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Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis

NHMRC Career Development Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
A/Prof Flora Tzelepis is a NHMRC Career Development Fellow whose research examines the effectiveness of scalable interventions on health risk behaviours in priority populations. Her work investigates the effectiveness of real-time video counselling for smoking cessation compared to other forms of behavioral support among residents in regional and remote areas. This research builds upon her PhD work that investigated the effectiveness of proactively offering NSW Quitline telephone support on smokers' long-term cessation rates for which she was awarded the University of Newcastle’s Research Higher Degree Excellence Award for the Faculty of Health and Medicine. 

In previous work she led a cluster randomised trial that examined the effectiveness of electronic feedback and referral to existing telephone and online support in reducing smoking, alcohol, nutrition and physical activity health risk behaviours in Technical and Further Education (TAFE) students. This research led to NHMRC funding to undertake a larger-scale cluster randomised trial in the TAFE setting. In other work, Flora led the development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure and assessed the quality of cancer care received by haematological cancer survivors. Flora is also working on research that examines the effectiveness of an organisational change intervention on cessation rates among smokers attending drug and alcohol treatment centres and the acceptability of a stepped care model for smoking cessation. Flora has published 84 peer-reviewed research papers and has been awarded four competitive fellowships from the Leukaemia Foundation/Cure Cancer Australia, the National Heart Foundation, the Cancer Institute NSW and NHMRC.

Teaching Expertise
Flora has taught 4th year medical students communication skills regarding preparing patients for potentially threatening clinical procedures and obtaining informed consent. She has also taught evaluation designs and measurement and analysis to postgraduate students enrolled in a health program evaluation course.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Psychology)(Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • cancer prevention
  • multiple health behaviours
  • quality of care
  • smoking cessation

Languages

  • Greek (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 65
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified 10
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
NHMRC Career Development Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 31/12/2015 National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow

National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

University of Newcastle
1/01/2012 - 1/12/2013 Fellow

Leukaemia

Foundation:- National Research Program (Postdoctoral Fellowship)

University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2011 - 1/12/2011 Fellow

Cure Cancer

Australia Foundation:- Postdoctoral Fellowship

University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (89 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Paul C, 'Barriers to diabetic self-care: A qualitative study of patients and healthcare providers perspectives', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28 2296-2308 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore patient and healthcare provider (HCP) perspectives about patients¿ barriers to the performance of diabetic self-... [more]

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore patient and healthcare provider (HCP) perspectives about patients¿ barriers to the performance of diabetic self-care behaviours in Ghana. Background: Sub-Saharan African urban populations are increasingly affected by type 2 diabetes due to nutrition transition, sedentary lifestyles and ageing. Diabetic self-care is critical to improving clinical outcomes. However, little is known about barriers to diabetic self-care (diet, exercise, medication taking, self-monitoring of blood glucose and foot care) in sub-Saharan Africa. Design: Qualitative study that followed the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) guidelines. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted among 23 people living with type 2 diabetes and 14 HCPs recruited from the diabetes clinics of three hospitals in Tamale, Ghana. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The constant comparative method of data analysis was used and identified themes classified according to constructs of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB): attitudes/behavioural beliefs, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Results: Barriers relating to attitudes included misconceptions that diabetes was caused by spiritual forces or curses, use of herbal medicines, intentional nonadherence, difficulty changing old habits, and feeling or lacking motivation to exercise. Barriers relating to subjective norms were inadequate family support, social stigma (usually by spouses and other members of the community) and cultural beliefs. Perceived behavioural control barriers were poor income levels, lack of glucometers, busy work schedules, long distance to the hospital and inadequate access to variety of foods due to erratic supply of foods or seasonality. Conclusions: Both patients and HCPs discussed similar barriers and those relating to attitude and behavioural control were commonly discussed. Relevance to Clinical Practice: Interventions to improve adherence to diabetic self-care should focus on helping persons with diabetes develop favourable attitudes and how to overcome behavioural control barriers. Such interventions should have both individualised and community-wide approaches.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.14835
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Chris Paul
2019 Lynagh M, Carey M, Paul C, Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, 'The needs of carers of blood cancer survivors: are there differences between Australia rural and urban dwellers?', Atlas of Science, (2019)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Mariko Carey
2019 Mogre V, Abanga ZO, Tzelepis F, Johnson NA, Paul C, 'Psychometric evaluation of the summary of diabetes self-care activities measure in Ghanaian adults living with type 2 diabetes', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 149 98-106 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Aims: We evaluated the content validity, factorial structure, internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects of the SDSCA among Ghana... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier B.V. Aims: We evaluated the content validity, factorial structure, internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects of the SDSCA among Ghanaian persons with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The summary of diabetes self-care activities measure (SDSCA) was administered to 187 adults living with type 2 diabetes from three diabetes clinics. Results: A confirmatory factor analysis maintained the four factor structure of the SDSCA. However, two items, 3 (fruit and vegetable servings) and 4 (red meat or full-fat dairy products) had factor loadings of 0.26 and 0.16 respectively. The model also had a statistical power of 0.72 (below acceptable criteria). Modification of the model by removing item 4 resulted in an improved revised model with a power of 0.82. Construct validity was found for the exercise and diet subscales of the SDSCA but not for the self-monitoring of blood glucose and foot care subscales. The internal consistency of the SDSCA measure was 0.68, below acceptable criteria for internal consistency. No floor effects were present but the exercise subscale had ceiling effects. Conclusion: The SDSCA measure had content validity, maintained its multidimensionality and met the criteria for floor effects but not for construct validity, internal consistency and ceiling effects. The SDSCA measure may require improvements to evaluate self-care behaviours of adult type 2 diabetes patients in Ghana and probably in other sub-Saharan countries.

DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.02.004
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Chris Paul
2019 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating Smoking Cessation Care into a Medically Supervised Injecting Facility Using an Organizational Change Intervention: A Qualitative Study of Staff and Client Views', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16112050
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton
2019 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Williams CM, Gilligan C, Regan T, Daly J, et al., 'Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2019 (2019)

© 2019 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Real-time video communication software such as Skype and FaceTime transmits live video and... [more]

© 2019 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Background Real-time video communication software such as Skype and FaceTime transmits live video and audio over the Internet, allowing counsellors to provide support to help people quit smoking. There are more than four billion Internet users worldwide, and Internet users can download free video communication software, rendering a video counselling approach both feasible and scalable for helping people to quit smoking. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of real-time video counselling delivered individually or to a group in increasing smoking cessation, quit attempts, intervention adherence, satisfaction and therapeutic alliance, and to provide an economic evaluation regarding real-time video counselling. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO and Embase to identify eligible studies on 13 August 2019. We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and Clinical-Trials.gov to identify ongoing trials registered by 13 August 2019. We checked the reference lists of included articles and contacted smoking cessation researchers for any additional studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), randomised trials, cluster RCTs or cluster randomised trials of real-time video counselling for current tobacco smokers from any setting that measured smoking cessation at least six months following baseline. The real-time video counselling intervention could be compared with a no intervention control group or another smoking cessation intervention, or both. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data from included trials, assessed the risk of bias and rated the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis for the primary outcome of smoking cessation, using the most stringent measure of smoking cessation measured at the longest follow-up. Analysis was based on the intention-to-treat principle. We considered participants with missing data at follow-up for the primary outcome of smoking cessation to be smokers. Main results We included two randomised trials with 615 participants. Both studies delivered real-time video counselling for smoking cessation individually, compared with telephone counselling. We judged one study at unclear risk of bias and one study at high risk of bias. There was no statistically significant treatment effect for smoking cessation (using the strictest definition and longest follow-up) across the two included studies when real-time video counselling was compared to telephone counselling (risk ratio (RR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 12.04; 2 studies, 608 participants; I2 = 66%). We judged the overall certainty of the evidence for smoking cessation as very low due to methodological limitations, imprecision in the effect estimate reflected by the wide 95% CIs and inconsistency of cessation rates. There were no significant differences between real-time video counselling and telephone counselling reported for number of quit attempts among people who continued to smoke (mean difference (MD) 0.50, 95% CI ¿0.60 to 1.60; 1 study, 499 participants), mean number of counselling sessions completed (MD ¿0.20, 95% CI ¿0.45 to 0.05; 1 study, 566 participants), completion of all sessions (RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.79; 1 study, 43 participants) or therapeutic alliance (MD 1.13, 95% CI ¿0.24 to 2.50; 1 study, 398 participants). Participants in the video counselling arm were more likely than their telephone counselling counterparts to recommend the programme to a friend or family member (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.11; 1 study, 398 participants); however, there were no between-group differences on satisfaction score (MD 0.70, 95% CI ¿1.16 to 2.56; 1 study, 29 participants). Authors' conclusions There is very little...

