Dr Megan Whatnall

Dr Megan Whatnall

Postdoctoral Fellow

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Whatnall is a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition (PRC-PAN) and the School of Health Sciences, and a Casual Academic in the College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing. She was awarded her PhD (Nutrition and Dietetics) from the University of Newcastle in 2019, Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics with Honours Class I from the University of Newcastle in 2015, and is an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD).

Dr Whatnall's research focuses on the eating habits of young adults and university students, and developing and evaluating innovative and technology based interventions to improve eating habits and general well-being, and reduce chronic disease risk.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health Nutrition
  • Young adulthood
  • e&mHealth

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
Postdoctoral Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
10/10/2019 -  Post-Doctoral Researcher Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/3/2016 - 31/12/2019 Casual Research Assistant School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/6/2017 - 30/4/2018 Casual Research Assistant School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/7/2019 - 31/12/2019 Casual Research Assistant School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia

Awards

Professional

Year Award
2018 School of Health Sciences Staff Award - Health and Safety Excellence
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Research Award

Year Award
2021 School of Medicine and Public Health Community Impact Award
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
2020 Dr Dave Roberts Memorial Award in Food and Nutritional Science
The University of Newcastle
2019 Early Career Researcher Innovation Award
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
2019 Best Student Poster Award - Nutrition Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting
Nutrition Society of Australia
2017 2017 Best Publication in the Nutrition and Dietetics Theme
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
2016 Student Travel Grant
Nutrition Society of Australia

Scholarship

Year Award
2016 Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship
The University of Newcastle

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
NUDI2200 Nutrition 2
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 30/7/2018 - 30/11/2019
NUDI2110 Community Nutrition Practice
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 1/7/2019 - 30/11/2020
NUDI3310 Community and Public Health Nutrition 2
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Tutor 2/3/2020 - 30/6/2020
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (26 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hutchesson MJ, Duncan MJ, Oftedal S, Ashton LM, Oldmeadow C, Kay-Lambkin F, Whatnall MC, 'Latent class analysis of multiple health risk behaviors among australian university students and associations with psychological distress', Nutrients, 13 1-16 (2021)

University students have high rates of health risk behaviors and psychological distress. This study explores patterns of health behaviors among a sample of Australian university s... [more]

University students have high rates of health risk behaviors and psychological distress. This study explores patterns of health behaviors among a sample of Australian university students, and determines whether patterns of health behaviors are associated with psychological distress and demographic characteristics. Cross-sectional data from the University of Newcastle Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2019 were analyzed. Fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, physical activity, sitting time, smoking, alcohol intake, drug use, sleep and psychological distress were assessed. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify patterns of health risk be-haviors, and latent class regression to explore associations between psychological distress and demographic characteristics with health behavior classes. Analysis included 1965 students (mean age 25.8 ± 8.6 years, 70.7% female). Three patterns of health behaviors were identified: healthier (48.6%), moderate (40.2%) and unhealthy (11.2%) lifestyle classes. Students in the moderate and unhealthy lifestyle classes had higher odds of moderate (OR 1.43 and 2.37) and high/very high psychological distress risk (OR 2.71 and 11.69). Students in the unhealthy and moderate lifestyle classes had a higher odds of being male, younger, enrolled in transition to university and English language courses, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent and to report some financial difficulty. Study findings may be used to inform the design of mental health interventions for university students that target key health risk behaviors.

DOI 10.3390/nu13020425
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Mitch Duncan, Lee Ashton, Frances Kaylambkin, Christopher Oldmeadow
2021 Whatnall MC, Soo ZM, Patterson AJ, Hutchesson MJ, 'University students purchasing food on campus more frequently consume more energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods: A cross-sectional survey', Nutrients, 13 (2021)

University food environments are typically dominated by unhealthy food choices. The aim was to investigate associations between on-campus food purchasing behaviours and dietary in... [more]

University food environments are typically dominated by unhealthy food choices. The aim was to investigate associations between on-campus food purchasing behaviours and dietary intake in an Australian university student sample. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2017¿2018 with students (n = 362, 71.0% female, mean age 27.5 ± 10.5 years) from the University of Newcastle, Australia. On-campus food purchasing behaviours (purchasing frequency and weekly expenditure), dietary intake (diet quality and percentage energy/day from energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) foods) and sociodemographic and student characteristics (e.g., time spent on campus) were measured. Linear regression was used to explore associations between food purchasing be-haviours and dietary intake, adjusted for potential confounders. Mean percentage energy/day from EDNP foods was 31.7 ± 14.4. Mean diet quality score was 32.6 ± 10.2 out of 73. Higher percentage energy/day from EDNP foods was associated with higher weekly expenditure (ß = 0.203, p < 0.001) and more frequent purchase (ß = 18.041, p < 0.001 for =4 times a week vs. never) of food/drinks on campus. Diet quality was not significantly associated with purchase frequency or expenditure (p > 0.05). Findings are supportive of changes being made to university food environments, as a strategy to improve dietary intake among university students.

