Dr Katie Wynne

Dr Katie Wynne

Conjoint Associate Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

I am a Clinical Endocrinologist with a conjoint appointment with University of Newcastle. I graduated with a degree in Medical Science and Experimental Psychology from Cambridge University in 1996. I completed my MBBS medical degree at King’s College London in 1999 and then joined Imperial College London as a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellow, completing a PhD in 2007. My postdoctoral research was in the field of appetite control as a National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer. I moved to Newcastle, Australia in 2012 and continue to research and publish in the field of endocrinology, with special interest in transgender medicine, antenatal endocrinology and metabolic health. 


Keywords

  • antenatal endocrinology
  • diabetes
  • metabolic disease
  • obesity
  • transgender health science

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111103 Nutritional Physiology 20
110306 Endocrinology 80

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/08/2019 -  Senior Staff Specialist and Conjoint Associate Professor Discipline of Human Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/11/2018 - 31/07/2019 Senior Staff Specialist and Conjoint Senior Lecturer

Senior Staff Specialist and Conjoint Senior Lecturer

Endocrinology & Diabetes, John Hunter Hospital, NSW.

Discipline of Human Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/09/2010 - 1/11/2012 Senior Lecturer

Senior Lecturer
Head of Graduate Entry Medicine and Endocrinology lead for Biomedical Science Department of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, UK 

Imperial College London
United Kingdom
1/09/2006 - 1/09/2010 National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer

National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer
Certificate Advanced Study in Learning and Teaching (Master’s level) Department of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, UK 

Imperial College London
United Kingdom
1/09/2003 - 1/09/2006 Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellow

Thesis entitled “The role of the gut hormone oxyntomodulin in the control of body-weight” Department of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, UK 

Imperial College London
United Kingdom

Awards

Prize

Year Award
2006 Britain’s Top Younger Bioscience Researchers Award
Scientists Engineers and Technologists for Britain
2006 Britain’s Top Younger Bioscience Researchers Award
Scientists Engineers and Technologists for Britain
2005 Endocrine Society Travel Grant Award for Exceptional Research
Endocrine Society
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wynne K, 'Clinical Management of Diabetes in Pregnancy', Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics in Diabetes, John Wiley & Sons, UK 168-175 (2015)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2011 Wynne K, 'VIPomas', Oxford Textbook of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Oxford University Press, UK (2011)
DOI 10.1093/med/9780199235292.003.0653
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2009 Small CJ, Wynne K, Bloom SR, 'The gut as a second brain', Peptides in Energy Balance and Obesity: Frontiers in Nutritional Science 93-113 (2009)
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne

Journal article (35 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Rowe CW, Arthurs S, O Neill CJ, Hawthorne J, Carroll R, Wynne K, Bendinelli C, 'High-dose preoperative cholecalciferol to prevent post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia: A randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled trial', Clinical Endocrinology, 90 343-350 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objective: Post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia is a significant cause of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization, usually due to transient parathy... [more]

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Objective: Post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia is a significant cause of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization, usually due to transient parathyroid gland damage, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. We present a randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled trial of preoperative loading with high-dose cholecalciferol (300¿000 IU) to reduce post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia. Patients and Measurements: Patients (n¿=¿160) presenting for thyroidectomy at tertiary hospitals were randomized 1:1 to cholecalciferol (300¿000¿IU) or placebo 7¿days prior to thyroidectomy. Ten patients withdrew prior to surgery. The primary outcome was post-operative hypocalcaemia (corrected calcium <2.1¿mmol/L in first 180¿days). Results: The study included 150 patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves¿ disease (31%), malignancy (20%) and goitre (49%). Mean pre-enrolment vitamin D was 72¿±¿26¿nmol/L. Postoperative hypocalcaemia occurred in 21/72 (29%) assigned to cholecalciferol and 30/78 (38%) participants assigned to placebo (P¿=¿0.23). There were no differences in secondary end-points between groups. In pre-specified stratification, baseline vitamin D status did not predict hypocalcaemia, although most individuals were vitamin D replete at baseline. Post-hoc stratification by day 1 parathyroid hormone (PTH) (<10¿pg/mL, low vs =10¿pg/mL, normal) was explored due to highly divergent rates of hypocalcaemia in these groups. Using a Cox regression model, the hazard ratio for hypocalcaemia in the cholecalciferol group was 0.56 (95%CI 0.32-0.98, P¿=¿0.04) after stratification for Day 1 PTH. Further clinical benefits were observed in these subgroups. Conclusions: Pre-thyroidectomy treatment with high-dose cholecalciferol did not reduce the overall rate of hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy. In subgroups stratified by day 1 PTH status, improved clinical outcomes were noted.