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012659.pub2
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Chris Paul, Christopher M Williams, Conor Gilligan
2019 Byaruhanga J, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, Lecathelinais C, 'Cost Per Participant Recruited From Rural and Remote Areas Into a Smoking Cessation Trial Via Online or Traditional Strategies: Observational Study', Journal of medical Internet research, 21 e14911 (2019)

©Judith Byaruhanga, Flora Tzelepis, Christine Paul, John Wiggers, Emma Byrnes, Christophe Lecathelinais. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://w... [more]

©Judith Byaruhanga, Flora Tzelepis, Christine Paul, John Wiggers, Emma Byrnes, Christophe Lecathelinais. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 12.11.2019. BACKGROUND: Rural and remote residents are more likely to smoke than those who live in major cities; however, recruitment of research participants from rural and remote areas can be challenging. The cost per participant recruited from rural and remote areas via online (eg, social media) and traditional strategies (eg, print) has implications for researchers on how to allocate resources to maximize the number of participants recruited. Participant characteristics such as demographics, financial stress, mental health, and smoking-related factors may be associated with recruitment method (ie, online vs traditional), and so it is important to understand whether certain subgroups are more likely to be recruited via a particular strategy. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the cost per participant recruited and examine whether characteristics such as demographics, financial stress, mental health, and smoking-related factors may be associated with the recruitment method (ie, online vs traditional). METHODS: Participants were recruited into a randomized trial that provided smoking cessation support. Eligible participants were aged 18 years or older; used tobacco daily; had access to video communication software, internet, and telephone; had an email address; and lived in a rural or remote area of New South Wales, Australia. This study describes the natural (observed) experience of recruiting participants via online and traditional methods into a smoking cessation trial. RESULTS: Over 17 months, 655 participants were recruited into the smoking cessation trial. A total of 88.7% (581/655) of the participants were recruited via online methods. Moreover, 1.8% (12/655) of the participants were recruited from remote locations and none from very remote areas. The cost per participant recruited by the various online strategies ranged from Aus $7.29 (US $4.96, £4.09, and ¿4.43) for Gumtree, a local online classified website, to Aus $128.67 (US $87.63, £72.20, and ¿78.28) for email. The cost per participant recruited using traditional strategies ranged from Aus $0 (US $0, £0, and ¿0) for word of mouth to Aus $3990.84 (US $2757.67, £2227.85, and ¿2477.11) for telephone. Women had greater odds of being recruited via online methods than men (odds ratio 2.50, 95% CI 1.42-4.40). No other characteristics were associated with the recruitment method. CONCLUSIONS: The cost per participant recruited via online and traditional strategies varied, with the range being smaller for online than traditional recruitment strategies. Women have greater odds of being recruited via online strategies into rural smoking cessation trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12617000514303; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=372584&isReview=true.

DOI 10.2196/14911
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2019 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Boyes AW, D'Este C, Sherwood E, Girgis A, 'Continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis: a longitudinal study of intentions and attempts to quit', JOURNAL OF CANCER SURVIVORSHIP, 13 687-694 (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s11764-019-00787-5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Allison Boyes
2019 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Shaw JE, Paul C, 'A systematic review of adherence to diabetes self-care behaviours: Evidence from low- and middle-income countries.', J Adv Nurs, (2019)
DOI 10.1111/jan.14190
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natalie Johnson
2019 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Tzelepis F, Wyse RJ, Bartlem KM, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under.', Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 2019 (2019)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub6
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, Erica James, Kate Bartlem
2019 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Paul C, 'Attitudes towards, facilitators and barriers to the provision of diabetes self-care support: A qualitative study among healthcare providers in Ghana', Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews, 13 1745-1751 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Diabetes India Statement of the problem: Self-care support provided by healthcare providers (HCPs) is critical to diabetes self-care. However, a number of barriers prevent ... [more]

© 2019 Diabetes India Statement of the problem: Self-care support provided by healthcare providers (HCPs) is critical to diabetes self-care. However, a number of barriers prevent HCPs from providing self-care support to people with diabetes. We explored attitudes towards, barriers and facilitators of the provision of diabetes self-care support among Ghanaian HCPs. Methods: Fourteen semi-structured interviews were conducted among HCPs recruited from three diabetes clinics in Tamale, Ghana. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded and analysed thematically. Results: HCPs reported a sense of responsibility and urgency to provide self-care education to diabetes patients; while believing it was the patients¿ responsibility to self-care for their diabetes condition. Accordingly, HCPs perceived their role to be limited to information sharing rather than behaviour change interventions. Facilitators to the provision of self-care support included patients¿ motivation, and team work among healthcare professionals. Barriers that hindered self-care support included language barriers and poor inter-professional collaboration. Furthermore, HCPs discussed that they felt inadequately trained to provide self-care support. Healthcare-system-related barriers were inadequate office space, lack of professional development programmes, high patient numbers, inadequate staff numbers, inadequate health insurance and a lack of sufficient supplies and equipment in the hospital. Conclusion: HCPs attitudes were generally favourable towards supporting self-care, albeit with a focus on information provision rather than behaviour change. Training in effective strategies for providing self-care support are needed, and better use of the resources that are available.

DOI 10.1016/j.dsx.2019.03.041
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Chris Paul
2018 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, O'Brien KM, Wyse RJ, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub4
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Rebecca Hodder, Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan
2018 O'Brien KM, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, Williams A, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of telephone-based interventions for managing osteoarthritis and spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis', PEERJ, 6 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.7717/peerj.5846
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong
2018 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Campbell HS, Bradstock K, Carey ML, Williamson A, 'Unmet supportive care needs of haematological cancer survivors: rural versus urban residents', Annals of Hematology, 97 1283-1292 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Due to fewer cancer services in rural locations, rural survivors may have unique unmet needs compared to urban survi... [more]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Due to fewer cancer services in rural locations, rural survivors may have unique unmet needs compared to urban survivors. This study compared among rural and urban haematological cancer survivors the most common ¿high/very high¿ unmet supportive care needs and the unmet need scores for five domains (information, financial concerns, access and continuity of care, relationships and emotional health). Survivors¿ socio-demographics, rurality, cancer history and psychological factors associated with each unmet need domain were also explored. A total of 1511 haematological cancer survivors were recruited from five Australian state cancer registries and 1417 (1145 urban, 272 rural) allowed extraction of their residential postcode from registry records. A questionnaire that contained the Survivor Unmet Needs Survey was mailed to survivors. Dealing with feeling tired was the most common ¿high/very high¿ unmet need for rural (15.2%) and urban (15.5%) survivors. The emotional health domain had the highest mean unmet need score for rural and urban survivors. Rurality was associated with a decreased unmet emotional health domain score whereas travelling for more than 1¿h to treatment was associated with increased unmet financial concerns and unmet access and continuity of care. Depression, anxiety and stress were associated with increased unmet need scores for all five domains. Unmet need domain scores generally did not differ by rurality. Travelling for more than 1¿h to treatment was associated with increased unmet need scores on two domains. Telemedicine and increased financial assistance with travel and accommodation may help those travelling long distances for treatment.

DOI 10.1007/s00277-018-3285-x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Yoong SL, Stockings E, Chai LK, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, et al., 'Prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use among youth globally: A systematic review and meta-analysis of country level data', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 303-308 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking s... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective: To describe the prevalence and change in prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) use in youth by country and combustible smoking status. Methods: Databases and the grey literature were systematically searched to December 2015. Studies describing the prevalence of ENDS use in the general population aged =20 years in a defined geographical region were included. Where multiple estimates were available within countries, prevalence estimates of ENDS use were pooled for each country separately. Results: Data from 27 publications (36 surveys) from 13 countries were included. The prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 among youth were highest in Poland (62.1%; 95%CI: 59.9-64.2%), and lowest in Italy (5.9%; 95%CI: 3.3-9.2%). Among non-smoking youth, the prevalence of ENDS ever use in 2013¿2015 varied, ranging from 4.2% (95%CI: 3.8-4.6%) in the US to 14.0% in New Zealand (95%CI: 12.7-15.4%). The prevalence of ENDS ever use among current tobacco smoking youth was the highest in Canada (71.9%, 95%CI: 70.9-72.8%) and lowest in Italy (29.9%, 95%CI: 18.5-42.5%). Between 2008 and 2015, ENDS ever use among youth increased in Poland, Korea, New Zealand and the US; decreased in Italy and Canada; and remained stable in the UK. Conclusions: There is considerable heterogeneity in ENDS use among youth globally across countries and also between current smokers and non-smokers. Implications for public health: Population-level survey data on ENDS use is needed to inform public health policy and messaging globally.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12777
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Li K Chai, Chris Paul, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2018 Lynagh MC, Williamson A, Bradstock K, Campbell S, Carey M, Paul C, et al., 'A national study of the unmet needs of support persons of haematological cancer survivors in rural and urban areas of Australia', Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 1967-1977 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: This study aimed to compare support persons of haematological cancer survivors living in rural and urban areas in regard to the type, prevalence an... [more]

