Dr Catherine Chojenta

Dr Catherine Chojenta

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

Faculty of Health and Medicine

A healthy start for mums and babies worldwide

Dr Catherine Chojenta’s research is helping to give more babies a better start to life by supporting their mum’s health during preconception, pregnancy and the perinatal period.

Dr Catherine Chojenta image

Dr Catherine Chojenta’s work is giving more babies the chance at a healthy and thriving life by examining the main problems faced by mums and babies before, during and after pregnancy.

For mothers, this includes challenges such as tobacco and alcohol use, mental illness, mum-infant attachment difficulties and more. For babies, Catherine’s work is helping to build essential information about stillbirth, congenital conditions and other key infant health issues.

“My research explores how women’s health and wellbeing in preconception and pregnancy impact on birth outcomes and babies’ outcomes. The relationship between maternal and infant health is critical and can have a profound impact on outcomes for the birth and for that child in the future.

“My high-level research goal is to identify the ways to optimise the health of mothers and their babies, so all babies can have the best possible start to life. Once we’ve identified how to optimise early life, we can have a significant impact on child development and wellbeing.”

Creating nation-wide change

A mother’s health can have a substantial impact on her baby. It can affect her baby’s chances of survival, how they bond with the family, and even their long-term wellbeing as they grow and develop. Research continues to highlight the importance of good maternal health during the prenatal and perinatal periods. And yet, infant deaths and rates of illness worldwide remain staggeringly high. Catherine asserts that, despite progress, additional research is crucial to saving more lives.

“While much work has been done globally to improve infant outcomes, the rates of stillbirths, low birth weight and prematurity have remained largely unchanged, even in Australia.

“This indicates that there are still underlying reasons why these conditions occur that we are yet to understand. Large administrative datasets, as well as data collected via large-scale longitudinal studies, are helping us better understand what’s happening so we can inform solutions.”

To help bring national change, Catherine was involved in one of Australia’s most important longitudinal studies, the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, between 2001-2013. Catherine’s role for the study saw her contribute to numerous reports, promotional material and peer-reviewed journal articles that provided key insights into the physical and mental health of Australian women and led to important new policies, such as the National Women’s Health Policy 2010.

“I managed several research projects for the study, conducting both semi-structured and open-ended interviews with younger women on a range of topics such as postnatal depression and experiences of motherhood, tobacco use in relation to life stages, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy.

“The study provided invaluable data about the health of women across the lifespan and is now informing federal and state government policies.”

Committed to global advancement

Catherine is also committed to supporting the health of mums and babies around the world. Despite global progress, more than 303,000 children worldwide pass away within four weeks of birth every year, according to the World Health Organisation. Catherine asserts that more young lives could be saved by providing mothers with basic, timely perinatal care and support.

“In developing countries, empowering women to be able to access antenatal care, skilled delivery care and postnatal care can have a major impact on maternal and infant health.

“Identifying those who are least likely to receive care, and developing interventions to improve their access, will significantly improve the lives of mothers and their babies. Access to health services is a key way to avert maternal and infant mortality and morbidity.”

To help generate new knowledge on global health services for maternal and infant wellbeing, Catherine is currently working as the infant health lead for the Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing’s Worldwide Wellness of Mothers and Babies program.

For this program, Catherine collaborates with many of the University’s leading researchers in maternal and infant health, including Professor Deborah Loxton, Dr Melissa Harris, Dr Nicole Reilly and Associate Professor Kym Rae. Their shared goal is to eliminate preventable maternal and infant mortality and morbidity by conducting a plethora of research at global, national and community levels.

“As well as contributing to research projects, I also supervise 18 students through the program, mostly from developing countries, who are studying key areas of maternal and infant health around the globe. It’s one of my greatest career highlights to date.”

Targeted support for local families

In partnership with fellow researchers and clinicians from the John Hunter Children’s Hospital, Catherine is currently leading a collaborative data-driven project to examine the maternal and environmental risk factors for congenital conditions in NSW.

Congenital conditions such as heart defects, neural tube defects and Down syndrome can contribute to long-term disability and affect a child’s entire life. Catherine explains that the project was started after staff noticed a worrying trend among children in the Hunter region.

“This is an important project as it arose from clinical observations in the rise of some congenital conditions, especially in our local area.

