Dr Lee Ashton

Dr Lee Ashton

Project Manager

School of Health Sciences

One size doesn’t fit all when it comes to men’s health

Dr Lee Ashton always knew he wanted to make a difference through nutrition and health research, and couldn’t be more delighted that it’s led him to Newcastle.

Hailing from Manchester in the UK, Lee’s passion for sport naturally directed him towards a career in the field of health. However, it was while studying his undergraduate degree in Sport and Exercise Science that the nutrition subjects captured, and held, his interest. A Masters in Nutrition at Leeds University quickly followed, but Lee’s journey to UON to undertake his PhD was inspired by a connection with a UON leader in the field.

“I’d met Professor Clare Collins at a conference and we’d stayed in touch afterwards,” Lee explains. “She was telling me about all the people who work in the PRC for Physical Activity and Nutrition and I realised that all the papers I were currently reading were written by people at UON. I couldn’t believe that all the people I’d been reading in my literature review were in the one place, so I did everything I could to come here.”

Talking about men’s health

Lee came to UON to undertake his PhD, where he developed and tested a participatory-based healthy lifestyle intervention for men aged 18 – 25 years. The HEYMAN program was devised after input and consultation with more than 340 young men. “We’d seen that young men in particular were neglected in health research,” Lee said. “I’d spoken to some young guys who’d gone along to weight-loss groups but didn’t feel engaged or that it appealed to them.”

Because there are so many pressing health issues across this age group, Lee knew that targeting young men’s health was a priority. “During this time of life there are a lot of transitional changes taking place: moving out of home, finding new groups of friends, settling down and starting a family – and all of these changes are key determinants of health,” Lee says. “There’s a lot of research that shows that behaviours that you create as a young adult are likely to continue through life, so if we’re able to target this group, improve their key health behaviours we can set them on a positive health trajectory for their rest of their life.”

A one-size-fits-all approach to weight loss and wellbeing is unlikely to work for young men. “A review of 244 weight loss programs found that only around 23 per cent of program participants were men, and a lot of them would drop out,” Lee affirms. “So by sitting down with young men in focus groups to find out what they wanted, we could work out what were the motivators and the barriers and address these in the program.”

Like young women, young men were focussed on body image, but with an emphasis on strength and muscle-tone, so as one of the suite of tools on offer the HEYMAN program used High Intensity Interval training (HIIT) to deliver a 10 – 15 minute sessions that offers strength and fitness training anywhere at any time. This also solved another key barrier to fitness: a lack of time to exercise.

Accentuate the positive

Focussing on health benefits, rather than negative aspects was a key issue with the young men, “They didn’t want a facilitator who was constantly talking about the negative aspects of weight and health,” Lee says. “They’d rather relate to the positive aspects.”

The same positive messages applied with alcohol consumption. “None of the participants wanted to be told ‘you have to give up alcohol’ so we tried a health-by-stealth approach which has been successfully used in the SHED-IT program by Dr Myles Young and Professor Philip Morgan, which is more about raising awareness and offering options for specific scenarios. It has to be relevant to their lives or they’re not going to do it.”

The fact that the participants played such a strong role in informing the development and implementation of the program is something that Lee attributes to its success. “There were positive outcomes in a range of areas such as activity and diet – and particularly in relation to junk food,” Lee says. “With many of the men, almost 40 per cent of their diet when starting the program was junk food. But in just three months, they reduced that intake by up to eight per cent. There were also reported improvements in mental health.”

A tight team

The team at UON’s PRC for Physical and Activity and Nutrition offer an enormous scope for collaboration, and Lee was very fortunate to be paired with some of the best for his PhD. “I worked with Professor Clare Collins who’s a nutrition/dietitian expert, Dr Megan Rollo who’s also a nutrition/dietitian researcher but is also an e-health expert, and then Dr Melinda Hutchesson whose focus is on young adults, and Professor Phil Morgan who has expertise in mens’ health and physical activity,” Lee says. “They all had expertise related to my PhD and I was so lucky to have these people to bounce ideas off and to have them help deliver and design the program.”