© 2018, The Author(s). Purpose: This study aimed to compare support persons of haematological cancer survivors living in rural and urban areas in regard to the type, prevalence and factors associated with reporting unmet needs. Methods: One thousand and four (792 urban and 193 rural) support persons of adults diagnosed with haematological cancer were recruited from five Australian state population-based cancer registries. Participants completed the Support Person Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS) that assessed the level of unmet needs experienced over the past month across six domains. Results: Overall, 66% of support persons had at least one ¿moderate, high or very high¿ unmet need and 24% (n = 182) reported having multiple (i.e. 6 or more) ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs in the past month. There were no significant differences between rural and urban support persons in the prevalence of multiple unmet needs or mean total unmet needs scores. There were however significant differences in the types of ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs with support persons living in rural areas more likely to report finance-related unmet needs. Support persons who indicated they had difficulty paying bills had significantly higher odds of reporting multiple ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs. Conclusions: This is the first large, population-based study to compare the unmet needs of support persons of haematological cancer survivors living in rural and urban areas. Findings confirm previous evidence that supporting a person diagnosed with haematological cancer correlates with a high level of unmet needs and highlight the importance of developing systemic strategies for assisting support persons, especially in regard to making financial assistance and travel subsidies known and readily accessible to those living in rural areas.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-4039-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Paul CL, Byaruhanga J, Byrnes E, Bowman J, et al., 'A randomised trial of real-time video counselling for smoking cessation in regional and remote locations: study protocol', CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS, 74 70-75 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.cct.2018.10.001
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rod Ling, Andrew Searles, Chris Paul
2018 Tzelepis F, Clinton-McHarg T, Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Joshua D, Carey ML, 'Quality of patient-centered care provided to patients attending hematological cancer treatment centers', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15030549
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Mariko Carey
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Bonevski B, 'Integrating smoking cessation care in alcohol and other drug treatment settings using an organizational change intervention: a systematic review', Addiction, 113 2158-2172 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction Background and Aims: Organizational change interventions involve systems and cultural change within health-care services to make smoking ... [more]

© 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction Background and Aims: Organizational change interventions involve systems and cultural change within health-care services to make smoking cessation care delivery part of usual treatment. Six strategies for organizational change have been proposed. This study examined the evidence for organizational change interventions in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting on: (a) smoking cessation care; and (b) smoking cessation and cessation-related outcomes. Methods: A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Scopus were searched using keywords and MeSH terms from database inception to 1 June 2018. Interventions were assessed against the six organizational change strategies. Results: Of the 5155 papers identified, 14 publications from seven unique studies were included. Most studies employed four or fewer organizational change strategies. The majority (n¿=¿11) were rated weak to moderate in methodological quality. Nine published papers, four unique studies, examined staff reported provision of smoking cessation care; eight reported an increase, one found no change. Three papers, two unique studies, examined client receipt of care; all found significant increases. Three papers, two unique studies, assessed staff smoking prevalence from pre- to post-intervention. Only one study reported a significant reduction in staff smoking prevalence (35.2 versus 21.8%, P¿=¿0.005). Nine papers, six unique studies, assessed client smoking cessation and smoking-related outcomes. Seven papers reported on client smoking prevalence; two found a significant decrease and five found no change to smoking. Four papers reported on number of cigarettes per day, three found a significant decrease and one found no change. Two papers reported on smoking cessation finding a 10% and a 25% seven-day point prevalence abstinence post-discharge from the AOD service. Conclusions: Organizational change interventions within health-care services to make smoking cessation care delivery part of usual treatment offer promise for increasing smoking cessation care and reducing smoking prevalence.

DOI 10.1111/add.14369
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski
2018 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, Clinton-Mcharg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub5
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Wyse, Kate Bartlem, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Hodder, Erica James, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating smoking cessation care into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility: An acceptability study', Addictive Behaviors, 84 193-200 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this popu... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this population. This study aims to examine staff and client perspectives from a supervised injecting facility regarding: i) whether an organizational change intervention increased rates of smoking cessation care delivery (pre- to post-intervention); and ii) acceptability of the intervention. Methods: A pre-and-post intervention pilot study in a supervised injecting facility was conducted in Sydney, Australia between July 2014¿December 2015. The intervention employed an organizational change approach and included six components. Cross-sectional samples of staff (pre n = 27, post n = 22) and clients (pre n = 202, post n = 202) completed online surveys pre and post intervention. Results: From pre to post-intervention staff reported smoking cessation practices significantly increased for the provision of verbal advice (30% to 82%; p < 0.001), offer of free or subsidized nicotine replacement therapy (30% to 91%; p < 0.001), referral to a general practitioner (19% to 64%; p = 0.001), and follow-up to check on quit smoking progress (18.5% to 64%; p = 0.001). Significantly more clients reported receiving all smoking cessation strategies post-intervention. Over 85% of staff agreed that it was acceptable to address client smoking as part of usual care and 95% of clients agreed that it was acceptable to be asked by staff about their tobacco smoking. Conclusions: Increasing the provision of smoking cessation care using an organizational change approach is both feasible for staff and acceptable to staff and clients of supervised injecting facilities.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.001
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski
2017 Tzelepis F, Daly J, Dowe S, Bourke A, Gillham K, Freund M, 'Supporting aboriginal women to quit smoking: Antenatal and postnatal care providers' confidence, attitudes, and practices', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 19 642-646 (2017) [C1]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies hav... [more]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies have investigated the amount or type of smoking cessation care that stafffrom Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal services provide to clients who smoke or staffconfidence to do so. This study examined Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal staffconfidence, perceived role and delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women and characteristics associated with provision of such care. Methods: Stafffrom 11 Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Services and eight Aboriginal Child and Family Health services in the Hunter New England Local Health District in Australia completed a cross-sectional self-reported survey (n = 67, response rate = 97.1%). Results: Most staffreported they assessed clients' smoking status most or all of the time (92.2%). However, only a minority reported they offered a quitline referral (42.2%), provided follow-up support (28.6%) or provided nicotine replacement therapy (4.7%) to most or all clients who smoked. Few stafffelt confident in motivating clients to quit smoking (19.7%) and advising clients about using nicotine replacement therapy (15.6%). Staffconfident with talking to clients about how smoking affected their health had significantly higher odds of offering a quitline referral [OR = 4.9 (1.7-14.5)] and quitting assistance [OR = 3.9 (1.3-11.6)] to clients who smoke. Conclusions: Antenatal and postnatal staffdelivery of smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal women or mothers with young Aboriginal children could be improved. Programs that support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal providers to deliver smoking cessation care to clients are needed. Implications: Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staffhave multiple opportunities to assist Aboriginal women to quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum. However, staffconfidence and practices of offering various forms of smoking cessation support to pregnant Aboriginal women is unexplored. This is the first study to examine the amount and type of smoking cessation support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staffprovide to Aboriginal women, staffconfidence and their perceived role in delivering smoking cessation care. This information is valuable for developing strategies that assist antenatal and postnatal staffto improve their delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntw286
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megan Freund
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Smoking cessation care provision in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services: A cross-sectional survey of staff self-reported practices', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77 101-106 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client&apos;s smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all ... [more]

© 2017 Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client's smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smokers. The aim of this study was to examine Australian AOD program staff report of recommended SCC practices: assessment and recording of smoking status; and the provision of 9 types of SCC. The study also assessed how the decision to provide SCC is made and the AOD program service and AOD staff characteristics associated with the provision of SCC. Methods Between July¿October 2014, treatment staff from 31 Australian AOD services participated in an online cross-sectional survey. In addition, a site contact at each service was interviewed to gather service related data. Results Overall, 362 AOD program staff participated (response rate¿=¿57%) and 62% estimated that client smoking status was recorded for the ¿majority or all¿ of their clients. About a third (33%) reported that they ¿always¿ provide verbal advice to their clients to quit smoking, 18% ¿always¿ offered free or subsidized NRT and 16% ¿always¿ followed-up to check on client quit progress. Thirty percent reported that the decision to provide SCC was made on a client by client basis and 26% offered SCC only when the client requested assistance. Government-managed services, age and gender of AOD program staff were significantly associated with the provision of SCC. Conclusion Most AOD program staff report that smoking status is recorded for the majority of their clients however, the frequency with which SCC practices are delivered is low and the decision to provide care is arbitrary.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop
2017 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Williams CM, Gilligan C, Regan T, Daly J, et al., 'Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2017 (2017)

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objective... [more]

