Mrs Janelle Skinner

Mrs Janelle Skinner

Postdoctoral Fellow

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Janelle Skinner is a Postdoctoral researcher in the College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing; and an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD). Her research focuses on addictive eating and objective biomarkers that may characterise compulsive overeating behaviours. She has a special interest in how people react to food cues, particularly 'hyperpalatable' foods, and the effects this has on physiological responses in the body.



Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Behaviour change
  • Dietary assessment
  • Food addiction

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321001 Clinical nutrition 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Postdoctoral Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Pursey KM, Collins R, Skinner J, Burrows TL, 'Characteristics of individuals seeking addictive eating treatment.', Eat Weight Disord, (2021)
DOI 10.1007/s40519-021-01147-y
Co-authors Kirrilly Pursey, Rebecca A Collins Uon, Tracy Burrows
2021 Whatnall M, Skinner J, Verdejo-Garcia A, Carter A, Brown RM, Andrews ZB, et al., 'Symptoms of Addictive Eating: What Do Different Health Professions Think?', Behav Sci (Basel), 11 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/bs11050060
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Megan Whatnall, Tracy Burrows
2021 Whatnall MC, Skinner J, Pursey K, Brain K, Collins R, Hutchesson MJ, Burrows TL, 'Efficacy of dietary interventions in individuals with substance use disorders for illicit substances or illicit use of pharmaceutical substances: A systematic review.', J Hum Nutr Diet, (2021)
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12871
Co-authors Katherine Brain, Rebecca A Collins Uon, Tracy Burrows, Megan Whatnall, Kirrilly Pursey, Melinda Hutchesson
2020 Skinner JA, Garg ML, Dayas CV, Burrows TL, 'Using participant ratings to construct food image paradigms for use in the Australian population A pilot study', Food Quality and Preference, 82 (2020) [C1]

In human research, images of food are often used as cues in place of real foods. To elicit anticipatory responses in targeted populations (e.g. prompting changes in metabolic horm... [more]

In human research, images of food are often used as cues in place of real foods. To elicit anticipatory responses in targeted populations (e.g. prompting changes in metabolic hormones, invoking food cravings), cultural differences and population norms with regard to food preferences need to be considered. This pilot study aimed to construct two image paradigms (healthy vs. hyperpalatable foods) for experimental use within the Australian population. A dataset of 200 images (from the licenced database Food-pics and internet sources), representative of healthy and hyperpalatable foods commonly consumed in Australia, was compiled by research dietitians. Ten male and female adults volunteered to view the images. Participants categorised each image as either healthy food or ¿junk food¿ (i.e. hyperpalatable food), and rated each image according to three criteria: 1) familiarity of the food displayed; 2) recognisability of the food; and 3) appetisingness of the food. Overall, agreement with a priori categories was high for both healthy and hyperpalatable food images, 87.3% and 87.7% respectively. The food images with the lowest overall ratings (score <7 out of possible 9) were removed from the dataset and the final paradigms each contain 75 images. The healthy food paradigm contains foods from the five core food groups (fruit, vegetables, grains and cereals, meat and meat alternatives, dairy foods), and the hyperpalatable food paradigm contains non-core foods (sweet and savoury discretionary choice foods). The paradigms represent a broad range of commonly consumed foods that will be relevant for prospective projects utilising food cues in Australian adults.

DOI 10.1016/j.foodqual.2020.103885
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Manohar Garg, Christopher Dayas, Tracy Burrows
2020 Fenton S, Burrows TL, Skinner JA, Duncan MJ, 'The influence of sleep health on dietary intake: a systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention studies', JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, 34 273-285 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12813
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Mitch Duncan
2019 Skinner JA, Garg ML, Dayas CV, Burrows TL, 'Is weight status associated with peripheral levels of oxytocin? A pilot study in healthy women.', PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR, 212 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2019.112684
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Manohar Garg, Christopher Dayas
2019 Skinner JA, Campbell EJ, Dayas CV, Garg ML, Burrows TL, 'The relationship between oxytocin, dietary intake and feeding: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies in mice and rats', Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, 52 65-78 (2019) [C1]

The neuropeptide oxytocin has been associated with food intake and feeding behaviour. This systematic review aimed to investigate the impact of oxytocin on dietary intake and feed... [more]

The neuropeptide oxytocin has been associated with food intake and feeding behaviour. This systematic review aimed to investigate the impact of oxytocin on dietary intake and feeding behaviour in rodent studies. Six electronic databases were searched to identify published studies to April 2018. Preclinical studies in mice and rats were included if they reported: (1) a dietary measure (i.e. food or nutrient and/or behaviour (2) an oxytocin measure, and (3) relationship between the two measures. A total of 75 articles (n = 246 experiments) were included, and study quality appraised. The majority of studies were carried out in males (87%). The top three oxytocin outcomes assessed were: exogenous oxytocin administration (n = 126), oxytocin-receptor antagonist administration (n = 46) and oxytocin gene deletion (n = 29). Meta-analysis of exogenous studies in mice (3 studies, n = 43 comparisons) and rats (n = 8 studies, n = 82 comparisons) showed an overall decrease in food intake with maximum effect shown at 2 h post-administration.