Lee is motivated by making a difference, and is buoyed by staying in touch with some of his pilot participants. “There were so many late nights and long hours when I was completing my PhD, but, at the end, when you see the guys and see the changes they’ve made, it makes it so worthwhile. You can see the changes in them and it’s great to see them continuing on with the health and fitness changes they’ve made.”

“Cost is a massive barrier to exercise, so we try to make them aware of activities that are available for little-to-no money. You can do high intensity training just using your own body weight, we used an app called Freeletics that the guys can continue to use after our program finishes,” Lee says. “We’re so lucky in Australia as we have free ocean baths for swimming, open parklands to exercise in, and in Newcastle we now have parkruns – a free 5km run for people of all fitness levels,” Lee says.

“One of our HEYMAN sessions involved participation in a local parkrun session and I recently bumped into a guy who told me he’s bought his own fitness tracker and is still doing the parkrun here at Uni every week.”

This pilot program is now informing a larger study that the team are looking to roll out across the country. “We’re now looking at cost-effective approaches such as using e-health to deliver the messages – particularly in rural and remote areas.”

Focussing on translation of research, Lee’s ultimate aim is to see this kind of program rolled out to as many young men as possible, across Australia and in rural areas. “We’re lucky at UON in that we have the Department of Rural Health that enables collaboration on projects across Callahan and Tamworth,” says Lee.

The team in the PRC for PAN is a continual motivation for Lee. “I’ve never worked anywhere like this, everyone always comes together and springs ideas off each other – even though we all come from different areas. When we go to conferences people are envious of what we have. I feel really lucky to have been given this opportunity to come here and to continue to work here after my PhD.”

Taking the local and making it global is the ultimate goal: “When I see the work that Phil’s done with Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids being rolled out in the US and the UK that’s something that I aspire to.”

Giving men the tools they need to live a healthier life isn’t a short-term fix, but Lee firmly believes that educating men about the small changes they can make will help them with their health and wellbeing for the rest of their lives.

One size doesn’t fit all when it comes to men’s health

Dr Lee Ashton always knew he wanted to make a difference through nutrition and health research, and couldn’t be more delighted that it’s led him to Newcastle.

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr. Ashton is a post-doctoral researcher at the Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition and the School of Health Sciences. He was awarded his PhD from the University of Newcastle in March 2017. He also completed a Master of Science in Nutrition, Obesity & Health at the University of Leeds (UK) in 2011 and a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Science at Leeds Beckett University (UK) in 2010.

Dr. Ashton's research focuses on the development and evaluation of user-driven, gender-tailored healthy lifestyle programs using innovative technologies to improve physical activity, eating habits and well-being in young adult men. Dr Ashton is creating a research profile in chronic disease prevention, masculinities and men’s health (particularly young men), eHealth, participatory research and health behaviour change interventions.

Research Expertise

  • Developing and testing participatory based healthy lifestyle interventions for young men (aged 18-25).
  • Conducting randomised controlled trials of public health interventions.
  • Designing and testing eHealth interventions in young adults
  • Examining the utility of Behaviour Change Techniques to explain and predict behaviours and other health outcomes.
  • Conducting systematic reviews of the effectiveness of health behaviour change interventions in young men
  • Undertaking Qualitative (i.e.,focus groups) and quantitative research (i.e., surveys) to inform intervention design.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Leeds - UK
  • Master of Science, University of Leeds - UK

Keywords

  • Men's Health
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity Prevention
  • Participatory research
  • Physical activity
  • Systematic review

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2015 - 30/06/2016 Project Sub-committee Member Young and Well Co-operative Research Centre
Australia
1/09/2014 - 30/06/2016 Volunteer - Youth Brains Trust Member Young and Well Co-operative Research Centre
Australia
28/01/2013 - 14/10/2016 Casual Research Assistant PRC in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
Australia
2/05/2011 - 21/12/2012 Research Assistant Clinical Trial Research Unit - University of Leeds
United Kingdom