© 2017 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: The objectives of this review are to assess the following, across community, healthcare or other settings. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling delivered individually or to a group for increasing smoking cessation. The effectiveness of real-time video counselling on increasing the number of quit attempts. The effect of real-time video counselling on intervention adherence and duration of consultations. The effect of real-time video counselling on satisfaction, including ease of use. The effect of real-time video counselling on therapeutic alliance. To provide a brief economic commentary of real-time video counselling.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD012659
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Chris Paul
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan NK, Sutherland R, Yoong SL, Hodder RK, Wyse RJ, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677.pub2
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Christopher M Williams, Serene Yoong, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Hodder, Alice Grady, Alison A Fielding, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Nicole Nathan
2017 Tzelepis F, Hanna JH, Paul CL, Boyes AW, Carey ML, Regan T, 'Quality of patient-centred care: Medical oncology patients' perceptions and characteristics associated with quality of care', Psycho-Oncology, 26 1998-2001 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pon.4380
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey
2017 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, O'Brien KM, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub3
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Rebecca Hodder, Erica James, Serene Yoong, Kate Bartlem, Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rachel Sutherland
2017 Mogre V, Abanga ZO, Tzelepis F, Johnson NA, Paul C, 'Adherence to and factors associated with self-care behaviours in type 2 diabetes patients in Ghana', BMC ENDOCRINE DISORDERS, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12902-017-0169-3
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Natalie Johnson, Chris Paul
2017 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, et al., 'Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document', BMC Public Health, 17 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study aimed to examine within AOD services: staff awareness of their service's smoking policy compared to the written policy document and staff and service factors associated with accurate awareness of a total ban and perceived enforcement of a total ban. Methods: An audit of written tobacco smoking policy documents and an online cross-sectional survey of staff from 31 Australian AOD services. In addition, a contact at each service was interviewed to gather service-related data. Results: Overall, 506 staff participated in the survey (response rate: 57%). Nearly half (46%) perceived their service had a total ban with 54% indicating that this policy was always enforced. Over one-third (37%) reported a partial ban with 48% indicating that this policy was always enforced. The audit of written policies revealed that 19 (61%) services had total bans, 11 (36%) had partial bans and 1 (3%) did not have a written smoking policy. Agreement between staff policy awareness and their service's written policy was moderate (Kappa 0.48) for a total ban and fair (Kappa 0.38) for a partial ban. Age (1 year increase) of staff was associated with higher odds of correctly identifying a total ban at their service. Conclusions: Tobacco smoking within Australian AOD services is mostly regulated by a written policy document. Staff policy awareness was modest and perceived policy enforcement was poor.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3968-y
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, A Dunlop
2017 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Shaw J, Paul C, 'Adherence to self-care behaviours and associated barriers in type 2 diabetes patients of low-and middle-income countries: a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 6 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-017-0436-4
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Natalie Johnson
2017 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'A systematic review of eHealth behavioral interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity for young adults', Preventive Medicine, 99 197-206 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 A systematic review of randomized control trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth behavioral interventions aiming to improve smoking rates, nut... [more]

© 2017 A systematic review of randomized control trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth behavioral interventions aiming to improve smoking rates, nutrition behaviors, alcohol intake, physical activity levels and/or obesity (SNAPO) in young adults. Seven electronic databases were searched for RCTs published in English from 2000 to April 2015 and evaluating eHealth interventions aiming to change one or multiple SNAPO outcomes, and including young adult (18¿35¿years) participants. Of 2,159 articles identified, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most interventions targeted alcohol (n¿=¿26), followed by smoking (n¿=¿7), physical activity (n¿=¿4), obesity (n¿=¿4) and nutrition (n¿=¿1). Three interventions targeted multiple behaviors. The eHealth interventions were most often delivered via websites (79.5%). Most studies (n¿=¿32) compared eHealth interventions to a control group (e.g. waiting list control, minimal intervention), with the majority (n¿=¿23) showing a positive effect on a SNAPO outcome at follow-up. Meta-analysis demonstrated a significantly lower mean number of drinks consumed/week in brief web or computer-based interventions compared to controls (Mean Difference -¿2.43 [-¿3.54, -¿1.32], P¿<¿0.0001, n¿=¿10). Sixteen studies compared eHealth delivery modes, with inconsistent results across target behaviors and technology types. Nine studies compared eHealth to other modes of delivery (e.g. in person) with all finding no difference in SNAPO outcomes between groups at follow-up. This review provides some evidence for the efficacy of eHealth SNAPO interventions for young adults, particularly in the short-term and for alcohol interventions. But there is insufficient evidence for their efficacy in the longer-term, as well as which mode of delivery is most effective.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.009
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Lee Ashton, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers', SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PREVENTION AND POLICY, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0106-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Clinton-McHarg T, Yoong SL, Tzelepis F, Regan T, Fielding A, Skelton E, et al., 'Psychometric properties of implementation measures for public health and community settings and mapping of constructs against the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0512-5
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Eliza Skelton, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding
2016 Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need?', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 785-789 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates t... [more]

© 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs In Australia and New Zealand, population groups who experience social disadvantage smoke at much higher rates than the general population. As there are limited data specific to these groups regarding the success of nicotine replacement therapy for smoking cessation, this commentary will provide an overview of the relevant international literature supplemented with observational data relevant to the policy contexts in Australia and New Zealand. [Paul C, Wolfenden L, Tzelepis F, Yoong S, Bowman J, Wye P, Sherwood E, Rose S, Wiggers J. Nicotine replacement therapy as a smoking cessation aid among disadvantaged smokers: What answers do we need? Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:785¿789].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12362
Co-authors Chris Paul, Jenny Bowman, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Paul C, Tzelepis F, Bisquera A, Noble N, Wiggers J, 'Just how high-risk are ongoing smokers? Exploring clusters of health risk behaviours among current and ex-smokers.', Prev Med, 93 70-75 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.09.021
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Natasha Noble, John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2016 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse RJ, Kingsland M, et al., 'Strategies to improve the implementation of healthy eating, physical activity and obesity prevention policies, practices or programmes within childcare services', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011779.pub2
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 49
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers, Christopher M Williams
2016 Hall A, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bryant J, 'How can we help haematological cancer survivors cope with the changes they experience as a result of their cancer?', Ann Hematol, 95 2065-2076 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00277-016-2806-8
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
2016 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'An organisational change intervention for increasing the delivery of smoking cessation support in addiction treatment centres: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', TRIALS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1401-6
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Catherine Deste, A Dunlop
2016 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., ''The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 92-101 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from th... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs. Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from the perspective of staff and clients in addiction treatment settings.Design and Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between August and November 2013 using grounded theory methodology. Participants were recruited from four government-funded drug and alcohol services in a regional centre of New South Wales, Australia. Treatment centre staff (n=10) were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide and two focus groups (n=5 and n=6) were held with clients of the same treatment centres.Results: Both clients and staff wish to do more about tobacco use in addiction treatment services, but a number of barriers were identified. Staff barriers included lack of time, tobacco-permissive organisational culture, lack of enforcement of smoke-free policies, beliefs that tobacco is not a treatment priority for clients and that clients need to smoke as a coping strategy, and perceptions that treatment was either ineffective or not used by clients. Clients reported smoking as a habit and for enjoyment or stress relief, seeing staff smoking, nicotine replacement therapy unaffordability and perceptions that nicotine replacement therapy may be addictive, and inability to relate to telephone cessation counselling as barriers to quitting smoking.Discussion and Conclusions: Client and staff perceptions and attitudes about the treatment of tobacco, particularly those relating telephone support and nicotine replacement therapy, provided information, which will inform the design of smoking cessation programs for addiction treatment populations. [Wilson AJ, Bonevski B., Dunlop A., Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F., Walsberger S., Farrell M., Kelly PJ, Guillaumier A. 'The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12322
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Amanda Wilson
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'Development and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care measure with hematological cancer survivors', Cancer, 121 2383-2392 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Cancer Society. BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome mea... [more]

© 2015 American Cancer Society. BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended 6 objectives for achieving patient-centered care. However, most patient-reported outcome measures developed with cancer populations fail to address all 6 patient-centeredness dimensions. The Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure was developed on the basis of IOM recommendations, and the measure's validity, reliability, and floor and ceiling effects were examined. METHODS The development of the QPCCC measure included interviews with hematological cancer survivors and feedback from hematologists and cancer patients. To evaluate the measure's psychometric properties, hematological cancer survivors were identified via 2 cancer registries and were mailed the QPCCC measure. To examine test-retest reliability, a second QPCCC measure was mailed to survivors 7 to 14 days after they had returned the first measure. RESULTS Overall, 545 hematological cancer survivors completed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 10-factor structure with factor loadings>0.40. The subscales were labeled Treatment Delivery, Treatment Decision Making, Coordinated and Integrated Care, Emotional Support, Timely Care, Follow-Up Care, Respectful Communication, Patient Preferences and Values, Cancer Information, and Equitable Care. The QPCCC measure demonstrated acceptable internal consistency for all subscales (Cronbach's a=.73-.94). When test-retest reliability was assessed, 4 items demonstrated substantial agreement (¿>0.60), whereas 40 items showed moderate agreement (¿=0.41-0.60). Ceiling effects were present for 8 subscales. CONCLUSIONS The QPCCC measure has acceptable face and content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency. However, the measure's discriminant validity and test-retest reliability could be improved. The QPCCC measure could be used to improve patient-centered cancer care. Cancer 2015;121:2383-2392.