“By using linked administrative datasets, we have enough statistical power to explore these rare conditions, which would not be possible with conventional recruitment techniques. This project brings together public health strategies to investigate a clinical issue.”

Across her program of work, Catherine is driven by the central goal of providing mums and babies with the right support at the right time. Committed to generating new knowledge and creating evidence-based solutions, Catherine is helping to create significant and meaningful benefits for families and the next generation.

“I am very passionate about my research in women’s health, especially reproductive health. I’m inspired to discover ways to enable all infants to have the best start to life. This sets them up to have an optimised childhood and adult life, which will then have a positive impact on future generations.”

Dr Catherine Chojenta image

A healthy start for mums and babies worldwide

Dr Catherine Chojenta’s research is helping to give more babies a better start to life by supporting their mum’s health during preconception, pregnancy and the perinatal period.Dr Catherine Chojenta’s work is giving more babies the chance at a healthy and…

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Catherine Chojenta BA Psych (Hons) PhD is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle. She is a public health researcher with a particular focus on women's health and well-being across the life course. She has expertise in a range of research methodologies including mixed methods, quantitative, qualitative and data linkage, and has applied these to produce high quality evidence for those factors that increase women's risk of poor health and those which are protective of well-being. She is an emerging expert in the field of perinatal mental health and has applied a range of methods to determine risk factors for poor perinatal mental health and determinants of long and short term mental health outcomes for women and infants.

As an early career researcher, Dr Chojenta has already made an impact on the understanding and promotion of women’s health in Australia. As a postdoctoral research fellow in Public Health, she is developing a program of work that focuses on frequent users of health services, in particular older people and women of reproductive age. She has employed a number of complex statistical techniques to interrogate survey data linked to administrative hospital service use data in order to explore drivers of health services in Australia.

Dr Chojenta worked for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health 2001-2013, and in this role she has contributed to numerous reports, promotional material and peer-reviewed journal articles that have been used as an evidence base for policy. For example, she contributed to a 2009 report on Reproductive Health to the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing on reproductive health that was cited numerous times in the new National Women’s Health Policy 2010.

Dr Chojenta has been awarded several grants over her short academic career totalling over $800,000. She has been awarded two University of Newcastle grants ($34,993) to support her PhD studies, and this opportunity has offered her the experience of being a chief investigator on a project. She has also been awarded several other grants as part of a research team. She was a Chief Investigator on a NHMRC Project Grant examining the long term impact and outcomes of the 75+ Health Assessments. She was part of a team who were awarded $248,000 from the BUPA Foundation to examine the efficacy of psychosocial screening for perinatal mood disorders. She was also awarded $74,957 by the Department of Veterans Affairs along with Prof Julie Byles to produce a cook book and health-related material for elderly residents in the community. Both of these projects utilize a person-centred focus on a public health issue. Two recent follow-ups to this project were awarded in 2012 for $79,412 and 2015 for $33,872 to extend on this work and re-develop and extend the Cooking for One or Two program.

Dr Chojenta has already published over 40 peer-reviewed journal articles and has several other manuscripts in production. She has conducted reviews for the British Medical Journal, Medical Journal of Australia, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, BMC Women’s Health and PLoS One.

Dr Chojenta has had extensive experience in project management throughout her role with the ALSWH since 2001. She has managed several research projects, and has had specific experience in conducting both semi-structured and open-ended interviews with younger women in relation to a range of topics such as postnatal depression and experiences of motherhood, tobacco use in relation to life stages, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy. She has also trained a number of other researchers in research techniques.

She has co-supervised one PhD candidate to completion as well as four honours project. She is currently supervising 20 PhD candidates on a number of project related to maternal and infant health (12 as primary supervisor).

Dr Chojenta has mentored several general staff members at RCGHA. In this role she has trained staff in administrative tasks and research techniques, as well as provided guidance on goal setting and problem-solving when necessary.