DOI 10.1111/cen.13897
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne
2019 Wynne K, Devereaux B, Dornhorst A, 'Diabetes of the exocrine pancreas', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia), 34 346-354 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley &amp; Sons Australia, Ltd Diabetes of the exocrine pancreas (DEP) is a form of diabetes that occurs d... [more]

© 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd Diabetes of the exocrine pancreas (DEP) is a form of diabetes that occurs due to pancreatic disease. It is far more common than has been previously considered, with a recent study showing 1.8% of adults with new-onset diabetes should have been classified as DEP. The majority is misdiagnosed as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with DEP exhibit varying degrees of exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. Damage to the islet of Langerhans effects the secretion of hormones from the ß, a, and pancreatic polypeptide cells; the combination of low insulin, glucagon, and pancreatic polypeptide contributes to rapid fluctuations in glucose levels. This form of ¿brittle diabetes¿ may result in the poorer glycemic control observed in patients with DEP, when compared with those with T2DM. Diabetes of the exocrine pancreas has a different natural history to other forms of diabetes; patients are more likely to require early insulin initiation compared with those with T2DM. Therefore, individuals with DEP should be advised about the symptoms of decompensated hyperglycemia, although they are less likely to develop ketoacidosis. Clinicians should screen for DEP in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis, following pancreatic resection, or with co-existing cystic fibrosis or hemochromatosis. Incident diabetes may herald the onset of pancreatic ductal carcinoma in a small subset of patients. Once identified, patients with DEP can benefit from specific lifestyle advice, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, metformin treatment, appropriate insulin dosing, and monitoring. Further research is needed to establish the ideal treatment regimens to provide optimal clinical outcomes for this unique form of diabetes.

DOI 10.1111/jgh.14451
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2019 Panth N, Dias CB, Wynne K, Singh H, Garg ML, 'Medium-chain fatty acids lower postprandial lipemia: A randomized crossover trial', Clinical Nutrition, (2019)

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism Epidemiological and interventional studies have linked saturated fatty acids (SFA) with elevated lev... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism Epidemiological and interventional studies have linked saturated fatty acids (SFA) with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and increased CVD risk. However, the effects of the SFA chain length on postprandial lipemia in humans are not well elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of short, medium and long-chain SFA on postprandial blood lipids in healthy volunteers. Sixteen healthy volunteers consumed test biscuits containing 40 g of either butter (BB), coconut oil (CB) or lard (LB) in a single-blinded, randomized crossover design. Blood samples were collected fasting and 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours postprandially and assessed for blood lipids (total cholesterol, TC; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL-C; LDL-C and triglyceride, TG). The postprandial TG response following CB was 59.8% lower than following BB (p < 0.01) and 58.8% lower than LB (p < 0.01), although no difference was observed between the BB and the LB responses. The net area under the LDL-C concentration curve was significantly larger after consumption of the CB compared to the BB, despite no significant differences in postprandial net area under the TC and HDL-C concentration curves. Consumption of medium-chain SFA as CB resulted in lower postprandial TG excursions compared to short-chain SFA as BB and long-chain SFA as LB, despite their identical fat and caloric content. These results suggest that SFA differ in their potential to elevate postprandial lipid levels, and that coconut oil, a rich source of medium-chain SFA may not be as hyperlipidemic as animal fats rich in long chain SFA. Anzctr identifier: 12617000903381. Clinical trial registry number: The study was registered with the Australia New Zealand Trial registry as ACTRN12617000903381.