DOI 10.3390/nu13041053
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2021 Whatnall MC, Skinner J, Pursey K, Brain K, Collins R, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, 'Efficacy of dietary interventions in individuals with substance use disorders for illicit substances or illicit use of pharmaceutical substances: A systematic review.', J Hum Nutr Diet, (2021)
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12871
Co-authors Katherine Brain, Rebecca A Collins Uon, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Kirrilly Pursey
2021 Whatnall MC, Sharkey T, Hutchesson MJ, Haslam RL, Bezzina A, Collins CE, Ashton LM, 'Effectiveness of interventions and behaviour change techniques for improving physical activity in young adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.', J Sports Sci, 1-18 (2021)
DOI 10.1080/02640414.2021.1898107
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Aaron Bezzina, Lee Ashton
2021 Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, Sharkey T, Haslam RL, Bezzina A, Collins CE, et al., 'Recruiting and retaining young adults: What can we learn from behavioural interventions targeting nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity? A systematic review of the literature', Public Health Nutrition, (2021)

Objective: To describe strategies used to recruit and retain young adults in nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity intervention studies, and quantify the success and efficie... [more]

Objective: To describe strategies used to recruit and retain young adults in nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity intervention studies, and quantify the success and efficiency of these strategies. Design: A systematic review was conducted. The search included six electronic databases to identify RCTs published up to 6th December 2019 that evaluated nutrition, physical activity and/or obesity interventions in young adults (17-35 years). Recruitment was considered successful if the pre-determined sample size goal was met. Retention was considered acceptable if =80% retained for =6-month follow-up or =70% for >6-month follow-up. Results: From 21,582 manuscripts identified, 107 RCTs were included. Universities were the most common recruitment setting used in 84 studies (79%). Less than half (46%) the studies provided sufficient information to evaluate whether individual recruitment strategies met sample size goals, with 77% successfully achieving recruitment targets. Reporting for retention was slightly better with 69% of studies providing sufficient information to determine whether individual retention strategies achieved adequate retention rates. Of these, 65% had adequate retention. Conclusions: This review highlights poor reporting of recruitment and retention information across trials. Findings may not be applicable outside a university setting. Guidance on how to improve reporting practices to optimise recruitment and retention strategies within young adults could assist researchers in improving outcomes.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980021001129
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Aaron Bezzina, Flora Tzelepis, Melinda Hutchesson
2020 Yang Y, Chai LK, Collins R, Leary M, Whatnall M, Burrows T, 'Process Evaluation of a Personality Targeted Intervention for Addictive Eating in Australian Adults.', Behav Sci (Basel), 10 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/bs10120186
Co-authors Rebecca A Collins Uon, Tracy Burrows
2020 Burrows T, Verdejo-Garcia A, Carter A, Brown RM, Andrews ZB, Dayas CV, et al., 'Health professionals and health professional trainees views on addictive eating behaviours: A cross-sectional survey', Nutrients, 12 1-15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu12092860
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Christopher Dayas
2020 Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, Patterson AJ, 'Predictors of Food Insecurity among Australian University Students: A Cross-Sectional Study', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 17 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17010060
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2020 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Hutchesson MJ, 'Determinants of eating behaviours in Australian university students: A cross-sectional analysis', Nutrition and Dietetics, 77 331-343 (2020) [C1]

Aim: This study aimed to explore clustering among individual eating behaviours in a sample of Australian university students, and explore associations between clustered eating beh... [more]

