Mr Daniel Barker

Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health (Statistics)

Career Summary

Biography

Daniel is a lecturer of medical statistics with the School of Medicine and Public Health and has 7 years experience as an applied statistician in health related research. In addition to being well-versed in common statistical methods, he specialises in the design of complex clinical trials and the modelling of data that is longitudinal or otherwise correlated. Daniel collaborates with researchers and clinicians both locally and nationally. His expertise has been applied to a wide variety of medical research topics including, cancer, cardiovascular disease, drug and alcohol, indigenous health, nutrition, pharmaceuticals, respiratory and stroke.

Daniel graduated from the University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Mathematics in 2006. He began his postgraduate education with a Masters of Medical Statistics in 2010, but he opted to graduate early with a Graduate Diploma in 2012 so that he could commence a PhD in Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics the following year. His research is focused on the design and analysis of stepped wedge cluster randomised trials.

In addition to his varied collaborations, Daniel's current research focus is on the sample size methods for cluster randomised trials with repeated measurements over time. His teaching focus is on integrating newer technologies into course delivery so that students can more quickly grasp core statistical concepts.


Qualifications

  • Graduate Diploma in Medical Statistics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Analysis Methodology
  • Biostatistics
  • Clinical Trials
  • Public Health
  • Regression Modelling
  • Statistics
  • Trial Design

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
010402 Biostatistics 60
111502 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 10
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
21/03/2006 - 5/04/2013 Statistician Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2013 BCA Star Graduate
Biostatistics Collaboration of Australia

Nomination

Year Award
2016 17th Annual J.B. Douglas Postgraduate Award
Statistical Society of Australia Inc.

Scholarship

Year Award
2013 Australian Postgraduate Award (APA)
The University of Newcastle

Teaching Award

Year Award
2017 Highly Commended Teaching Award
School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
BIOS 6920 Biostatistics B
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 29/07/2013 - 9/12/2016
BIOS 6061 Clinical Trial Design
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 24/07/2017 - 8/12/2017
BIOS 6910 Biostatistics A
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 4/03/2013 - 27/06/2016
BIOS 6130 Bayesian Methods for Medical Statistics
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 27/02/2017 - 8/12/2017
BIOS 6070 Linear Regression Modelling
Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle
Course Co-ordinator 27/02/2017 - 21/07/2017
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Barker D, D'Este C, Campbell MJ, McElduff P, 'Minimum number of clusters and comparison of analysis methods for cross sectional stepped wedge cluster randomised trials with binary outcomes: A simulation study', TRIALS, 18 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-1862-2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Patrick Mcelduff
2017 Dunlop AJ, Brown AL, Oldmeadow C, Harris A, Gill A, Sadler C, et al., 'Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of unsupervised buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of heroin dependence in a randomized waitlist controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 174 181-191 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Background Access to opioid agonist treatment can be associated with extensive waiting periods with significant health and financial burdens. This study aimed to determine... [more]