DOI 10.1016/j.clnu.2019.02.008
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Nisha Panth Uon, Manohar Garg, Katie-Jane Wynne
2019 Cheung AS, Wynne K, Erasmus J, Murray S, Zajac JD, 'Position statement on the hormonal management of adult transgender and gender diverse individuals', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 211 127-133 (2019)
DOI 10.5694/mja2.50259
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2019 Rowe CW, Putt E, Brentnall O, Gebuehr A, Allabyrne J, Woods A, Wynne K, 'An intravenous insulin protocol designed for pregnancy reduces neonatal hypoglycaemia following betamethasone administration in women with gestational diabetes', Diabetic Medicine, 36 228-236 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Diabetes UK Aims: Marked hyperglycaemia is common following betamethasone administration in women with gestational diabetes (GDM), and may contribute to neonatal hypoglycae... [more]

© 2018 Diabetes UK Aims: Marked hyperglycaemia is common following betamethasone administration in women with gestational diabetes (GDM), and may contribute to neonatal hypoglycaemia. Validated protocols to deliver glycaemic stability following betamethasone are lacking. We hypothesized that an intravenous insulin (IVI) protocol for pregnancy-specific glycaemic targets (Pregnancy-IVI) would achieve greater at-target glycaemic control than a generic adult intravenous insulin protocol (Adult-IVI), and may reduce neonatal hypoglycaemia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of the performance Adult-IVI and Pregnancy-IVI following betamethasone in GDM, sequentially implemented at a tertiary hospital, without change in indication for IVI. Cases were identified by electronic record search. Primary outcome was percentage of on-IVI time with at-target glycaemia [blood glucose level (BGL) 3.8¿7¿mmol/l]. Secondary outcomes were time with critical hyperglycaemia (BGL >¿10¿mmol/l), occurrence of maternal hypoglycaemia (BGL <¿3.8¿mmol/l), and incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia (BGL =¿2.5¿mmol/l) if betamethasone was administered within 48¿h of birth. Results: The cohorts comprised 151 women (Adult-IVI n¿=¿86; Pregnancy-IVI n¿=¿65). The primary outcome was 68% time-at-target [95% confidence interval (CI) 64¿71%) for Pregnancy-IVI compared with 55% (95% CI 50¿60%) for Adult-IVI (P¿=¿0.0002). Critical maternal hyperglycaemia (0% vs. 2%, P¿=¿0.02) and hypoglycaemia (2% vs. 12%, P¿=¿0.02) were both lower with Pregnancy-IVI than Adult-IVI. Neonatal hypoglycaemia was less common after Pregnancy-IVI (29%) than after Adult-IVI (54%, P¿=¿0.03). A multiple logistic regression model adjusting for potential confounders gave an odds ratio for neonatal hypoglycaemia with Pregnancy-IVI of 0.27 (95% CI 0.10¿0.76, P¿=¿0.01). Conclusions: An IVI protocol designed for pregnancy effectively controlled maternal hyperglycaemia following betamethasone administration in GDM. This is the first intervention to show a reduction in betamethasone-associated neonatal hypoglycaemia, linked with optimum maternal glycaemic control.

DOI 10.1111/dme.13864
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne, Christopher W Rowe
2018 Panth N, Abbott KA, Dias CB, Wynne K, Garg ML, 'Differential effects of medium- and long-chain saturated fatty acids on blood lipid profile: A systematic review and meta-analysis', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 108 675-687 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 American Society for Nutrition. Background Medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs) may affect circulating lipids and lipoproteins differently than long-chain saturated f... [more]

© 2018 American Society for Nutrition. Background Medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFAs) may affect circulating lipids and lipoproteins differently than long-chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs), but the results from human intervention trials have been equivocal. Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether MCFAs and LCSFAs have differential impacts on blood lipids and lipoproteins. Design Five databases were searched (EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Scopus) until April 2018, and published clinical trials investigating the differential effects of dietary MCFAs and LCSFAs on blood lipids were included. Searches were limited to the English language and to studies with adults aged >18 y. Where possible, studies were pooled for meta-analysis using RevMan 5.2. The principle summary measure was the mean difference between groups calculated using the random-effects model. Results Eleven eligible crossover and 1 parallel trial were identified with a total of 299 participants [weighted mean ± SD age: 38 ± 3 y; weighted mean ± SD body mass index (kg/m 2): 24 ± 2]. All studies were pooled for the meta-analysis. Diets enriched with MCFAs led to significantly higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations than diets enriched with LCSFAs (0.11 mmol/L; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.15 mmol/L) with no effect on triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and total cholesterol concentrations. Consumption of diets rich in MCFAs significantly increased apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) concentrations compared with diets rich in LCSFAs (0.08 g/L; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.14 g/L). There was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity for HDL cholesterol, apoA-I, and triglyceride concentrations; however, significant heterogeneity was observed for the total cholesterol (I 2 = 49%) and LDL cholesterol analysis (I 2 = 58%). Conclusion The findings of this research demonstrate a differential effect of MCFAs and LCSFAs on HDL cholesterol concentrations. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the mechanism by which the lipid profile is altered. This trial was registered at www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO as CRD42017078277.

