Dr Susan Heaney

Dr Susan Heaney

Placement Coordinator

School of Health Sciences

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Susan Heaney is a Placement Coordinator for Nutrition and Dietetics within the School of Health Sciences and Lecturer with the University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health (UoNDRH) at the Port Macquarie Campus. Susan has also worked both as a senior clinical dietitian and research & development dietitian at the John Hunter Hospital. She was awarded her PhD from the University of Sydney in 2012 for her project which aimed to develop a Screening Instrument to Identify Nutrition Risk in Athletes.

Susan is interested in all things related to student placements and facilitates and supports placements across the Nutrition and Dietetics program.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Health Science (Nutrition & Dietetics), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Dietetics
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition Knowledge
  • Placement
  • Rural
  • Sports
  • Teaching

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Placement Coordinator University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia
Lecturer University of Newcastle
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Randall AM, Stevenson J, Heaney S, Notaras S, Hoffman A, Choi P, et al., 'SUN-103 PREVALENCE OF MALNUTRITION & NUTRITION-IMPACT SYMPTOM BURDEN IN PATIENTS ATTENDING RENAL SUPPORTIVE CARE', Kidney International Reports, 4 S199-S199 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.ekir.2019.05.500
2019 Randall AM, Stevenson J, Heaney S, Notaras S, Hoffman A, Choi P, et al., 'SUN-102 NUTRITION-IMPACT SYMPTOM BURDEN IN PATIENTS ATTENDING RENAL SUPPORTIVE CARE', Kidney International Reports, 4 199-199 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.ekir.2019.05.499
2018 Mudge LA, Watson DI, Smithers BM, Isenring EA, Smith L, Jamieson GG, et al., 'Multicentre factorial randomized clinical trial of perioperative immunonutrition versus standard nutrition for patients undergoing surgical resection of oesophageal cancer', British Journal of Surgery, 105 1262-1272 (2018)

© 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Preoperative immunonutrition has been proposed to reduce the duration of hospital stay and infective co... [more]

© 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Background: Preoperative immunonutrition has been proposed to reduce the duration of hospital stay and infective complications following major elective surgery in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. A multicentre 2 × 2 factorial RCT was conducted to determine the impact of preoperative and postoperative immunonutrition versus standard nutrition in patients with oesophageal cancer. Methods: Patients were randomized before oesophagectomy to immunonutrition (IMPACT®) versus standard isocaloric/isonitrogenous nutrition, then further randomized after operation to immunonutrition versus standard nutrition. Clinical and quality-of-life outcomes were assessed at 14 and 42 days after operation on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome was the occurrence of infective complications. Secondary outcomes were other complications, duration of hospital stay, mortality, nutritional and quality-of-life outcomes (EuroQol EQ-5D-3 L¿, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-OES18). Patients and investigators were blinded until the completion of data analysis. Results: Some 278 patients from 11 Australian sites were randomized; two were excluded and data from 276 were analysed. The incidence of infective complications was similar for all groups (37 per cent in perioperative standard nutrition group, 51 per cent in perioperative immunonutrition group, 34 per cent in preoperative immunonutrition group and 40 per cent in postoperative immunonutrition group; P = 0·187). There were no significant differences in any other clinical or quality-of-life outcomes. Conclusion: Use of immunonutrition before and/or after surgery provided no benefit over standard nutrition in patients undergoing oesophagectomy. Registration number: ACTRN12611000178943 (https://www.anzctr.org.au).

DOI 10.1002/bjs.10923
Citations Scopus - 3
2017 Stevenson J, Meade A, Randall AM, Manley K, Notaras S, Heaney S, et al., 'Nutrition in Renal Supportive Care: Patient-driven and flexible', Nephrology, 22 739-747 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Renal Supportive Care is an alternative treatment pathway in advanced chronic kidney disease that is being increasingly adopted, particu... [more]

© 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology Renal Supportive Care is an alternative treatment pathway in advanced chronic kidney disease that is being increasingly adopted, particularly in the elderly. Renal Supportive Care uses principles of palliative care and has been developed to enhance the care for dialysis patients with a high symptom burden and those being managed on a non-dialysis pathway. Nutrition management is often an under-recognized component of care and can play an important role in improving patients' quality of life to reduce symptom burden, support physical function and independence and provide appropriate counselling to patients and their families to ensure the goals of Renal Supportive Care are met. Nutrition interventions need to target patient and treatment goals, with frequent monitoring to ensure patient needs are being met. This review outlines available literature on this topic and suggests some practical ways in which nutrition can be enhanced for these patients.