Aim: This study aimed to explore clustering among individual eating behaviours in a sample of Australian university students, and explore associations between clustered eating behaviours and demographic characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of data from the University of Newcastle (UON) Student Healthy Lifestyle Survey 2017 was conducted. Measures included eating behaviours (eg, vegetables, energy-dense nutrient poor [EDNP] food intakes) assessed using short diet questions, and demographic characteristics (eg, age, undergraduate/postgraduate student). Factor analysis was used to explore clustering of individual eating behaviours (ie, identify factors). Linear regression models were used to explore associations between eating behaviour factors identified and demographic characteristics. Results: A total of 3062 students (70% female; 56% aged 17-24 years) were included in the analysis. The six eating behaviour factors identified (characterised by higher consumption of the named foods/drinks) were; EDNP snack foods, meat and takeaway foods, fruit and vegetables, sugary drinks, breakfast, and breads and cereals. A higher fruit and vegetable factor score was associated with being female (P <.001), and a higher meat and takeaway foods factor score was associated with being male (P <.001) and of younger age (P <.001). Conclusions: Nutrient-rich foods clustered together and EDNP foods clustered together, that is, the identified factors represent either nutrient-rich or EDNP foods. Interventions in the university setting should target students with the poorest eating behaviours, including males and younger students.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12584
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson, Christopher Oldmeadow
2020 Sharkey T, Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, Haslam RL, Bezzina A, Collins CE, Ashton LM, 'Effectiveness of gender-targeted versus gender-neutral interventions aimed at improving dietary intake, physical activity and/or overweight/obesity in young adults (aged 17-35 years): a systematic review and meta-analysis', Nutrition journal, 19 78-98 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12937-020-00594-0
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Aaron Bezzina, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2020 Sharkey T, Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, Haslam RL, Bezzina A, Collins CE, Ashton LM, 'Effectiveness of gender-targeted versus gender-neutral interventions aimed at improving dietary intake, physical activity and/or overweight/obesity in young adults (aged 17-35 years): a systematic review and meta-analysis (vol 19, 78, 2020)', NUTRITION JOURNAL, 19 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12937-020-00605-0
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Aaron Bezzina
2020 Ashton LM, Sharkey T, Whatnall MC, Haslam RL, Bezzina A, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'Which behaviour change techniques within interventions to prevent weight gain and/or initiate weight loss improve adiposity outcomes in young adults? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials', OBESITY REVIEWS, 21 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.13009
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Aaron Bezzina, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2020 Whatnall MC, Ng HS, Liau CY, Patterson AJ, Hutchesson MJ, 'What is the nutritional value of food and drinks sold in vending machines at an Australian university? A food environment audit study', NUTRITION & DIETETICS, 77 550-552 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12615
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2020 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Hutchesson MJ, 'Effectiveness of Nutrition Interventions in Vending Machines to Encourage the Purchase and Consumption of Healthier Food and Drinks in the University Setting: A Systematic Review', NUTRIENTS, 12 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu12030876
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2019 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Siew YY, Kay-Lambkin F, Hutchesson M, 'Are psychological distress and resilience associated with dietary intake among Australian university students?', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16214099
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2019 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Brookman S, Convery P, Swan C, Pease S, Hutchesson MJ, 'Lifestyle behaviors and related health risk factors in a sample of Australian university students', JOURNAL OF AMERICAN COLLEGE HEALTH, 68 734-741 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/07448481.2019.1611580
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2019 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Burrows TL, Hutchesson MJ, 'Higher diet quality in university students is associated with higher academic achievement: a cross-sectional study', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 32 321-328 (2019) [C1]

Background: Unhealthy diets are typical of university students and the effects may be wider reaching than health. The present study aimed to describe the association between dieta... [more]

Background: Unhealthy diets are typical of university students and the effects may be wider reaching than health. The present study aimed to describe the association between dietary intake and academic achievement in a sample of Australian university students. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of data from an online survey of 278 students from the University of Newcastle (UON), Australia [mean (SD) age 26.9¿(10.5)¿years; 70.9% female] was conducted. Dietary intake, in terms of diet quality score [Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS)], including individual sub-scales, and percentage energy per day from energy-dense nutrient poor (EDNP) foods, including individual sub-groups, was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey Food Frequency Questionnaire, and academic achievement was assessed as self-reported grade point average (GPA). The association between GPA and dietary intake was explored using linear regression, with adjustment for socio-demographic and student characteristics. Results: Higher GPA was associated with higher diet quality (ARFS) (ß¿=¿0.02, P¿=¿0.011), higher sub-scale scores for vegetables (ß¿=¿0.03, P¿=¿0.026) and fruit (ß¿=¿0.05, P¿=¿0.029) and with lower percentage energy per day from EDNP foods overall (ß¿=¿-0.01, P¿=¿0.047) and also from sweetened drinks (ß¿=¿-0.06, P¿<¿0.001). Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate small associations between a healthier dietary intake and higher academic achievement, as well as vice versa. Given that the associations were small, they may not be particularly meaningful. However, this evidence could be used as a motivator for efforts aiming to improve dietary intake among university students.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12632
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2019 Tan M, Brown LJ, Mathews KI, Whatnall MC, Hutchesson MJ, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Patterson AJ, 'Rural versus urban women: An examination of anthropometry and body composition', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 27 70-77 (2019) [C1]