DOI 10.1093/ajcn/nqy167
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne, Nisha Panth Uon, Manohar Garg
2018 Chua TH, Ly M, Thillainadesan S, Wynne K, 'From renal salt wasting to SIADH', BMJ Case Reports, 2018 (2018)

© 2018 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. All rights reserved. Hyponatraemia is common following major head injury and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A 20-year-old... [more]

© 2018 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. All rights reserved. Hyponatraemia is common following major head injury and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A 20-year-old man presented with reduced consciousness after head trauma and was found to have a fractured skull base with bilateral frontal contusions. On day 3 of his admission, he developed hyponatraemia with raised urine sodium and osmolality, despite receiving dexamethasone and intravenous fluid therapy. His hyponatraemia worsened after the treatment with fluid restriction and oral salt. He was in negative fluid balance suggesting possible renal salt wasting. A trial of isotonic normal saline resulted in a further fall in serum sodium level. He was subsequently treated for suspected syndrome of inappropriate ADH with a hypertonic (3%) saline infusion. His sodium level and neurological status improved. This case report illustrates the confounding factors that commonly affect clinical decision-making when treating patients with hyponatraemia following head injury. The guidelines for diagnosis and management are discussed.

DOI 10.1136/bcr-2017-223606
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2017 Joshi T, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Wynne K, 'The duration of intrapartum maternal hyperglycaemia predicts neonatal hypoglycaemia in women with pre-existing diabetes', Diabetic Medicine, 34 725-731 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: There is a high incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia in neonates born to mothers with pre-existing diabetes. This often necessitates admission to the neonat... [more]

© 2017 Diabetes UK Aim: There is a high incidence of neonatal hypoglycaemia in neonates born to mothers with pre-existing diabetes. This often necessitates admission to the neonatal intensive care. Guidelines suggest maintaining intrapartum blood glucose levels (BGLs) of 4¿7 mmol/l in women with diabetes to reduce the risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia. This study assessed whether intrapartum BGLs in women with pre-gestational Type 1 and 2 diabetes were predictive of neonatal hypoglycaemia. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 261 births delivered at a tertiary hospital in Australia from 2009 to 2014. Results: There were 122 cases of neonatal hypoglycaemia (glucose = 2.6 mmol/l) in 261 births (47%). The mothers in the neonatal hypoglycaemia group spent less time with BGL in the range 4¿7 mmol/l [55 ± 37% vs. 65 ± 35%, P = 0.02; odds ratio (OR) 0.992, P = 0.03] and more time with BGL in the 7¿10 mmol/l range (31 ± 34% vs. 18 ± 27%, P = 0.003; OR 1.013, P = 0.003) compared with those without neonatal hypoglycaemia. Although statistically significant, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that time spent with maternal BGLs in the range 4¿7 mmol/l [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.58] or 7¿10 mmol (AUC = 0.60) was not strong enough to be a useful clinical predictor of neonatal hypoglycaemia. HbA1c in the second trimester of pregnancy (P = 0.02, OR 1.42) and percentage time spent in BGL range of 7¿10 mmol/l (P = 0.001, OR 1.02) were both associated with a risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia in a logistic regression model. HbA1c in the third trimester (P = 0.07, OR 1.28) approached, but did not reach, significance. Conclusions: These data support a BGL range of 4¿7 mmol/l as an intrapartum target. Glycaemic control in the second trimester is associated with neonatal hypoglycaemia. Improvement in ante- and intrapartum glycaemic control may reduce neonatal hypoglycaemia in women with pre-existing diabetes.