In 2018 she was invited to present her research findings at the TMU-UoN Joint Symposium on Women’s Health in Taipei, Taiwan. In 2016 she was invited to chair a session of the Marce Society International Conference in Melbourne on the latest treatment and research news. She has presented research findings at several national and international conferences, such as the Marce Society International Conferences in Melbourne (2016), Paris (2012), Pittsburgh (2010) and Sydney (2008), the International Qualitative Health Conference in Canada (2010), the Mixed Methods Conference in Leeds (2009), the Australian Women’s Health Conferences in Hobart (2010) and Sydney (2013) and the International Women’s Mental Health Conference in Melbourne (2008). Additionally, she has conducted media interviews on the prevalence and risk factors for postnatal depression for print, live radio and live television.

Dr Chojenta is a member of the Australian Branch of the Marce Society, the Australian Association of Gerontology, the International Association of Mixed Methods and the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth, and participates in conferences and online discussions for each of these associations.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Gender and Health), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Healthy ageing
  • Infant health
  • Longitudinal Research
  • Maternal health
  • Mixed Methods
  • Perinatal Mental Health
  • Women's Health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170105 Gender Psychology 25
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 75

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2013 - 31/12/2013 Research Fellow

As a Research Fellow, I drafted manuscripts and reports for publication, wrote grant applications, presented research findings at conferences and seminars. I reviewed manuscripts for journals, and have also mentored postgraduate students. I designed new research projects, and conducted both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods. I was also responsible for project management for two projects. I managed professional staff, coordinated production of grant deliverables and reports, managed the ethics applications and approvals, and managed the day to day timeline of the projects to ensure goals were met.

Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/6/2008 - 31/12/2012 Research Academic The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/1/2014 - 31/12/2017 HMRI Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/6/2005 - 31/5/2008 Research and Communications Officer The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/2/2004 - 31/5/2005 Research Assistant Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, NSW
Australia
1/7/2001 - 31/1/2004 Project Assistant Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, NSW
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2012 HMRI Postnatal Depression Travel Award
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Prestigious works / other achievements

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious work / other achievement Role
2009 2009 Reproductive Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health Report to Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Contributor
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (86 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2020 Tiruye TY, Harris ML, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'The mediation effect of contraceptive use and women's autonomy on the relationship between intimate partner violence and unintended pregnancy in Ethiopia.', BMC Public Health, 20 1408 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-09514-7
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, D'Arcy E, Loxton D, 'Population attributable fraction estimates for factors associated with different types of anaemia among women in Ethiopia: multilevel multinomial analysis.', Public Health Nutr, 1-11 (2020)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980020003109
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Melka A, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'E-cigarette use and cigarette smoking initiation among Australian women who have never smoked', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2020)

© 2020 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aim: Evidence regarding the association between e-cigarette use and subsequent initiation of s... [more]

© 2020 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aim: Evidence regarding the association between e-cigarette use and subsequent initiation of smoking mostly relates to the US population. In Australia, no studies are available investigating the association between the uses of e-cigarettes and smoking initiation among young adults who have never smoked. This study aimed to determine the association between lifetime e-cigarette use and subsequent initiation of cigarette smoking among tobacco-naïve Australian women aged 20¿27. Design and Methods: The current study used data (n = 5398) from the third (2015) and fourth (2016) surveys collected from a cohort of Australian women born in 1989¿1995 who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the association between lifetime e-cigarette use at the baseline survey and initiation of cigarette smoking (smoked 100 cigarettes or more in the last year) at the follow up adjusting for possible confounders. Effects were expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. Results: The mean (± SD) age of the study participants at baseline (third survey) was 22.5 (±1.7). Ever e-cigarette use at baseline was positively associated with smoking initiation at follow up (adjusted odds ratio 3.71; 95% confidence interval 2.33, 5.93). History of depression, binge drinking and higher childhood adversity score were also risk factors for subsequent smoking initiation in the follow up. Discussion and Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between e-cigarette use and subsequent initiation of smoking. Enforcing the existing restriction of sale and supply of e-liquid containing nicotine is essential to prevent never smokers from nicotine addiction via e-cigarettes.