© 2017 Background Access to opioid agonist treatment can be associated with extensive waiting periods with significant health and financial burdens. This study aimed to determine whether patients with heroin dependence dispensed buprenorphine-naloxone weekly have greater reductions in heroin use and related adverse health effects 12-weeks after commencing treatment, compared to waitlist controls and to examine the cost-effectiveness of this strategy. Methods An open-label waitlist RCT was conducted in an opioid treatment clinic in Newcastle, Australia. Fifty patients with DSM-IV-TR heroin dependence (and no other substance dependence) were recruited. The intervention group (n = 25) received take-home self-administered sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone weekly (mean dose, 22.7 ± 5.7 mg) and weekly clinical review. Waitlist controls (n = 25) received no clinical intervention. The primary outcome was heroin use (self-report, urine toxicology verified) at weeks four, eight and 12. The primary cost-effectiveness outcome was incremental cost per additional heroin-free-day. Results Outcome data were available for 80% of all randomized participants. Across the 12-weeks, treatment group heroin use was on average 19.02 days less/month (95% CI -22.98, -15.06, p < 0.0001). A total 12-week reduction in adjusted costs including crime of $A5,722 (95% CI 3299, 8154) in favor of treatment was observed. Excluding crime, incremental cost per heroin-free-day gained from treatment was $A18.24 (95% CI 4.50, 28.49). Conclusion When compared to remaining on a waitlist, take-home self-administered buprenorphine-naloxone treatment is associated with significant reductions in heroin use for people with DSM-IV-TR heroin dependence. This cost-effective approach may be an efficient strategy to enhance treatment capacity.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.01.016
Co-authors A Dunlop, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2017 Dunn A, Marsden DL, Barker D, Van Vliet P, Spratt NJ, Callister R, 'Cardiorespiratory fitness and walking endurance improvements after 12 months of an individualised home and community-based exercise programme for people after stroke.', Brain injury, 31 1617-1624 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/02699052.2017.1355983
Co-authors Paulette Vanvliet, Robin Callister, Neil Spratt
2017 Wiggers J, McElwaine K, Freund M, Campbell L, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Increasing the provision of preventive care by community healthcare services: a stepped wedge implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0636-2
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2017 Collins CE, Morgan PJ, Hutchesson MJ, Oldmeadow C, Barker D, Callister R, 'Efficacy of Web-Based Weight Loss Maintenance Programs: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Standard Features Versus the Addition of Enhanced Personalized Feedback over 12 Months.', Behavioral sciences (Basel, Switzerland), 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/bs7040076
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Philip Morgan, Melinda Hutchesson
2017 Reeves AJ, McEvoy MA, MacDonald-Wicks LK, Barker D, Attia J, Hodge AM, Patterson AJ, 'Calculation of Haem Iron Intake and Its Role in the Development of Iron Deficiency in Young Women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', NUTRIENTS, 9 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/nu9050515
Co-authors Mark Mcevoy, Amanda Patterson, John Attia, Lesley Wicks
2016 Barker D, McElduff P, D'Este C, Campbell MJ, 'Stepped wedge cluster randomised trials: a review of the statistical methodology used and available', BMC MEDICAL RESEARCH METHODOLOGY, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12874-016-0176-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Bartlem KM, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye PM, Barker D, McElwaine KM, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the provision of preventive care by community mental health services: a non-randomized, multiple baseline implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0408-4
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Paul CL, Boyes AW, O'Brien L, Baker AL, Henskens FA, Roos I, et al., 'Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of Proactive Web-Based Versus Telephone-Based Information and Support: Can Electronic Platforms Deliver Effective Care for Lung Cancer Patients?', JMIR RESEARCH PROTOCOLS, 5 (2016)
DOI 10.2196/resprot.6248
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Frans Henskens, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Elizabeth Fradgley, Allison Boyes, Chris Paul
2016 Paul CL, Piterman L, Shaw JE, Kirby C, Barker D, Robinson J, et al., 'Patterns of type 2 diabetes monitoring in rural towns: How does frequency of HbA1c and lipid testing compare with existing guidelines?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 24 371-377 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To indicate levels of monitoring of type 2 diabetes in rural and regional Australia by examining patterns of glycated haemog... [more]