DOI 10.1111/dme.13337
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Attia, Katie-Jane Wynne, Christopher Oldmeadow
2017 Rowe CW, Haider AS, Viswanathan D, Jones M, Attia J, Wynne K, Acharya S, 'Insulin resistance correlates with maculopathy and severity of retinopathy in young adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus', Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 131 154-160 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Aims To assess the relationship between insulin resistance (IR), retinopathy and maculopathy in young adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-se... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. Aims To assess the relationship between insulin resistance (IR), retinopathy and maculopathy in young adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study at a regional Australian tertiary hospital. Retinal pathology, assessed by colour fundus photography, was correlated with two surrogate measures of IR: estimated Glucose Disposal Rate (eGDR) and Insulin Sensitivity Score (ISS), where lower scores reflect greater IR. Results 107 patients were recruited, with mean age 24.7¿years, 53% male, and mean duration of disease 10.8¿years. Mean eGDR scores (5.6¿vs 8.0 p¿<¿0.001) and ISS (4.7¿vs 7.9, p¿<¿0.001) were lower in subjects having at least moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR; relative to nil/mild-NPDR). Similarly, mean eGDR (4.2¿vs 6.2, p¿=¿0.001) and ISS (3.8¿vs 6.1, p¿=¿0.003) were lower in patients with maculopathy. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was used to control for confounding. For retinopathy severity, a unit increase in eGDR or ISS (representing lower IR) was associated with a 50% decrease in odds of moderate-NPDR or worse (eGDR OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.32¿0.77, p¿=¿0.002; ISS OR 0.49, 95%CI 0.29¿0.84, p¿=¿0.01). A unit increase in eGDR or ISS was associated with a 46¿56% decrease in odds of maculopathy (eGDR OR 0.54, 95%CI 0.37¿0.81, p¿=¿0.003; ISS OR 0.44, 95%CI 0.22¿0.88, p¿=¿0.02). Conclusions IR correlates with more severe retinopathy in young adults with Type 1¿DM. This is the first description of a correlation between IR and maculopathy in Type 1¿DM, warranting further evaluation. Prospective studies examining whether reducing IR can improve microvascular complications are required.

DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.06.022
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne, John Attia
2017 Chan DWC, Wu AIY, Wynne K, 'Intracranial hypotension causing pituitary enlargement', BMJ Case Reports, 2017 (2017)
DOI 10.1136/bcr-2017-220057
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2016 Rollo ME, Aguiar EJ, Williams RL, Wynne K, Kriss M, Callister R, Collins CE, 'Ehealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management', Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 9 381-390 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Rollo et al. Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake ... [more]