Awards

Award

Year Award
2017 International Award for Best Student Oral Presentation
International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity
2015 Student Travel Grant
Nutrition Society Australia
2015 Best RHD publication (Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition)
The University of Newcastle
2014 Runner-up in the University of Newcastle 3-Minute Thesis competition ($1000 prize) [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mO9z8x6mRI]
The University of Newcastle
2014 Best RhD Confirmation (School of Health Sciences)
The University of Newcastle
2011 National Alpro Foundation Award for best MSc Thesis in the UK
Alpro Foundation

Scholarship

Year Award
2014 Greaves Family Postgraduate Scholarship in Medical Research
Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program
2013 Felicity Thompson Rainbow Foundation top-up scholarship
Hunter Medical Research Institute
2013 University of Newcastle International Postgraduate Research Scholarship
The University of Newcastle
2013 University of Newcastle Research Scholarship Central
University of Newcastle

Invitations

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2017 Pint of Science - 'Fake News in Diet and Health'
2017 'Weight loss strategies in young men'
Presented as part of the Nutrition and Dietetics Research day at the University of Newcastle, Department of Rural Health, Tamworth
2016 A brief guide to conducting Scoping Reviews

Invited by: The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences

http://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/governance-and-leadership/faculties-and-schools/faculty-of-health-and-medicine/resources/for-students

2015 Can young men change their lifestyle? A novel way to improve health
Invited to present at the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, Centre for Men’s Health, Leeds Beckett University, UK. June 2nd 2015. 
2015 Development of a gender-tailored healthy lifestyle program specifically for young adult men (aged 18-25 years)
Invited to present at MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Science Unit, University of Glasgow, UK 9th June, 2015

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
HUBS2503 Clinical Exercise Physiology
The University of Newcastle - School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy
Tutor 28/02/2017 - 24/05/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Ashton LM, Pezdirc KB, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Is skin coloration measured by reflectance spectroscopy related to intake of nutrient-dense foods? A cross-sectional evaluation in Australian young adults', Nutrients, 10 (2018)

© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The current study examines associations between the dietary intakes of nutrient-dense foods, measured using brief indice... [more]

© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. The current study examines associations between the dietary intakes of nutrient-dense foods, measured using brief indices and skin coloration, measured using reflectance spectroscopy in young adults. This is a cross-sectional analysis of 148 young Australian males and females (55% female) aged 18 to 25 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, with responses used to calculate two dietary indices: (i) the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS); and (ii) the Fruit And Vegetable VAriety Score (FAVVA). Skin yellowness was measured at three body locations using reflectance spectroscopy. Associations were assessed using Spearman¿s correlation coefficients, regression analysis, and agreement using weighted kappa (K w ). Significant, moderate correlations were found between skin yellowness and diet index scores for the ARFS (¿ = 0.30, p < 0.001) and FAVVA score (¿ = 0.39, p < 0.001). These remained significant after adjustment for confounders (total fat intake, sex, skin lightness) and for agreement based on categorical rankings. Results suggest that measurement of skin coloration by reflectance spectroscopy can be used as an indicator of overall dietary quality and variety in young adults. Further exploration in diverse populations is required.

DOI 10.3390/nu10010011
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kristine Pezdirc, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson
2018 Whatnall MC, Patterson AJ, Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, 'Effectiveness of brief nutrition interventions on dietary behaviours in adults: A systematic review', APPETITE, 120 335-347 (2018)
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2017.09.017
Co-authors Amanda Patterson, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Young Men¿s Preferences for Design and Delivery of Physical Activity and Nutrition Interventions: A Mixed-Methods Study', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 1588-1599 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Young adult men are under-represented in health research, and little is known about how to reach and engage them in lifestyle interventions. This m... [more]