DOI 10.1111/nep.13090
2015 Spronk I, Heaney SE, Prvan T, O'Connor HT, 'Relationship between general nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in elite athletes', International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 25 243-251 (2015)

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study investigated the association between general nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in a convenience sample of athletes (= state level) rec... [more]

© 2015 Human Kinetics, Inc. This study investigated the association between general nutrition knowledge and dietary quality in a convenience sample of athletes (= state level) recruited from four Australian State Sport Institutes. General nutrition knowledge was measured by the validated General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire and diet quality by an adapted version of the Australian Recommended Food Score (A-ARFS) calculated from food frequency questionnaire data. Analysis of variance and linear modeling were used to assess relationships between variables. Data: mean (Standard Deviation). A total of 101 athletes (Males: 37; Females: 64), 18.6 (4.6) years were recruited mainly from team sports (72.0%). Females scored higher than males for both nutrition knowledge (Females: 59.9%; Males: 55.6%; p = .017) and total A-ARFS (Females: 54.2% Males: 49.4%; p = .016). There was no significant influence of age, level of education, athletic caliber or team/individual sport participation on nutrition knowledge or total A-ARFS. However, athletes engaged in previous dietetic consultation had significantly higher nutrition knowledge (61.6% vs. 56.6%; p = .034) but not total A-ARFS (53.6% vs. 52.0%; p = .466). Nutrition knowledge was weakly but positively associated with total A-ARFS (r = .261, p= .008) and A-ARFS vegetable subgroup (r = .252, p = .024) independently explaining 6.8% and 5.1% of the variance respectively. Gender independently explained 5.6% of the variance in nutrition knowledge (p= .017) and 6.7% in total A-ARFS (p = .016). Higher nutrition knowledge and female gender were weakly but positively associated with better diet quality. Given the importance of nutrition to health and optimal sports performance, intervention to improve nutrition knowledge and healthy eating is recommended, especially for young male athletes.

DOI 10.1123/ijsnem.2014-0034
Citations Scopus - 22
2012 Spendlove JK, Heaney SE, Gifford JA, Prvan T, Denyer GS, O'Connor HT, 'Evaluation of general nutrition knowledge in elite Australian athletes', British Journal of Nutrition, 107 1871-1880 (2012)

The aim of the present study was to investigate and benchmark the level of general nutrition knowledge in elite Australian athletes (EA) against a similar aged community (CM) and ... [more]

The aim of the present study was to investigate and benchmark the level of general nutrition knowledge in elite Australian athletes (EA) against a similar aged community (CM) and criterion sample with dietetic training (DT). EA (n 175), CM (n 116) and DT (n 53) completed the General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ), which assesses four domains (sections A-D) of general nutrition knowledge (section A: dietary guidelines; section B: sources of nutrients; section C: choosing everyday foods; section D: diet-disease relationships). Age, sex and education level were collected in all groups, and athletic calibre and sport type (team or individual) in EA. Dietitians and nutrition scientists (n 53) re-examined the GNKQ for content validity, resulting in instrument revision (R-GNKQ; ninety-six items). Psychometric assessment (internal consistency: Cronbach-a; test-retest: Spearman rank correlation) was performed in a sub-sample (n 28). Independent t tests, ANOVA and ANCOVA (¿ 2 for categorical variables) were used to assess between-group differences. DT scored higher than EA and CM in all sub-sections and overall (P < 0¿005). EA scored lower than CM in GNKQ for section B (P < 0¿005) and overall (P < 0¿005), and in R-GNKQ for section B (P < 0¿005), section C (P < 0¿005), section D (P = 0¿006) and overall (P < 0¿005). Overall score was influenced by age (P = 0¿036 for GNKQ: P = 0¿053 for R-GNKQ), sex (P = 0¿016 for GNKQ: P = 0¿003 for R-GNKQ) and athletic calibre (P = 0¿029 for R-GNKQ only), but not level of education, living situation or ethnicity. EA and CM performed best on section A and worst on D. EA had lower overall general knowledge scores than CM. This was significantly influenced by age and sex. © 2011 The Authors.