Objective: To describe and compare body composition and fat distribution of Australian women 18¿44 years from an urban and rural location. Design: Cross-sectional survey and colle... [more]

Objective: To describe and compare body composition and fat distribution of Australian women 18¿44 years from an urban and rural location. Design: Cross-sectional survey and collection of anthropometric and body composition measurements. Setting: Newcastle and Tamworth in New South Wales. Participants: Convenience sample of women recruited through media and community. Main outcome measures: Weight, height, waist and hip girths, visceral fat area, body fat (kg and %) and skeletal muscle mass. Results: Of the total sample (n = 254), 53% resided in an urban area and the mean age was 28.0 (7.6) years. The mean age of rural women was significantly higher than for urban women. The majority of women (66.5%) had a Body Mass Index within the healthy range (18.5¿24.9 kg m ) and there was no significant difference in mean Body Mass Index between rural and urban women. Measures of central fat distribution, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were significantly higher in rural residents. Visceral fat area was significantly higher among rural women. After adjustment for age, differences in waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and visceral fat area were no longer statistically significant. Conclusion: While we did not find statistically significant differences in body composition among urban and rural women, these results highlight the dramatic effect of age on measures of central adiposity. Population surveillance needs to incorporate measures of excess central adiposity, particularly visceral fat area, to better investigate changes in body composition among women in their 20s and 30s. -2

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12466
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Leanne Brown, Lesley Wicks
2019 Ashton LM, Sharkey T, Whatnall MC, Williams RL, Bezzina A, Aguiar EJ, et al., 'Effectiveness of Interventions and Behaviour Change Techniques for Improving Dietary Intake in Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of RCTs', NUTRIENTS, 11 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11040825
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Aaron Bezzina, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson
2019 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Hutchesson MJ, 'Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of the Eating Advice to Students (EATS) Brief Web-Based Nutrition Intervention for Young Adult University Students: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial', NUTRIENTS, 11 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11040905
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2019 Haslam R, Taylor RM, Whatnall M, Collins CE, 'Dietary intake in health and disease, challenges in measuring and reporting diet-disease relationships', NUTRITION & DIETETICS, 76 501-506 (2019)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12595
Co-authors Clare Collins, Rachael Taylor
2019 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Hutchesson M, 'A Brief Web-Based Nutrition Intervention for Young Adult University Students: Development and Evaluation Protocol Using the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/11992
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2018 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, 'Effectiveness of brief nutrition interventions on dietary behaviours in adults: A systematic review', Appetite, 120 335-347 (2018) [C1]

Brief interventions are effective in improving health behaviours including alcohol intake, however the effectiveness of brief interventions targeting nutrition outcomes has not be... [more]

Brief interventions are effective in improving health behaviours including alcohol intake, however the effectiveness of brief interventions targeting nutrition outcomes has not been determined. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of brief nutrition interventions in adults. Seven databases were searched for RCT/pseudo RCT studies published in English to April 2016, and evaluating brief interventions (i.e. single point of contact) designed to promote change in eating behaviours in healthy adults (=18 years). Of 4849 articles identified, 45 studies met inclusion criteria. Most studies targeted fruit and/or vegetable intake (n = 21) or fat intake (n = 10), and few targeted diet quality (n = 2). Median follow-up was 3.5 months, with few studies (n = 4) measuring longer-term outcomes (=12 months). Studies aimed to determine whether a brief intervention was more effective than another brief intervention (n = 30), and/or more effective than no intervention (n = 20), with 17 and 11 studies, respectively, reporting findings to that effect. Interventions providing education plus tailored or instructional components (e.g. feedback) were more effective than education alone or non-tailored advice. This review suggests that brief interventions, which are tailored and instructional, can improve short-term dietary behaviours, however evidence for longer-term behaviour change maintenance is limited.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.09.017
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2018 Hutchesson M, Callister R, Morgan P, Pranata I, Clarke E, Skinner G, et al., 'A Targeted and Tailored eHealth Weight Loss Program for Young Women: The Be Positive Be Healthe Randomized Controlled Trial', Healthcare, 6 1-19 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare6020039
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Geoff Skinner, Erin Clarke Uon, Robin Callister, Lee Ashton, Ilung Pranata, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Burrows TL, Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Hutchesson MJ, 'Associations between Dietary Intake and Academic Achievement in College Students: A Systematic Review.', Healthcare, 5 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare5040060
Citations Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson
2016 Whatnall MC, Collins CE, Callister R, Hutchesson MJ, 'Associations between Unhealthy Diet and Lifestyle Behaviours and Increased Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Young Overweight and Obese Women.', Healthcare (Basel), 4 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/healthcare4030057
Citations Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
Show 23 more journal articles

