Associate Professor Leanne Brown

Associate Professor Leanne Brown

Associate Professor

University Newcastle Department of Rural Health (Nutrition and Dietetics)

The Composition of Rural Health

Dietitian Dr Leanne Brown is working towards improving the health of rural Australians, as well as the sustainability of the clinical workforce who look after them.

Leanne is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Lead, Teaching and Learning at the University of Newcastle, Department of Rural Health (UONDRH).

An Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian with more than 20 years experience in the dietetics profession, Leanne spent ten years in metropolitan hospitals before joining the UONDRH in Tamworth in 2003.

With support from the Commonwealth Government, the UONDRH works toward a sustainable rural health workforce through facilitating student placements and learning, enhancing the health of local communities through community projects and conducting research into rural health issues.

Leanne completed her PhD (Nutrition and Dietetics) at the University of Newcastle 2009, with her doctoral research investigating the barriers to the provision of a best practice dietetics service in rural areas.

Her ongoing research interests include dietetic workforce issues, rural dietetic services, sports nutrition, and best practice dietetic services for rural areas.

Nutrition and diet

Leanne’s work is readily translational to public health programs that can change health outcomes, especially in a rural context.

And it seems those programs are more necessary now than ever.

Leanne admits to being concerned when recent data from the Australian Health Policy Collaboration found the local area to have some of the highest rates of overweight and obesity in Australia.

“We have a focus at the moment on a research project looking at cardiovascular disease rurally, and trying to look at different ways of engaging with people,” Leanne says.

“Obviously the further you go out from major cities, the more difficult and expensive access to fresh food becomes.”

“If you don’t have a lot of income or accessible transport, and you live in a part of town that is only serviced by corner shops and takeaways, your food choices are very limited.”

One area of possible change that Leanne is a strong advocate for is implementing lifestyle change instead to combat health risks related to ill-health such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes.

“We are trying to intervene earlier and support people to try some dietary changes, and use phone and text to follow people up as opposed to having to wait for appointments.”

Rural focus on learning

As Academic Lead, Teaching and Learning at UONDRH, Leanne supports students on placements navigate practice based education, learning and assessment.

An area of current focus at the UONDRH is inter-professional education, with the aim of improving relationships in healthcare practice.

“We have year-long student placements in medicine and some allied health disciplines,” Leanne explains.

“So we are getting those students together on a monthly basis and engaging them in an inter-professional activity with them that is focused on a health topic or communication skill that is relevant across disciplines.”

“Our role is also to provide continuing professional development locally, so we organise speakers and information days on relevant topics for students and clinicians.”

“We have also just started a local graduate network that offers new practitioners professional and social support to work rurally.”

Body Composition

Leanne has accreditation as a Level 3 Anthropometrist with the International Society for Advancement of Kinanthropometry. She explains:

“We can measure height and weight and calculate BMI but we know that BMI is not the best indicator of whether you are overweight or not,” she says.

To get a more accurate measure of body composition Leanne uses bioelectrical impedance analysis, which differentiates between muscle and fat.

“So not only is this differentiation important when predicting health outcomes, but it is a way to evaluate the success of exercise and diet interventions despite overall weight not changing significantly.”

Sports nutrition is another area of expertise for Leanne.

Whereas in the general population, the public health focus is most often on limiting energy intake to maintain or lose weight, the opposite can be true for elite athletes who need adequate energy to fuel significant exercise.

This area of specialisation also extends to knowledge of which sportspeople may benefit from which supplements that have an ergogenic effect, improving performance.

Future direction

Looking to the future, Leanne will continue several ongoing collaborations and her own research.

Leanne works with Associate Professor Kym Rae on the Gomeroi gaaynggal program, targeting the health of local rural Aboriginal mothers and their babies.

Another collaboration is with Dr Lesley MacDonald-Wicks and Dr Amanda Patterson, who are finalising for publication work on changing body composition and circumference measures of average urban and rural Australian women.

Leanne is also working in concert with Professor Clare Collins to replicate urban nutrition studies in the rural landscape.

Leading on from Professor Collins’ work using a spectrophotometer, Leanne is looking at comparing self-reported diet to actual diet reflected by the effects of carotenoid intakes from vegetables and fruit on skin colour.

Leanne is also looking to further develop a strong dietetics and nutrition focus at the UONDRH with fellow dietitian, Dr Tracy Schumacher.

Her wish list also includes more PhD students in dietetics choosing to study in Tamworth.

“Given the nutrition-related health issues in rural areas, we will be looking to implement and evaluate community based interventions so there are opportunities for students to be involved in positive change in rural communities.”

Leanne Brown

The Composition of Rural Health

Dietitian Dr Leanne Brown is working towards improving the health of rural Australians, and the sustainability of the clinical workforce who look after them

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I am the Academic Team Lead - Teaching and Learning at the University of Newcastle, Department of Rural Health. My ongoing research interests include rural health workforce issues, rural health service delivery, chronic disease and optimising rural health. I am interested in measuring the outcomes of teaching and learning across areas of interprofessional learning, student experiences and graduate outcomes.

Professional background

I am an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian with more than 20 years experience in the dietetics profession, with over 10 years experience across a broad range of dietetic and management experience. I am an Accredited Sports Dietitian and accreditation as a Level 3 Anthropometrist with the International Society for Advancement of Kinanthropometry.

Setting

I am based in Tamworth at the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health. The Department of Rural Health program focuses on facilitating and supporting student placements in regional, rural and remote settings. Student learning is enhanced through engagement with the local community and interprofessional opportunities with co-located health professional students.

Teaching expertise

I teach into the Bachelor of Nutrition & Dietetics program by providing online teaching and course co-ordination for two courses, Sports Nutrition NUDI4270 and Independent Professional Practice NUDI4280. In 2009 I was awarded an Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Certificate in Paediatric Nut & Dietetics, University of Melbourne
  • Graduate Certificate in Sports Nutrition, Deakin University

Keywords

  • Anthropometrics
  • Best practice
  • Clinical Nutrition
  • Dietetics workforce
  • General Nutrition
  • Interprofessional learning
  • Oncology
  • Primary health care
  • Public health
  • Rural health
  • Service delivery models
  • Sports Nutrition

Languages

  • English (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321099 Nutrition and dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2016 - 1/8/2016 Acting Director Department of Rural Health, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/1/2012 - 31/12/2017 Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
Department of Rural Health
Australia
1/2/2003 - 31/12/2011 Lecturer Nutrition & Dietetics University of Newcastle
Department of Rural Health
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2010 -  Membership - Sports Dietitians Australia Sports Dietitians Australia
Australia
1/1/2009 -  Membership - Dietitians Association of Australia Dietitians Association of Australia
1/1/2009 - 31/12/2010 Membership - Dietitians Assoication of Australia NSW Branch Dietitians Assoication of Australia NSW Branch Executive
Australia
1/1/2004 -  Membership - International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2016 UON Faculty of Health & Medicine - Special Leadership Excellence Award
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
2014 Office of Teaching and Learning Citation for Programs that Enhance Learning - Team Award
Office of Learning and Teaching
2013 Vice Chancellor's Award for Programs that Enhance Learning - UONDRH IPL team
University of Newcastle
2009 Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citation
Australian Learning and Teaching Council
2008 Vice Chancellor's Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
University of Newcastle
2007 DAA NSW Branch Service Award 2003-2006
Dietitians Association of Australia
2004 Academic Achievement Award
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
2004 Academic Achievement Award
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
2003 Greatness in Dietetics Award
Dietitians Association of Australia NSW Branch

Recipient

Year Award
2011 Nursing and Allied Health Scholarship and Support Scheme
Services for Australian Rural and Remote Allied Health

Recognition

Year Award
2011 NSW Premier's Awards Finalist
NSW Government
2011 Hunter New England Health Quality Awards Finalist
Hunter New England Health
2011 Alumni Award Finalist for Regional Leadership
University of Newcastle
2005 Certificate of Appreciation
Dietitians Association of Australia NSW Branch

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2015 Rural and Remote Dietitians Workshop
Organisation: DAA

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2017 Thriving in Rural and Remote Practice
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Little AL, Brown L, 'Putting interprofessional education into practice: Is it really as simple as it seems?', Collaborating in Healthcare Reinterpreting Therapeutic Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 229-236 (2016) [B1]
Co-authors Alexandra Little
2014 Little FH, Brown L, Grotowski M, Harris D, 'Interprofessional Relationships in Healthcare Practice', Health Practice Relationships, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 143-152 (2014) [B1]
Co-authors Fiona Little, Miriam Grotowski
2010 Brown LJ, Little FH, 'Nourishing networks: Using information technology and mentoring to promote interdisciplinary education and training in rural areas', A Bright Future For Rural Health: Evidence-Based Policy And Practice In Rural And Remote Australian Health Care, Australian Rural Health Education Network, Canberra, ACT 82-84 (2010) [B2]
Co-authors Fiona Little
2006 Cooper RJ, Brown LJ, 'Client education issues in rural and remote settings', Client Education: A partnership approach for health practitioners, University of New South Wales Press, Sydney 327-342 (2006) [B2]
Show 1 more chapter

Journal article (49 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Lee R, Crowley ET, Baines SK, Heaney S, Brown LJ, 'Patient Perspectives of Living with Coeliac Disease and Accessing Dietetic Services in Rural Australia: A Qualitative Study', NUTRIENTS, 13 (2021)
DOI 10.3390/nu13062074
Co-authors Susan Heaney, Elesa Crowley, Surinder Baines
2021 Sutton K, Depczynski J, Smith T, Mitchell E, Wakely L, Brown LJ, et al., 'Destinations of nursing and allied health graduates from two Australian universities: A data linkage study to inform rural placement models', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 29 191-200 (2021) [C1]

Objective: Combined, nursing and allied health constitute most of the Australian health workforce; yet, little is known about graduate practice destinations. University Department... [more]