DOI 10.1017/S0007114511005125
Citations Scopus - 49
2011 Heaney S, O'Connor H, Michael S, Gifford J, Naughton G, 'Nutrition knowledge in athletes: A systematic review', International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 21 248-261 (2011)

Context: Nutrition education aims to enhance knowledge and improve dietary intake in athletes. Understanding athletes&apos; nutrition knowledge and its influence on dietary intake... [more]

Context: Nutrition education aims to enhance knowledge and improve dietary intake in athletes. Understanding athletes' nutrition knowledge and its influence on dietary intake will inform nutrition-education programs in this population. Purpose: To systematically review the level of nutrition knowledge in athletes, benchmark this against nonathlete comparison groups, and determine the impact of nutrition knowledge on dietary intake. Methods: An extensive literature search from the earliest record to March 2010 using the terms nutrition knowledge or diet knowledge and athlete or sport was conducted. Included studies recruited able or physically disabled, male or female, competitive (recreational or elite) athletes over the age of 13 yr. Quantitative assessment of knowledge and, if available, diet intake was required. Because of variability in the assessment of nutrition knowledge and dietary intake, meta-analysis was not conducted. Results: Twenty-nine studies (17 published before 2000) measuring nutrition knowledge (7 including a nonathlete comparison group) met inclusion criteria. Athletes' knowledge was equal to or better than that of nonathletes but lower than comparison groups including nutrition students. When found statistically significant, knowledge was greater in females than males. A weak (r < .44), positive association between knowledge and dietary intake was reported in 5 of 9 studies assessing this. Common flaws in articles included inadequate statistical reporting, instrument validation, and benchmarking. Conclusion: The nutrition knowledge of athletes and its impact on their dietary intake is equivocal. There is a need for high-quality, contemporary research using validated tools to measure nutrition knowledge and its impact on dietary intake. © 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.

DOI 10.1123/ijsnem.21.3.248
Citations Scopus - 77
2010 Heaney S, O'Connor H, Gifford J, Naughton G, 'Comparison of strategies for assessing nutritional adequacy in elite female athletes' dietary intake', International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 20 245-256 (2010)

Purpose: This study aimed to compare strategies for assessing nutritional adequacy in the dietary intake of elite female athletes. Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using an ad... [more]

Purpose: This study aimed to compare strategies for assessing nutritional adequacy in the dietary intake of elite female athletes. Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using an adapted food-frequency questionnaire in 72 elite female athletes from a variety of sports. Nutritional adequacy was evaluated and compared using mean intake; the proportion of participants with intakes below Australian nutrient reference values (NRV), U.S. military dietary reference intakes (MDRI), and current sports nutrition recommendations; and probability estimates of nutrient inadequacy. Results: Mean energy intake was 10,551 ± 3,836 kJ/day with macronutrient distribution 18% protein, 31% fat, and 46% carbohydrate, consistent with Australian acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges. Mean protein intake (1.6 g·kg -1·d-1) was consistent with (>1.2 g·kg-1·d-1), and carbohydrate intake (4.5 g·kg-1·d-1), below, current sports nutrition recommendations (>5 g·kg-1·d-1), with 30% and 65% of individuals not meeting these levels, respectively. Mean micronutrient intake met the relevant NRV and MDRI except for vitamin D and folate. A proportion of participants failed to meet the estimated average requirement for folate (48%), calcium (24%), magnesium (19%), and iron (4%). Probability estimates of inadequacy identified intake of folate (44%), calcium (22%), iron (19%), and magnesium (15%) as inadequate. Conclusion: Interpretation of dietary adequacy is complex and varies depending on whether the mean, proportion of participants below the relevant NRV, or statistical probability estimate of inadequacy is used. Further research on methods to determine dietary adequacy in athlete populations is required. © 2010 Human Kinetics, Inc.

DOI 10.1123/ijsnem.20.3.245
Citations Scopus - 36
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Joy E, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab SK, 'General practitioners' assessment of risk of violence in their practice: results from a qualitative study', Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 14 385-390 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2007.00874.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Parker Magin
2008 Magin PJ, Adams J, Joy E, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab S, 'Violence in general practice: Perceptions of cause and implications for safety', Canadian Family Physician, 54 1278-1284 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Parker Magin
2006 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Joy E, Heaney SE, Darab S, 'The response of general practitioners to the threat of violence in their practices: results from a qualitative study', Family Practice, 23 273-278 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmi119
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Parker Magin
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Heaney S, Darab S, 'After hours care: A qualitative study of GPs' perceptions of risk of violence and effect on service provision', Australian Family Physician, 34 91-92 (2005)