DOI 10.1002/cncr.29384
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2015 Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Stevenson W, Smits R, Henskens F, Wei A, et al., 'Protocol of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of a web-based information intervention with nurse-delivered telephone support for haematological cancer patients and their support persons', BMC Cancer, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatmen... [more]

© 2015 Bryant et al.; licensee BioMed Central. Background: High rates of anxiety, depression and unmet needs are evident amongst haematological cancer patients undergoing treatment and their Support Persons. Psychosocial distress may be minimised by ensuring that patients are sufficiently involved in decision making, provided with tailored information and adequate preparation for potentially threatening procedures. To date, there are no published studies evaluating interventions designed to reduce psychosocial distress and unmet needs specifically in patients with haematological cancers and their Support Persons. This study will examine whether access to a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support reduces depression, anxiety and unmet information needs for haematological cancer patients and their Support Persons. Methods/Design: A non-blinded, parallel-group, multi-centre randomised controlled trial will be conducted to compare the effectiveness of a web-based information tool and nurse-delivered telephone support with usual care. Participants will be recruited from the haematology inpatient wards of five hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's lymphoma, Lymphoblastic lymphoma (B or T cell), or Diffuse Large B-Cell lymphoma and their Support Persons will be eligible to participate. Patients and their Support Persons will be randomised as dyads. Participants allocated to the intervention will receive access to a tailored web-based tool that provides accurate, up-to-date and personalised information about: cancer and its causes; treatment options including treatment procedures information; complementary and alternative medicine; and available support. Patients and Support Persons will complete self-report measures of anxiety, depression and unmet needs at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-recruitment. Patient and Support Person outcomes will be assessed independently. Discussion: This study will assess whether providing information and support using web-based and telephone support address the major psychosocial challenges faced by haematological patients and their Support Persons. The approach, if found to be effective, has potential to improve psychosocial outcomes for haematological and other cancer patients, reduce the complexity and burden of meeting patients' psychosocial needs for health care providers with high potential for translation into clinical practice.

DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1314-x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Jamie Bryant, Frans Henskens, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Chris Paul
2015 Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'What do haematological cancer survivors want help with? A cross-sectional investigation of unmet supportive care needs', BMC research notes, 8 221 (2015) [C1]

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify the most prevalent unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors. METHODS: Haematological cancer survivors aged 18-80 years at time of re... [more]

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify the most prevalent unmet needs of haematological cancer survivors. METHODS: Haematological cancer survivors aged 18-80 years at time of recruitment were selected from four Australian state cancer registries. Survivors completed the Survivor Unmet Needs Survey. The most frequently reported "high/very high" unmet needs items were identified, as well as characteristics associated with the three most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs reported by haematological cancer survivors. RESULTS: A total of 715 eligible survivors returned a completed survey. "Dealing with feeling tired" (17%), was the most frequently endorsed "high/very high" unmet need. Seven out of the ten most frequently endorsed unmet needs related to emotional health. Higher levels of psychological distress (e.g., anxiety, depression and stress) and indicators of financial burden as a result of cancer (e.g., having used up savings and trouble meeting day-to-day expenses due to cancer) were consistently identified as characteristics associated with the three most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs. CONCLUSIONS: A minority of haematological cancer survivors endorsed a "high/very high" unmet need on individual items. Additional emotional support may be needed by a minority of survivors. Survivors reporting high levels of psychological distress or those who experience increased financial burden as a result of their cancer diagnosis may be at risk of experiencing the most prevalent "high/very high" unmet needs identified by this study.

DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1188-7
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Zucca AC, Fradgley EA, 'Measuring the quality of patient-centered care: Why patient-reported measures are critical to reliable assessment', Patient Preference and Adherence, 9 831-835 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimens... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Purpose: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient-centeredness as crucial to quality health care. The IOM endorsed six patient-centeredness dimensions that stipulated that care must be: respectful to patients¿ values, preferences, and expressed needs; coordinated and integrated; provide information, communication, and education; ensure physical comfort; provide emotional support; and involve family and friends. Patient-reported measures examine the patient¿s perspective and are essential to the accurate assessment of patient-centered care. This article¿s objectives are to: 1) use the six IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimensions as a framework to outline why patient-reported measures are crucial to the reliable measurement of patient-centered care; and 2) to identify existing patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centered care dimension. Methods: For each IOM-endorsed patient-centeredness dimension, the published literature was searched to highlight the essential role of patients in assessing patient-centered care and informing quality improvement efforts. Existing literature was also searched to identify examples of patient-reported measures that assess each patient-centeredness dimension. Conclusion: Patient-reported measures are arguably the best way to measure patient-centeredness. For instance, patients are best positioned to determine whether care aligns with patient values, preferences, and needs and the Measure of Patient Preferences is an example of a patient-reported measure that does so. Furthermore, only the patient knows whether they received the level of information desired, and if information was understood and can be recalled. Patient-reported measures that examine information provision include the Lung Information Needs Questionnaire and the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. In relation to physical comfort, only patients can report the severity of physical symptoms and whether medications provide adequate relief. Patient-reported measures that investigate physical comfort include the Pain Care Quality Survey and the Brief Pain Inventory. Using patient-reported measures to regularly measure patient-centered care is critical to identifying areas of health care where improvements are needed.

DOI 10.2147/PPA.S81975
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Alison Zucca, Elizabeth Fradgley
2015 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg T, 'The quality of patient-centred care: Haematological cancer survivors' perceptions', Psycho-Oncology, 24 796-803 (2015) [C1]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd. Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patien... [more]

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Objective Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care have failed to measure all six patient-centredness dimensions endorsed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). This study is the first to use the Quality of Patient-Centered Cancer Care (QPCCC) measure that covers all six IOM patient-centredness dimensions to examine haematological cancer survivors' perceptions of care and characteristics associated with perceived quality of care. Methods Haematological cancer survivors diagnosed in the last 6 years and aged 18-80 years were recruited from two Australian state population-based cancer registries. Survivors were mailed the 48-item QPCCC measure. Results Overall, 545 haematological cancer survivors completed the measure. Areas of care most commonly identified as delivered were hospital staff showing respect to survivors (93%) and making sure the correct treatment was received (93%). Aspects of care most frequently nominated as not delivered were hospital staff helping family and friends (34%) or the survivor (32%) to find other people with similar experiences to talk to. Characteristics associated with survivors perceiving higher quality care was delivered included being employed, having private health insurance, being younger, a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and more recent diagnosis. Being depressed or stressed was associated with perceived lower quality of care. Conclusions Provision of peer support programs that allow haematological cancer survivors and families and friends to talk to others in similar situations could be improved. Using PROMs to identify areas where cancer survivors perceive improvements are needed is essential to quality improvement efforts.

DOI 10.1002/pon.3728
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'Targeting multiple health risk behaviours among vocational education students using electronic feedback and online and telephone support: Protocol for a cluster randomised trial Health behavior, health promotion and society', BMC Public Health, 15 (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adul... [more]

© 2015 Tzelepis et al. Background: Technical and Further Education (TAFE) colleges are the primary provider of vocational education in Australia. Most TAFE students are young adults, a period when health risk behaviours become established. Furthermore, high rates of smoking, risky alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake and insufficient physical activity have been reported in TAFE students. There have been no intervention studies targeting multiple health risk behaviours simultaneously in this population. The proposed trial will examine the effectiveness of providing TAFE students with electronic feedback regarding health risk behaviours and referral to a suite of existing online and telephone services addressing smoking, risky alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity levels. Methods/Design: A two arm, parallel, cluster randomised trial will be conducted within TAFE campuses in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. TAFE classes will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control condition (50 classes per condition). To be eligible, students must be: enrolled in a course that runs for more than 6 months; aged 16 years or older; and not meet Australian health guideline recommendations for at least one of the following: smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and/or vegetable intake, or physical activity. Students attending intervention classes, will undertake via a computer tablet a risk assessment for health risk behaviours, and for behaviours not meeting Australian guidelines be provided with electronic feedback about these behaviours and referral to evidence-based online programs and telephone services. Students in control classes will not receive any intervention. Primary outcome measures that will be assessed via online surveys at baseline and 6 months post-recruitment are: 1) daily tobacco smoking; 2) standard drinks of alcohol consumed per week; 3) serves of fruit consumed daily; 4) serves of vegetables consumed daily; and 5) metabolic equivalent minutes of physical activity per week. Discussion: Proactive enrolment to existing online and telephone services has the potential to address modifiable determinants of disease. This trial will be the first to examine a potentially scalable intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviours among students in the vocational training setting.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1898-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Marita Lynagh, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, John Wiggers, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul, Patrick Mcelduff, Kypros Kypri, Clare Collins
2015 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Knight J, Duncan SL, McElduff P, Wiggers J, 'Improving the continuity of smoking cessation care delivered by quitline services', Patient Education and Counseling, 98 1643-1648 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objectives: This study identified smokers&apos; intended use of new quitline features aimed at improving smoking cessation such as having the same qui... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Objectives: This study identified smokers' intended use of new quitline features aimed at improving smoking cessation such as having the same quitline advisor for each call, longer-term telephone counselling and provision of additional cessation treatments. Methods: Smokers who had previously used quitline counselling completed a computer-assisted telephone interview examining intended use of potential quitline enhancements. Results: The majority of smokers (61.1%) thought their chances of quitting would have increased a lot/moderately if they had the same quitline advisor for each call. Most smokers reported likely use of longer-term quitline telephone support after a failed (58.3%) or successful (60%) quit attempt. Smokers were likely to use quitline support long-term (mean = 9.9 months). Most smokers would be likely to use free or subsidised nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) (74.9%) if offered by quitlines. Younger smokers had greater odds of being likely to use text messages, whereas less educated smokers had greater odds of being likely to use free or subsidised NRT. Conclusions: Smokers appear interested in quitlines offering longer-term telephone support, increased continuity of care and additional effective quitting strategies. Practice implications: Quitlines could adopt a stepped care model that involves increasingly intensive treatments and extended telephone counselling delivered by the same quitline advisor.

DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.07.004
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Smits R, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Henskens F, Paul C, Stevenson W, 'Tailored and integrated Web-based tools for improving psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients: the DoTTI development framework.', J Med Internet Res, 16 e76 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2849
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul, Frans Henskens
2014 Clinton-Mcharg T, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Williamson A, 'Anxiety and depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres: Prevalence and predictors', Journal of Affective Disorders, 165 176-181 (2014) [C1]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demo... [more]

Background This study aimed to: (1) estimate the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression among haematological cancer patients attending treatment centres; and (2) explore the demographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with anxiety and/or depression. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients from three haematology clinics in Australia. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of haematological cancer were approached by a research assistant while waiting for their appointment and invited to participate in the survey. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and self-reported demographic, disease and treatment characteristics. Results Questionnaires from 304 participants were returned. Twenty-seven percent of patients reported anxiety and 17% reported depression. Specifically, 15% reported anxiety without depression, 5% reported depression without anxiety, and 12% reported comorbid anxiety and depression. Participants who had to relocate to receive treatment had almost three times the odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression compared to those who did not have to move. Former smokers also had significantly higher odds of reporting anxiety and/or depression. Limitations The HADS is likely to have produced some false positives and false negatives when compared with gold standard structured clinical interviews for assessing psychological morbidity. Conclusions Approximately 20% of haematological cancer patients attending outpatient clinics may experience clinically significant levels of anxiety and/or depression. Providing additional tailored support to patients who have had to relocate for treatment, and to former smokers, may help to reduce anxiety and depression among these subgroups. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2014.04.072
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2014 Hall A, D Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Factors associated with haematological cancer survivors experiencing a high level of unmet need across multiple items of supportive care: a cross-sectional survey study', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 2899-2909 (2014) [C1]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to identify subgroups of haematological cancer survivors who report a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on ... [more]

© 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Purpose: This study aimed to identify subgroups of haematological cancer survivors who report a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on multiple (=7) items of supportive care.Results: Of the 696 survivors included in this study, 175 (n = 25¿%) reported a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on seven or more items of the SUNS. Survivors who: had relocated due to their cancer (OR: 2.04; 95¿% CI: 1.18, 3.52), had difficulty paying bills (OR: 2.42; 95¿% CI: 1.34, 4.38), had used up their savings as a result of cancer (OR: 1.90; 95¿% CI: 1.06, 3.40), and were classified as having above normal symptoms of depression (OR: 3.65; 95¿% CI: 2.17, 6.15) and stress (OR: 5.94; 95¿% CI: 3.22, 10.95) on the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) had statistically significantly higher odds of reporting seven or more ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs.Methods: Haematological cancer survivors, aged 18 to 80¿years at recruitment were selected from four Australian state-based cancer registries. Eligible survivors were sent a survey containing the Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with haematological cancer survivors reporting a ¿high/very high¿ level of unmet need on =7 items of the SUNS.Conclusions: Additional and intensive supportive care may be needed for this subgroup of haematological cancer survivors experiencing multiple ¿high/very high¿ unmet needs. Assistance with accessing relevant financial support and highly accessible services that provide emotional and information support, such as online and telephone peer support programs may prove beneficial in addressing the needs of this subgroup of haematological cancer survivors. It is suggested that future, methodologically rigorous intervention studies assess such strategies.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2264-6
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh
2014 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, 'The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for haematological cancer survivors: a cross-sectional study assessing the relevance and psychometric properties', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-211
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh
2014 Hall A, Sanson-Fisher R, Lynagh M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'A COMPARISON OF THE UNMET NEEDS OF YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULT HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 10 162-163 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Tzelepis F, Rose SK, Sanson-Fisher RW, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey ML, Paul CL, 'Are we missing the Institute of Medicine's mark? A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures assessing quality of patient-centred cancer care', BMC Cancer, 14 (2014) [C1]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must ... [more]

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has endorsed six dimensions of patient-centredness as crucial to providing quality healthcare. These dimensions outline that care must be: 1) respectful to patients' values, preferences, and expressed needs; 2) coordinated and integrated; 3) provide information, communication, and education; 4) ensure physical comfort; 5) provide emotional support-relieving fear and anxiety; and 6) involve family and friends. However, whether patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) comprehensively cover these dimensions remains unexplored. This systematic review examined whether PROMs designed to assess the quality of patient-centred cancer care addressed all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and the psychometric properties of these measures.Methods: Medline, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Embase, CINAHL and Scopus were searched to retrieve published studies describing the development and psychometric properties of PROMs assessing the quality of patient-centred cancer care. Two authors determined if eligible PROMs included the six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care and evaluated the adequacy of psychometric properties based on recommended criteria for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face/content validity, construct validity and cross-cultural adaptation.Results: Across all 21 PROMs, the most commonly included IOM dimension of patient-centred care was " information, communication and education" (19 measures). In contrast, only five measures assessed the " involvement of family and friends." Two measures included one IOM-endorsed patient-centred care dimension, two measures had two dimensions, seven measures had three dimensions, five measures had four dimensions, and four measures had five dimensions. One measure, the Indicators (Non-small Cell Lung Cancer), covered all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care, but had adequate face/content validity only. Eighteen measures met the recommended adequacy criteria for construct validity, 15 for face/content validity, seven for internal consistency, three for cross-cultural adaptation and no measure for test-retest reliability.Conclusions: There are no psychometrically rigorous PROMs developed with cancer patients that capture all six IOM dimensions of patient-centred care. Using more than one measure or expanding existing measures to cover all six patient-centred care dimensions could improve assessment and delivery of patient-centred care. Construction of new comprehensive measures with acceptable psychometric properties that can be used with the general cancer population may also be warranted. © 2014 Tzelepis et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-14-41
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Knight J, Wiggers J, 'Who enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of quitline support? Comparison of participants versus nonparticipants.', Nicotine Tob Res, 15 2107-2113 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntt114
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2013 Paul CL, McLennan J, Baxendale A, Schnelle B, Rawson J, Turon HE, Tzelepis F, 'Implementation of a personalized workplace smoking cessation programme.', Occup Med (Lond), 63 568-574 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/occmed/kqt121
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Chris Paul
2013 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers J, Duncan SL, Knight J, 'Predictors of abstinence among smokers recruited actively to quitline support', ADDICTION, 108 181-185 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.03998.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2012 Carey ML, Anderson AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Lynagh MC, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, 'How well are we meeting haematological cancer survivors' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making?', Patient Education and Counseling, 88 87-92 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2011.12.014
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2012 Paul CL, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Lynagh MC, Sanson-Fisher RW, Tzelepis F, 'On-line information and support for supporters and carers of haematological cancer patients: Is access an issue?', Supportive Care in Cancer, 20 2687-2695 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s00520-012-1388-9
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2012 Carey ML, Paul CL, Cameron EC, Lynagh MC, Hall AE, Tzelepis F, 'Financial and social impact of supporting a haematological cancer survivor', European Journal of Cancer Care, 21 169-176 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Marita Lynagh
2012 Walsh RA, Cholowski KM, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E, 'Smoking prevalence, attitudes, and confidence about tobacco roles among Australian nursing students', Journal of Addictions Nursing, 23 181-190 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2012 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Freund MA, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, 'Acceptability of proactive telephone recruitment to a telephone support service to encourage healthy eating, physical activity and weight loss', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 295-296 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden
2012 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Duncan SL, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, 'Increasing the reach of quitlines through active telephone recruitment: Do cold-called smokers differ from quitline callers?', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 14 1488-1493 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntr317
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2011 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, McElduff P, Knight JJ, 'Proactive telephone counseling for smoking cessation: Meta-analyses by recruitment channel and methodological quality', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 103 922-941 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/jnci/djr169
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul
2011 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers JH, Walsh RA, Knight JJ, Duncan SL, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of proactive telephone counselling on cold-called smokers' cessation rates', Tobacco Control, 20 40-46 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/tc.2010.035956
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 32
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2011 Walsh RA, Paul CL, Paras LE, Stacey FG, Tzelepis F, 'Workplace-related smoking in New South Wales: Extent of bans, public attitudes and relationships with relapse', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 22 85-90 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul
2009 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Lecathelinais LC, et al., 'Telephone recruitment into a randomized controlled trial of Quitline support', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37 324-329 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2009.05.022
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2009 Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E, 'Australian superannuation funds and tobacco investments: Issues for DAR readers', Drug and Alcohol Review, 28 445-446 (2009) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00095.x
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2009 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, Duncan SL, Knight JJ, 'Active telephone recruitment to quitline services: Are nonvolunteer smokers receptive to cessation support?', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 11 1205-1215 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntp125
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2008 Paul CL, Walsh RA, Stacey FG, Tzelepis F, Oakes W, Tang A, 'Smoking in movies in Australia: Who feels over-exposed and what level of regulation will the community accept?', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 19 229-231 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul
2008 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Parfitt N, Girgis A, 'How to improve adolescents' sun protection behavior? Age and gender issues', American Journal of Health Behavior, 32 387-398 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Chris Paul
2008 Walsh RA, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E, Tang A, 'Is government action out-of-step with public opinion on tobacco control? Results of a New South Wales population survey', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 32 482-488 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2008.00284.x
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski, Chris Paul
2008 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Walsh RA, Bonevski B, 'Is Australia headed for an epidemic of nicotine replacement therapy addicts?', Medical Journal of Australia, 189 346 (2008) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2008 Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E, 'Australian pension funds and tobacco investments: promoting ill health and out-of-step with their members', Health Promotion International, 23 35-41 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/heapro/dam043
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski
2007 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Walsh RA, Turner R, 'Pharmacists on the front line in providing support for nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion purchasers', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 429-433 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230701373966
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul
2007 Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, 'Adolescents and tobacco use: Systematic review of qualitative research methodologies and partial synthesis of findings', Substance Use and Misuse, 42 1269-1321 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/10826080701204904
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 11
2006 Walsh RA, Cholowski KM, Tzelepis F, 'Surveying university students: variability in ethics committee requirements (Letter)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 30 84-85 (2006) [C3]
2006 Walsh RA, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E, 'Quit smoking behaviours and intentions and hard-core smoking in New South Wales', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 17 54-60 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20
Co-authors Elizabeth Stojanovski, Chris Paul
2005 Paul CL, Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, 'A Monetary Incentive Increases Postal Survey Response Rates for Pharmacists', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 59 1099-1101 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/jech.2005.037143
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Chris Paul
2005 Walsh RA, Bowman JA, Tzelepis F, Lecathelinais LC, 'Smoking cessation interventions in Australian drug treatment agencies: a national survey of attitudes and practices', Drug and Alcohol Review, 24 235-244 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/09595230500170282
Citations Scopus - 64Web of Science - 61
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2005 Walsh RA, Bowman JA, Tzelepis F, Lecathelinais LC, 'Regulation of environmental tobacco smoke by Australian drug treatment agencies', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29 276-278 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00768.x
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
2004 Paul CL, Girgis A, Tzelepis F, Walsh RA, 'Solaria use by minors in Australia: Is there a cause for concern?', ANZ Journal of Public Health, 28 90 (2004) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul
2003 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Walsh RA, Girgis A, King L, McKenzie J, 'Has the investment in public cancer education delivered observable changes in knowledge over the past 10 years?', Cancer, 97 2931-2939 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/cncr.11393
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 34
Co-authors Chris Paul
2003 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Girgis A, Parfitt N, 'The Slip Slop Slap years: Have they had a lasting impact on todays' adolescents?', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 14 219-221 (2003) [C3]
Co-authors Chris Paul
2003 Cockburn JD, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, McElduff P, Byles JE, 'Delay in seeking advice for symptoms that potentially indicate bowel cancer', American Journal of Health Behavior, 27 401-407 (2003) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul, Julie Byles
2003 Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, 'Support for smoking restrictions in bars and gaming areas: review of Australian studies', Australia & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 27 310-322 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2003.tb00400.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2003 Tzelepis F, Walsh RA, Paul CL, 'Community attitudes towards environmental tobacco smoke in licensed premises: follow-up study after the Sharp case', Australia & New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 27 539-542 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2003.tb00830.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul
2003 Girgis A, Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, McElduff P, McKenzie J, 'Australians' use of fake tanning lotions: another piece of the puzzle', Promoting Health, 27 529-532 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2003.tb00828.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul
2002 Cockburn JD, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, McElduff P, Byles JE, 'Screening for bowel cancer among NSW adults with varying levels of risk: a community survey', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 26(3) 236-241 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Julie Byles, Chris Paul
2002 Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, Paul CL, McKenzie J, 'Environmental tobacco smoke in homes, motor vehicles and licensed premises: community attitudes and practices', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 26(6) 536-542 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Chris Paul
2000 Perkins JJ, Sanson-Fisher RW, Rainbird KJ, Tzelepis F, 'Unmet needs: The challenge of caring for people with advanced cancer', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, 9 S40-S40 (2000)
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher
2000 Walsh RA, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, 'Overwhelming support for smoking bans', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 24 640-641 (2000)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2000.tb00536.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Chris Paul
Show 86 more journal articles