Objective: Combined, nursing and allied health constitute most of the Australian health workforce; yet, little is known about graduate practice destinations. University Departments of Rural Health have collaborated on the Nursing and Allied Health Graduate Outcomes Tracking to investigate graduate entry into rural practice. Design: Data linkage cohort study. Setting: Monash University and the University of Newcastle. Participants: Graduates who completed their degree in 2017 across seven disciplines. Main outcome measure(s): The outcome variable was Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency principal place of practice data. Explanatory variables included discipline, age, gender, location of origin, and number and duration of rural placements. Result: Of 1130 graduates, 51% were nurses, 81% females, 62% under 21¿years at enrolment, 23% of rural origin, 62% had at least one rural student placement, and 23% had over 40 cumulative rural placement days. At the time of their second Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency registration, 18% worked in a ¿Rural principal place of practice.¿ Compared to urban, rural origin graduates had 4.45 times higher odds ratio of ¿Rural principal place of practice.¿ For graduates who had <20 cumulative rural placement days, compared to zero the odds ratio of ¿Rural principal place of practice¿ was the same (odds ratio¿=¿1.10). For those who had 20-40 rural placement days, the odds ratio was 1.93, and for >40 rural placement days, the odds ratio was 4.54). Conclusion: Rural origin and more rural placement days positively influenced graduate rural practice destinations. Outcomes of cumulative placements days may compare to immersive placements.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12722
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Julie Depczynski, Tony Smith, Karin Fisher
2021 Smith T, Sutton K, Beauchamp A, Depczynski J, Brown L, Fisher K, et al., 'Profile and rural exposure for nursing and allied health students at two Australian Universities: A retrospective cohort study', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 29 21-33 (2021) [C1]

Objective: Linking enrolment and professional placement data for students&apos; from 2 universities, this study compares characteristics across universities and health disciplines... [more]

Objective: Linking enrolment and professional placement data for students' from 2 universities, this study compares characteristics across universities and health disciplines. The study explores associations between students' location of origin and frequency, duration and type of placements. Design: Retrospective cohort data linkage. Setting: Two Australian universities, Monash University and the University of Newcastle. Participants: Students who completed medical radiation science, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy or physiotherapy at either university between 2 February 2017 and 28 February 2018. Interventions: Location of origin, university and discipline of enrolment. Main outcome measure(s): Main measures were whether graduates had multiple rural placements, number of rural placements and cumulative rural placement days. Location of origin, discipline and university of enrolment were the main explanatory variables. Secondary dependent variables were age, sex, socio-economic indices for location of origin, and available placements. Results: A total of 1,315 students were included, of which 22.1% were of rural origin. The odds of rural origin students undertaking a rural placement was more than 4.5 times greater than for urban origin students. A higher proportion of rural origin students had multiple rural placement (56.0% vs 14.9%), with a higher mean number of rural placement days. Public hospitals were the most common placement type, with fewer in primary care, mental health or aged care. Conclusions: There is a positive association between rural origin and rural placements in nursing and allied health. To help strengthen recruitment and retention of graduates this association could be further exploited, while being inclusive of non-rural students.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12689
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Julie Depczynski, Karin Fisher, Tony Smith
2021 Chai LK, Collins CE, May C, Ashman A, Holder C, Brown LJ, Burrows TL, 'Feasibility and efficacy of a web-based family telehealth nutrition intervention to improve child weight status and dietary intake: A pilot randomised controlled trial', Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 27 146-158 (2021) [C1]

Introduction: Innovative eHealth solutions that improve access to child weight management interventions are crucial to address the rising prevalence of childhood obesity globally.... [more]

Introduction: Innovative eHealth solutions that improve access to child weight management interventions are crucial to address the rising prevalence of childhood obesity globally. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a 12-week online telehealth nutrition intervention to improve child weight and dietary outcomes, and the impact of additional text messages (SMS) targeted to mothers and fathers. Methods: Families with children aged 4 to 11 were randomised across three groups: Telehealth, Telehealth+SMS, or Waitlist control. Telehealth and Telehealth+SMS groups received two telehealth consultations delivered by a dietitian, 12 weeks access to a nutrition website and a private Facebook group. The Telehealth+SMS group received additional SMS. Feasibility was assessed through recruitment, retention, and intervention utilisation. Efficacy was assessed through changes in measured child body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and diet. Results: Forty-four (96%) and 36 (78%) families attended initial and second telehealth consultations, respectively. Thirty-six families (78%) completed week 12 assessments. Child BMI and waist circumference changes from baseline to week 12 were not statistically different within or between groups. Children in Telehealth+SMS had significantly reduced percentage energy from energy-dense nutrient-poor food (95% CI -21.99 to -0.03%E; p =.038) and increased percentage energy from healthy core food (95% CI -0.21 to 21.89%E; p =.045) compared to Waitlist control. Discussion: A family-focused online telehealth nutrition intervention is feasible. While the modest sample size reduced power to detect between-group changes in weight status, some improvements in child dietary intakes were identified in those receiving telehealth and SMS.

DOI 10.1177/1357633X19865855
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2021 Chai LK, Collins CE, May C, Brown LJ, Ashman A, Burrows TL, 'Fidelity and acceptability of a family-focused technology-based telehealth nutrition intervention for child weight management', Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 27 98-109 (2021) [C1]

Introduction: Previous reviews of family-based interventions for childhood obesity treatment found that studies were of low methodological quality with inadequate details reported... [more]

Introduction: Previous reviews of family-based interventions for childhood obesity treatment found that studies were of low methodological quality with inadequate details reported, especially related to intervention fidelity. The evaluation of fidelity is crucial to inform interpretation of the intervention outcomes. This study aimed to summarise intervention fidelity, participants¿ acceptability and satisfaction with a 12-week family-focused technology-based child nutrition and weight management intervention. Methods: Families with children aged 4¿11 years participated in a telehealth intervention with complementary components: website, Facebook group and text messages. Intervention fidelity was reported using National Institutes of Health Treatment Fidelity Framework. Delivery was measured using a dietitian-reported evaluation survey. Google Analytics and Bitly platform were used to objectively track data on frequency and pattern of intervention use. Participants¿ acceptability and satisfaction were measured using a process evaluation survey. Results: Telehealth consultations delivered by trained dietitians had good adherence (=83%) to the structured content. Process evaluation results indicated that parents (n = 30; mean age 41 years, 97% were female, body mass index 30 kg/m2) found the intervention components easy to use/understand (87¿100%), the programme had improved their family/child eating habits (93%), and they wanted to continue using telehealth and the website, as well as recommending it to other parents (90¿91%). Discussion: In summary, a family-focused technology-based child nutrition and weight management intervention using telehealth, website, Facebook and SMS can be delivered by trained dietitians with good fidelity and attain high acceptability and satisfaction among families with primary-school-aged children in New South Wales, Australia.

DOI 10.1177/1357633X19864819
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2021 Waller S, Walker L, Farthing A, Brown L, Moran M, 'Understanding the elements of a quality rural/remote interprofessional education activity: A rough guide', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 29 294-300 (2021)
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12700
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2021 Kocanda L, Brain K, Frawley J, Schumacher TL, May J, Rollo ME, Brown LJ, 'The Effectiveness of Randomized Controlled Trials to Improve Dietary Intake in the Context of Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Management in Rural Communities: A Systematic Review', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2021.05.025
Co-authors Lucy Kocanda Uon
2021 Beringer M, Schumacher T, Keogh L, Sutherland K, Knox P, Herden J, et al., 'Nutritional adequacy and the role of supplements in the diets of Indigenous Australian women during pregnancy', Midwifery, 93 (2021)

Objective: To determine sources of key nutrients contributing towards nutritional adequacy during pregnancy (fibre, calcium, iron, zinc and folate) in a cohort of women carrying a... [more]

Objective: To determine sources of key nutrients contributing towards nutritional adequacy during pregnancy (fibre, calcium, iron, zinc and folate) in a cohort of women carrying an Indigenous child. Design: Analysis of cross-sectional data from a prospective longitudinal cohort study that followed Indigenous women through pregnancy. Setting: Women recruited via antenatal clinics in regional and remote locations in NSW, Australia as part of the Gomeroi gaaynggal project. Participants: One hundred and fifty-two pregnant Australian women who identified as Indigenous or carrying an Indigenous child. Measurements and Findings: Measurement outcomes included demographic information, smoking status, anthropometrics (weight and height,), self-reported pre-pregnancy weight, health conditions and dietary information (24-hour food recall). Findings indicate the inadequate intake of key pregnancy nutrients in this cohort. Supplements contributed to the nutrient adequacy of the cohort with 53% reporting use. As expected, predominant sources of fibre were from core food groups, whereas calcium was attained from a range of sources including food and beverages, with small amounts from supplementation. Importantly, supplements contributed significant amounts of iron, zinc and folate. Key Conclusions: There is limited literature on Indigenous Australian maternal nutrition. This study highlights the key dietary contributors of nutritional adequacy during pregnancy for the cohort and that supplementation may be considered a viable source of nutrients during pregnancy for these women. Few women met national nutrient recommendations. The findings present an opportunity to optimise nutrient intakes of Indigenous pregnant women. Implications for practice: Culturally appropriate targeted interventions to optimise dietary intakes of Indigenous Australian pregnant women is required. Collaborative support of health workers, Indigenous Australian communities, dietitians, and researchers to raise awareness of nutrition during pregnancy is imperative to achieving nutrient targets and optimising pregnancy outcomes. Targeted interventions provide positive opportunities to achieve improvements.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102886
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kym Rae, Tracy Schumacher
2021 Kocanda L, Schumacher TL, Kerr J, May J, Rollo ME, Neubeck L, Brown LJ, 'Current nutrition practice in cardiac rehabilitation programs', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, (2021)

Purpose: This study sought to determine current practice regarding nutrition care within cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs, including perceived barriers and facilitators to pro... [more]

Purpose: This study sought to determine current practice regarding nutrition care within cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs, including perceived barriers and facilitators to providing nutrition care in this setting. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in October and November 2019. Potential participants were program coordinators, identified through the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association program directory and invited to participate via e-mail. Results: Forty-nine respondents (response rate: 13%) are included in this analysis. Programs provided group (n = 42, 86%) and/or individual (n = 25, 51%) nutrition education, and most were supported by a dietitian (63%). However, the availability of dietitians and nutrition care provided at CR was variable. For example, individual education was consistently provided at 13 programs and usually by health professionals other than dietitians. Eight programs (16%) used a formal behavior change framework for nutrition care. Generally, respondents were positive about the role of nutrition; CR coordinators perceived nutrition as a valuable component of the program, and that they had good nutrition knowledge. An identified barrier was the financial resources available to support the provision of nutrition care. Conclusions: To ensure that patients receive the benefits of evidence-based nutrition care, program staff may require additional support, particularly regarding the use of evidence-based behavior change techniques. Key facilitators that may be leveraged to achieve this include the high value and priority that CR program coordinators place on nutrition care.