© 2016 Rollo et al. Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

DOI 10.2147/DMSO.S95247
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Megan Rollo, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Katie-Jane Wynne
2016 Rowe CW, Murray K, Woods A, Gupta S, Smith R, Wynne K, 'Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty', ENDOCRINOLOGY DIABETES AND METABOLISM CASE REPORTS, (2016)
DOI 10.1530/EDM-16-0071
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne, Roger Smith, Christopher W Rowe
2013 Cegla J, Jones B, Seyani L, Papadoulou D, Wynne K, Martin NM, et al., 'Comparison of the overnight metyrapone and glucagon stimulation tests in the assessment of secondary hypoadrenalism', CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, 78 738-742 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/cen.12043
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2012 Ali SN, Tan T, Meeran K, Wynne K, 'CASE REPORT A man with anxiety, confusion, and red eyes', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 344 (2012)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.e4443
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2011 Clarke C, Hui E, Oliver N, Wynne K, 'An unconscious patient', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 343 (2011)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.d7266
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2011 Wynne K, 'Oxford textbook of Endocrinology and Diabetes Chapter 6.7 Vipomas', Oxford Textbook of Endocrinology and Diabetes, (2011)
DOI 10.1093/med/9780199235292.001.1
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2010 Field BCT, Wren AM, Peters V, Baynes KCR, Martin NM, Patterson M, et al., 'PYY3-36 and Oxyntomodulin Can Be Additive in Their Effect on Food Intake in Overweight and Obese Humans', DIABETES, 59 1635-1639 (2010)
DOI 10.2337/db09-1859
Citations Scopus - 80Web of Science - 67
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2010 Wynne K, Field BCT, Bloom SR, 'The mechanism of action for oxyntomodulin in the regulation of obesity', CURRENT OPINION IN INVESTIGATIONAL DRUGS, 11 1151-1157 (2010)
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2009 Ashby DR, Ford HE, Wynne KJ, Wren AM, Murphy KG, Busbridge M, et al., 'Sustained appetite improvement in malnourished dialysis patients by daily ghrelin treatment', KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL, 76 199-206 (2009)
DOI 10.1038/ki.2009.114
Citations Scopus - 102Web of Science - 81
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2009 Banerjee A, Wynne K, Tan T, Hatfield EC, Martin NM, Williamson C, Meeran K, 'High dose cabergoline therapy for a resistant macroprolactinoma during pregnancy', CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, 70 812-813 (2009)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03425.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2009 Wynne K, 'The role of the gut hormone oxyntomodulin in the regulation of body-weight. (2009)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2008 Chaudhri OB, Wynne K, Bloom SR, 'Can Gut Hormones Control Appetite and Prevent Obesity?', DIABETES CARE, 31 S284-S289 (2008)
DOI 10.2337/dc08-s269
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2008 Wynne K, Chaudhri O, Gorrigan R, Tan T, Meeran K, 'A case of severe hyponatraemia', BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 337 (2008)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.a2377
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2007 Wynne K, Wren A, Meeran K, 'Putative auto-infarct of a pancreatic gastrinoma', Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer, 38 135-136 (2007)
DOI 10.1007/s12029-008-9025-z
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2006 Wynne K, Park AJ, Small CJ, Meeran K, Ghatei MA, Frost GS, Bloom SR, 'Oxyntomodulin increases energy expenditure in addition to decreasing energy intake in overweight and obese humans: a randomised controlled trial', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBESITY, 30 1729-1736 (2006)
DOI 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803344
Citations Scopus - 205Web of Science - 187
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2006 Wynne K, Bloom SR, 'The role of oxyntomodulin and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) in appetite control', NATURE CLINICAL PRACTICE ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM, 2 612-620 (2006)
DOI 10.1038/ncpendmet0318
Citations Scopus - 60Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2006 le Roux CW, Batterham RL, Aylwin SJB, Patterson M, Borg CM, Wynne KJ, et al., 'Attenuated peptide YY release in obese subjects is associated with reduced satiety', ENDOCRINOLOGY, 147 3-8 (2006)
DOI 10.1210/en.2005-0972
Citations Scopus - 374Web of Science - 339
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2005 Wynne K, Park AJ, Small CJ, Patterson M, Ellis SM, Murphy KG, et al., 'Subcutaneous oxyntomodulin reduces body weight in overweight and obese subjects - A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial', DIABETES, 54 2390-2395 (2005)
DOI 10.2337/diabetes.54.8.2390
Citations Scopus - 258Web of Science - 238
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2005 Wynne K, Stanley S, McGowan B, Bloom S, 'Appetite control', JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, 184 291-318 (2005)
DOI 10.1677/joe.1.05866
Citations Scopus - 374Web of Science - 335
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2005 Stanley S, Wynne K, McGowan B, Bloom S, 'Hormonal regulation of food intake', PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIEWS, 85 1131-1158 (2005)
DOI 10.1152/physrev.00015.2004
Citations Scopus - 258Web of Science - 233
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2005 Wynne K, Giannitsopoulou K, Small CJ, Patterson M, Frost G, Ghatei MA, et al., 'Subcutaneous ghrelin enhances acute food intake in malnourished patients who receive maintenance peritoneal dialysis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial', JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY, 16 2111-2118 (2005)
DOI 10.1681/ASN.2005010039
Citations Scopus - 162Web of Science - 141
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2005 Bloom S, Wynne K, Chaudhri O, 'Gut feeling - the secret of satiety?', CLINICAL MEDICINE, 5 147-152 (2005)
DOI 10.7861/clinmedicine.5-2-147
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2004 Stanley S, Wynne K, Bloom S, 'Gastrointestinal satiety signals - III. Glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, and pancreatic polypeptide', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-GASTROINTESTINAL AND LIVER PHYSIOLOGY, 286 G693-G697 (2004)
DOI 10.1152/ajpgi.00536.2003
Citations Scopus - 86Web of Science - 62
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2004 Wynne K, Stanley S, Bloom S, 'The gut and regulation of body weight', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 89 2576-2582 (2004)