Conference (46 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Atorkey P, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, Mitchell A, 'Do Technical and Further Education (TAFE) Students Intend to Change Their Health Risk Behaviours?', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2019 Atorkey P, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, Mitchell A, Byrnes E, 'Uptake of Proactively Offered Online and Telephone Interventions Targeting Health Risk Behaviours amongst Technical and Further Education (TAFE) Students', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2019)
Co-authors Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2018 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'A CLUSTER RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE FOR SMOKING CESSATION IN AUSTRALIAN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CENTRES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski
2018 Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, Paul C, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING BEHAVIOURS AND QUIT HISTORY OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF AUSTRALIAN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT CLIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul
2018 Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, Paul C, et al., 'PATTERNS AND PREDICTORS OF NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY USE AMONG ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG CLIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul, Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Catherine Deste
2018 Skelton E, Guillaumier A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, Paul C, et al., 'POLYDRUG USE IN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT SEEKERS WHO SMOKE TOBACCO: DRUG USE PROFILES, SMOKING BEHAVIOURS AND QUIT INTENTIONS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2018)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Chris Paul, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2018 Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, Byaruhanga J, Mitchell A, et al., 'The Long-Term Effectiveness of Real-Time Video Counseling for Smoking Cessation among Regional and Remote Residents', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2018 Byaruhanga J, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, Bowman J, et al., 'The Short-Term Effectiveness of Real-Time Video Counseling on Smoking Cessation Among Smokers Residing in Regional and Remote Areas', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul, Jenny Bowman
2018 Paul C, Tzelepis F, Boyes A, Girgis A, Deste C, Sherwood E, 'CONTINUED SMOKING AFTER A CANCER DIAGNOSIS: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF INTENTIONS AND ATTEMPTS TO QUIT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2018)
Co-authors Allison Boyes, Chris Paul
2018 Byaruhanga J, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, 'Online Versus Traditional Recruitment of Rural Smokers into a Cessation Trial', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2018 Byaruhanga J, Tzelepis F, Paul C, Wiggers J, Byrnes E, 'Connectivity of Real-Time Video Counseling Versus Telephone Counseling for Smoking Cessation', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2018)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT CLIENT PERCEPTIONS OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTE USE, SAFETY AND HARM REDUCTION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Catherine Deste, A Dunlop, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Chris Paul
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Guillaumier A, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Lambert S, 'SAME SAME BUT DIFFERENT: A COMPARISON OF HETEROSEXUAL AND LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL AND TRANSGENDER CLIENT PREFERENCES AND REPORTED RECEIPT OF SMOKING CARE IN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS TO INTEGRATING SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'INTEGRATING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE TREATMENT INTO ROUTINE SERVICE DELIVERY IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Sam Mccrabb, Billie Bonevski
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating tobacco dependence treatment into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Sam Mccrabb
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Guillaumier A, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Lambert S, 'Same same but different: A comparison of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender client preferences and reported receipt of smoking care in alcohol and other drug treatment', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to integrating smoking cessation care in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Sam Mccrabb, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2017 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Skelton E, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Alcohol and other drug treatment client perceptions of electronic cigarette use, safety and harm reduction', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors A Dunlop, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Catherine Deste, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Eliza Skelton
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, et al., 'ADDRESSING TOBACCO SMOKING IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTER WITH AN ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTION: AN ACCEPTABILITY STUDY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, 'THE POTENTIAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTIONS TO INCREASE THE DELIVERY OF SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN THE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG TREATMENT SETTING: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski
2016 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wiggers J, Kypri K, Bonevski B, McElduff P, et al., 'A PILOT CLUSTER RANDOMISED TRIAL OF ELECTRONIC FEEDBACK, ONLINE AND TELEPHONE SUPPORT ON MULTIPLE HEALTH BEHAVIOURS AMONG VOCATIONAL EDUCATION STUDENTS', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Marita Lynagh, Philip Morgan, Kypros Kypri, John Wiggers, Andrew Searles, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Luke Wolfenden, Clare Collins, Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'AN ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTION FOR SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE: AN ACCEPABILITY STUDY', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2016 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Woods W, Jauncey M, 'TOBACCO USE AND INTEREST IN SMOKING CESSATION AMONG PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE (MSIC)', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, Catherine Deste, A Dunlop, Eliza Skelton, Chris Paul
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul, Eliza Skelton, A Dunlop, Andrew Searles
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, 'STAFF AND MANAGER ATTITUDES, BARRIERS AND ORGANISATIONAL READINESS FOR DELIVERY OF SMOKING CESSATION CARE TO CLIENTS OF AUSTRALIAN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CENTRES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'TOBACCO SMOKING BEHAVIOURS, NICOTINE DEPENDENCE AND INTEREST IN QUITTING - A SURVEY OF SYDNEY MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE CLIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2015 Clinton-Mcharg TL, Wolfenden L, Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Kingsland M, Fielding A, Skelton E, 'Reliable and valid measures for evaluating public health research implementation', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Alison A Fielding, Eliza Skelton
2015 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, 'THE TOBACCO SMOKING PROFILE OF CLIENTS ATTENDING A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING CENTRE', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2015 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'eHealth behavioural interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity (SNAPO) in young adults: A systematic review', http://www.anzos2015.org/program-page/, Melbourne, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Lee Ashton
2014 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher RW, Hall AE, Carey ML, Paul CL, Clinton-McHarg T, 'DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION OF THE QUALITY OF PATIENT-CENTERED CANCER CARE MEASURE WITH HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Chris Paul, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Bonevski B, Wilson A, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION IN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTINGS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF STAFF AND CLIENT BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Amanda Wilson, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2014 Hall A, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, D'Este C, 'PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATES OF THE TOP HIGH/VERY HIGH UNMET NEEDS OF AUSTRALIAN HAEMATOLOGICAL CANCER SURVIVORS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, McLennan J, Hull P, Drinkwater R, et al., 'INCREASING IMPLEMENTATION OF EFFECTIVE SMOKING CESSATION STRATEGIES - THE QUITSTAIR', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Wolfenden L, Bonevski B, Wiggers J, 'PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT INTO EFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS TARGETING CANCER RISK BEHAVIOURS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden
2013 Tzelepis F, Sanson-Fisher R, Hall A, Carey M, Paul C, Clinton-McHarg T, 'Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care Measure', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Mariko Carey, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Chris Paul
2013 Hall A, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, Tzelepis F, D'Este C, 'Unmet Needs: What do Hematological Cancer Survivors Want Help With?', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Marita Lynagh, Catherine Deste
2013 Hall A, D'Este C, Tzelepis F, Lynagh M, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) for Hematological Cancer Survivors: A Psychometric Assessment', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Marita Lynagh, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2013 Tzelepis F, Rose S, Sanson-Fisher R, Clinton-McHarg T, Carey M, Paul C, 'A Systematic Review of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Assessing Quality of Patient-Centred Cancer Care', PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2012 Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Paul C, Tzelepis F, Bryant J, Salmon A, Hull P, 'PRESENTATION 2-ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE INTERVENTIONS TO ENHANCE SMOKING CESSATION TREATMENT PROVISION IN THE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTING', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Jamie Bryant
2012 Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Bryant JL, Salmon A, Hull P, 'Organisational change interventions to enhance smoking cessation treatment provision in the drug and alcohol treatment setting', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Jamie Bryant, Billie Bonevski
2010 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, McElduff P, Knight JJ, 'Cold calling smokers for proactive telephone counselling: what are their long-term cessation rates?', 12th Annual Meeting of the SRNT Europe Programme, Bath, UK (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul
2010 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, McElduff P, Knight JJ, 'Proactive telephone counselling for smoking cessation: meta-analyses of the impact of recruitment channel and methodological quality on efficacy', 12th Annual Meeting of the SRNT Europe Programme, Bath, UK (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul, Patrick Mcelduff
2007 Paul CL, Walsh RA, Paras L, Tzelepis F, 'NSW smokers' views on the new graphic pack warnings: the motivated and the disaffected (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
Co-authors Chris Paul
2007 Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Daly JB, et al., 'Telemarketing smoking cessation: a proactive approach to non-volunteer smokers (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
Show 43 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Yoong S, Tzelepis F, Wiggers J, Oldmeadow C, Kheng Chai L, Paul C, et al., 'Systematic Review: Prevalence of smoking-proxy electronic inhaling systems (SEIS) use and its association with tobacco initiation in youth', World Health Organisation, 41 (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Christopher Oldmeadow, Chris Paul, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 20
Total funding $4,366,337