DOI 10.1097/HCR.0000000000000588
Co-authors Jennifer May, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Megan Rollo, Tracy Schumacher
2021 Kocanda L, Fisher K, Brown LJ, May J, Rollo ME, Collins CE, et al., 'Informing telehealth service delivery for cardiovascular disease management: Exploring the perceptions of rural health professionals', Australian Health Review, 45 241-246 (2021)

Objective: To explore the perceptions of rural health professionals who use telehealth services for cardiovascular health care, including the potential role of telehealth in enhan... [more]

Objective: To explore the perceptions of rural health professionals who use telehealth services for cardiovascular health care, including the potential role of telehealth in enhancing services for this patient group. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten rural health professionals across a range of disciplines, including medicine, nursing and allied health. All study participants were based in the same rural region in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Participant responses emphasised the importance of including rural communities in ongoing dialogue to enhance telehealth services for cardiovascular care. Divergent expectations about the purpose of telehealth and unresolved technology issues were identified as factors to be addressed. Rural health professionals highlighted the importance of all stakeholders coming together to overcome barriers and enhance telehealth services in a collaborative manner. Conclusion: This study contributes to an evolving understanding of how health professionals based in regional Australia experience telehealth services. Future telehealth research should proceed in collaboration with rural communities, supported by policy that actively facilitates the meaningful inclusion of rural stakeholders in telehealth dialogue. What is known about the topic?: Telehealth is frequently discussed as a potential solution to overcome aspects of rural health, such as poor outcomes and limited access to services compared with metropolitan areas. In the context of telehealth and cardiovascular disease (CVD), research that focuses on rural communities is limited, particularly regarding the experiences of these communities with telehealth. What does this paper add?: This paper offers insight into how telehealth is experienced by rural health professionals. The paper highlights divergent expectations of telehealth's purpose and unresolved technological issues as barriers to telehealth service delivery. It suggests telehealth services may be enhanced by collaborative approaches that engage multiple stakeholder groups. What are the implications for practitioners?: The use and development of telehealth in rural communities requires a collaborative approach that considers the views of rural stakeholders in their specific contexts. To improve telehealth services for people living with CVD in rural communities, it is important that rural stakeholders have opportunities to engage with non-rural clinicians, telehealth developers and policy makers.

DOI 10.1071/AH19231
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Schumacher, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Andrew Boyle, Jennifer May, Karin Fisher, Megan Rollo
2020 Payne E, Brown LJ, Crowley E, Rollo M, Schumacher TL, 'Exploring core food accessibility in Tamworth, NSW, Australia', Informatics for Health and Social Care, 45 428-443 (2020) [C1]

Introduction: A lack of core food accessibility negatively affects diet quality, potentially increasing the prevalence of health risk factors such as obesity. The purpose of this ... [more]

Introduction: A lack of core food accessibility negatively affects diet quality, potentially increasing the prevalence of health risk factors such as obesity. The purpose of this study was to investigate core food access in an Australian regional center through the use of data visualization techniques. Methods: Supermarkets were used as a proxy for core food accessibility and were identified and mapped by town region with a combination of Google Maps and Stata/IC 15.1 software. A statistical analysis comparing the demographics of each town region was also completed using Stata. Results: The maps generated suggest that there may be a disparity in core food accessibility between town regions. The analysis of demographics demonstrated that one town region had a greater proportion of disadvantaged residents, with statistically significant variation between regions. Conclusion: Data visualization and analysis may be a useful tool for clinicians to communicate accessibility information experienced by local residents. This need not be limited to food accessibility and extended to health services.

DOI 10.1080/17538157.2020.1793345
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo
2020 Urquhart L, Brown L, Duncanson K, Roberts K, Fisher K, 'A Dialogical Approach to Understand Perspectives of an Aboriginal Wellbeing Program: An Extension of Habermas Theory of Communicative Action', International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 19 1-10 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1609406920957495
Co-authors Kerith Duncanson, Karin Fisher, Lisa Urquhart
2020 Latter R, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, Schumacher TL, 'The role of socio-economic status and energy-density in Australian women of child-bearing age', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 33 718-728 (2020) [C1]

Introduction: An optimal diet is imperative in preparing women for pregnancy and this may be influenced by socio-economic status (SES). This research aims to investigate the role ... [more]

Introduction: An optimal diet is imperative in preparing women for pregnancy and this may be influenced by socio-economic status (SES). This research aims to investigate the role of SES on the dietary energy density (ED) in Australian women of preconception age. Methods: A secondary analysis of the Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey 2011¿12 for females aged 18¿39¿years (n¿=¿1617) was conducted. Dietary intake was assessed by 24-hr recalls and dietary ED by dietary energy per weight (kJ.g-1). ED was further categorised as ED of foods and beverages separately. SES was assessed by three variables: Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA), developed by the Australian Bureau of Statistics; income decile; and level of education. Linear mixed model regressions were used to identify associations between ED and SES. Results: The median ED for food, beverages and combined food and beverages was 9.38¿kJ g-1, 1.02 kJ g-1 and 7.11¿kJ g-1, respectively. No significant variation was explained by SES variables when analysing combined ED in the adjusted model or ED from foods. Income decile reduced ED of beverages, although with little effect (coefficient: -0.04, P¿=¿0.002). Significant confounders included inactivity, which increased ED in both combined ED and ED foods (coefficient: 0.51, P¿=¿0.001 and coefficient: 0.78, P¿<¿0.001). Conclusions: SES explained little variation in dietary ED in women of childbearing age. A large proportion of women had high energy-dense diets regardless of their SES. These findings suggest that a large proportion of women, who may become pregnant, have diets that exceed the international recommendations for dietary energy density.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12742
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo, Kym Rae
2020 Osborne SR, 'The Spinifex Network engages place-based researchers to identify research priorities to improve the health and wellbeing of communities living in regional, rural and remote Australia', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 213 S3-+ (2020)
DOI 10.5694/mja2.50881
Co-authors Hazel Dalton, Nicholas Goodwin, A Dunlop
2019 Croker A, Brown L, Little A, Squires K, Crowley E, 'Developing and maintaining collaborative practice: Exploring perspectives from dietetics and speech pathology about what works well ', Nutrition and Dietetics, 76 28-37 (2019) [C1]

Aim: The aim was to support rich collaborative practice between two professions who frequently work together across both ordered and organic modes of collaboration. Methods: This ... [more]

Aim: The aim was to support rich collaborative practice between two professions who frequently work together across both ordered and organic modes of collaboration. Methods: This study uses a qualitative research approach of collaborative dialogical inquiry to explore the question ¿From the perspective of dietitians and speech pathologists, ¿what works well¿ for developing and maintaining collaborative practice?¿ We deliberately chose a context where collaborative practice is evident, University Department of Rural Health (UONDRH). Participants in the research were academics and clinicians from dietetics and speech pathology. Data were sourced from our research reflections and focus group transcriptions. Analysis was dialogical and iterative. Results: Beyond shared purpose, knowledge of roles and good communication, the notions of curiosity, willingness and momentum were at the core of ¿what works well¿ for collaborative practice between dietitians and speech pathologists. Participant perspectives related to collaborative practice between these professions and beyond to other professions, and involved collaborative practice within and across healthcare organisations and a university setting. Conclusions: Our interpreted themes of curiosity, willingness and momentum for developing and maintaining collaborative practice highlight the importance of paying attention to the less visible and difficult to measure aspects of patient-centred care. Questions for reflection are suggested to inform the ongoing process of developing and maintaining our and others¿ collaborative practice.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12506
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Anne Croker, Alexandra Little, Kelly Squires, Elesa Crowley
2019 Tan M, Brown LJ, Mathews KI, Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Patterson AJ, 'Rural versus urban women: An examination of anthropometry and body composition', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 27 70-77 (2019) [C1]

Objective: To describe and compare body composition and fat distribution of Australian women 18¿44 years from an urban and rural location. Design: Cross-sectional survey and colle... [more]

