionals Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Sean Lochrin. Development of a survey to assess physiotherapy student preparedness for clinical placement Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Physiotherapy clinical placements: geographical distribution and relationship to assessment outcome Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Experiences of Fatigue Following Critical Illness: a mixed methods study Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours Relationship between student academic and student clinical performance in core content areas of physiotherapy practice Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Performance in physiotherapy clinical exit examinations: relationship to academic and clinical placement assessment Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Physical activity of rurally residing children with a disability: perceptions of parents and carers Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours Use of portable dynamometry for muscle strength assessment in critical illness survivors Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2013 Honours Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) tubing: physiological responses in a COPD population Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2013 Honours The physiological responses to positive expiratory pressure (PEP) tubing in a healthy adult population Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2013 Honours The relationship between academic and clinical performance in entry-level physiotherapy students Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2012 Honours Discordance between distance mobilised as part of usual care and functional exercise capacity in critical illness survivors upon intensive care discharge Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2010 Honours Current Physiotherapy Practices in Australian Level 3 Intensive Care Units Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2010 Honours Current physiotherapy management of patients following median sternotomy – a national web-based survey Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2009 Honours Pilot of Web-bsed sternotomy questionnaire Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2009 Honours PEP therapy: a survey of current Physiotherapy practice in NSW Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2009 Honours Critical illness weakness syndromes - an exploration of the role of the physiotherapist Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2009 Honours Post sternotomy management: The effect of a change in sternal precautions protocol Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
2008 Honours Development of an internet based questionnaire to evaluate current postoperative sternotomy management Physiotherapy, UON Principal Supervisor
2007 Honours Designing a Valid Tool to Assess Education Needs in Pulmonary Rehabilitation Physiotherapy, UON Co-Supervisor
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Dr Catherine Johnston

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Physiotherapy

Contact Details

Email cath.johnston@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 7782

Office

Room HC38
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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