Background: Workplace violence in general practice has been found to be an important problem in the United Kingdom. No research has been undertaken in this area in Australian urba... [more]

Background: Workplace violence in general practice has been found to be an important problem in the United Kingdom. No research has been undertaken in this area in Australian urban practice. Method: Four focus groups involved 18 urban general practitioners and over 9 hours of taped responses were transcribed. The transcripts were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results: General practitioners expressed a wide range of risks relating to the provision of after hours care. This makes them apprehensive about participating in it. Those who had experienced violence, or perceived its risk, had limited their participation in after hours care; sometimes completely. Discussion: Structures may be needed to support provision of after hours general practice services.

Citations Scopus - 22
Co-authors Parker Magin
2005 Magin PJ, Adams J, Ireland M, Heaney SE, Darab SK, 'After hours care: a qualitative study of gp's perceptions of risk of violence and effect on service provision', Australian Family Physician, 34 91-92 (2005) [C1]
Co-authors Parker Magin
2004 Shah NC, Sibbritt DW, Heaney SE, Sharples J, 'Sphygmomanometers: An audit in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 33 952-954 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 3
2004 Heaney SE, Tolhurst HM, Baines SK, 'Choosing to practice in rural dietetics: What factors influence that decision?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 12 192-196 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1854.2004.00603.x
Citations Scopus - 14
Co-authors Surinder Baines
2002 Shah NC, Pond CD, Heaney SE, 'Research capacity building in general practice', Australian Family Physician, 31(2) 201-204 (2002) [C1]
Co-authors Dimity Pond
2002 Shah NC, Pond D, Heaney S, 'Research capacity building in general practice. The new Australian scene.', Australian family physician, 31 201-204 (2002)

BACKGROUND: Primary care research needs strengthening. The Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Aged Care has recently funded the university departments of general pra... [more]

BACKGROUND: Primary care research needs strengthening. The Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Aged Care has recently funded the university departments of general practice and rural health to build research capacity in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To explore issues surrounding building primary care research capacity, as well as looking at barriers to research capacity building and ways of overcoming them. DISCUSSION: New funding provides many opportunities for increasing research capacity in primary health care areas. Different institutions will select those methods that are best suited to their skills and the requirements of their area.

Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Dimity Pond
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Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Brown L, Urquhart L, Squires K, Crowley E, Heaney S, Hicks A, Burrows J, 'Better Than Expected - Rural placements offering diversity of practice for dietetic students', Gold Coast, QLD (2019)
Co-authors Kelly Squires, Leanne Brown, Lisa Urquhart, Elesa Crowley, Julie Burrows
2011 Spendlove J, Heaney S, Gifford J, Prvan T, Denyer G, O'Connor H, 'Evaluation of General Nutrition Knowledge in Elite Australian Athletes', America (2011)
2006 Heaney S, O'Connor H, Naughton G, 'Factors affecting nutritional adequacy in athletes', Sydney (2006)
2003 Heaney SE, Pond N, Finch M, Collins CE, 'Dietary intake and growth of gymnasts in the Hunter Region', Proceedings of the 21st National Conference Dietitians Association of Australia, Cairns (2003) [E3]
Co-authors Clare Collins
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 3
Total funding $62,000

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20183 grants / $62,000

Extended enteral feeding in Oesophageal Cancer $42,000

Funding body: Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)

Funding body Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA)
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON N

Fast-tracking Malnutrition $12,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Health

Funding body Hunter New England Health
Scheme Innovation Scholarship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

International Student Placement Preparation and Mentoring Support – Nutrition and Dietetics$8,000

Funding body: 2018 Strategic Pilot Grant-Research and Teaching, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle

Funding body 2018 Strategic Pilot Grant-Research and Teaching, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Project Team

Dr Susan Heaney, Mrs Shirlee Maxwell, Assoc Prof Surinder Baines, Dr Amanda Patterson

Scheme 2018 Strategic Pilot Grant- Research and Teaching, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 Masters Simulated Learning Experiences in Nutrition and Dietetics M Philosophy (Nutrition&Diet), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Susan Heaney

Positions

Placement Coordinator
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Lecturer
University of Newcastle Department of Rural Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email susan.heaney@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4985 4920

Office

Room HE 24
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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