Objective: To describe and compare body composition and fat distribution of Australian women 18¿44 years from an urban and rural location. Design: Cross-sectional survey and collection of anthropometric and body composition measurements. Setting: Newcastle and Tamworth in New South Wales. Participants: Convenience sample of women recruited through media and community. Main outcome measures: Weight, height, waist and hip girths, visceral fat area, body fat (kg and %) and skeletal muscle mass. Results: Of the total sample (n = 254), 53% resided in an urban area and the mean age was 28.0 (7.6) years. The mean age of rural women was significantly higher than for urban women. The majority of women (66.5%) had a Body Mass Index within the healthy range (18.5¿24.9 kg m -2 ) and there was no significant difference in mean Body Mass Index between rural and urban women. Measures of central fat distribution, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were significantly higher in rural residents. Visceral fat area was significantly higher among rural women. After adjustment for age, differences in waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and visceral fat area were no longer statistically significant. Conclusion: While we did not find statistically significant differences in body composition among urban and rural women, these results highlight the dramatic effect of age on measures of central adiposity. Population surveillance needs to incorporate measures of excess central adiposity, particularly visceral fat area, to better investigate changes in body composition among women in their 20s and 30s.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12466
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Whatnall
2019 Pringle KG, Lee YQ, Weatherall L, Keogh L, Diehm C, Roberts CT, et al., 'Influence of maternal adiposity, preterm birth and birth weight centiles on early childhood obesity in an Indigenous Australian pregnancy-through-to-early-childhood cohort study', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 10 39-47 (2019) [C1]

Childhood obesity rates are higher among Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous Australian children. It has been hypothesized that early-life influences beginning with the intrau... [more]

Childhood obesity rates are higher among Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous Australian children. It has been hypothesized that early-life influences beginning with the intrauterine environment predict the development of obesity in the offspring. The aim of this paper was to assess, in 227 mother-child dyads from the Gomeroi gaaynggal cohort, associations between prematurity, Gestation Related-Optimal Weight (GROW) centiles, maternal adiposity (percentage body fat, visceral fat area), maternal non-fasting plasma glucose levels (measured at mean gestational age of 23.1 weeks) and offspring BMI and adiposity (abdominal circumference, subscapular skinfold thickness) in early childhood (mean age 23.4 months). Maternal non-fasting plasma glucose concentrations were positively associated with infant birth weight (P=0.005) and GROW customized birth weight centiles (P=0.008). There was a significant association between maternal percentage body fat (P=0.02) and visceral fat area (P=0.00) with infant body weight in early childhood. Body mass index (BMI) in early childhood was significantly higher in offspring born preterm compared with those born at term (P=0.03). GROW customized birth weight centiles was significantly associated with body weight (P=0.01), BMI (P=0.007) and abdominal circumference (P=0.039) at early childhood. Our findings suggest that being born preterm, large for gestational age or exposed to an obesogenic intrauterine environment and higher maternal non-fasting plasma glucose concentrations are associated with increased obesity risk in early childhood. Future strategies should aim to reduce the prevalence of overweight/obesity in women of child-bearing age and emphasize the importance of optimal glycemia during pregnancy, particularly in Indigenous women.

DOI 10.1017/S2040174418000302
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, E Lumbers, Kirsty Pringle, Roger Smith
2019 Wolfgang R, Wakely L, Smith T, Burrows J, Little A, Brown LJ, 'Immersive placement experiences promote rural intent in allied health students of urban and rural origin', JOURNAL OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY HEALTHCARE, 12 699-710 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.2147/JMDH.S214120
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Luke Wakely, Tony Smith
2018 Fisher KA, Smith A, Brown L, Little A, Wakely K, Hudson J, et al., 'Value-adding to health professional student placement experiences: Enhancing work readiness and employability through a rural community engagement program', Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability, 9 41-61 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.21153/jtlge2018vol9no1art698
Citations Scopus - 5
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Kelly Squires, Nicky Hudson, Karin Fisher, Katrina Wakely, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little
2018 Kocanda L, Brown L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta C, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australian longitudinal cohort', Nutrition & Dietetics, 75 50-50 (2018)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Kym Rae
2018 May J, Brown LJ, Burrows J, 'In-Place Training: Optimizing Rural Health Workforce Outcomes through Rural-Based Education in Australia', Education Sciences, 8 1-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/educsci8010020
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Jennifer May
2017 Brown L, Smith T, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Longitudinal tracking of workplace outcomes for undergraduate allied health students undertaking placements in Rural Australia', Journal of Allied Health, 46 79-87 (2017) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows
2017 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validation of a Smartphone Image-Based Dietary Assessment Method for Pregnant Women', NUTRIENTS, 9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu9010073
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo
2017 Brown LJ, Smith A, Wakely L, Little A, Wolfgang R, Burrows J, 'Preparing graduates to meet the allied health workforce needs in rural Australia: Short-term outcomes from a longitudinal study', Education Sciences, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/educsci7020064
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows
2017 Ashman AM, Brown LJ, Collins CE, Rollo ME, Rae KM, 'Factors Associated with Effective Nutrition Interventions for Pregnant Indigenous Women: A Systematic Review', Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 117 1222-1253 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jand.2017.03.012
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2016 Rae K, Bohringer E, Ashman A, Brown L, Collins C, 'Cultural experiences of student and new-graduate dietitians in the Gomeroi gaaynggal ArtsHealth program: A quality assurance project', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 27 162-166 (2016) [C1]

Issue addressed Undergraduate dietetic students are required to demonstrate cultural awareness and culturally respectful communication to meet national competencies, but exposure ... [more]

Issue addressed Undergraduate dietetic students are required to demonstrate cultural awareness and culturally respectful communication to meet national competencies, but exposure to practical experiences may be limited. The Gomeroi gaaynggal ArtsHealth Centre was established in 2009 after community consultation with the Indigenous community in Tamworth, New South Wales. The Centre provides a safe and welcoming space where women can create art while discussing health issues with visiting health professionals and students. The present study aimed to evaluate the cultural experiences of student and new-graduate dietitians visiting an Aboriginal ArtsHealth centre through a quality assurance project. Methods Six student and new-graduate dietitians were invited to provide feedback on their experiences for this report. A generic inductive approach was used for qualitative data analysis. Results Key qualitative themes of 'building rapport' and 'developing cultural understanding' were identified. Four of the participants interviewed felt they gained a deeper understanding of the context around health disparity for Indigenous Australians through their experiences. Key ways to build rapport with community members were identified. Conclusions Results suggest that first-hand experiences working in an Aboriginal ArtsHealth centre are effective in building cultural competency skills for student and new-graduate dietitians. These experiences could be better supported through improved preparation for the cultural setting, and ongoing monitoring of participant experiences is recommended. So what? The authors encourage undergraduate dietetic programs and students to seek out opportunities for further development of cultural awareness through increased practical experiences working with Indigenous communities.

DOI 10.1071/HE15028
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Weatherall LJ, Keogh L, Brown LJ, Rollo ME, et al., 'Dietary intakes and anthropometric measures of Indigenous Australian women and their infants in the Gomeroi gaaynggal cohort', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 7 481-497 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/s2040174416000325
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Roger Smith, Megan Rollo
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Weatherall L, Brown LJ, Rollo ME, Clausen D, et al., 'A cohort of Indigenous Australian women and their children through pregnancy and beyond: The Gomeroi gaaynggal study', Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 7 357-368 (2016) [C1]

Indigenous Australians have high rates of chronic diseases, the causes of which are complex and include social and environmental determinants. Early experiences in utero may also ... [more]

Indigenous Australians have high rates of chronic diseases, the causes of which are complex and include social and environmental determinants. Early experiences in utero may also predispose to later-life disease development. The Gomeroi gaaynggal study was established to explore intrauterine origins of renal disease, diabetes and growth in order to inform the development of health programmes for Indigenous Australian women and children. Pregnant women are recruited from antenatal clinics in Tamworth, Newcastle and Walgett, New South Wales, Australia, by Indigenous research assistants. Measures are collected at three time points in pregnancy and from women and their children at up to eight time points in the child's first 5 years. Measures of fetal renal development and function include ultrasound and biochemical biomarkers. Dietary intake, infant feeding and anthropometric measurements are collected. Standardized procedures and validated tools are used where available. Since 2010 the study has recruited over 230 women, and retained 66 postpartum. Recruitment is ongoing, and Gomeroi gaaynggal is currently the largest Indigenous pregnancy-through-early-childhood cohort internationally. Baseline median gestational age was 39.1 weeks (31.5-43.2, n=110), median birth weight was 3180 g (910-5430 g, n=110). Over one third (39.3%) of infants were admitted to special care or neonatal nursery. Nearly half of mothers (47.5%) reported tobacco smoking during pregnancy. Results of the study will contribute to knowledge about origins of chronic disease in Indigenous Australians and nutrition and growth of women and their offspring during pregnancy and postpartum. Study strengths include employment and capacity-building of Indigenous staff and the complementary ArtsHealth programme.

DOI 10.1017/S204017441600009X
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, John Attia, Megan Rollo, Kirsty Pringle, Roger Smith, E Lumbers
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'A Brief Tool to Assess Image-Based Dietary Records and Guide Nutrition Counselling Among Pregnant Women: An Evaluation', JMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH, 4 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/mhealth.6469
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo
2016 Potter J, Brown LJ, WIlliams RL, Byles J, Collins CE, 'Diet quality and cancer outcomes in adults: A Systematic review of epidemiological studies', International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 17 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijms17071052
Co-authors Julie Byles, Clare Collins
2016 Goodyer L, Brown LJ, Crowley E, 'Celiac Disease Knowledge and Practice of Dietitians in Rural New South Wales, Australia', Food and Nutrition Sciences, 07 874-883 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/fns.2016.710087
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2016 Bohringer E, Brown L, 'Nutrition Screening and Referrals in Two Rural Australian Oncology Clinics', Food and Nutrition Sciences, 07 1070-1081 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/fns.2016.712103
2016 Croker A, Brown L, Little A, Crowley E, 'Interprofessional Relationships for Work-Integrated Learning in Healthcare: Identifying Scope for Ongoing Professional Development', Creative Education, 07 1729-1738 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.4236/ce.2016.712176
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker
2015 Gausia K, Thompson SC, Lindeman MA, Brown LJ, Perkins D, 'Contribution of university departments of rural health to rural health research: An analysis of outputs', Australian Journal of Rural Health, (2015) [C1]

Objective: To assess the research contribution of eleven University Departments of Rural Health (UDRH) which were established as a rural health workforce program in the late 1990s... [more]

