Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani

Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

My childhood was split between 3 continents, Australia, America and Europe. I went to Medical School in Sheffield UK and commenced my early surgical training there. I was awarded the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1984 and promptly moved to Australia where I embarked on advanced surgical training at the Royal Newcastle Hopsital. I was awarded the Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons in 1989 and undertook a years post fellowship training in Upper GI and HPB surgery (an emerging subspecialty at the time) at Flinders Medical Centre in Adelaide in 1989.

I returned to Newcastle as a Lecturer in 1990 on grants from RACS and subsequently became a Staff Specialist at The John Hunter Hospital upon its opening in 1991. I worked at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge in 2000 on a semi-sabbatical before returning to Newcastle as a VMO. I was awarded an MD from the University of Newcastle by thesis in 2001 (Towards better Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Hunter Region).

I have been the Conjoint Professor of Surgery and the Medical Director of Surgery at the John Hunter since 2015 although my clinical work has been limited since 2018.


Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Surgery

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 90
111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified 10

Professional Experience

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2015 -  Medical Director of Surgery John Hunter Hospital

Surgical Leadership

John Hunter Hospital
Surgery
Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
TRAU6002 Master of Traumatology
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Post Grad Teaching 1/01/2018 - 18/08/2019
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (56 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Eliezer DD, Holmes M, Sullivan G, Gani J, Pockney P, Gould T, et al., 'High-Risk Emergency Laparotomy in Australia: Comparing NELA, P-POSSUM, and ACS-NSQIP Calculators', Journal of Surgical Research, 246 300-304 (2020)

© 2019 Background: The National Emergency Laparotomy Audit (NELA) highlights the importance of identifying high-risk patients due to the potential for significant morbidity and mo... [more]

© 2019 Background: The National Emergency Laparotomy Audit (NELA) highlights the importance of identifying high-risk patients due to the potential for significant morbidity and mortality. The NELA risk prediction calculator (NRPC) was developed from data in England and Wales and is one of several calculators available. We seek to determine the utility of NRPC in the Australian population and compare it with Portsmouth Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enumeration of mortality and Morbidity (P-POSSUM) and American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) calculators. Methods: A retrospective review of all emergency laparotomies undertaken at four Australian centers was performed between January 2016 and December 2017. Data extracted from patient records were used to calculate NRPC, ACS-NSQIP, and P-POSSUM scores for 30-day mortality risk. The sensitivity of NRPC was assessed using the NELA high-risk cohort score of =10% and this was compared with the other two calculators. Results: There were 562 (M = 261, mean age = 66 [±17] y) patient charts reviewed in the study period. 59 patients died within 30 d (10.5%). NRPC was able to identify 52 (sensitivity = 88.1%) of these as being within the high-risk group. Using the NELA high-risk cutoff, NRPC identified 52 deaths of 205 (25.4%) high-risk patients, P-POSSUM identified 46 of 245 (18.8%), and ACS-NSQIP identified 46 of 201 (22.9%). Using the McNemar test, no significant difference was noted between NRPC and P-POSSUM (P = 0.07) or NRPC and ACS-NSQIP (P = 0.18). Conclusions: In the Australian context, the NRPC is a highly sensitive and useful tool for predicting 30-day mortality in high-risk emergency laparotomy patients and is comparable with P-POSSUM and ACS-NSQIP calculators.

DOI 10.1016/j.jss.2019.09.024
Co-authors Peter Pockney
2019 Clarke L, Pockney P, Gillies D, Foster R, Gani J, 'Direct access colonoscopy service for bowel cancer screening produces a positive financial benefit for patients and local health districts', Internal Medicine Journal, 49 729-733 (2019)

© 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: A direct access colonoscopy service (DACS) for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program has become standard of care ... [more]

© 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: A direct access colonoscopy service (DACS) for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program has become standard of care in Newcastle public hospitals because of the effect it has on time to colonoscopy. Cost-effectiveness has not been studied to date. Aim: The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the cost-effectiveness of a DACS. Methods: Data were collected for patients referred to DACS between January 2014 and June 2016, and patients who were treated on the normal service pathway in 2013 prior to the introduction of the process. A cost-benefit analysis from the patient¿s and local health district¿s perspective was undertaken. Results: Introduction of the DACS produces a direct financial gain to patients in the form of reduced direct costs. It produces an indirect financial gain in terms of increased productivity if the patient is in work, and of increased leisure time if not in work. The DACS is modest income generating for the local health district, an evaluation which is sensitive to internal policies for distribution of government funding within a district. The DACS increases the availability of outpatient consultations to other patients, which is not a quantifiable economic benefit, but is likely to be an overall health benefit. Conclusion: The introduction of DACS in the public system in Australia is of financial benefit to patients and to the local health service provider. It is likely to produce health benefits to non-screening patients, by means of freeing consultations to be used for other indications.