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Young adult men are under-represented in health research, and little is known about how to reach and engage them in lifestyle interventions. This mixed-methods study aimed to explore young males¿ preferences for recruitment strategies, content, format (delivery mode and program duration and frequency), and facilitator characteristics for future physical activity and nutrition interventions. Ten focus groups involving 61 men (aged 18¿25 years) in the Hunter region, New South Wales, Australia and an online survey distributed within Australia were completed by 282 males (aged 18¿25 years). Key focus group themes included a preference for recruitment via multiple sources, ensuring images and recruiters were relatable; intervention facilitators to be engaging and refrain from discussing negative consequences of being unhealthy. Key program content preferences included skill development and individualized goals and feedback. Focus groups and the survey confirmed a preference for multiple delivery modes, including; face-to-face (group and individual), with support using eHealth technologies. Survey results confirmed the most favored program content as: ¿healthy eating on a budget,¿ ¿quick and easy meals,¿ and ¿resistance training.¿ Focus group responses suggested a program duration of =6 months, with 2¿3 combined face-to-face and supportive eHealth sessions per week. Survey intervention duration preference was 3 months with 4 face-to-face sessions per month. Findings can guide the design, conduct, and evaluation of relevant contemporary physical activity and or nutrition interventions for young men. There is a need to identify the most effective ways to address young men¿s individual preferences in intervention research.

DOI 10.1177/1557988317714141
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Collins CE, 'Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the 'HEYMAN' healthy lifestyle program for young men: a pilot randomised controlled trial', Nutrition Journal, 16 1-17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0227-8
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2017 Ashton L, Williams R, Wood L, Schumacher T, Burrows T, Rollo M, et al., 'Comparison of Australian recommended food score (ARFS) and plasma carotenoid concentrations: A validation study in adults', Nutrients, 9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu9080888
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Clare Collins, Kristine Pezdirc, Lisa Wood, Megan Rollo, Tracy Schumacher, Tracy Burrows, Robin Callister
2017 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'Motivators and Barriers to Engaging in Healthy Eating and Physical Activity: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Young Adult Men', American Journal of Men's Health, 11 330-343 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a ... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Many Australian young men (18-25 years) fail to meet recommendations in national dietary or physical activity (PA) guidelines. However, there is a lack of understanding of their perspectives on PA and diet to inform intervention design. This study examined young men¿s motivators and barriers to healthy eating and PA, along with differences by demographic and behavioral factors. A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 282 men aged 18 to 25 years in Australia. Results identified the most common motivators for healthy eating included improving health (63.5%), body image (52.3%), and increasing energy (32.1%). Motivators for PA included improving body image (44.6%), fitness (44.2%), and health (41.0%). Common barriers to healthy eating were access to unhealthy foods (61.1%), time to cook/prepare healthy foods (55.0%), and motivation to cook healthy foods (50.7%). Barriers for PA included motivation (66.3%), time (57.8%), and cost of equipment/facilities (33.3%). Significant differences (p < .01) in motivators to healthy eating and/or PA were identified for BMI category, marital status, PA level, alcohol intake, and stress levels. Significant differences were identified for barriers to healthy eating and/or PA by BMI, PA level, stress, and fruit and vegetable intake, assessed using Pearson¿s chi-square test. Findings suggest that promotion of benefits related to health, appearance/body image, increased energy and fitness, and addressing key barriers including motivation, time, financial restraints, and accessibility of unhealthy foods, could engage young men in improving lifestyle behaviors. Differences by demographic and behavioral factors suggest development of tailored programs to address diversity among young men may be required.

DOI 10.1177/1557988316680936
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Philip Morgan
2017 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'A systematic review of eHealth behavioral interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity for young adults', Preventive Medicine, 99 197-206 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 A systematic review of randomized control trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth behavioral interventions aiming to improve smoking rates, nu... [more]