Objective: To assess the research contribution of eleven University Departments of Rural Health (UDRH) which were established as a rural health workforce program in the late 1990s through analysis of peer-reviewed journal output. Design and settings: Descriptive study based on validated publications from publication output reported in annual key performance indicator (KPI) reports to the Commonwealth Department of Health, Australia. Main outcome measures: In addition to counts and the type of publications, articles were examined to assess fields of research, evidence of research collaboration, and potential for influencing policy. Funding acknowledgement was examined to provide insight into funding sources and research consultancies. Results: Of the 182 peer-reviewed articles, UDRH staff members were the first and corresponding author for 45% (n=82); most (69%, n=126) were original research. Most publications examined included Australian data only (80%, n=101). Over half (56%; n=102) of the articles addressed rural health issues; Aboriginal health was the main subject in 14% (n=26). Thirty-three articles (18%) discussed the policy implications of the research and only half (51%, n=93) of the articles listed sources of funding. Number of authors per article ranged from 1-19, with a mean of 5 (SD=3.2) authors per article, two-thirds of articles included authors from 2-5 universities/organisations but only 5% of articles included an author from more than one UDRH. Conclusions: Staff from UDRHs are regularly publishing peer-reviewed articles, and research productivity demonstrated cooperation with external partners. Better collaboration between UDRH staff and others may help increase the quality and value of Australian rural health research.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12142
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors David Perkins
2015 Brown LJ, MacDonald-Wicks L, Squires K, Crowley E, Harris D, 'An innovative dietetic student placement model in rural New South Wales, Australia', Journal of Allied Health, 44 117-122 (2015) [C1]

Over the past 10 years, the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health, based in Tamworth, New South Wales, has supported increased opportunities for short- and longterm r... [more]

Over the past 10 years, the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health, based in Tamworth, New South Wales, has supported increased opportunities for short- and longterm rural dietetic placements through an ongoing collaboration between Hunter New England Local Health District dietitians and University of Newcastle academic staff, using an innovative student placement model. A recent strategy has been the implementation of year-long student attachments to a rural area in an attempt to improve long-term recruitment and retention of staff to rural and remote areas. This paper describes the dietetic student placement model and outcomes to date. There has been an increase in the number and diversity of student placements in Tamworth, from 2 student placements in 2002 to 33 in 2013 and a maximum increase of 317 student weeks. Students have rated the short- and long-term options highly. Intention to work rurally after graduation was reported at 49% for the 2011/2012 cohort of students. Seventy-three percent of all year-long students have obtained work in a rural setting after graduation. An increased exposure to a rural location has the potential to increase the recruitment of staff in rural areas.

Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Kelly Squires, Lesley Wicks
2014 Potter JL, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Hure AJ, 'Diet quality of Australian breast cancer survivors: A cross-sectional analysis from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 27 569-576 (2014) [C1]

Background: Evidence supports strong associations between healthful eating patterns and maintaining a healthy weight with favourable health outcomes for breast cancer survivors (B... [more]

Background: Evidence supports strong associations between healthful eating patterns and maintaining a healthy weight with favourable health outcomes for breast cancer survivors (BCS). The present study aimed to evaluate the diet quality of Australian BCS and to determine whether diet quality differed between BCS and age-matched healthy controls (HC) or by geographical location. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 281 BCS and 4069 HC from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health mid-aged cohort completing Survey 3 in 2001. Data from the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies food frequency questionnaire were used to calculate the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), a validated summary estimate of diet quality based on adherence to the Australian dietary guidelines. Results: The mean (SD) ARFS of the BCS group was 33.2 (9.4) out of a maximum of 74. Mean (SD) total ARFS and component scores of BCS did not differ from the HC group [32.9 (8.7)] and no differences were found in ARFS between urban and rural BCS. Conclusions: This is the first study dedicated exclusively to describing the diet quality of Australian BCS. Although no difference was found when comparisons were made with a HC group, there is considerable room for improvement in the diet quality of Australian BCS. Given research suggesting higher risk of chronic conditions such as obesity amongst BCS, and the recognition of optimising diet quality as a key factor in health promotion for all population groups, data from the present study suggest the need for research targeting the feasibility and impact of improving diet quality of Australian BCS.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12198
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Clare Collins, Alexis Hure
2013 Sheridan T, Brown LJ, Moy S, Harris D, 'Health outcomes of eating disorder clients in a rural setting', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, 21 232-233 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12042
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Wakely L, Brown L, Burrows J, 'Evaluating interprofessional learning modules: health students' attitudes to interprofessional practice', JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE, 27 424-425 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/13561820.2013.784730
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Julie Burrows
2012 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Developing dietetic positions in rural areas: What are the key lessons?', Rural and Remote Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
2012 Little FH, Brown LJ, Grotowski M, Harris D, 'Nourishing networks: An interprofessional learning model and its application to the Australian rural health workforce', Rural and Remote Health, 12 1-7 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Fiona Little, Miriam Grotowski
2012 Crowley ET, Williams LT, Brown LJ, 'How do mothers juggle the special dietary needs of one child while feeding the family? A qualitative exploration', Nutrition and Dietetics, 69 272-277 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2011 Brown LJ, Mitchell LJ, Williams LT, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Capra S, 'Private practice in rural areas: An untapped opportunity for dietitians', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 19 191-196 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2011.01211.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Lesley Wicks
2010 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Going rural but not staying long: Recruitment and retention issues for the rural dietetic workforce in Australia', Nutrition & Dietetics, 67 294-302 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2010.01480.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
2009 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Cooper RJ, 'A multidisciplinary model of rural allied health clinical-academic practice: A case study', Journal of Allied Health, 38 236-241 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 21
Co-authors Tony Smith
2008 Smith AN, Cooper RJ, Brown LJ, Hemmings R, Greaves J, 'Profile of the rural allied health workforce in Northern New South Wales and comparison with previous studies', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 16 156-163 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2008.00966.x
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Tony Smith
2008 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'A best practice dietetic service for rural patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy: A pilot of a pseudo-randomised controlled trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 65 175-180 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2008.00238.x
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
2006 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Features of a best practice dietetic service for rural patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy', Nutrition & Dietetics, 63 A3 (2006) [C3]
2006 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Profile of the Australian dietetic workforce: 1991-2005', Nutrition and Dietetics, 63 166-178 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/00129334-200604000-00012
Citations Scopus - 30
2004 Brown LJ, 'Nutrition matter for cancer', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 12 131 (2004) [C3]
Show 46 more journal articles