Conference (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Ashton L, Sharkey T, Whatnall M, Haslam R, Bezzina A, Auguiar E, et al., 'Which Behaviour-Change Techniques within Weight-Management Interventions Improve Adiposity Outcomes in Young Adults? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs)', Which Behaviour-Change Techniques within Weight-Management Interventions Improve Adiposity Outcomes in Young Adults? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs), Newcastle, NSW, Australia (2020)
DOI 10.3390/proceedings2020043002
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Aaron Bezzina
2019 Patterson A, Whatnall M, Siew YY, Kay-Lambkin F, Hutchesson M, 'Are psychological distress and resilience associated with dietary intake among Australian university students?', Gold Coast, QLD, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson, Frances Kaylambkin
2019 Patterson A, Whatnall M, Hutchesson M, 'Predictors of food insecurity among Australian university students: a cross-sectional study', Gold Coast, QLD, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2019 Sharkey T, Hutchesson M, Whatnall M, Haslam R, Bezzina A, Aguiar E, et al., 'Effectiveness of behaviour change techniques used in nutrition interventions in young adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised control trials', Gold Coast, Australia (2019)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12567
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton, Clare Collins, Aaron Bezzina
2019 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Hutchesson M, 'Targeting young adult university students through a brief online nutrition intervention: Results of the EATS pilot RCT', Prague, Czech Republic (2019)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson, Christopher Oldmeadow
2019 Whatnall M, Siew YY, Patterson A, Kay-Lambkin F, Hutchesson M, 'Are psychological distress and resilience associated with eating behaviours among Australian university students?', Prague, Czech Republic (2019)
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2018 Hutchesson M, Whatnall M, Patterson A, 'University students' satisfaction with the cost and availability of food on campus', Nutrition & Dietetics, Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2018 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Hutchesson M, 'Determinants of eating behaviours in Australian university students', Nutrition & Dietetics, Sydney, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2018 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Hutchesson M, 'Eating Advice To Students (EATS): Development and process evaluation results of a brief online nutrition intervention for young adult university students', ISBNPA 2018 Abstract Book, Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2018 Aguiar E, Ashton L, Collins C, Whatnall M, Pezdirc K, Williams R, Hutchesson M, 'What are the characteristics of a successful intervention in young adults? - Results from a systematic review', ISBNPA 2018 Abstract Book, Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Kristine Pezdirc, Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2018 Ashton L, Whatnall M, Morgan P, Rollo M, Collins C, Hutchesson M, 'Process evaluation of two targeted healthy lifestyle programs for either young men (The HEYMAN study) or young women (Be Positive Be Healthe) what works and what doesn t?', ISBNPA 2018 Abstract Book, Hong Kong (2018)
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo
2017 Tan L, Patterson A, Whatnall M, Brookman S, Convery P, Swan C, et al., 'Diet and other lifestyle risk factors among Australian university students', Nutrition and Dietetics, Hobart, Tasmania (2017)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2017 Patterson A, Whatnall M, Hutchesson M, 'Eating behaviours of Australian university students in relation to socio-demographic, study type and health-related characteristics', ISBNPA 2017 Abstract Book, Victoria, Canada (2017)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2016 Whatnall M, Patterson A, Hutchesson M, 'A systematic review of brief nutrition interventions in adults', Melbourne (2016)
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Amanda Patterson
2016 Whatnall M, Collins CE, Callister R, Hutchesson MJ, 'Lifestyle behaviours and cardiovascular disease risk in young overweight and obese women: A cross-sectional analysis', http://www.alswh.org.au/scientificmeeting2016/program, Newcastle, Australia (2016) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Robin Callister
Show 12 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $12,874

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20211 grants / $4,184

Research Assistant support to apply an ultra-processed food classification system to Australian dietary intake data $4,184

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Megan Whatnall
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2021
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2100142
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20192 grants / $8,690

Faculty of Health and Medicine 2019 Strategic Research Pilot Grant$7,690

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Scheme Faculty of Health and Medicine 2019 Strategic Research Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Early Career Researcher Travel Grant$1,000

Funding body: Australian Nutrition Trust Fund

Funding body Australian Nutrition Trust Fund
Scheme Australian Nutrition Trust Fund 2019 Grant Round
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Dr Megan Whatnall

Positions

Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Casual Project Officer
Student Central
Academic Division

Casual Research Assistant
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email megan.whatnall@newcastle.edu.au
Link Twitter

Office

Room ATC205
Building ATC Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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