© 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc. Objective: To indicate levels of monitoring of type 2 diabetes in rural and regional Australia by examining patterns of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood lipid testing. Design and Setting: Retrospective analysis of pathology services data from twenty regional and rural towns in eastern Australia over 24 months. Participants: Of 13 105 individuals who had either a single HbA1c result =7.0% (53 mmol mol -1 ); or two or more HbA1c tests within the study period. Main outcome measures: Frequency of testing of HbA1c and blood lipids (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides) were compared with guideline recommendations. Results: About 58.3% of patients did not have the recommended 6-monthly HbA1c tests and 30.6% did not have annual lipid testing. For those who did not receive tests at the recommended interval, the mean between-test interval was 10.5 months (95% CI = 7.5¿13.5) rather than 6 months for HbA1c testing; and 15.7 (95% CI = 13.3¿18.1) months rather than annually for blood lipids. For those with at least one out-of-range test result, 77% of patients failed to receive a follow-up HbA1c test and 86.5% failed to receive a follow-up blood lipid test within the recommended 3 months. Patients less than 50 years of age, living in a more remote area and with poor diabetes control were less likely to have testing at the recommended intervals (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although poor diabetes testing is not limited to rural areas, more intensive diabetes monitoring is likely to be needed for patients living in non-metropolitan areas, particularly for some subgroups.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12283
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2015 Magin P, Dunbabin J, Goode S, Valderas JM, Levi C, D'Souza M, et al., 'Patients' responses to transient ischaemic attack symptoms: A cross-sectional questionnaire study in Australian general practices', British Journal of General Practice, 65 e24-e31 (2015) [C1]

©British Journal of General Practice Background Consensus guidelines for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) recommend urgent investigation and management, but delays in management ... [more]

©British Journal of General Practice Background Consensus guidelines for transient ischaemic attack (TIA) recommend urgent investigation and management, but delays in management occur and are attributable to patient and health system factors. Aim To establish general practice patients' anticipated responses to TIA sy mptoms, and associations of appropriate responses. Design and setting A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study in Australian general practices. Method Consecutive patients attending general practices completed questionnaires that contained the Stroke Action Test (STAT) adapted for TIA about demographic, health system use, and stroke risk factors. STAT elicits appropriate or inappropriate anticipated responses to 28 symptom complexes. Anticipated actions in-hours and out-of-hours were elicited. Associations of independent variables with adapted-STAT scores were tested with multiple linear regression. Results There were 854 participants (response rate 76.9%). Urgent healthcare-seeking responses to transient neurological symptoms ranged from 96.8% for right-sided weakness with dysphasia to 59.1% for sudden dizziness. Associations of higher adapted-STAT scores were older age, Indigenous status, previous after-hours services use, self-perception of health as poor, and familiarity with a stroke public awareness campaign. A personal or family history of stroke, smoking status, and time of event (in-hours/out-of-hours) were not significantly associated with adapted-STAT scores. Conclusion Most general practice attendees expressed intentions to seek health care urgently for most symptoms suggestive of TIA, with highest levels of urgency observed in high stroke-risk scenarios. Intentions were not associated with a number of major risk factors for TIA and might be improved by further educational interventions, either targeted or at population level.

DOI 10.3399/bjgp15X683125
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Christopher Levi, Parker Magin
2015 Kodur S, Ahmad W, Heittarachi M, Reeves G, Attia J, Barker D, Collins N, 'Influence of age on outcome in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension', Heart Lung and Circulation, 24 719-723 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Background: The development of ... [more]

© 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Background: The development of effective orally administered medical therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has made a significant impact on outcome in patients with PAH. Identification of patient groups likely to derive optimal benefit is important, given cost and potential side effects; the clinical effectiveness of these therapies in older patients with PAH is unclear as the presence of co-morbidity may limit benefits of therapy. Aims: We evaluated the epidemiology of PAH in a contemporary cohort to assess the influence of age on long-term outcome using PAH-specific therapies. Results: A total of 119 patients (88% female; mean age 65±12 years) were reviewed, comprising 52% with underlying connective tissue disease. Bosentan was the PAH specific agent most frequently used. The baseline 6MWT distance in the entire cohort was 304m with age associated with a significant decline in 6MWT. Conclusions: In a large cohort of patients treated with PAH-specific therapies, patients less than 55 years of age showed improvement in 6MWT with older patients demonstrating stabilisation or decline.

DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2015.01.012
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia
2014 Campbell HS, Hall AE, Sanson-Fisher RW, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, 'Development and validation of the Short-Form Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SF-SUNS)', Supportive Care in Cancer, 22 1071-1079 (2014) [C1]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. A... [more]

Purpose: The Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SUNS) is one of the only unmet needs measures that was developed and evaluated utilising a population-based sample of cancer survivors. At 89 items, the current scale is quite burdensome. The current study aimed to develop a valid and reliable short version of this survey. Methods: A heterogeneous sample of 1,589 cancer survivors, aged 19 years or over at diagnosis, diagnosed with a histologically confirmed cancer in the previous 12 to 60 months, completed the SUNS. Using these data, we employed a combined theoretical and statistical method of reducing the number of items in the SUNS. The shortened survey was examined for construct validity, internal consistency, discriminant validity and floor and ceiling effects. Results: Fifty-nine items were removed. Construct validity closely reflected the original structure of the SUNS. However, all items from the Emotional health and Relationships domains loaded onto one factor. Cronbach's alpha for the final four domains were 0.85 or above, demonstrating strong internal consistency. Intra-class correlations of the three domains from the original survey (Financial concerns, Information and Access and continuity of care) and shortened survey were high ( > 0.9). Discriminant validity illustrated the short-form SUNS' ability to discriminate between those who had recently received treatment and those who had not. Conclusions: This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the short-form SUNS (SF-SUNS). Future studies should confirm the test-retest reliability and predictive validity of the SF-SUNS utilising large, independent, population-based samples of cancer survivors. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

DOI 10.1007/s00520-013-2061-7
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2014 Campbell SH, Carey M, Sanson-Fisher R, Barker D, Turner D, Taylor-Brown J, Hall A, 'Measuring the unmet supportive care needs of cancer support persons: The development of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey - short form', European Journal of Cancer Care, 23 255-262 (2014) [C1]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person&apos;s Unmet Nee... [more]

Few rigorous measures of unmet needs have been developed for cancer support persons. This study describes the development of a short version of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS). Cancer survivors [n = 1589, 612 (52%) men, mean age of 62.5 years, SD 11.5] 1-5 years post diagnosis and recruited through three Canadian population-based cancer registries were asked to pass a survey package on to their principal support person. Surveys were returned by 1183 support persons. The survey included the long form of the SPUNS, which contains 78 items. Fifty-two items were deleted using a combination of expert opinion and statistical criteria. Analysis of the remaining items revealed a five-factor structure. The original factors were retained with the exception of a merging of the personal and emotional needs subscales. Cronbach's alpha co-efficients for all subscales were =0.87, and intraclass correlation of domain scores of the short and long versions of the SPUNS were high. The SPUNS short form was able to discriminate between support persons of survivors who had (n = 147), and those who had not received treatment in the past month (n = 969). At just 26 items, it is likely to have strong clinical and research applicability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

DOI 10.1111/ecc.12138
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Alix Hall, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2014 Williamson A, Redman S, Haynes A, Barker D, Jorm L, Green S, et al., 'Supporting Policy In health with Research: an Intervention Trial (SPIRIT)¿protocol for a stepped wedge trial', BMJ Open, 4 (2014)

Introduction: Governments in different countries have committed to better use of evidence from research in policy. Although many programmes are directed at assisting agencies to b... [more]

Introduction: Governments in different countries have committed to better use of evidence from research in policy. Although many programmes are directed at assisting agencies to better use research, there have been few tests of the effectiveness of such programmes. This paper describes the protocol for SPIRIT (Supporting Policy In health with Research: an Intervention Trial), a trial designed to test the effectiveness of a multifaceted programme to build organisational capacity for the use of research evidence in policy and programme development. The primary aim is to determine whether SPIRIT results in an increase in the extent to which research and research expertise is sought, appraised, generated and used in the development of specific policy products produced by health policy agencies. Methods and analysis: A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial involving six health policy agencies located in Sydney, Australia. Policy agencies are the unit of randomisation and intervention. Agencies were randomly allocated to one of three start dates (steps) to receive the 1-year intervention programme, underpinned by an action framework. The SPIRIT intervention is tailored to suit the interests and needs of each agency and includes audit, feedback and goal setting; a leadership programme; staff training; the opportunity to test systems to assist in the use of research in policies; and exchange with researchers. Outcome measures will be collected at each agency every 6 months for 30 months (starting at the beginning of step 1). Ethics and dissemination: Ethics approval was granted by the University of Western Sydney Human Research and Ethics Committee HREC Approval H8855. The findings of this study will be disseminated broadly through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences and used to inform future strategies.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005293
Citations Scopus - 13
Co-authors Catherine Deste
2013 Handley TE, Attia JR, Inder KJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Barker D, Lewin TJ, Kelly BJ, 'Longitudinal course and predictors of suicidal ideation in a rural community sample.', Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47 1032-1040 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867413495318
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors John Attia, Kerry Inder, Brian Kelly, Frances Kaylambkin, Terry Lewin
2013 Lambert SD, Girgis A, McElduff P, Turner J, Levesque JV, Kayser K, et al., 'A parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners: Design and rationale', BMJ Open, 3 (2013) [C2]