DOI 10.1111/imj.14149
Co-authors Peter Pockney
2019 Clarke L, Pockney P, Gillies D, Foster R, Gani J, 'Time to colonoscopy for patients accessing the direct access colonoscopy service compared to the normal service in Newcastle, Australia', Internal Medicine Journal, 49 1132-1137 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: The 2017 National Bowel Cancer Screening Program report records a median time from positive faecal occult blood test to... [more]

© 2018 Royal Australasian College of Physicians Background: The 2017 National Bowel Cancer Screening Program report records a median time from positive faecal occult blood test to colonoscopy of 53 days. There is some intrinsic delay in accessing specialist medical opinion prior to colonoscopy. Aim: To examine the effect of the introduction of a Direct Access Colonoscopy Service (DACS). Methods: Using prospectively maintained databases, patients undergoing normal service (NS) colonoscopy and those referred to DACS were compared. The primary outcome measure was the time from general practitioner (GP) referral to colonoscopy. Secondary outcome measures included the proportion of patients who met the current recommended 30 days from GP referral to colonoscopy, and the proportion of patients who waited longer than 90 days. Results: There were 289 patients in the NS group, and 601 patients who progressed on the DACS pathway. The demographics of both groups were comparable. DACS patients had a median waiting time of 49 days, significantly shorter than NS patients whose median wait was 79 days (P < 0.0001). Approximately 15.1% patients in the DACS group had their colonoscopy within 30 days from GP referral, significantly better than in the NS group (4.5%, P < 0.001). In the NS group, 41.2% patients waited longer than 90 days from GP referral to colonoscopy, compared with 16.3% in the DACS group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: DACS reduces waiting times to colonoscopy and is associated with an increased proportion of patients undergoing colonoscopy in a timely manner.

DOI 10.1111/imj.14157
Co-authors Peter Pockney
2019 March B, Leigh L, Brussius-Coelho M, Holmes M, Pockney P, Gani J, 'Can CRP velocity in right iliac fossa pain identify patients for intervention? A prospective observational cohort study', Surgeon, 17 284-290 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Introduction: Previous studies have shown single CRP meas... [more]

© 2018 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Introduction: Previous studies have shown single CRP measurements at time of presentation to have limited predictive benefit for appendicitis. Our objective was to determine the diagnostic utility of serial CRP measurements (to determine CRP velocity [CRPv]) in patients with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain. Methods: A single-centre prospective observational study was conducted on adult patients admitted with RIF pain. CRP was measured on admission, at midnight, and the following morning. Appendicitis was diagnosed on histopathology, or diagnostic imaging in non-operatively managed patients. Therapeutic interventions included all appropriate operative procedures and effective non-operative treatment with antibiotics. Logistic regression was used to generate predictors of therapeutic intervention, and then used to create a new risk score incorporating CRPv. Results: 98 of 112 (87.5%) participants had complete CRP data. 58 patients met the criteria for appendicitis (59.2%). Most patients presented with intermediate Modified Alvarado Scores (MAS) 5¿6 (40.8%) or Appendicitis Inflammatory Response Scores (AIRS) 5¿8 (49%). Our risk score had an AUROC of 0.88 (95% CI 0.81¿0.96) in predicting therapeutic intervention. This score was superior to MAS, AIRS, and single admission biomarker measurements. Patients with an increasing CRPv had 14 times the odds (OR 14.07, 95% CI 0.63¿315.2) of complicated appendicitis, and no cases of complicated appendicitis were observed in patients with a flat CRPv. Conclusions: CRP velocity is superior to single CRP at predicting intervention. Our v-Score shows promise as a decision making-aide by predicting the need for surgical intervention in RIF pain. A flat CRPv identifies a group of patients with a very low risk of complicated appendicitis.