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20183 grants / $638,290

Chronic disease prevention in priority populations via scalable health behaviour interventions$443,590

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Career Development Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700240
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Addressing the health risk behaviours of the education workforce: A program to enhance the wellbeing of primary school teachers$124,700

Funding body: Teachers Health Foundation

Funding body Teachers Health Foundation
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800853
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Enhancing Teacher's Health$70,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Nicole Nathan, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Serene Yoong, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Doctor Rebecca Hodder, Doctor Kathryn Reilly, Doctor Elaine Toomey
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800924
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20172 grants / $671,986

A cluster randomised trial of electronic feedback, online and telephone support on multiple health risk behaviours among Technical and Further Education (TAFE) students$651,986

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Kypros Kypri, Professor Philip Morgan, Associate Professor Marita Lynagh, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Kathryn Chapman
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600256
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Scholarship Top-Up - Judith Byaruhanga: Real-time video counselling for smoking cessation$20,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Local Health District

Funding body Hunter New England Local Health District
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Judith Byaruhanga
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700999
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

20161 grants / $592,843

A randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of real-time video counselling on smoking cessation in smokers residing in regional and remote areas$592,843

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Early Career Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1500775
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20143 grants / $190,000

Targeted evidence-based support for reducing unhealthy Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol and Physical Activity behaviours among students in vocational education: a cluster randomised controlled trial$150,000

Funding body: National Heart Foundation of Australia

Funding body National Heart Foundation of Australia
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300688
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

The Quit-STAIR: Is a stepped care model cost-effective for increasing smoking cessation success at a community level? $20,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Professor John Wiggers, Ms Jenny Knight, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301402
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Quality of cancer care from the patient perspective: An international comparison study$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Dr Megumi Uchida, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Alison Zucca, Dr ALIX Hall, Miss Lisa Mackenzie
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400058
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20135 grants / $1,285,746

Cost-effectiveness of a systems change intervention for smoking cessation in drug and alcohol treatment centres$1,103,648

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Anthony Shakeshaft, Professor Michael Farrell, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Dr Allison Salmon, Professor John Strang
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1200208
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Cost-effectiveness of a systems change intervention for smoking cessation in drug and alcohol treatment centres$76,098

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Professor Billie Bonevski, Associate Professor Anthony Shakeshaft, Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Peter Kelly
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300120
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

The Quit-STAIR: A randomised controlled trial of a proactive stepped approach for maximising uptake of evidence-based smoking cessation support$50,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300471
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

The Quit-STAIR: A randomised controlled trial of a proactive stepped approach for maximising uptake of evidence-based smoking cessation support$50,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Ms Jenny Knight
Scheme Near Miss
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300800
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

HMRI Leukaemia Travel Award 2012$6,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300506
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20124 grants / $703,303

Improving cancer treatment systems: An RCT of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$318,274

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100618
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Increasing rates of organ donor registration: An RCT to determine the differential effectiveness of electronic and interpersonal information interventions.$237,682

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Doctor Conor Gilligan, Doctor Heidi Turon, Doctor Tara Clinton-McHarg, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100421
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving cancer treatment systems: evaluation of a consumer action model for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy$133,140

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Ms A Tang, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Ms Kathryn Chapman, Ms Paula Vallentine, Conjoint Professor Christopher Doran, Doctor Patrick McElduff
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1100721
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Improving cancer care for lymphoma: patients' perceptions of optimal care$14,207

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Tara Clinton-McHarg, Ms Alison Zucca
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200212
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20112 grants / $284,169

Quality of care in blood cancer: Patients perceptions$198,836

Funding body: Leukaemia Foundation

Funding body Leukaemia Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher
Scheme National Research Program (Postdoctoral Fellowship)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100276
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Quality of care in blood cancer: Patients' perception about the quality of care they receive$85,333

Funding body: Cure Cancer Australia Foundation

Funding body Cure Cancer Australia Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher
Scheme Postdoctoral Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000760
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Multiple Health Risk Behaviours Among Vocational Education Students PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Development and Validation of a Measure to Assess Dependence on Khaini Use PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Real-Time Video Counselling for Smoking Cessation PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Smoking Cessation Care for Australian Cancer Patients: Exploring Current Practices and Potential for Improvement PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Self-Care Behaviours in Ghanaian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Adherence and Barriers PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD An Investigation of an Organisational Change Approach for Smoking Cessation in the Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Setting PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Unmet Needs of Survivors of a Haematological Malignancy: Prevalence, Predictors, and Psychometrics PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

UON researchers shine in 2017 NHMRC funding

October 11, 2017

University of Newcastle researchers have secured more than $6 million in the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding

Quit smoking study recruiting participants in regional and remote areas

May 23, 2017

A new quit smoking study is recruiting participants in regional and remote areas of New South Wales, Australia

2017 NHMRC Project Grants funding success

December 5, 2016

UON researchers have been awarded funding for an array of projects including stroke, asthma, mental health and cancer treatment.

Hunter cancer research projects gain $1.65m funding boost

June 9, 2016

UON researchers have received almost $1.65 million to support four ground-breaking cancer projects, as part of a $39 million funding package

Associate Professor Flora Tzelepis

Position

NHMRC Career Development Fellow
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email flora.tzelepis@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4924 6275

Office

Room 1182
Building Booth Building
Location Wallsend Campus

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