Introduction: Coping skills training interventions have been found to be efficacious in helping both patients and their partners manage the physical and emotional challenges they ... [more]

Introduction: Coping skills training interventions have been found to be efficacious in helping both patients and their partners manage the physical and emotional challenges they face following a cancer diagnosis. However, many of these interventions are costly and not sustainable. To overcome these issues, a self-directed format is increasingly used. The efficacy of self-directed interventions for patients has been supported; however, no study has reported on the outcomes for their partners. This study will test the efficacy of Coping-Together - a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners. Methods and analysis: The proposed three-group, parallel, randomised controlled trial will recruit patients diagnosed in the past 4 months with breast, prostate, colorectal cancer or melanoma through their treating clinician. Patients and their partners will be randomised to (1) a minimal ethical care (MEC) condition - selected Cancer Council New South Wales booklets and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline, (2) Coping-Together generic - MEC materials, the six Coping-Together booklets and DVD, the Cancer Council Queensland relaxation audio CD and login to the Coping-Together website or (3) Coping-Together tailored - MEC materials, the Coping-Together DVD, the login to the website and only those Coping-Together booklet sections that pertain to their direct concerns. Anxiety (primary outcome), distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy and dyadic and individual coping will be assessed before receiving the study material (ie, baseline) and again at 3, 6 and 12 months postbaseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination: This study has been approved by the relevant local area health and University ethics committees. Study findings will be disseminated not only through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations but also through educational outreach visits, publication of lay research summaries in consumer newsletters and publications targeting clinicians.

DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003337
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff
2013 Talseth-Palmer BA, Wijnen JT, Barker D, Vasen HFA, Scott RJ, 'Is the reported modifying effect of 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 on colorectal cancer risk for MLH1 mutation carriers valid? Reply', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CANCER, 133 1764-1764 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1002/ijc.28178
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Bente Talseth-Palmer
2013 Talseth-Palmer B, Wijnen JT, Brenne IS, Jagmohan-Changur S, Barker DJ, Ashton KA, et al., 'Combined analysis of three Lynch syndrome cohorts confirms the modifying effects of 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 in MLH1 mutation carriers', International Journal of Cancer, 132 1487-1729 (2013) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Rodney Scott, Bente Talseth-Palmer
2013 Bonevski B, O'Brien J, Frost S, Yiow L, Oakes W, Barker D, 'Novel setting for addressing tobacco-related disparities: a survey of community welfare organization smoking policies, practices and attitudes', HEALTH EDUCATION RESEARCH, 28 46-57 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cys077
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski
2013 Carey M, Bryant J, Yoong SL, Russell G, Barker D, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 14 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-14-186
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2013 Courtney RJ, Paul CL, Carey ML, Sanson-Fisher RW, Macrae FA, D'Este C, et al., 'A population-based cross-sectional study of colorectal cancer screening practices of first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients', BMC CANCER, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2407-13-13
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Mariko Carey
2013 Nathan N, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Bell AC, Barker D, Wiggers J, 'Validity of a self-report survey tool measuring the nutrition and physical activity environment of primary schools', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 10 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1479-5868-10-75
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Philip Morgan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2013 Talseth-Palmer BA, Wijnen JT, Andreassen EK, Barker D, Jagmohan-Changur S, Tops CM, et al., 'The importance of a large sample cohort for studies on modifier genes influencing disease severity in FAP patients.', Hered Cancer Clin Pract, 11 20 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1897-4287-11-20
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Bente Talseth-Palmer, Rodney Scott
2012 Wood LG, Garg ML, Smart JM, Scott HA, Barker D, Gibson PG, 'Manipulating antioxidant intake in asthma: A randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96 534-543 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.111.032623
Citations Scopus - 56Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Peter Gibson, Hayley Scott, Lisa Wood, Manohar Garg
2011 Paul CL, Sanson-Fisher RW, Douglas HE, Clinton-Mcharg TL, Williamson A, Barker DJ, 'Cutting the research pie: A value-weighting approach to explore perceptions about psychosocial research priorities for adults with haematological cancers', European Journal of Cancer Care, 20 345-353 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2354.2010.01188.x
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Chris Paul
2011 Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Barker DJ, 'Effects of restricting pub closing times on night-time assaults in an Australian city', Addiction, 106 303-310 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03125.x
Citations Scopus - 69Web of Science - 60
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Kypros Kypri
2010 Marsden DL, Spratt NJ, Walker R, Barker DJ, Attia JR, Pollack MR, et al., 'Trends in stroke attack rates and case fatality in the Hunter Region, Australia 1996-2008', Cerebrovascular Diseases, 30 500-507 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1159/000319022
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 22
Co-authors John Attia, Neil Spratt, Mark Parsons, Christopher Levi
2010 Gwynn JD, Hardy LL, Wiggers JH, Smith WT, D'Este CA, Turner N, et al., 'The validation of a self-report measure and physical activity of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous rural children', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 S57-S65 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00555.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Wayne Smith, John Attia, Catherine Deste, John Wiggers, Josephine Gwynn
2009 MacDonald K, Lowe J, Barker DJ, Mensch M, Attia JR, 'Effect of popular takeaway foods on blood glucose levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on intensive insulin therapy', International Journal of Clinical Practice, 63 189-194 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1742-1241.2008.01970.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Attia
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Morten M, Collison A, Murphy V, Barker D, Meredith J, Powell H, et al., 'ASTHMA CONTROL DURING PREGNANCY, 17Q21 VARIANTS AND CHILDHOOD-ONSET ASTHMA', RESPIROLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Vanessa Murphy, Joerg Mattes, Peter Gibson, Adam Collison
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Barker D, McElwaine K, et al., 'INCREASING THE ROUTINE PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE BY COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIANS: A WHOLE SERVICE APPROACH', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2013 Collins N, Kodur S, Ahmad W, Barker D, Davies A, Attia J, 'Influence of Age on Outcome in Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension', Heart, Lung and Circulation, Gold Coast (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2013.05.190
Co-authors John Attia
2009 Kypri K, Jones C, McElduff P, Barker DJ, 'Effects of a restriction in pub trading hours on night-time assaults in an Australian city: Preliminary analyses', KBS 2009 Abstracts, Copenhagen, Denmark (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Patrick Mcelduff
Show 1 more conference
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.45

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD The use of Multivariate Stochastic Models in Medical Research. PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Characterization of neutrophil subtypes in obstructive airway disease. PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Molecular and Cellular Characterisation of Severe Asthma PhD (Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2004 PhD Innovative Ways of Treating co-Morbid Diabetes Type II and Depression: Development of the "MADE-IT" Program. PhD (Psychiatry), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 32
United Kingdom 6
Canada 4
Netherlands 3
Norway 2
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Mr Daniel Barker

Position

Lecturer
SMPH
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Statistics

Contact Details

Email daniel.barker@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0503
Fax (02) 4042 0039

Office

Building HMRI Building
Location New Lambton

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