Conference (108 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Kocanda L, Brown L, Rollo M, Kerr J, Schumacher T, May J, 'Nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia. Is it evidence based?', Nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation programs in Australia. Is it evidence based?, Melbourne, Virtual Conference (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12627
Co-authors Jennifer May, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo
2020 Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Kerr J, May J, Rollo M, Brown L, 'Providing nutrition care at cardiac rehabilitation. A survey of current practice and attitudes in Australia', Virtual Conference (2020)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tracy Schumacher, Jennifer May, Lucy Kocanda Uon
2020 Squires K, Brown L, Heaney S, MacDonald L, Johnston C, 'Investigating the use of placement-based simulation on preparedness and confidence of dietetics students', Melbourne (Virtual Conference) (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12627
Co-authors Lesley Wicks, Susan Heaney, Cath Johnston, Kelly Squires
2019 Brown L, Urquhart L, Squires K, Crowley E, Heaney S, Hicks A, Burrows J, 'Better Than Expected - Rural placements offering diversity of practice for dietetic students', Gold Coast, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Elesa Crowley, Lisa Urquhart, Kelly Squires, Susan Heaney
2019 Schumacher T, Squires K, Urquhart L, Crowley E, Hicks A, Brown L, 'Opportunistic health screening for festival goers: A stimulus for health improvements', Gold Coast, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Kelly Squires, Lisa Urquhart, Tracy Schumacher
2019 Jones T, Melton A, Cranney T, Squires K, Schumacher T, Brown L, 'Exploring the eating habits of travellers at the Tamworth Country Music Festival', Gold Coast, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Kelly Squires, Tracy Schumacher
2019 Payne E, Brown L, Crowley E, Rollo M, Schumacher T, 'Mapping access to core foods in a rural setting: Dietitians using visual techniques to raise awareness for service planning', Gold Coast, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tracy Schumacher, Elesa Crowley
2019 Chai L, Collins C, May C, Holder C, Brown L, Burrows T, 'An online telehealth nutrition intervention to support parents in child weight management - a randomised feasibility controlled trial', Glasgow, Scotland UK (2019)
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2019 Brown L, Smith A, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Mapping rural workforce outcomes from a longitudinal study of allied health graduates', Brisbane, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang
2019 Wolfgang R, Wakely L, Brown L, Smith A, Little A, Burrows J, 'Rural career intentions: The influence of placement experiences for allied health students', Hobart, TAS (2019)
Co-authors Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Luke Wakely, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little
2019 Kocanda L, Kerr J, Brown L, May J, Schumacher T, Rollo M, Rutherford J, 'Nutrition education in cardiac rehabilitation: Time for change', Sydney, NSW (2019)
Co-authors Lucy Kocanda Uon, Tracy Schumacher, Megan Rollo, Jennifer May
2019 Urquhart L, Roberts K, Brown L, Duncanson K, Fisher K, 'Mutual respect for ways of knowing, doing and learning: Collaborative yarning to understand an Aboriginal wellbeing program', Darwin, NT (2019)
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Lisa Urquhart
2019 Smith A, Waller S, Beauchamp A, Sutton K, Depczynski J, Brown L, et al., 'The Nursing and Allied Health Graduate Outcomes Tracking Study: Methodology for Large-scale Data Linkage Tony Smith, University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health Australia', Canberra, ACT (2019)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Julie Depczynski, Karin Fisher, Tony Smith
2018 Brown LJ, Smith AN, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Growing the rural allied health workforce through immersion placements', Canberra (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Tony Smith, Julie Burrows
2018 Kocanda L, Brown L, May J, Rollo M, Collins C, Schumacher T, 'Can opportunistic CVD risk screening increase interest in own health for a rural population?', Tamworth, NSW (2018)
Co-authors Tracy Schumacher, Jennifer May, Megan Rollo, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Clare Collins
2018 Ferns JL, Little AL, Smith AN, Croker AL, Brown LJ, 'Educating for collaborative healthcare opportunities (ECHO): Evolution on a rural landscape', Auckland, NZ (2018)
Co-authors Anne Croker, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little, Jane Ferns
2018 Brown LJ, Burrows JM, Wakely LT, 'Mapping rural workforce outcomes: results from a longitudinal study of allied health graduates', Launceston, TAS (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Julie Burrows
2018 Little AL, Ferns JL, Croker AL, Brown LJ, 'Educating for collaborative healthcare opportunities (ECHO): Ideas for a sustainable model', Hobart, TAS (2018)
Co-authors Jane Ferns, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker
2018 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Wakely LT, Wolfgang RL, Little AL, Burrows JM, 'Tracking change on the rural workforce landscape: a longitudinal study of allied health recent graduates', Darwin, NT (2018)
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Luke Wakely, Tony Smith
2018 Smith AN, May JA, Burrows JM, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Fisher KA, et al., 'Counting the chickens as they hatch: tracking students and the rural health pipeline', Tamworth, NSW (2018)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Karin Fisher, Julie Burrows, Jennifer May, Tony Smith
2018 De Silva LK, Cooper E, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Little AL, Ferns JL, 'Preparing for the interprofessional landscape: a program facilitating collaboration between physiotherapy and radiography students', Darwin, NT (2018)
Co-authors Tony Smith, Emma Cooper, Lani Carter, Jane Ferns, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little
2018 Urquhart LE, Monaghan N, Cook J, Brown LJ, Fisher KA, Duncanson K, 'Yarning About Spring into Shape : beyond the usual methods.', Tamworth, NSW (2018)
Co-authors Lisa Urquhart, Karin Fisher
2018 Rae KM, Keogh L, Diehm C, Roberts CT, Eades S, Brown A, et al., 'Influence of Maternal Adiposity, Preterm Birth and Birth Weight Centiles on Early Childhood Obesity in an Indigenous Australian Pregnancy through to Early Childhood Cohort Study', San Diego, California (2018)
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, E Lumbers, Roger Smith, Kirsty Pringle
2018 Brown LJ, Collins C, Williams R, Coyle D, 'Diet Quality, Cancer Risk and Mortality in Adults: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Clare Collins
2018 Brown LJ, Harris D, Staples L, Penman K, 'Thinking beyond the teenage years: to achieve good nutrition and mental health', Sydney (2018)
2018 Brown LJ, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta CL, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australia longitudinal cohort', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Kym Rae, Lucy Kocanda Uon
2018 Plunkett BM, Robinson A, Brown L, Pretty J, Ferns J, 'Creating new opportunities for student placement and enhancing patient care through the establishment of a rural dietetic service learning clinic (DSLC)', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Amy Robinson, Jane Ferns
2018 Munro SL, Brown L, Croker A, Burrows J, Fisher K, Munro L, 'Yearning to Yarn: Teaching for Equity', Auckland, NZ (2018)
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Anne Croker, Julie Burrows
2017 Robinson A, Brown LJ, Plunkett B, Urquhart L, Bohringer E, Squires K, Crowley E, 'Establishing academic roles in rural areas to cultivate the dietetic workforce', Dietitians Association of Australia 34th National Conference 'Cultivating Fresh Evidence', Hobart (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12354
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Kelly Squires, Amy Robinson, Lisa Urquhart
2017 Axelsen N, Lee R, Szpitalak K, Morris J, Brown LJ, 'Starting out rural after graduation - reflections from recent graduate dietitians', Dietitians Association of Australia 34th National Conference 'Cultivating Fresh Evidence', Hobart (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12354
2017 Ashman A, Collins C, Brown LJ, Rae K, Rollo M, 'Acceptability and usability of a mobile phone method for image-based dietary assessment and provision of nutrition counselling amongst pregnant women', Dietitians Association of Australia 34th National Conference 'Cultivating Fresh Evidence', Hobart (2017)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12354
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo
2017 Brown LJ, Smith A, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Burrows J, 'Where are they now? Tracking allied health graduates after rural placements', 14th National Rural Health Conference, Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows
2017 Brown L, Smith A, Wakely LT, Little A, Wolfgang R, Burrows J, 'Developing the future allied health workforce for Australian rural health context', Cairns (2017)
Co-authors Tony Smith, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely
2017 Ashman A, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validity and acceptability of a smartphone image-based dietary assessment method for pregnant women', Canberra (2017)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo
2016 Brown L, Crowley E, Harris D, Squires K, 'Sustaining the rural dietetic workforce in Australia: Outcomes from an immersive rural placement program', Revista Espanola de Nutricion Humana y Dietetica, Granada, Spain (2016)
DOI 10.14306/renhyd
Co-authors Kelly Squires, Elesa Crowley
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Evaluation of a mobile phone tool for dietary assessment and to guide nutrition counselling among pregnant women.', Melbourne, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2016 Ashman AM, Collins CE, Brown LJ, Rae KM, Rollo ME, 'Validation of an image-based dietary assessment method using smartphones for pregnant women.', Melbourne, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo
2016 Sutton K, Waller S, Fisher K, Farthing A, McAnnalley K, Russell D, et al., 'Understanding the Decision to Relocate Rural Amongst Urban Nursing and Allied Health Students and Recent Graduates' (2016)
Co-authors Tony Smith, Karin Fisher
2016 Brown LJ, Crowley E, Little A, Croker A, 'Embedding Interprofessional experiences into dietetic students placements: starting with a collaborative approach to feeding difficulties', Melbourne (2016)
Co-authors Alexandra Little, Elesa Crowley, Anne Croker
2016 Bohringer E, Brown LJ, Ashman A, Corby C, Rae K, 'Engaging students in a remote community placement experience: Making tracks for the future', Melbourne (2016)
Co-authors Kym Rae
2016 Rollo M, Ashman A, Brown L, Rae KM, Weatherall L, Skinner G, et al., 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, Newcastle (2016)
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo, Roger Smith
2016 Brown L, Crowley E, Croker A, Little AL, Fisher K, 'Embracing the boundaries of interprofessional practice-based collaboration in work integrated learning', Embracing the boundaries of interprofessional practice-based collaboration in work integrated learning, Sydney (2016)
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Elesa Crowley, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker
2015 Rollo M, Ashman A, Brown L, Rae KM, Weatherall L, Skinner G, Smith R, 'A brief tool for assessing diet quality and selected nutrient intakes from image-based dietary records: Design and preliminary results from use in pregnant women', Brisbane (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Geoff Skinner, Kym Rae, Megan Rollo, Roger Smith
2015 Matthews KI, Tan M, Brown LJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Hutchesson MJ, Patterson AJ, 'Body image does not improve and dieting practices increase with age for young Australian women', Hobart (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Tan M, Matthews K, Hutchesson ML, Brown LJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Patterson AJ, 'Rural vs urban women: Same BMI, different body composition', Hobart (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Potter J, Collins C, Byles J, Brown LJ, 'Diet Quality, Cancer Risk and Mortality in Adults: A Systematic Review of Epidemiological Studies', Hobart (2015) [E3]
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Jennifer May, Julie Byles, Clare Collins
2015 Brown LJ, Smith T, Wakely L, Burrows J, Wolfgang R, Little A, 'Conversion by immersion: outcomes of short and long-term rural allied health placements', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little, Julie Burrows, Rebecca Wolfgang
2015 Berko N, Brown LJ, Woodley I, Thomas L, 'Social determinants of health: opportunities for youth through education and social support', People Places Possibilities - 13th National Rural Health Conference, Darwin (2015) [E3]
2015 Little AL, Croker A, Brown L, Crowley E, ''Bang for buck' In interprofessional learning grants: Should we be funding catalysts or coercers of interprofessional rapport?', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker
2015 Johnston C, Wakely LT, Brown L, 'The use of iPads by undergraduate allied healthe professional students on clinical placement', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Cath Johnston, Luke Wakely
2015 Brown LJ, Smith T, Wakely L, Wolfgang R, Little A, Harries-Jones H, et al., 'Engaging allied health students in experiential learning: The rural immersion experience', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Tony Smith, Alexandra Little, Rebecca Wolfgang, Julie Burrows
2015 Fisher KA, Brown L, Smith T, Hudson N, 'Evaluation of a community engagement program: What do rural healthcare students gain from experiential community-engaged learning?', ANZAHPE-AMEA 2015 Conference, Newcastle (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Tony Smith, Nicky Hudson
