Dr Kerith Duncanson

Dr Kerith Duncanson

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Faculty of Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Refereed Journal Articles  

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First author (10)

Duncanson, K., Shrewsbury, VA., Collins, CE. and The DiET-CO Consortium. Interim Report on the Effectiveness of Dietary Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Overweight and Obesity for the World Health Organization. December 2017. ISBN 978-0-7259-0013-7  http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1354472

Duncanson, K., Webster, E.L. and Schmidt, D.D., 2018. Impact of a remotely delivered, writing for publication program on publication outcomes of novice researchers. Rural & Remote Health18(2).

Duncanson, K., Talley, NJ., Walker, MM. and Burrows, T. Food and functional dyspepsia: a systematic review. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 15 September 2017 DOI:10.1111/jhn.12506

Duncanson, K., Lee, YQ., Burrows, T., Collins, C. Utility of a brief index to measure diet quality of Australian preschoolers in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial. Nutrition & Dietetics. 2016. 1 Aug 2016

Duncanson, K., Burrows, T., Walker, M.M. and Talley, N.J., 2017. Sa1606-Food and Functional Dyspepsia: A Systematic Review. Gastroenterology. 152(5). p.S303.

Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE Child Feeding and Parenting Style Outcomes and Composite Score Measurement in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial. Children. 3:28 epub 10 Nov 2016 doi:10.3390/children3040028

Duncanson KR, Lee Yu Qi, Burrows TL, Collins CE. Utility of a brief index to measure diet quality of Australian preschoolers in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial Nutrition & Dietetics. Early View August 2016 doi:10.1111/1747-0080.12295

Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE. Peer education is a feasible method of disseminating information related to child nutrition and feeding between new mothers. BMC Public Health. 2014,  Dec12, 14:1262 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1262

Duncanson, K., Burrows, T., Holman, B., & Collins, CE. Parents’ perceptions of child feeding: A qualitative study based on the theory of planned behaviour. Journal of Developmental And Behavioral Pediatrics, 2013; 34(4), 227-236. Doi:10.1097/DBP.0b013e31828b2ccf 

Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE. Effect of a low-intensity parent-focused nutrition intervention on dietary intake of 2- to 5-year olds. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2013 Dec; 57(6):728-34. Doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000068

Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE. Study protocol of a parent-focused child feeding and dietary intake intervention: The Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial. BMC Public Health 2012, 12:564. DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-564

CONTRIBUTING AUTHOR  (13)

Schmidt, D., Duncanson, K., Webster. E. Building research experience: impact of a novice researcher development program for rural health workers. Australian Journal of Rural Health Published online.

Burrows, T., Collins, C., Adam, M., Duncanson, K., Rollo, M. Dietary Assessment of Shared Plate Eating: A Missing Link. Nutrients 2019; Published online: 5 April 2019

Taylor, R.M.,  Haslam, R.L., Burrows, T.L., Duncanson, K.R., Ashton, L.M., Rollo, M.E., Shrewsbury, V.A.,  Schumacher, T.L., Collins. C.E. Issues in Measuring and Interpreting Diet and Its Contribution to Obesity Current Obesity Reports. Available online March 15, 2019. Doi: 10.1007/s13679-019-00336-2

Shrewsbury, V.A., Burrows, T., Ho, M., Jensen, M., Garnett, S.P., Stewart, L., Gow, M.L., Ells, L.J., Chai, L.K., Ashton, L. and Walker, J.L., 2018. Update of the best practice dietetic management of overweight and obese children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol. JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports16(7), pp.1495-1502

Bucher, T.; Duncanson, K.; Murawski, B.; Van der Horst, K.; Labbe, D. Consumer Understanding, Perception and Interpretation of Serving Size Information on Food Labels: A Scoping Review.  Preprints 2018, 2018010212doi:10.2094410.20944/preprints201801.0212.v1

Young, K.G., Duncanson, K. and Burrows, T., 2018. Influence of grandparents on the dietary intake of their 2–12‐year‐old grandchildren: A systematic review. Nutrition & Dietetics75(3), pp. 291-306.Young K, Duncanson K, Burrows T. Nutrition and Dietetics