DOI 10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.09.002
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Christopher Dayas, Tracy Burrows, Manohar Garg
2018 Mckenna R, Rollo M, Skinner J, Burrows T, 'Food Addiction Support: Website Content Analysis', JMIR Cardio, 2 1-12 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/cardio.8718
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Tracy Burrows, Rebecca A Collins Uon
2018 Skinner JA, Garg ML, Dayas CV, Fenton S, Burrows TL, 'Relationship between dietary intake and behaviors with oxytocin: a systematic review of studies in adults.', Nutr Rev, 76 303-331 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/nutrit/nux078
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Christopher Dayas, Manohar Garg
2018 Burrows T, Kay-Lambkin F, Pursey K, Skinner J, Dayas C, 'Food addiction and associations with mental health symptoms: a systematic review with meta-analysis', Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 31 544-572 (2018) [C1]

Background: The present study systematically reviewed the literature aiming to determine the relationships between food addiction, as measured by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YF... [more]

Background: The present study systematically reviewed the literature aiming to determine the relationships between food addiction, as measured by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), and mental health symptoms. Methods: Nine databases were searched using keywords. Studies were included if they reported: (i) YFAS diagnosis or symptom score and (ii) a mental health outcome, as well as the association between (i) and (ii). In total, 51 studies were included. Results: Through meta-analysis, the mean prevalence of food addiction diagnosis was 16.2%, with an average of 3.3 (range 2.85¿3.92) food addiction symptoms being reported. Subanalyses revealed that the mean number of food addiction symptoms in populations seeking treatment for weight loss was 3.01 (range 2.65¿3.37) and this was higher in groups with disordered eating (mean 5.2 3.6¿6.7). Significant positive correlations were found between food addiction and binge eating [mean r¿=¿0.602 (0.557¿0.643), P¿<¿0.05], depression, anxiety and food addiction [mean r¿=¿0.459 (0.358¿0.550), r¿=¿0.483 (0.228¿0.676), P¿<¿0.05, respectively]. Conclusions: A significant, positive relationship exists between food addiction and mental health symptoms, although the results of the present study highlight the complexity of this relationship.

DOI 10.1111/jhn.12532
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 65
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Tracy Burrows, Christopher Dayas, Kirrilly Pursey
2017 Burrows T, Skinner J, McKenna R, Rollo M, 'Food Addiction, Binge Eating Disorder, and Obesity: Is There a Relationship?', BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/bs7030054
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 44
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Rebecca A Collins Uon, Megan Rollo
2017 Burrows T, Skinner J, Joyner MA, Palmieri J, Vaughan K, Gearhardt AN, 'Food addiction in children: Associations with obesity, parental food addiction and feeding practices', Eating Behaviors, 26 114-120 (2017) [C1]

Food addiction research in children is limited, and to date addictive-like eating behaviors within families have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to understand fact... [more]

Food addiction research in children is limited, and to date addictive-like eating behaviors within families have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to understand factors associated with addictive-like eating in children. The association between food addiction in children with obesity, parental food addiction, and parental feeding practices (i.e., restriction, pressure to eat, monitoring) was investigated. Parents/primary caregivers (aged¿=¿18¿years) of children aged 5¿12¿years, recruited and completed an online cross-sectional survey including demographics, the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS), and the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ). Parents, reporting on themselves and one of their children, were given a food addiction diagnosis and symptom score according to the YFAS predefined criteria. The total sample consisted of 150 parents/primary caregivers (48% male) and 150 children (51% male). Food addiction was found to be 12.0% in parents and 22.7% in children. In children, food addiction was significantly associated with higher child BMI z-scores. Children with higher food addiction symptoms had parents with higher food addiction scores. Parents of FA children reported significantly higher levels of Restriction and Pressure to eat feeding practices, but not Monitoring. Children with elevated YFAS-C scores may be at greater risk for eating-related issues.

DOI 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.02.004
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Tracy Burrows
McKenna RA, Rollo ME, Skinner JA, Burrows TL, 'Food Addiction Support: Website Content Analysis
DOI 10.2196/preprints.8718
Co-authors Tracy Burrows, Megan Rollo, Rebecca A Collins Uon
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Mrs Janelle Skinner

Positions

Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Casual Research Assistant
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Casual Research Assistant
School of Health Sciences
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email janelle.skinner@newcastle.edu.au
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