2015 Tan M, Brown LJ, Patterson A, Macdonald-Wicks L, Hutchesson M, 'Describing the average Australian woman: Body composition and metabolic rate comparisons between urban and rural areas', Dietitians Association of Australia 32nd National Conference, Perth (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Mathews K, Patterson A, Macdonald-Wicks L, Hutchesson M, Brown LJ, Tan M, 'The average Australian woman: A cross-sectional analysis of the body shape and size of Australian women', Dietitians Association of Australia 32nd National Conference, Perth (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson, Lesley Wicks
2015 Harris D, Grotowski M, Brown L, Little F, 'Riding the wave of success: revamping the Nourishing Networks education program', ANZAED's 13th Annual Conference, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Fiona Little, Miriam Grotowski
2015 Crowley ET, Harris D, Brown L, 'Rad Eating Disorder Education for Student Dietitians', ANZAED's 13th Annual Conference, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2015 Harris D, Staples L, Penman K, Carter H, Brown LJ, 'Diving deeper: ways to improve the early identification of young clients with disordered eating in rural areas', ANZAED's 13th Annual Conference, Gold Coast (2015) [E3]
2015 Ashman A, Collins C, Brown LJ, Rollo M, Rae K, 'Investigating dietary intakes of Indigenous Australian women and their infants in the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', A Healthy Start for the Human Race... 2015 DOHaD Conference., Melbourne (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Kym Rae
2014 Potter J, Collins CE, Brown L, Hure A, 'Diet quality of Australian breast cancer survivors: A cross-sectional analysis from the Australian longitudinal study on women s health', Nutrition and Dietetics, Brisbane, Australia (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Alexis Hure
2014 Croker AL, Harries-Jones H, Wakely L, Brown L, Little A, Fisher K, 'Preparing students for collaborative healthcare practice: Valuing educators' interdisciplinary rapport', Proceedings of the 2014 Practice-Based Education Summit, Sydney (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Karin Fisher, Luke Wakely, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker
2014 Wakely LT, Brown L, Little A, Squires K, Leys J, Harries-Jones H, 'Learning around the campfire: A weekend camp to promote teamwork and interprofessional interaction for rural allied health students', Surf's Up: Ride the Waves SARRAH National Conference for Rural and Remote Allied Health Professionals, Kingscliff NSW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Squires, Jacqui Leys, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely
2014 Wolfgang RL, Brown L, Smith T, Wakely L, Harries-Jones H, Little A, Burrows J, 'Diving deeper - outcomes of a rural immersive experience for allied health students', Surf's Up: Ride the Waves SARRAH National Conference for Rural and Remote Allied Health Professionals, Kingscliff NSW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Rebecca Wolfgang, Alexandra Little, Luke Wakely, Julie Burrows
2014 Fisher K, Wakely L, Squires K, Shipley L, Wakely K, Brown L, et al., 'A model for enhancing community engagement of undergraduate health professional students on rural placement', The 2014 Muster Global Community Engaged Medical Education, Uluru (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Karin Fisher, Kelly Squires, Katrina Wakely, Luke Wakely, Nicky Hudson
2014 Johnston C, Brown LJ, Wakely L, 'Would iPads Assist Students on Clinical Placement?', ANZAHPE 2014 Conference Handbook & Program, Gold Coast (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Cath Johnston, Lesley Wicks
2014 Squires K, Brown L, 'Creating the future: Evaluating a restructure of gestational diabetes melltus (GDM) clinics', Nutrition and Dietetics Journal of the Dietitians Association of Australia Volume 71 Supplement 1 May 2014, Brisbane (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Squires
2014 Ashman A, Weatherall L, Brown LJ, Collins C, Naden M, Rae K, et al., 'Infant feeding practices in an Aboriginal cohort of pregnancy and infancy - the Gomeroi gaaynggal study', Aboriginal Health Conference 2014, Perth (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Kym Rae, Clare Collins, Roger Smith
2013 Brown L, Williams L, Squires K, 'Building the rural dietetics workforce: a bright future?', Proceedings of the 12th National Rural Health Conference, Adelaide (2013) [E1]
Co-authors Kelly Squires
2013 Brown LJ, Wakely L, Smith A, 'Outback Immersion: Allied health students' experiences of long term rural placements', ANZAHPE 2013 Conference Handbook & Program, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely
2013 Harries-Jones H, Burrows J, Smith T, Brown L, wakely L, 'Interprofessional learning: from the Start for the Future', ANZAHPE 2013 Conference Handbook & Program, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely, Julie Burrows
2013 Squires K, Brown L, 'Innovative Community Engagement Building Tomorrows Dietitians', Nutrition & Dietetics, Canberra (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Kelly Squires
2012 Brown LJ, Crowley ET, Ancuk K, Harris D, 'Growing the dietetics profession in rural Australia: Ten years of rural focussed placements', Abstracts. Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2012 Williams R, Brown LJ, 'Hydration status of junior rugby union players: A pilot study', Abstracts. Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2012 Smith AN, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Wolfgang RL, 'Creating community capacity and enhancing student learning on rural placement', Conference Handbook. SARRAH National Conference, Launceston, Tasmania (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Luke Wakely, Rebecca Wolfgang
2012 Smith AN, Wakely LT, Brown LJ, Burrows JM, 'Integrating interprofessional learning into rural clinical placements - Assessing student's attitudes', Symposium Program. Interprofessional Education for Quality Use of Medicines, Newcastle Beach, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Julie Burrows, Luke Wakely
2012 Bohringer E, Brown LJ, 'Nutrition screening and dietetic services in rural oncology clinics', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
2011 Sheridan T, Brown LJ, Moy S, Harris D, 'Multi-disciplinary co-ordinated care for eating disorder clients in rural areas', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
2011 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra SM, 'Growing dietetic services in rural primary health care settings', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2011) [E3]
2011 George C, Brown L, Wakely LT, Wakely K, 'I am, you are, we are community - linking undergraduate students to community through partnerships', Conference Handbook, Port Macquarie (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Katrina Wakely
2011 Crowley ET, Brown LJ, Smith AN, Williams LT, 'Evidence based interprofessional learning for dietetic students on rural clinical placement', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Oral Program Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith, Elesa Crowley
2011 Brown LJ, Crowley ET, Harris D, Williams LT, 'A long term strategy to grow the rural dietetics workforce', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2011 Sheridan T, Brown LJ, Moy S, Harris D, 'Outcome measures of eating disorder clients: The importance of documentation with a triad approach', Nutrition and Dietetics: Dietitians Association of Australia 29th National Conference Poster Abstracts, Adelaide (2011) [E3]
2010 Little FH, Brown LJ, Pryor D, Harris D, Grotowski M, 'Nourishing Networks: Innovation in interprofessional learning for rural clinicians working with eating disorder clients', All Together Better Health 5 Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Fiona Little
2010 Smith AN, Brown LJ, May JA, Wakely LT, Greaves J, Wolfgang R, et al., 'Interprofessional learning modules: Making undergraduate IPE clinically relevant', All Together Better Health 5 Conference. Program, Sydney, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Tony Smith, Jennifer May, Luke Wakely
2010 Brown LJ, Harris D, Little FH, Grotowski M, 'Challenges of delivering an inter-professional education program for rural clinicians working with eating disorder clients', National SARRAH Conference 2010 Conference. Program, Broome, WA (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Miriam Grotowski, Fiona Little
2010 Greaves J, Brown LJ, 'Bush babies completing the final year of an allied health degree in a rural area: Nurturing the next generation', National SARRAH Conference 2010 Conference. Program, Broome, WA (2010) [E3]
2010 Brown LJ, Crowley ET, Duncanson KR, Woodward GM, Kooloos NM, 'Rural based dietetic academic roles: Opportunities for growth and capacity building', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley, Kerith Duncanson
2010 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Dietetic workload in rural acute care settings', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
2010 Harris D, Brown LJ, Little FH, Pryor D, Grotowski M, 'Nourishing networks: An innovative program for rural health professionals working with eating disorder clients', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne, Australia (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Fiona Little
2009 Moy S, Brown LJ, Harris D, 'Health outcomes of clients with eating disorders in Tamworth compared with best practice guidelines', 2009 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference: Abstracts and Presentations, Melbourne, VIC (2009) [E3]
2009 Harris D, Grotowski M, Brown LJ, Little FH, Pryor D, 'Nourishing networks: Learning and development program', 7th Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders: Programme and Abstracts, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Fiona Little
2009 Brown LJ, Harris D, Crowley ET, 'Teaching and learning on dietetic professional practice placement in the acute care setting', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2009: Program Book, Tamworth, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Elesa Crowley
2009 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Dietetic workload and casemix in rural acute care settings', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2009: Program Book, Tamworth, NSW (2009) [E3]
2009 Little FH, Brown LJ, Pryor D, Harris D, Grotowski M, 'Nourishing networks: Utilising information technology and mentoring to promote education and training in rural areas', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2009: Program Book, Tamworth, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Fiona Little
2009 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'A best-practice dietetics service model for rural patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy', Rural Health: The Place To Be: 10th National Rural Health Conference, Cairns, QLD (2009) [E3]
2009 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Champions for expanding the dietetics workforce in rural areas', Nutrition & Dietetics, Darwin, NT (2009) [E3]
2009 Brown LJ, Williams LT, Capra S, 'Opportunities for private practice in rural Australia', Nutrition & Dietetics, Darwin, NT (2009) [E3]
2008 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Recruitment and retention issues for the rural dietetic workforce', Nutrition & Dietetics, Gold Coast, QLD (2008) [E3]
2008 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Ensuring equitable access to dietetic services in Australia', Abstract Book: 15th International Congress of Dietetics, Yokohama, Japan (2008) [E3]
2007 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Development and characteristics of the dietetic workforce in six rural sites in NSW', Nutrition & Dietetics, Hobart, TAS (2007) [E3]
2007 Smith AN, Brown LJ, Cooper RJ, Blackman KR, Hayes P, 'Outcomes of rural allied health academic appointments in the University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), Northern NSW', NSW Rural Allied Health Conference 2007. Rural Allied Health: Actions and Solutions. Program Book, Dubbo, NSW (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Tony Smith
2006 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Features of a best practice dietetic service for rural patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy', Nutrition & Dietetics, Sydney, Australia (2006) [E3]
2006 Smith T, Brown LJ, Cooper RJ, 'An Investigation of the Rural Allied Health Workforce in Northern NSW', Abstracts from the SARRAH 2006 Conference, Albury, NSW (2006) [E3]
2005 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Opportunity and inequity in rural dietetics', Dietitians Association of Australia 23rd National Conference, Intercontinental Burswood Resort, Perth WA (2005) [E3]
2005 Brown LJ, Capra SM, Williams LT, 'Opportunity and Inequity in Rural Dietetics', 23rd National conference of the Dieticians Asccociation of Australia, Perth (2005) [E3]
2005 Smith AN, Thornberry P, Cooper RJ, Brown LJ, Williams LT, Lyons MJ, Jones PD, 'The Challenge of evaluating rural undergraduate multi-professional education', Central to Health: Sustaining Well-being in Remote and Rural Health, Alice Springs (2005) [E2]
Co-authors Tony Smith
2004 Brown LJ, Capra SM, 'The changing face of dietetics in Australia', Growing Dietetics, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2004) [E3]
2004 Sager R, Brown LJ, 'Rural dietitian: a new frontier', Dietitians Association of Australia 22nd National Conference, Melbourne (2004) [E3]
2004 Williams LT, Brown LJ, 'A strategy for growing dietetics in the rural setting', Dietitians Association of Australia 22nd National Conference, Melbourne (2004) [E3]
Show 105 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Croker A, Wakely K, Brown L, Cone L, Cooper E, De Silva L, et al., 'Out of sight, out of mind?: Pedagogical and equity implications of videoconferencing for healthcare students education in rural areas' (2019)
Co-authors Luke Wakely, Emma Cooper, Lani Carter, Sonja Littlejohns, Alexandra Little, Anne Croker, Lauren Cone, Katrina Wakely, Miriam Grotowski, Karin Fisher, Fiona Little
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 25
Total funding $6,660,747