Dickson, R., Duncanson, K., Shepherd. S. The path to ultrasound proficiency: a systematic review of ultrasound education and training programs for junior medical practitioners. Australasian Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. 1 February 2017 doi: 10.1002/ajum.12039   html:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajum.12039/full

Ball, R.; Duncanson, K.; Burrows, T.; Collins, C. Experiences of Parent Peer Nutrition Educators Sharing Child Feeding and Nutrition Information. Children 2017, 4(9), 78; doi:10.3390/children4090078

Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, Hutchesson MJ. The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: the Australian Recommended Food Score. 2015; Nutrients7(2), 785-798. IF=3.15

Collins CE, Watson JF, Guest M, Boggess MM, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, Rollo M, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL. Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for adults. Clin Nutr. 2014 Oct; 33(5):906-14. 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015.

Collins, C., Bucher, T., Taylor, A., Pezdirc, K., Lucas, H., Watson, J., Rollo, M., Duncanson, K., Hutchesson. M. How big is a food portion? A pilot study in Australian families. Health Promotion Journal of Australia. 2015 ; 26 (2), 83-88  IF=1.09

Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson JF, Guest M, Boggess MM, Hutchesson MJ, Rollo M, Duncanson K, Collins CE. Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Preschoolers.  Nutrition Journal, 2014; 13(1):87 Doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-13-87  IF=2.64

Collins CE, Duncanson KR, Burrows TL. A systematic review investigating associations between parenting style and child feeding behaviours. J Hum Nutr & Dietetics. 2013, Dec; 27(6):557-68 Doi: 10.1111/jhn.12192

Under review

Schmidt, D., Duncanson, K., Webster, E. Written feedback on research reports by student supervisors. International Journal for Researcher Development. Submitted August 2016

Dietary intake review Nutrition reviews

Books  

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Duncanson, K. Licence to eat (1998) RWM Publishing, Canberra, Australia.

Invited Book Chapters  

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Collins, C. Burrow, T. Duncanson, K. In Stewart L, Thompson J(Eds) Early Years Nutrition and Healthy Weight Hoboken, New Jersey, Wiley Blackwell Chapter 7, 71-80.

Refereed Conference Papers   

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  • Duncanson K, Shrewsbury V, Burrows T, Chai LK, Ashton L, Gow M, Ho M, Ells L, Stewart L, Garnett S, Jensen M, Nowicka P, Littlewood R, Demaio A, Coyle D, Walker J, Collins C. Impact of nutrition interventions on dietary intake in children and adolescents with overweight or obesity: A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. 18th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA). Prague, Czech Republic; June 2019. Accepted Oral Presentation
    • Towards evidence-based Aboriginal Health Education: Learnings from the NSW HETI Rural and             Remote Portfolio. (Accepted for oral presentation: Health Education in Practice Symposium,    May 2018)
    • Compared to what his friends eat, I think he would be perfect (Oral presentation to the Hunter New England Allied Health Research Forum, 2012)
    • “Best bet” resources not enough to impact on what parents feed their children: a Randomised        Controlled Trial with three month outcomes (Oral presentation: Dietitian Association of           Australia Conference, May 2011)

Poster presentations at international conferences   

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  • Feeding healthy food to kids: A qualitative investigation into parental perceptions of child               feeding (Poster presentation International Congress of Dietetics Sydney September 2012)
  • Twelve Month Outcomes of the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial        (FNCE San Diego poster presentation 2011)
  • Associations between child feeding practices and parenting style (FENS Conference Madrid poster presentation, September 2011)


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Aboriginal nutrition
  • Maternal and child nutrition
  • community nutrition
  • dietary assessment

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology 50
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 50

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Office of the PVC Health and Medicine
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2018 -  Project Manager

Project Manager for VISIDA project assessing dietary intake in lower middle income countries.