© 2017 A systematic review of randomized control trials (RCT) was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of eHealth behavioral interventions aiming to improve smoking rates, nutrition behaviors, alcohol intake, physical activity levels and/or obesity (SNAPO) in young adults. Seven electronic databases were searched for RCTs published in English from 2000 to April 2015 and evaluating eHealth interventions aiming to change one or multiple SNAPO outcomes, and including young adult (18¿35¿years) participants. Of 2,159 articles identified, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most interventions targeted alcohol (n¿=¿26), followed by smoking (n¿=¿7), physical activity (n¿=¿4), obesity (n¿=¿4) and nutrition (n¿=¿1). Three interventions targeted multiple behaviors. The eHealth interventions were most often delivered via websites (79.5%). Most studies (n¿=¿32) compared eHealth interventions to a control group (e.g. waiting list control, minimal intervention), with the majority (n¿=¿23) showing a positive effect on a SNAPO outcome at follow-up. Meta-analysis demonstrated a significantly lower mean number of drinks consumed/week in brief web or computer-based interventions compared to controls (Mean Difference -¿2.43 [-¿3.54, -¿1.32], P¿ < ¿0.0001, n¿=¿10). Sixteen studies compared eHealth delivery modes, with inconsistent results across target behaviors and technology types. Nine studies compared eHealth to other modes of delivery (e.g. in person) with all finding no difference in SNAPO outcomes between groups at follow-up. This review provides some evidence for the efficacy of eHealth SNAPO interventions for young adults, particularly in the short-term and for alcohol interventions. But there is insufficient evidence for their efficacy in the longer-term, as well as which mode of delivery is most effective.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.009
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Ashton LM, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Young MD, Collins CE, 'A systematic review of SNAPO (Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity) randomized controlled trials in young adult men', Preventive Medicine, 81 221-231 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. Th... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of Smoking, Nutrition, Alcohol, Physical activity and Obesity (SNAPO) interventions in young men exclusively. The secondary aim was to evaluate the recruitment, retention and engagement strategies. Methods: A search with no date restrictions was conducted across seven databases. Randomized controlled trials recruiting young men only (aged 18-35. years) into interventions targeting any SNAPO risk factors were included. Results: Ten studies were included (two nutrition, six alcohol use, two targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors). Six studies (two nutrition, three alcohol use and one targeting multiple SNAPO risk factors) demonstrated significant positive short-term intervention effects, but impact was either not assessed beyond the intervention (n = 3), had short-term follow-up (= 6 months) (n = 2) or not sustained beyond six months (n = 1). Overall, a high risk of bias was identified across studies. Only one study undertook a power calculation and recruited the required sample size. Adequate retention was achieved in three studies. Effectiveness of engagement strategies was not reported in any studies. Conclusions: Despite preliminary evidence of short-term effectiveness of SNAPO interventions in young men, few studies characterized by a high risk of bias were identified. High quality SNAPO interventions for young men are warranted.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.09.005
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan, Myles Young
2015 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Thompson DI, Collins CE, 'Young adult males' motivators and perceived barriers towards eating healthily and being active: A qualitative study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 12 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0257-6
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Clare Collins, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Brown J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Nixon J, 'Systematic review to identify and appraise outcome measures used to evaluate childhood obesity treatment interventions (CoOR): evidence of purpose, application, validity, reliability and sensitivity.', Health Technol Assess, 18 1-380 (2014)
DOI 10.3310/hta18510
Citations Scopus - 7
2014 Ashton LM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo ME, Morgan PJ, Collins CE, 'A scoping review of risk behaviour interventions in young men.', BMC public health, 14 957 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-957
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Nixon J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Brown J, 'Framework of outcome measures recommended for use in the evaluation of childhood obesity treatment interventions: the CoOR framework', PEDIATRIC OBESITY, 9 e116-e131 (2014)
DOI 10.1111/j.2047-6310.2014.220.x
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 7
2014 Bryant M, Ashton L, Nixon J, Jebb S, Wright J, Roberts K, Brown J, 'The use and reporting of primary and secondary outcome measures in trials evaluating childhood obesity treatment interventions', BMC Obesity, 1 (2014)
DOI 10.1186/s40608-014-0025-1
Show 10 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Thompson D, Collins CE, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men', Edinburgh, UK (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2015 Oosterveen E, Tzelepis F, Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, 'eHealth behavioural interventions targeting smoking, nutrition, alcohol, physical activity and/or obesity (SNAPO) in young adults: A systematic review', http://www.anzos2015.org/program-page/, Melbourne, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Flora Tzelepis
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Motivators and barriers to engaging in healthy eating and physical activity in young adult men: a cross-sectional study.', Melbourne, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo
2015 Ashton L, Hutchesson M, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins C, 'Young men's motivators and barriers to healthy eating and their preferences for a healthy eating intervention', Wellington, New Zealand (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Philip Morgan
2014 Ashton L, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Morgan P, Collins CE, 'Have young men been targeted to change risk behaviours? A scoping review of the literature.', Obesity Reviews, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2014)
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan, Clare Collins
2013 Ashton L, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Young MD, Morgan P, Callister R, et al., 'A comparison of outcomes of young and old adult males in the SHED-IT weight loss program for men', Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, Melbourne (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Myles Young, Megan Rollo, Robin Callister, Clare Collins, Ron Plotnikoff, Melinda Hutchesson, Philip Morgan
Show 3 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $73,512