DOI 10.1016/j.surge.2018.08.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peter Pockney
2018 Rutledge A, Carroll G, Smith S, Gani J, 'Response to Re: How to do it: use of the Alexis wound protector as a laparostomy device', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 88 117-118 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/ans.14270
Co-authors Stephen Smith
2017 Joshi T, Woodford P, Maiti K, Smith R, Gani J, Acharya S, 'GIANT RETROPERITONEAL TERATOMA ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED POSTOPERATIVE ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY: CRH AND ACTH SECRETION FROM TERATOMA?', AACE Clinical Case Reports, 3 e8-e11 (2017)
DOI 10.4158/ep15785.cr
2017 Gani JS, 'How to do it: Use of the Alexis wound protector as a laparostomy device', ANZJSurg, (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ans.14097
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Stephen Smith
2017 Burnett D, Gani JS, 'Routine magnetic resonance imaging is not the panacea to common duct stones', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 87 743-744 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ans.14105
2016 Burnett D, Gani J, 'Response to Re: Single-stage laparoscopic cholecystectomy and intraoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: is this strategy feasible in Australia?', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 86 1069-1069 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/ans.13797
2016 Burmeister EA, Jordan SJ, O'Connell DL, Beesley VL, Goldstein D, Gooden HM, et al., 'Using a Delphi process to determine optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer.', Asia-Pacific journal of clinical oncology, 12 105-114 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12450
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
2016 March B, Burnett D, Gani J, 'Single-stage laparoscopic cholecystectomy and intraoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: is this strategy feasible in Australia?', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 86 874-877 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Currently in Australasia, concomitant cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis are usually managed with two procedures: laparoscop... [more]

© 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Currently in Australasia, concomitant cholecystolithiasis and choledocholithiasis are usually managed with two procedures: laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and pre or postoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This approach exposes the patient to the risk of complications from the common bile duct stone(s) while awaiting ERCP, the risks of the ERCP itself (particularly pancreatitis) and the need for a second anaesthetic. This article explores the evidence for a newer hybrid approach, single stage LC and intraoperative ERCP (SSLCE) and compares this approach with the commonly used alternatives. SSLCE offers reduced rates of pancreatitis, reduced length of hospital stay and reduced cost compared with the two-stage approach and requires only one anaesthetic. There is a reduced risk of bile leak compared with procedures that involve a choledochotomy, and ductal clearance rates are superior to trans-cystic exploration and equivalent to the standard two-stage approach. Barriers to widespread implementation relate largely to operating theatre logistics and availability of appropriate endoscopic expertise, although when bile duct stones are anticipated these issues are manageable. There is compelling justification in the literature to gather prospective evidence surrounding SSLCE in the Australian Healthcare system.

DOI 10.1111/ans.13676
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2014 March B, Gillies D, Gani J, 'Appendicectomies performed > 48 hours after admission to a dedicated acute general surgical unit', Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 96 614-617 (2014)

Introduction: Acute general surgical units (AGSUs) are changing the way in which acute appendicitis is managed. In the AGSU at John Hunter Hospital, some patients wait more than 4... [more]

Introduction: Acute general surgical units (AGSUs) are changing the way in which acute appendicitis is managed. In the AGSU at John Hunter Hospital, some patients wait more than 48 hours from admission to undergo an appendicectomy, usually because they are not unwell enough to precipitate an operation before that time. We analysed this subgroup of appendicectomy patients to determine how effectively they are being managed and how this might be improved. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted of all patients who received an appendicectomy while admitted under the AGSU at John Hunter Hospital in the five years between January 2009 and December 2013. Results: A total of 1,039 appendicectomies were performed in the study period, with 81 patients (7.8%) waiting > 48 hours for their operation (delayed appendicectomy group). Overall, the negative appendicectomy (NA) rate was 21.6%; the NA rate in delayed appendicectomies was 50.62% and a non-therapeutic operation occurred in 47% of this group (n=38). No significant difference was found in the incidence of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis between patients having surgery in <48 hours and the delayed appendicectomy groups (11.2% vs 9.9%, p=0.85). A combination of negative diagnostic imaging result, a normal white cell count and normal C-reactive protein (ie a negative 'triple test') was the best predictor of a negative appendicectomy (p=0.0158, negative predictive value: 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.99), in the delayed appendicectomy group. Conclusions: In the delayed appendicectomy group, the incidence of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis was not significantly different from that found in patients having appendicectomy performed sooner. However, the NA and non-therapeutic operation rates were unacceptably high. An appendix triple test can improve diagnostic accuracy significantly without an unacceptable rise in the rates of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis.