PRC in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle
Nutrition
Australia
27/01/1997 - 31/12/2013 Community Nutritionist

Community Nutrition including Early Childhood, Schools settings, Aboriginal health and Community Dietetics

Hunter New England Local Health District
Community Health
Australia
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Collins C, Burrows TL, Duncanson K, 'Parenting strategies for healthy weight in childhood', Early Years Nutrition and Healthy Weight, John Wiley & Sons, New York 71-80 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins

Journal article (19 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Van der Horst K, Bucher T, Duncanson K, Murawski B, Labbe D, 'Consumer Understanding, Perception and Interpretation of Serving Size Information on Food Labels: A Scoping Review', Nutrients, 11 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11092189
Co-authors Beatrice Murawski Uon, Tamara Bucher
2019 Burrows T, Collins C, Adam M, Duncanson K, Rollo M, 'Dietary assessment of shared plate eating: A missing link', Nutrients, 11 1-14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu11040789
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Marc Adam, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2019 Duncanson K, Burrows T, Keely S, Potter M, Das G, Walker M, Talley NJ, 'The alignment of dietary intake and symptom-reporting capture periods in studies assessing associations between food and functional gastrointestinal disorder symptoms: A systematic review', Nutrients, 11 (2019)

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Food ingestion is heavily implicated in inducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD)... [more]

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Food ingestion is heavily implicated in inducing symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD), which affect over one-third of adults in developed countries. The primary aim of this paper was to assess the alignment of dietary assessment and symptom-reporting capture periods in diet-related studies on IBS or FD in adults. Secondary aims were to compare the degree of alignment, validity of symptom-reporting tools and reported significant associations between food ingestion and symptoms. A five-database systematic literature search resulted in 40 included studies, from which data were extracted and collated. The food/diet and symptom capture periods matched exactly in 60% (n = 24/40) of studies, overlapped in 30% (n = 12/40) of studies and were not aligned in 10% (n = 4/40) of studies. Only 30% (n = 12/40) of studies that reported a significant association between food and global gastrointestinal symptoms used a validated symptom-reporting tool. Of the thirty (75%) studies that reported at least one significant association between individual gastrointestinal symptoms and dietary intake, only four (13%) used a validated symptom tool. Guidelines to ensure that validated symptom-reporting tools are matched with fit-for-purpose dietary assessment methods are needed to minimise discrepancies in the alignment of food and symptom tools, in order to progress functional gastrointestinal disorder research.

DOI 10.3390/nu11112590
Co-authors Nicholas Talley, Marjorie Walker, Tracy Burrows, Simon Keely
2018 Shrewsbury VA, Burrows T, Ho M, Jensen M, Garnett SP, Stewart L, et al., 'Update of the best practice dietetic management of overweight and obese children and adolescents: A systematic review protocol', JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 16 1495-1502 (2018)

© 2018 THE JOANNA BRIGGS INSTITUTE. Review question/objective: To update an existing systematic review series1,2 of randomized controlled trials (RCT) that include a dietary inter... [more]

© 2018 THE JOANNA BRIGGS INSTITUTE. Review question/objective: To update an existing systematic review series1,2 of randomized controlled trials (RCT) that include a dietary intervention for the management of overweight or obesity in children or adolescents. Specifically, the review questions are: In randomized controlled trials of interventions which include a dietary intervention for the management of overweight or obesity in children or adolescents: ¿ What impact do these interventions have on participants' adiposity and dietary outcomes? ¿ What are the characteristics or intervention components that predict adiposity reduction or improvements in dietary outcomes?

DOI 10.11124/JBISRIR-2017-003603
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Megan Jensen, Li K Chai, Clare Collins, Vanessa Shrewsbury, Lee Ashton
2018 Duncanson KR, Talley NJ, Walker MM, Burrows TL, 'Food and functional dyspepsia: A systematic review', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 31 390-407 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12506
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Marjorie Walker, Tracy Burrows, Nicholas Talley
2018 Bucher T, Murawski B, Duncanson K, Labbe D, Van der Horst K, 'The effect of the labelled serving size on consumption: A systematic review', Appetite, 128 50-57 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Guidance for food consumption and portion control plays an important role in the global management of overweight and obesity. Carefully conceptualised serving size labellin... [more]