DOI 10.1111/dar.13131
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Liz Holliday
2020 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Taddele T, Loxton D, 'Association between maternal mortality and caesarean section in Ethiopia: a national cross-sectional study.', BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 20 588 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12884-020-03276-1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Shifti DM, Chojenta C, Holliday EG, Loxton D, 'Socioeconomic inequality in short birth interval in Ethiopia: a decomposition analysis.', BMC Public Health, 20 1504 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-09537-0
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Deborah Loxton
2020 Kiross GT, Chojenta C, Barker D, Loxton D, 'The effects of health expenditure on infant mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: evidence from panel data analysis.', Health Econ Rev, 10 5 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13561-020-00262-3
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Daniel Barker, Deborah Loxton
2020 William J, Loong B, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'The profiles of public and private patients in maternal healthcare: A longitudinal study to examine adverse selection', Annals of Actuarial Science, 14 129-137 (2020) [C1]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2019. In this article, we investigate differences in the profiles of patients within the Australian mixed public-private maternal health syste... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2019. In this article, we investigate differences in the profiles of patients within the Australian mixed public-private maternal health system to examine the extent of adverse selection. There are conflicting influences on adverse selection within the private health sector in Australia due to government regulations that incentivise lower risk segments of the population to purchase community-rated private health insurance. We use a two-phase modelling methodology that incorporates statistical learning and logistic regression on a dataset that links administrative and longitudinal survey data for a large cohort of women. We find that the key predictor of private patient status is having private health insurance, which itself is largely driven by sociodemographic factors rather than health-or pregnancy-related factors. Additionally, transitioning between the public-private systems for a subsequent pregnancy is uncommon; however, it is primarily driven by changes in private health insurance when it occurs. Other significant factors when transitioning to the private system for a second pregnancy are hypertension, increased access to specialists and stress related to previous motherhood experiences. Consequently, there is limited evidence of adverse selection in this market, with targeted financial incentives likely outweighing the impact of community rating even during childbearing years where private health service use increases.

DOI 10.1017/S1748499519000083
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Getachew T, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Giving birth in Ethiopia: a spatial and multilevel analysis to determine availability and factors associated with healthcare facility births.', BJOG, 127 1537-1546 (2020)
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.16275
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2020 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, D'Arcy E, Loxton D, 'The effect of dietary patterns on hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in North Shewa, Ethiopia: A propensity score matched case-control study', Pregnancy Hypertension, 22 24-29 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy Objective: This study aimed to assess the effect of dietary patterns during pregnancy on HDP. A propensity ... [more]

© 2020 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy Objective: This study aimed to assess the effect of dietary patterns during pregnancy on HDP. A propensity score matched case-control study was conducted with 340 pregnant women (71 cases and 269 controls) in North Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. Data were collected through an interviewer-administered questionnaire and maternal anthropometry measurements. After propensity score matching, a conditional logistic regression model was used to identify the independent predictors of HDP by adjusting for the confounders. A p-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: A high dietary diversity score (Adjusted Odd Ratio (AOR) = 0.45; 95% CI: 0.21, 0.93) was associated with a lower odds of HDP. Being merchant (AOR = 3.71 (95% CI: 1.16, 11.89), having previous history of HDP (AOR = 27.58; 95% CI: 4.53, 168.06) and high hemoglobin level (AOR = 2.26; 95% CI: 1.66, 3.09) were associated with an increased odds of HDP. Diet is an amendable factor, and the promotion of diversified diet is an important approach for preventing the occurrence of HDP. Women should be counselled to diversify their dietary intake to include a high amount of vegetables, legumes, and fruit.