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20212 grants / $24,984

Hospitalisations and Allied Health Service Utilisation for Older Adults with Preventable Conditions in New South Wales Rural Coastal Regions$14,984

Funding body: College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle

Funding body College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Khoka,

Scheme Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

An investigation into the association between myocardial infarctions and takeaway food availability in the New England region of the Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network$10,000

Funding body: Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)

Funding body Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC)
Project Team Doctor Tracy Schumacher, Associate Professor Leanne Brown, Professor Jennifer May, Ms Annabelle Williams
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2100858
Type Of Funding C3200 – Aust Not-for Profit
Category 3200
UON Y

20181 grants / $13,600

Out of sight, out of mind?: Pedagogical and equity implications of videoconferencing for healthcare students' education in rural areas.$13,600

Funding body: Centre for Excellence in Equity in Higher Education (CEEHE)

Funding body Centre for Excellence in Equity in Higher Education (CEEHE)
Project Team

Anne Croker, Karin Fisher, Simon Munro, Leanne Brown, Emma Cooper, Miriam Grotowski, Alex Little, Sonja Littlejohns, Luke Wakely, Katrina Wakely

Scheme Excellence in Teaching for Equity in Higher Education (ETEHE)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20172 grants / $22,792

Yearning to yarn: Using Aboriginal ways of knowing and learning to support clinical placement experiences of Aboriginal health professional students $15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education

Funding body University of Newcastle - Centre of Excellence for Equity in Higher Education
Scheme SEED GRANTS 2015
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Feasibility and engagement strategies for a cardiovascular disease prevention program targeting a high need, low health literacy rural community.$7,792

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Tracy Schumacher, Associate Professor Leanne Brown, Professor Jennifer May, Professor Clare Collins, Professor Andrew Boyle
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701268
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20165 grants / $6,334,874

Rural Health Multidisciplinary Training Program$6,300,000

Funding body: Australian Government Department of Health

Funding body Australian Government Department of Health
Project Team

Leanne Brown, Tony Smith, Jennifer Lang

Scheme Consultancy/tender
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Rural Cardiovascular disease study$20,034

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Student Follow Up-Study$8,846

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Community Engagement Program evaluation$3,177

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Publications grant$2,817

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20153 grants / $40,597

Rural Cardiovascular disease study$30,096

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Student Follow-up Study $7,406

Funding body: Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia

Funding body Department of Rural Health University of Newcastle Australia
Scheme UONDRH research grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty of Health and Medicine Equipment Grant$3,095

Funding body: Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Scheme Strategic Infrastructure Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20142 grants / $18,000

Rural Health Continuing Education Grant (RHCE2- Round 5)$10,000

Nourishing Networks program for eating disorders

Funding body: Australian Government Department of Health

Funding body Australian Government Department of Health
Project Team

Leanne Brown

Scheme RHCE 2 - Round 5
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Work Integrated Learning Interprofessional Education grant$8,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Interprofessional Education Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20131 grants / $1,480

Dietitians Association of Australia 30th National Conference, Canberra Australia, 23 - 25 May 2013$1,480

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Leanne Brown
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300564
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $33,000

Faculty of Health Equipment Grant$33,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Leanne Brown

Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20113 grants / $28,600

Faculty of Health Equipment Grant$22,350

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Leanne Brown

Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Nutrition and Physical Activity PRC Seeding Grant$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team

Suridner Baines

Scheme Seeding Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Primary Health Care Research Conference, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, 13 - 15 July 2011$1,250

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Leanne Brown
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100678
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20091 grants / $128,000

National Rural Primary Health Care Projects Initiative$128,000

Nourishing Networks program for clients with eating disorders

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health & Aged Care
Project Team

Fiona Little

Scheme Rural Primary Health Care Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20081 grants / $1,700

International Congress of Dietetics$1,700

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Leanne Brown
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189007
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20062 grants / $6,120

Primary Health Care Research and Evaluation Development Grant in Aid$5,000

PHCRED Grant in Aid through UoNDRH

Funding body: Australian Rural Health Education Network

Funding body Australian Rural Health Education Network
Project Team

Leanne Brown

Scheme PHCRED
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Dietitians Association of Australia 24th National Conferece 11-13th May 2006$1,120

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Leanne Brown
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186502
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20041 grants / $7,000

Determining best practice dietetic services for rural oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy$7,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Leanne Brown
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0184046
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed21
Current11

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2021 Honours Systematic review of allied health practice models relevant to regional, rural and remote practice Occupational Therapy, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 Honours The student follow-up study Physiotherapy, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2021 Honours ‘Where are they now? A study to explore the workplace outcomes of graduate allied health students’ Occupational Therapy, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 Masters Investigating Home Enteral Tube Feeding in a Rural Australian Population and Exploring Patients’ Experiences M Philosophy (Nutrition&Diet), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Perceptions of Preparedness for Participating in Collaborative Practice: Unbundling the Experiences Influencing New Graduate Health Professionals PhD (Medical Education), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Simulated Learning Experiences in Nutrition and Dietetics PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Evaluating Nutrition Education Strategies in Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes Living in Rural Australia PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Is a Personalised Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Program Aimed at Primary and Secondary CVD Prevention, with and without Additional Telehealth Support from a Dietitian, Feasible, Acceptable and Cost-Effective in Lowering CVD Risk Over 12 Months, within Regional and Rural Primary Health Care Settings? PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 Honours Diet quality and adequacy of macronutrient intake of Australian adolescent athletes from a variety of sports Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Gathering Perspectives of Success in an Aboriginal Nutrition and Exercise Program PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Factors Involved in Translating Nutrition Knowledge to a High Risk Rural Population for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease PhD (Medicine), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 Honours Do rural placement experiences influence workforce outcomes for occupational therapy graduates? Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 Honours What do junior athletes eat and is it good enough? Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 Honours An investigation into the relationship between skin colour analysis and self-reported fruit and vegetable intake in people attending rural events in Australia Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 Honours Exploring core food access in Tamworth, NSW Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Honours The role of socioeconomic status on nutrient intakes, energy density and portion size in Australian women of child-bearing age Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Honours Portion size, energy density and nutritional adequacy of dietary intake in Indigenous women during pregnancy Nutrition & Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Optimising Dietary Intake and Nutrition Related Health Outcomes in Aboriginal Women and their Children PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 Honours Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in a longitudinal Australian cohort Nutrition & Dietetics, University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours Body image of Australian women aged 18-44 years: a cross-sectional analysis Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 Honours A six year follow-up of women with restricted eating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 Honours Changes in body image, body shape and clothing size in Australian women from 1999 to 2013 Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Use of hormone replacement therapy to improve bone health in adults with anorexia nervosa Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Evaluating occupational therapy student rural placement experiences and workplace outcomes Occupational Therapy, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Evaluating experiences of coeliac disease patients in rural dietetic outpatient clinic Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Describing the Average Australian Woman: Body composition, metabolic rate and a comparison between urban and rural areas Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Coeliac disease knowledge and practice: An audit and cross- sectional survey of rural-based dietitians Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Honours Dietary intakes of women with restricted eating from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health: a cross-sectional study Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2012 Honours Diet quality of Australian breast cancer survivors: a cross-sectional analysis from the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2011 Honours Review of dietary treatment and outcomes for patients with gastrointestinal cancer in two rural sites Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2011 Honours Evaluation of pre and post-match hydration status in junior rugby union players Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2010 Honours Health outcomes of eating disorder clients in a rural setting Nutrition & Dietetics, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
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Research Projects

Changing Health Actions at Rural Gala Events in 20 minutes 2017 - 2023

Changing Health Actions at Rural Gala Events in 20 minutes


The CHAMPS study 2019 - 2025


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Research Opportunities

Where are they now? A study to explore the workplace outcomes of graduate allied health students

Contribute to research investigating the workplace outcomes of allied health students who have undertaken an rural placement in the health program.

PHD

University Department of Rural Health

6/1/2020 - 2/1/2023

Contact

Associate Professor Leanne Brown
University of Newcastle
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
leanne.brown@newcastle.edu.au

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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 47
United Kingdom 2
Canada 1
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Associate Professor Leanne Brown

Position

Associate Professor
University Newcastle Department of Rural Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Nutrition and Dietetics

Contact Details

Email leanne.brown@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 67553540
Fax 67612355

Office

Room UoNDRH G.40
Building UoNDRH - Tamworth Education Centre
Location UoNDRH - Tamworth Education Centre

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