© 2018 Guidance for food consumption and portion control plays an important role in the global management of overweight and obesity. Carefully conceptualised serving size labelling can contribute to this guidance. However, little is known about the relationship between the information that is provided regarding serving sizes on food packages and levels of actual food consumption. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate how serving size information on food packages influences food consumption. We conducted a systematic review of the evidence published between 1980 and March 2018. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts for relevance and assessed relevant articles for eligibility in full-text. Five studies were considered eligible for the systematic review. In three of the included studies, changes in serving size labelling resulted in positive health implications for consumers, whereby less discretionary foods were consumed, if serving sizes were smaller or if serving size information was provided alongside contextual information referring to the entire package. One study did not find significant differences between the conditions they tested and one study suggested a potentially negative impact, if the serving size was reduced. The influence of labelled serving size on consumption of non-discretionary foods remains unclear, which is partially due to the absence of studies specifically focusing on non-discretionary food groups. Studies that investigate the impact of serving size labels within the home environment and across a broad demographic cross-section are required.

DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2018.05.137
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Beatrice Murawski Uon
2018 Young KG, Duncanson K, Burrows T, 'Influence of grandparents on the dietary intake of their 2 12-year-old grandchildren: A systematic review', Nutrition and Dietetics, 75 291-306 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: Grandparents are assuming increased child-caregiving responsibilities, which potentially influences the dietary intake of grandchil... [more]

© 2018 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: Grandparents are assuming increased child-caregiving responsibilities, which potentially influences the dietary intake of grandchildren. The aim of this systematic review is to determine the influence of grandparental care on the dietary intake, food-related behaviours, food choices and weight status of their preschool and school-aged grandchildren. Methods: Six electronic health databases were searched in January 2017. Inclusion criteria were publication in English language, peer-reviewed journal between 2000 and 2017; children aged 2¿12 years; study outcomes included child dietary intake/weight status, grandparent nutrition knowledge/beliefs or grandparent/parent feeding practices. Included studies were appraised for quality and bias. The review was registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42016047518. Results: Sixteen studies were identified in the review, published between 2007 and 2016, with 15 assessed as moderate or high quality. Nine studies reported grandparental child feeding attitudes and behaviours that are considered to negatively influence child dietary intake, while three studies identified positive influences. Seven studies identified that differences in child feeding attitudes and behaviours between parents and grandparents created conflict and tensions between caregivers, often resulting in poor feeding practices. Statistically significant positive associations (odds ratio 1.47¿1.72) between grandparent cohabitation and increased rates of child overweight and obesity were found in four studies. Conclusions: Grandparents in caregiving roles may negatively influence the dietary intake and weight status of their grandchildren. More rigorous, targeted studies are required to further define the mechanisms by which grandparents' knowledge, attitudes and feeding behaviours may influence child dietary intake. This review suggests that grandparents may be an important audience to target in future child nutrition interventions.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12411
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
2017 Ball R, Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Experiences of Parent Peer Nutrition Educators Sharing Child Feeding and Nutrition Information', CHILDREN-BASEL, 4 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children4090078
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2017 Duncanson K, Lee YQ, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Utility of a brief index to measure diet quality of Australian preschoolers in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial', Nutrition and Dietetics, 74 158-166 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: The aim was to evaluate the utility of a brief dietary intake assessment tool in measuring nutritional adequacy of preschoolers and... [more]

© 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia Aim: The aim was to evaluate the utility of a brief dietary intake assessment tool in measuring nutritional adequacy of preschoolers and differences in food and nutrient intake between quartiles stratified by overall diet quality. Methods: Dietary intakes of preschoolers (n = 146) from the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids trial were reported by parents/caregivers using a 120-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Diet quality was assessed using the Australian Recommended Food Score for Preschoolers. Analyses were performed using Kruskal¿Wallis one-way analysis of variance, adjusted for Type 1 error. Participants were grouped into quartiles by total food score for comparison of subscale scores, food groups and nutrient intakes from the FFQ. Results: Participants who scored less than the median total food score of 36 were more likely to have suboptimal micronutrient intakes. Median fruit (9 vs 5, P < 0.0001) and vegetable (14 vs 7, P < 0.0001) subscale scores for preschoolers in the highest quartile were significantly higher than the lowest quartile, indicating much greater fruit and vegetable variety. Statistically significant differences in diet quality score by quartiles (P < 0.05) were found for total energy and percentage energy from core foods, protein, fibre and 11 micronutrients. Conclusions: The Australian Recommended Food Score for Preschoolers is a practical brief diet quality assessment tool to measure food variety and nutritional adequacy in Australian preschoolers. Stratifying children by baseline diet quality in future nutrition interventions is recommended in order to identify those who are likely to benefit or require more targeted approaches to address specific nutritional needs in order to optimise food and nutrient intakes.

DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12295
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2016 Duncanson K, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Child Feeding and Parenting Style Outcomes and Composite Score Measurement in the 'Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Randomised Controlled Trial'', CHILDREN-BASEL, 3 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/children3040028
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2015 Collins CE, Bucher T, Taylor A, Pezdirc K, Lucas H, Watson J, et al., 'How big is a food portion? A pilot study in Australian families', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26 83-88 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative to... [more]

© 2015 Australian Health Promotion Association. Issues addressed It is not known whether individuals can accurately estimate the portion size of foods usually consumed relative to standard serving sizes in national food selection guides. The aim of the present cross-sectional pilot study was to quantify what adults and children deem a typical portion for a variety of foods and compare these with the serving sizes specified in the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE). Methods Adults and children were independently asked to serve out their typical portion of 10 common foods (rice, pasta, breakfast cereal, chocolate, confectionary, ice cream, meat, vegetables, soft drink and milk). They were also asked to serve what they perceived a small, medium and large portion of each food to be. Each portion was weighed and recorded by an assessor and compared with the standard AGHE serving sizes. Results Twenty-one individuals (nine mothers, one father, 11 children) participated in the study. There was a large degree of variability in portion sizes measured out by both parents and children, with means exceeding the standard AGHE serving size for all items, except for soft drink and milk, where mean portion sizes were less than the AGHE serving size. The greatest mean overestimations were for pasta (155%; mean 116 g; range 94-139g) and chocolate (151%; mean 38 g; range 25-50g), each of which represented approximately 1.5 standard AGHE servings. Conclusion The findings of the present study indicate that there is variability between parents' and children's estimation of typical portion sizes compared with national recommendations. So what? Dietary interventions to improve individuals' dietary patterns should target education regarding portion size.

DOI 10.1071/HE14061
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tamara Bucher, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Kristine Pezdirc, Clare Collins
2015 Collins CE, Burrows TL, Rollo ME, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, et al., 'The comparative validity and reproducibility of a diet quality index for adults: The Australian recommended food score', Nutrients, 7 785-798 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu7020785
Citations Scopus - 48Web of Science - 47
Co-authors Kristine Pezdirc, Megan Rollo, Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins
2014 Burrows TL, Collins K, Watson J, Guest M, Boggess MM, Neve M, et al., 'Validity of the Australian Recommended Food Score as a diet quality index for Pre-schoolers', Nutrition Journal, 13 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Burrows et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. ... [more]

© 2014 Burrows et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Background: Diet quality tools provide researchers with brief methods to assess the nutrient adequacy of usual dietary intake. This study describes the development and validation of a pediatric diet quality index, the Australian Recommended Food Scores for Pre-schoolers (ARFS-P), for use with children aged two to five years. Methods. The ARFS-P was derived from a 120-item food frequency questionnaire, with eight sub-scales, and was scored from zero to 73. Linear regressions were used to estimate the relationship between diet quality score and nutrient intakes, in 142 children (mean age 4 years) in rural localities in New South Wales, Australia. Results: Total ARFS-P and component scores were highly related to dietary intake of the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients including protein, ß-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin A. Total ARFS-P was also positively related to total consumption of nutrient dense foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and negatively related to total consumption of discretionary choices, such as sugar sweetened drinks and packaged snacks. Conclusion: ARFS-P is a valid measure that can be used to characterise nutrient intakes for children aged two to five years. Further research could assess the utility of the ARFS-P for monitoring of usual dietary intake over time or as part of clinical management.

DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-13-87
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Melinda Hutchesson, Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2014 Collins CE, Boggess MM, Watson JF, Guest M, Duncanson K, Pezdirc K, et al., 'Reproducibility and comparative validity of a food frequency questionnaire for Australian adults', Clinical Nutrition, 33 906-914 (2014) [C1]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and relia... [more]

Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) are used in epidemiological studies to investigate the relationship between diet and disease. There is a need for a valid and reliable adult FFQ with a contemporary food list in Australia. Aims: To evaluate the reproducibility and comparative validity of the Australian Eating Survey (AES) FFQ in adults compared to weighed food records (WFRs). Methods: Two rounds of AES and three-day WFRs were conducted in 97 adults (31 males, median age and BMI for males of 44.9 years, 26.2 kg/m2, females 41.3 years, 24.0 kg/m2. Reproducibility was assessed over six months using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and comparative validity was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated by fitting a mixed effects model for each nutrient to account for age, sex and BMI to allow estimation of between and within person variance. Results: Reproducibility was found to be good for both WFR and FFQ since there were no significant differences between round 1 and 2 administrations. For comparative validity, FFQ ICCs were at least as large as those for WFR. The ICC of the WFR-FFQ difference for total energy intake was 0.6 (95% CI 0.43, 0.77) and the median ICC for all nutrients was 0.47, with all ICCs between 0.15 (%E from saturated fat) and 0.7 (g/day sugars). Conclusions: Compared to WFR the AES FFQ is suitable for reliably estimating the dietary intakes of Australian adults across a wide range of nutrients. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.

DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.09.015
Citations Scopus - 58Web of Science - 53
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Melinda Hutchesson, Clare Collins, Megan Rollo, Kristine Pezdirc
2014 Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Peer education is a feasible method of disseminating information related to child nutrition and feeding between new mothers', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 14 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1262
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2014 Collins C, Duncanson K, Burrows T, 'A systematic review investigating associations between parenting style and child feeding behaviours', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 27 557-568 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 The British Dietetic Association. Background: A direct association between parenting style and child feeding behaviours has not been established. This review explores wheth... [more]

© 2014 The British Dietetic Association. Background: A direct association between parenting style and child feeding behaviours has not been established. This review explores whether an authoritative, authoritarian or permissive parenting style is associated with parental pressure to eat, responsibility, monitoring or restriction of child dietary intake. Methods: A search of eight electronic health databases was conducted. Inclusion criteria were children aged <12 years, published between 1975 and 2012, measured and reported associations between parenting style and child feeding behaviours. Results: Seven studies (n = 1845) were identified in the review. An authoritarian parenting style was associated with pressuring a child to eat and having restrictive parental food behaviours. Authoritative parenting was associated with parental monitoring of child food intake. A permissive parenting style was inversely related to monitoring of child dietary intake. Conclusions: Parenting styles showed only weak to moderate associations with individual domains of child feeding. The most consistent relationship found was a negative association between permissive parenting and monitoring for both mothers and fathers in two studies. Progress in this field could be achieved by conducting studies targeting fathers and culturally diverse populations, and development of a tool which could reflect overall child feeding behaviour rather than individual domains.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12192
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013 Duncanson K, Burrows T, Holman B, Collins C, 'Parents' Perceptions of Child Feeding: A Qualitative Study Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior', JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL AND BEHAVIORAL PEDIATRICS, 34 227-236 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/DBP.0b013e31828b2ccf
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2013 Duncanson K, Burrows T, Collins C, 'Effect of a low-intensity parent-focused nutrition intervention on dietary intake of 2- to 5-year olds', Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 57 728-734 (2013) [C1]

OBJECTIVES:: Community-based nutrition interventions aimed at influencing child dietary intake are rarely evaluated. We hypothesised that providing self-directed nutrition and par... [more]