Signals generated by the gastrointestinal tract are able to regulate appetite and influence body weight. Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide produced by the stomach. Satiety signals ... [more]

Signals generated by the gastrointestinal tract are able to regulate appetite and influence body weight. Ghrelin is an orexigenic peptide produced by the stomach. Satiety signals derived from the intestine and pancreas include peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, and cholecystokinin. Signals from the gut and adipose tissue are integrated in the central nervous system to provide energy homeostasis. Knowledge of the body's control of appetite is important because we strive to combat obesity in man.

DOI 10.1210/jc.2004-0189
Citations Scopus - 98
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
1999 Rogers RD, Everitt BJ, Baldacchino A, Blackshaw AJ, Swainson R, Wynne K, et al., 'Dissociable deficits in the decision-making cognition of chronic amphetamine abusers, opiate abusers, patients with focal damage to prefrontal cortex, and tryptophan-depleted normal volunteers: evidence for monoaminergic mechanisms.', Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 20 322-339 (1999)
DOI 10.1016/s0893-133x(98)00091-8
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
Show 32 more journal articles

Conference (14 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Rowe C, Woods A, Wynne K, 'Transient extreme insulin resistance in pregnancy following betamethasone administration managed with high-dose intravenous insulin: case series and literature review.', Sydney, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne
2019 Rowe C, Delbridge M, Brown K, Watkins B, Addley J, Wynne K, 'An insulin infusion designed for pregnancy provides comparable glycaemic control following betamethasone in women with gestational and pre-existing diabetes, although hypoglycaemia is more common in pre-existing diabetes.', Sydney, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne, Christopher W Rowe
2018 Pradeepan S, Pullen S, Viljevac N, Murdoch T, Bone E, Stormer J, et al., 'VLED is an effective real-life treatment for severe complex obesity, and improves obstructive sleep apnoea', Brisbane, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne, Surinder Baines, Christopher W Rowe
2018 Arora M, Walker K, Duvivier RJ, Wynne K, 'The effect of an educational session on attitudes toward delivery of transgender healthcare by medical students and general practitioners in the Hunter region', CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, Perth, AUSTRALIA (2018)
Co-authors Robbert Duvivier, Katie-Jane Wynne
2018 Chua TH, Ly M, Thillainadesan S, Wynne K, 'From renal salt-wasting to SIADH: A case report', CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, Perth, AUSTRALIA (2018)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2018 Wynne K, Wallbank R, 'Chromosomes, hormones and gender: Transsexualism in a patient with Klinefelter syndrome', CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, Perth, AUSTRALIA (2018)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2017 Marlow A, Rowe C, Anderson D, Wynne K, King BR, Smart CE, 'Children and young adults with type 1 diabetes are more overweight and obese than reference populations, and this worsens with age', Tasmania (2017)
Co-authors Carmel Smart, Bruce King, Katie-Jane Wynne, Christopher W Rowe
2016 Rowe C, Wynne K, Acharya SA, 'High rates of obesity in young adults with type 1 diabetes.', Gold Coast (2016)
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne
2016 Rowe C, Pain O, Ronthal R, Buckmaster C, Morrison S, Wynne K, 'Betamethasone leads to acute hyperglycaemia in women with GDM.', Gold Coast (2016)
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne
2015 Goodsall TM, Wynne K, Baker D, 'Severe symptomatic hypomagnesaemia due to proton pump inhibitors: pathophysiology and management of electrolyte derangement.', Alice Springs (2015)
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2015 Rowe C, Wynne K, Luu J, Quach T, Jackel D, Perry L, Acharya S, 'Emergency Department (ED) utilisation in young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) under care of a tertiary clinic.', Adelaide (2015)
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Lin Perry, Katie-Jane Wynne
2013 Rowe C, Joshi T, Wynne K, 'Remembering Halsted Mediastinal Mass Complicating Graves disease', Madrid, Spain (2013)
Co-authors Christopher W Rowe, Katie-Jane Wynne
2010 Tadross JA, Patterson M, Wynne KJ, Patel S, Suzuki K, Ghatei MA, Bloom SR, 'Nesfatin suppresses feeding and stimulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis', ENDOCRINE JOURNAL (2010)
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
2004 Wynne K, Stanley S, Bloom S, 'The gut and regulation of body weight', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM, New Orleans, LA (2004)
DOI 10.1210/jc.2004-0189
Citations Web of Science - 91
Co-authors Katie-Jane Wynne
Show 11 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 12
Total funding $806,496