DOI 10.1308/003588414X14055925058832
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
2014 Ho YM, Gani J, Draganic BD, Smith SR, 'Bladeless stoma creation using muscle separation technology: a novel technique', TECHNIQUES IN COLOPROCTOLOGY, 18 299-300 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1007/s10151-013-1041-8
Co-authors Stephen Smith
2013 Gillies D, Lack J, Gani J, Proietto T, 'IDENTIFYING SHORTCOMINGS AND VARIATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, 9 148-148 (2013)
2013 Gani JS, '21st century appendicitis: selecting non-operative winners', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 83 6-7 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/ans.12028
Citations Scopus - 2
2012 Gani J, Lewis K, 'Hepaticocholecystoenterostomy as an alternative to hepaticojejunostomy for biliary bypass', Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 94 472-475 (2012)

Introduction: Hepaticojejunostomy is the standard biliary bypass technique for periampullary cancer when trial dissection reveals unresectable disease or endoscopic stent placemen... [more]

Introduction: Hepaticojejunostomy is the standard biliary bypass technique for periampullary cancer when trial dissection reveals unresectable disease or endoscopic stent placement is not possible. This anastomosis can be technically demanding and potentially difficult. The simpler technique of hepaticocholecystoenterostomy (HCE) has only previously been reported in very limited numbers and without outcome data. Methods: All patients undergoing HCE for the management of periampullary cancer were identified from a prospectively maintained computerised database of a single surgeon and were reviewed retrospectively. The HCE technique achieves a biliary bypass by two anastomoses, using the gallbladder as a conduit. It involves an anastomosis of the infundibulum of the gallbladder to the common hepatic duct followed by a second anastomosis of the gallbladder fundus to the proximal small bowel. Results: From 1996 to 2010, 30 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma required a biliary bypass after a failed trial of Whipple procedure (80%) or failed endoscopic stenting (20%). There were 19 men and 11 women with a mean age of 64.5 years. The mean operative time for HCE alone was 92 minutes. The mean length of hospital stay was nine days. There was a single grade 2 complication (readmission with gastric emptying delay) and a single grade 3 complication (bile leak requiring reoperation). Thirty-day mortality was zero and the mean survival was 12 months (with one patient still alive at the time of writing). There were no readmissions with recurrent biliary obstruction or cholangitis. One patient had developed an incisional hernia by the 24-month follow-up appointment. Conclusions: HCE in periampullary cancer is safe and effective in selected patients. It involves two simple anastomoses with good access rather than one more demanding anastomosis. Morbidity, patency and overall survival are comparable with contemporary published series of hepaticojejunostomy.

DOI 10.1308/003588412X13171221592294
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2011 Nolan GJ, Bendinelli C, Gani J, 'Laparoscopic drainage of an intramural duodenal haematoma: a novel technique and review of the literature', WORLD JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY SURGERY, 6 (2011)
DOI 10.1186/1749-7922-6-42
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
2008 O'Neill CJ, Gillies DM, Gani JS, 'Choledocholithiasis: Overdiagnosed endoscopically and undertreated laparoscopically', ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 78 487-491 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.2008.04540.x
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 20
2008 Gani JS, 'Obesity surgery still does not equal laparoscopic gastric banding', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 78 227 (2008) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2007 Matsushita T, Seah PW, Gani J, 'Giant Morgagni Hernia Causing Cardiac Tamponade', Heart Lung and Circulation, 16 392-393 (2007)

A 57-year-old man presented with worsening symptoms of shortness of breath and chest pain. He was found to have a giant Morgagni hernia with severe compression of his right ventri... [more]

A 57-year-old man presented with worsening symptoms of shortness of breath and chest pain. He was found to have a giant Morgagni hernia with severe compression of his right ventricle on computed tomography scan. The hernia which contained greater omentum, small intestine and transverse colon was urgently repaired through a median sternotomy and laparotomy with a polypropylene mesh. Morgagni hernia is a type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, which may not be symptomatic until adulthood. Presentation with this degree of right ventricular compression is rare. © 2006 Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.

DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2006.10.008
Citations Scopus - 9
2005 Spigelman AD, Gani JS, 'Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for advanced duodenal disease in familial adenomatous polyposis (letter)', British Journal of Surgery, 92 253-253 (2005) [C3]
DOI 10.1002/bjs.4527
Citations Scopus - 52
2004 Spigelman AD, Gani JS, 'Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for advanced duodenal disease in familial adenomatous polyposis', British Journal of Surgery, 92 253 (2004) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2004 Winn RD, Laura S, Douglas C, Davidson PM, Gani JS, 'Protocol-Based approach to suspected appendicitis, incorporating the alvarado score and outpatient antibiotics', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 74 324-329 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-1433.2004.02993.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Charles Douglas
2004 Kable AK, Gibberd RW, Spigelman AD, 'Re: Complications after discharge for surgical patients', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 74 805-807 (2004) [C3]
Co-authors Ashley Kable, Robert Gibberd
2003 MacPherson NE, Gani JS, 'White cell count and appendicitis: the missing link', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 963-965 (2003) [C3]
2003 Amid P, Gani JS, Zib M, 'Inguinal hernia repair: where to next?', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 352-355 (2003) [C3]
2003 Levy RD, Barto W, Gani JS, 'Retrospective Study of the Utility of Nuclear Scintigraphic-labelled Red Cell Scanning for Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 73 205-209 (2003) [C1]
DOI 10.1046/j.1445-1433.2002.02567.x
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
2003 Amid PK, Gani J, Zib M, 'Inguinal hernia repair: Where to next? [1] (multiple letters)', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 73 352-353 (2003)
2003 Holz P, Cottee DB, Gani JS, 'Delayed gastric emptying with octreotide', Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, 31 235 (2003) [C3]
2002 Zib M, Gani JS, 'Inguinal hernia repair: where to next?', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 72(8) 573-579 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 14
2001 Winn R, Douglas C, Gani JS, 'A contolled trial of a protocol drive approach to the management of right iliac fossa (RIF) pain', ANZ Journal of Surgery, 71 GS4 (2001) [C3]
2000 Gani JS, Oakes L, 'Biliary scoring as a method of selecting patients for cholecystectomy', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 70 (9) 644-648 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2000 Wills V, Eno L, Walker C, Gani JS, 'Use of an ambulance-based helicopter retrieval service', Australian & New Zealnd Journal of Surgery, 70 (7) 506-510 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
2000 Zib M, Gani JS, 'Is the evidence for laparoscopic hernia repair good enough?', Australian New Zealand Journal Surgery, 70 898-899 (2000) [C3]
Citations Web of Science - 2
2000 Douglas CD, MacPherson NE, Davidson P, Gani JS, 'Randomised controlled trial of ultrasonography in diagnosis of acute appendicitis, incorporating the Alvarado score', British Medical Journal, 321 919 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 146Web of Science - 110
Co-authors Charles Douglas
2000 Zib M, Gani J, Slater GH, Bailey M, 'Is the evidence for laparoscopic hernia repair good enough? [1] (multiple letters)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, 70 898-900 (2000)
DOI 10.1046/j.1440-1622.2000.01993.x
Citations Scopus - 1
1998 Puvaneswary M, Gani J, Kalnins IK, 'Glomus vagale presenting as a supraclavicular mass: Magnetic resonance imaging findings', Australasian Radiology, 42 367-369 (1998)

Glomus vagale are rare vascular tumours of the paraganglion cells of the vagus nerve, and they usually occur in the carotid space. Tumours can be familial, multicentric, malignant... [more]

Glomus vagale are rare vascular tumours of the paraganglion cells of the vagus nerve, and they usually occur in the carotid space. Tumours can be familial, multicentric, malignant but rarely hormonally active. A rare case is reported of glomus vagale presenting as a supraclavicular mass.

DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1673.1998.tb00540.x
Citations Scopus - 2
1998 Gani JS, 'Can sincalide cholescintigraphy fulfil the role of a gall-bladder stress test for patients with gall-bladder stones?', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 68 514-519 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1998.tb04814.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
1998 Draganic B, James A, Booth M, Gani JS, 'Comparative experience of a simple technique for laparoscopic chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter placement', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 68 735-739 (1998)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1998.tb04662.x
Citations Scopus - 45Web of Science - 40
1997 Draganic BD, Gani JS, 'Retained gallstones: A pain in the back', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 67 662-664 (1997)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1997.tb04619.x
1996 Hayes C, Ambazidis S, Gani JS, 'Intensive care unit admissions following laparoscopic surgery: What lessons can be learned?', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 66 206-209 (1996)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1996.tb01165.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
1996 Draganic BD, Gani JS, 'The incidence of deep venous thrombosis after laparoscopic cholecystectomy', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 165 402-402 (1996)
DOI 10.5694/j.1326-5377.1996.tb125030.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 2
1996 Draganic B, Perry R, Gani J, 'Operative cholangiography in the laparoscopic era: A retrospective review of the quality and interpretation of this investigation', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 66 18-21 (1996)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1996.tb00693.x
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
1995 GANI JS, 'MANAGEMENT OF PERFORATION OF THE DUODENUM FOLLOWING ENDOSCOPIC SPHINCTEROTOMY - A PROPOSAL FOR SELECTIVE THERAPY', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 65 284-284 (1995)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1995.tb00629.x
1994 DRABBLE EK, GANI JS, DAVIDSON P, WRIGHT JE, 'PARTIAL LACERATION OF THE DISTAL BILE-DUCT AND WEDGE FRACTURE OF L1 CAUSED BY BLUNT TRAUMA - A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON TREATMENT', BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 81 120-120 (1994)
DOI 10.1002/bjs.1800810143
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
1993 COTTERILL GF, FERGUSSON JAE, GANI JS, BURNS GF, 'SCANNING-TUNNELING-MICROSCOPY OF COLLAGEN-I REVEALS FILAMENT BUNDLES TO BE ARRANGED IN A LEFT-HANDED HELIX', BIOCHEMICAL AND BIOPHYSICAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATIONS, 194 973-977 (1993)
DOI 10.1006/bbrc.1993.1916
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
1992 STOMSKI FC, GANI JS, BATES RC, BURNS GF, 'ADHESION TO THROMBOSPONDIN BY HUMAN EMBRYONIC FIBROBLASTS IS MEDIATED BY MULTIPLE RECEPTORS AND INCLUDES A ROLE FOR GLYCOPROTEIN-88 (CD36)', EXPERIMENTAL CELL RESEARCH, 198 85-92 (1992)
DOI 10.1016/0014-4827(92)90152-X
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 35
1992 DRABBLE EM, GANI JS, 'ACUTE GASTROCNEMIUS MYOSITIS - ANOTHER EXTRAINTESTINAL MANIFESTATION OF CROHNS-DISEASE', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 157 318-320 (1992)
DOI 10.5694/j.1326-5377.1992.tb137184.x
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
1991 SUGRUE M, GANI J, SARRE R, WATTS J, 'ECTOPIA AND AGENESIS OF THE GALLBLADDER - A REPORT OF 2 SETS OF TWINS AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 61 816-818 (1991)
DOI 10.1111/j.1445-2197.1991.tb00162.x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
1991 GANI JS, FOWLER PR, STEINBERG AW, WLODARCZYK JH, NANRA RS, HIBBERD AD, 'USE OF THE FISTULA ASSESSMENT MONITOR TO DETECT STENOSES IN ACCESS FISTULAS', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF KIDNEY DISEASES, 17 303-306 (1991)
DOI 10.1016/S0272-6386(12)80478-1
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 14
1990 GANI JS, ANSELINE PF, BISSETT RL, 'EFFICACY OF DOUBLE VERSUS SINGLE GLOVING IN PROTECTING THE OPERATING TEAM', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF SURGERY, 60 171-175 (1990)
DOI 10.1111/ans.1990.60.3.171
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 28
1990 Gani JS, Burns GF, 'Integrins and accessory adhesion molecules', Today's Life Science, 2 32-36 (1990)
Citations Scopus - 2
1989 GANI JS, FOWLER PR, STEINBERG AW, NANRA RS, HIBBERD AD, 'USE OF THE FISTULA ASSESSMENT MONITOR TO DETECT STENOSES IN ACCESS FISTULAS', KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL, 36 1167-1167 (1989)
1987 GANI JS, GILLIES JR, 'CYSTIC ARTERY EROSION - A RARE CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 147 260-261 (1987)
DOI 10.5694/j.1326-5377.1987.tb133436.x
Citations Scopus - 1
1987 GANI JS, MORRISON JM, 'SIMPLE THYROID CYST - CAUSE OF ACUTE BILATERAL RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVE PALSY', BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 294 1128-1129 (1987)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.294.6580.1128-a
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 17
Wijeratne A, Gani J, 'The use of a pedicalised gallbladder graft to repair a large duodenal defect: a case report and review of the literature.', Internal Medicine Review, 2
DOI 10.18103/imr.v2i11.270
Show 53 more journal articles