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Hunter Medical Research Institute Project grant for Male depression $25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Prof Clare Collins, Dr Frances Kay-Lambkin, Dr Melinda Hutchesson, Prof Philip Morgan, Dr Megan Rollo, Prof Robin Callister, Dr Geoffrey Skinner, Dr Shamus Smith, Dr Lee Ashton

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Hunter Medical Research Institute Greaves Family Postgraduate Scholarship in Medical Research 2014-15$35,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Lee Ashton

Scheme Greaves family postgraduate scholarship in medical research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20174 grants / $13,512

School of Health Sciences 2017 Strategic Pilot Grant$4,095

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences

Funding body The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Project Team

Dr Lee Ashton, Dr Rebecca Williams, Dr Kristine Pezdirc, Dr Melinda Hutchesson, Prof Clare Collins

Scheme Strategic Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

School of Health Sciences 2017 Strategic Pilot Grant$4,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences

Funding body The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Project Team

Dr Kristine Pezdirc, Dr Lee Ashton, Dr Melinda Hutchesson, Prof Clare Collins

Scheme Strategic Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

School of Health Sciences 2017 Strategic Pilot Grant$3,917

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences

Funding body The University of Newcastle - The School of Health Sciences
Project Team

Dr Rebecca Williams, Dr Lee Ashton, Dr Megan Rollo, Prof Clare Collins

Scheme Strategic Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Faculty of Health and Medicine Strategic ECR Pilot Grant $1,500

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team

Dr Rebecca Williams, Dr Lee Ashton, Prof Jennifer Martin

Scheme Strategic ECR Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $25,000

Hunter Medical Research Institute Project grant for Male depression $25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Prof Clare Collins, Dr Frances Kay-Lambkin, Dr Melinda Hutchesson, Prof Philip Morgan, Dr Megan Rollo, Prof Robin Callister, Dr Geoffrey Skinner, Dr Shamus Smith, Dr Lee Ashton

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

20141 grants / $35,000

Hunter Medical Research Institute Greaves Family Postgraduate Scholarship in Medical Research 2014-15$35,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Lee Ashton

Scheme Greaves family postgraduate scholarship in medical research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Exploring Gender Differences in Young Adult's Response to Technology Delivered Nutrition Interventions PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 11
United Kingdom 2
Netherlands 1
United States 1
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News

Professor Clare Collins and Amy Tribe

Linking young adults to healthy eating habits

February 7, 2018

The University of Newcastle has received funding from nib foundation to develop an innovative web platform that will deliver personalised nutrition advice.
HEYMAN

HEYMAN, it’s a tailored lifestyle study for young men

March 17, 2016

They asked for it, they informed the program design, and a group of men aged 18-25 are about to receive a University of Newcastle (UON) intervention firmly

Dr Lee Ashton

Position

Project Manager
PRC Physical Activity and Nutrition
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email lee.ashton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4913 8034
Link Twitter

Office

Room ATC205
Building ATC Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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