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $21,013

Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) as a novel biomarker for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes$20,063

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Katie Wynne, Professor Manohar Garg, Mr Rohith Thota
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900257
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON Y

Legal Rights, Protections and Barriers for the Trans and Gender Diverse Community across the Lifespan$950

Funding body: ACON Health

Funding body ACON Health
Project Team

Wynne K on behalf of the Hunter Gender Alliance

Scheme IDAHOBIT Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20182 grants / $34,409

Improving Timely Access to Evidence-based Transgender Health Services: A Novel Web-based Approach$27,809

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team

Nunn L, Lopez P, Crock P and Wynne K

Scheme Innovation Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Funding for a Hunter Region Conference for people that identify as Trans and Gender Diverse their allies and health professionals$6,600

Funding body: The Aurora Project

Funding body The Aurora Project
Project Team

Mills J, Kelly S, Kelly J and Wynne K on behalf of the Hunter Gender Alliance

Scheme Aurora Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20174 grants / $163,566

Evaluation of a type 2 diabetes risk reduction program for women with recent gestational diabetes$59,911

Funding body: Diabetes Australia

Funding body Diabetes Australia
Project Team

Rollo M, Collins C, Callister R, Hutchesson M, Aguiar E, Wynne K and Young A

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for the prevention of gestational diabetes: A double-blind randomized controlled trial $57,227

Funding body: BASF (Asia Pacific)

Funding body BASF (Asia Pacific)
Project Team Professor Manohar Garg, Mrs Kylie Abbott, Doctor Sham Acharya, Associate Professor Tracy Burrows, Doctor Katie Wynne, Dr Wendy Carseldine
Scheme Newtrition Asia Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1601197
Type Of Funding C3211 - International For profit
Category 3211
UON Y

Active pregnancy intervention for women with first trimester hyperglycaemia$24,575

Funding body: John Hunter Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Charitable Trust
Project Team

Ewald B, Wynne K

Scheme Charitable trust grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

Demand, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a type 2 diabetes risk reduction program for women with recent gestational diabetes$21,853

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)
Project Team

Collins C, Callister R, Rollo M, Hutchesson M, Aguiar E, Wynne K and Young A

Scheme Diabetes Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20161 grants / $23,848

Sweetdreams: Targeting obesity to improve Obstructive Sleep Apnoea and Health Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes$23,848

Funding body: Hunter New England Area Health Service

Funding body Hunter New England Area Health Service
Project Team

Pullen S, Baines S, Pradeepan S, Osmotherly P and Wynne K

Scheme Innovation Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20151 grants / $28,660

A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of high-dose pre-operative cholecalciferol to prevent post-thyroidectomy hypocalcaemia$28,660

Funding body: John Hunter Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Charitable Trust
Project Team

Arthurs S, Carroll R, Wynne K and Bendinelli C

Scheme Charitable trust grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding C1700 - Aust Competitive - Other
Category 1700
UON N

20071 grants / $279,000

Appetite Control$279,000

Funding body: Higher Education Funding Council for England

Funding body Higher Education Funding Council for England
Project Team

Wynne K and Bloom SR

Scheme Higher Level Skills Partnership
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20031 grants / $256,000

Is the loss of appetite sustained weight reduction after gastric bypass surgery due to changes in two gut hormones?$256,000

Funding body: Wellcome Trust

Funding body Wellcome Trust
Project Team

Wynne K and Bloom SR

Scheme Research Training Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current2

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD The Determinants of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Type 1 Diabetes PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Metabolically Healthy Obesity and Its Association with Adverse Health Outcomes PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 Masters Differential Effects of Saturated Fatty Acids of Varying Chain Length on Lipid Profiles in Healthy Individuals M Philosophy (Nutritl Biochem), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Katie Wynne

Position

Conjoint Associate Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email katie-jane.wynne@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 4921 4380

Office

Location John Hunter Hospital

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