Conference (7 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Mandaliya HA, Martin J, Majid A, Gani J, Sridharan S, Ackland SP, et al., 'Borderline resectable pancreas adenocarcinoma managed with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A prospective case series.', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY, Chicago, IL (2017)
Co-authors Stephen Ackland, Michael Fay
2017 Goodsall TM, Gilles D, Pockney P, Gani J, Foster R, 'Service optimization: Local experience of a multidisciplinary direct access colonoscopy program in the Hunter New England region, New South Wales', JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (2017)
2014 Gillies D, Gani J, Foster R, Pockney P, Duggan A, 'FAST TRACK COLONOSCOPY FOR POSITIVE FAECAL OCCULT BLOOD TESTING ( plus FOBT) IN A PUBLIC HOSPITAL SETTING', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014)
Co-authors Peter Pockney
2013 Gani JS, Lye EC, Gillies D, 'Pancreatico-Duodenectomy With High Quality Results in a Medium Volume Centre. What Are the Australian Definitions of Low Volume?', GASTROENTEROLOGY, Orlando, FL (2013) [E3]
2013 Gillies D, Lye E, Gani J, 'PANCREATICO-DUODENECTOMY WITH HIGH QUALITY RESULTS IN A MEDIUM VOLUME CENTRE. WHAT ARE THE AUSTRALIAN DEFINITIONS OF LOW VOLUME', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2013)
2010 Lewis K, Ward C, Gani JS, 'A new technique for open biliary bypass: hepatico-cholecysto-enterostomy', Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Gold Coast, NSW (2010) [E3]
2003 Spigelman AD, Gani JS, Burgess BT, Groombridge C, Dudding TE, Ingrey AJ, et al., 'Advanced Duodenal Polyposis: Literature review and experience with pancreas-sparing duodenectomy inpatients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)', Familial Cancer, Cleveland, Ohio (2003) [E4]
Co-authors T Dudding, Rodney Scott, Maree Gleeson
Show 4 more conferences

Other (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Gani JS, 'Should Groin Pain + Hernia on Ultrasound = Surgery', (2017) [O1]
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 5
Total funding $591,102

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20192 grants / $358,835

Testing the impact of an Interactive Health Communication Application on days alive out of hospital and quality of life following surgery for colorectal cancer$298,835

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Steve Smith, Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani, Dr Jon Gani, Associate Professor Mariko Carey, Doctor Sancha Robinson, Sancha Robinson, Professor Andrew Searles, Conjoint Professor Andrew Searles, Doctor Peter Pockney, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Mr Chris Oldmeadow, Conjoint Associate Professor Ross Kerridge
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2023
GNo G1800929
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A Double-Blind Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial Assessing the Effect of Peri-Operative Intravenous Lignocaine and Post-Operative Lignocaine Neurovascular Plane Infusion on Natural Killer Ce$60,000

Funding body: Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand Foundation Pty Ltd

Funding body Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia and New Zealand Foundation Pty Ltd
Project Team Doctor Peter Pockney, Doctor Steve Smith, Associate Professor Simon Keely, Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani, Doctor Gang Liu
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1901026
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

19921 grants / $172,944

Analysis Of An Integrin Accessory Molecule, Gp 88$172,944

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Gordon Burns, Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 1992
Funding Finish 1994
GNo G0174261
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

19912 grants / $59,323

Investigation Of Abnormal Thrombospondin Receptor Exp. By Melanoma Cells$49,323

Funding body: Cancer Council NSW

Funding body Cancer Council NSW
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0173891
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y

Reg Worcester Surgical Research Fellowship$10,000

Funding body: Royal Australasian College of Surgeons

Funding body Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
Project Team Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani
Scheme Foundation Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1991
Funding Finish 1991
GNo G0173998
Type Of Funding Donation - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFD
UON Y
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current1

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD The Introduction of an Emergency Laparotomy Audit in Australia PhD (Surgical Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Enhanced Recovery After Surgery in Colorectal Surgery PhD (Surgical Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
Edit

Conjoint Professor Jonathan Gani

Position

Conjoint Professor
Surgical services
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email jonathan.gani@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 3000 and connect via switchboard
Mobile 0409312284
Fax (02) 4921 4274
Link Facebook

Office

Room JHH 3200. In Surgical Services.
Building John Hunter Hospital
Location John Hunter Campus

,
Edit