OBJECTIVES:: Community-based nutrition interventions aimed at influencing child dietary intake are rarely evaluated. We hypothesised that providing self-directed nutrition and parenting resources to parents living in rural northern New South Wales, Australia, would positively affect the dietary patterns of children ages 2 to 5 years. METHODS:: A total of 146 parent-child dyads (76 boys, ages 2.0-5.9 years) were randomly assigned to either a 12-month parent-centred intervention involving self-directed education provided in CD and DVD formats, or a participant-blinded control group who received generic nutrition and physical activity information. Data were collected at baseline, 3, and 12 months. RESULTS:: Total reported energy from nutrient-dense food groups and percentage energy from energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were high at baseline relative to estimated total energy expenditure for child age. Using random effects modelling, there were significant group-by-time effects for a reduction in mean (standard deviation) total energy intake (EI) at 12 months (-461 kJ/day (196); Pâ¿¿=â¿¿0.04). An intervention group-by-time effect on carbohydrate intake (-17.4 g/day (10.6); Pâ¿¿<â¿¿0.05) was largely attributable to decreased consumption of breads and cereals (-180 g/day (80); Pâ¿¿=â¿¿0.007). Decreases in energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS:: The proportion of total EI from noncore foods in children in rural New South Wales is high and did not improve in response to a low-intensity nutrition intervention. Parents reported small changes in consumption frequency for core and noncore food intakes, leading to a reduction in total EI. Strategies to increase resource use such as prompting via e-mail are required to further explore the effectiveness of nutrition resource dissemination at a population level. Copyright © 2013 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology.

DOI 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000068
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Study protocol of a parent-focused child feeding and dietary intake intervention: The feeding healthy food to kids randomised controlled trial', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
Show 16 more journal articles

Conference (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Bucher T, Duncanson K, Murawski B, van der Horst K, Labbe D, 'Consumer understanding, perception and interpretation of serving size information on food labels: A scoping review', Verona, Italy (2018)
Co-authors Tamara Bucher, Beatrice Murawski Uon
2012 Watson J, Collins CE, Guest M, Pezdirc K, Duncanson K, Burrows T, Huxley S, 'Evaluation of an adult food frequency questionnaire and its associated diet quality score', The 8th International Conference on Diet Activity and Methods Abstract Book, Rome, Italy (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kristine Pezdirc, Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Duncanson KR, Holman B, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Above average but below par: A qualitative study exploring the child feeding paradox', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2012 Pezdirc KB, Collins CE, Watson JF, Burrows TL, Guest M, Boggess M, Duncanson KR, 'Validation of an adult food frequency questionnaire', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Kristine Pezdirc, Clare Collins
2011 Duncanson KR, Hudson N, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Associations between child feeding practises and parenting style', Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Madrid, Spain (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Clare Collins
2010 Brown LJ, Crowley ET, Duncanson KR, Woodward GM, Kooloos NM, 'Rural based dietetic academic roles: Opportunities for growth and capacity building', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Elesa Crowley
2010 Duncanson KR, Burrows TL, Collins CE, 'Child feeding practices at baseline in the Feeding Healthy Food to Kids Study', Nutrition & Dietetics, Melbourne (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins, Tracy Burrows
2009 Duncanson KR, ''The Lunch Crunch' changes in the composition of lunchboxes of children 4-5 yrs in response to a multi-strategy nutrition intervention', 3rd Rural Health Research Colloquium: Building a Healthier Future Through Research: Program and Abstract Book, Ballina, NSW (2009) [E3]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $9,200

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $4,200

Science and technology in childhood obesity policy (STOP)$4,200

Funding body: Karolinska Institutet

Funding body Karolinska Institutet
Project Team Professor Clare Collins, Doctor Vanessa Shrewsbury, Dr Lee Ashton, Doctor Kerith Duncanson, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900724
Type Of Funding C3232 - International Govt - Other
Category 3232
UON Y

20091 grants / $5,000

Feeding healthly food to kids - the role of parents$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Kerith Duncanson, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Professor Clare Collins
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189637
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Gathering Perspectives of Success in an Aboriginal Nutrition and Exercise Program PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD The PICNIC Project: Parents In Child Nutrition Information Community PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Kerith Duncanson

Positions

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Program Manager, Nutrition and Dietetics Postdoctoral research fellow, Gastroenterology
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Project Manager
Program Manager, Nutrition and Dietetics Postdoctoral research fellow, Gastroenterology
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Casual Assistant Content Developer
Program Manager, Nutrition and Dietetics Postdoctoral research fellow, Gastroenterology
Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Academic Division

Contact Details

Email kerith.duncanson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 0428848264
Mobile 0428848264

Office

Room Postdoctoral research room PRCPAN
Building PRCPAN
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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