DOI 10.1016/j.preghy.2020.07.002
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Delaying factors for maternal health service utilization in eastern Ethiopia: A qualitative exploratory study', Women and Birth, 33 e216-e226 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: In Ethiopia, maternal health service utilization is still unacceptably low. The societal and cultural factors that constrain wome... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: In Ethiopia, maternal health service utilization is still unacceptably low. The societal and cultural factors that constrain women from attending these services have not yet been sufficiently explored. Using qualitative methods, we aimed to explore the factors that delay maternal health service utilization in eastern Ethiopia. Method: A total of 13 audio-recorded focus group discussions were conducted comprising 88 participants. We conducted separate group discussions with reproductive aged women, mothers-in-law, traditional birth attendants, husbands, and Health Extension Workers to capture their knowledge, practices, feelings, thoughts and attitudes towards maternal health service utilization. The recorded sessions were transcribed into the local language and then translated into English for analysis. Result: The study identified a number of factors that may delay maternal health service utilization. Factors were grouped using the Three Delays model as a framework. Low level of awareness regarding need, poor involvement of husband, perceived absence of health problems, social power, community misperceptions and cultural restrictions, negative attitudes towards male midwives, acceptance of traditional birth attendants and poor social networking were Delay One factors. Lack of physical accessibility and high transportation costs were categorised as Delay Two factors for skilled birth care attendance. Perceived or experienced poor quality of care were categorised as Delay Three factors for both skilled birth and postnatal care utilization. Conclusion: Despite the ongoing government measures to improve maternal health service utilization in Ethiopia, numerous factors continue to contribute to delays in service use, which in turn contribute to high maternal mortality.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.04.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2020 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Taddele T, Loxton D, 'Magnitude and determinants of obstetric case fatality rate among women with the direct causes of maternal deaths in Ethiopia: a national cross sectional study', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 20 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-020-2830-5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Shifti DM, Chojenta C, Holliday EG, Loxton D, 'Application of geographically weighted regression analysis to assess predictors of short birth interval hot spots in Ethiopia', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0233790
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Liz Holliday
2020 Meazaw MW, Chojenta C, Muluneh MD, Loxton D, 'Systematic and meta-analysis of factors associated with preeclampsia and eclampsia in sub-Saharan Africa.', PloS one, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0237600
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Fradgley EA, Karnon J, Roach D, Harding K, Wilkinson-Meyers L, Chojenta C, et al., 'Taking the pulse of the health services research community: A cross-sectional survey of research impact, barriers and support', Australian Health Review, 44 160-167 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH18213
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Elizabeth Fradgley, Melissa Harris, Chris Paul
2020 Tiruye TY, Chojenta C, Harris ML, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'Intimate partner violence against women and its association with pregnancy loss in Ethiopia: evidence from a national survey.', BMC Womens Health, 20 192 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s12905-020-01028-z
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, Liz Holliday
2020 Hendryx M, Chojenta C, Byles JE, 'Latent Class Analysis of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery among Australian Women', Journal of Pediatrics, 218 42-48.e1 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To identify patterns of health, socioeconomic, behavioral, and psychosocial indicators that may be associated with low birth weight delivery or pr... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. Objectives: To identify patterns of health, socioeconomic, behavioral, and psychosocial indicators that may be associated with low birth weight delivery or preterm birth. Study design: Data were analyzed from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 9075 live singleton births among 3801 women were linked to state perinatal records with birth outcome data. Survey data were used to identify 11 indicators for latent class analysis. Latent classes were tested for association to birth outcomes. These indicators also were used along with covariates in main effect multiple logistic regression analyses of birth outcomes. Results: Latent class analysis revealed 5 classes, including those characterized by low education, recent drug use, stress/anxiety/depression, smoking/drinking/low education/multi-risk, and a low risk referent group. The stress/anxiety/depression class was associated with preterm delivery (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.20-2.92), and the smoking/drinking/low education/multirisk class was associated with low birth weight (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.02-2.30). Traditional logistic regression analyses for main effects identified some measures not captured by the latent classes, and the latent classes identified variable combinations not captured by the main effect analysis. Conclusions: Unique latent classes were associated with preterm delivery vs low birth weight. Both latent class analysis and main effects analyses may be combined to improve understanding of birth outcome risks. Clinical and programmatic interventions to reduce risks of low birth weight and preterm delivery may benefit from risk profiles that women experience.

DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.11.007
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles
2020 Tiruye TY, Chojenta C, Harris ML, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'The Role of Maternal Intimate Partner Violence Victimization on Neonatal Mortality in Ethiopia', JOURNAL OF INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE, (2020)
DOI 10.1177/0886260519897331
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Shifti DM, Chojenta C, Holliday EG, Loxton D, 'Individual and community level determinants of short birth interval in Ethiopia: A multilevel analysis', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0227798
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Deborah Loxton
2020 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Taddele T, Loxton D, 'Incidence of maternal near miss among women in labour admitted to hospitals in Ethiopia', MIDWIFERY, 82 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2019.102597
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Musa A, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'High rate of partner violence during pregnancy in eastern Ethiopia: Findings from a facility-based study', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0233907
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Tekelab T, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Incidence and determinants of neonatal near miss in south Ethiopia: A prospective cohort study', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 20 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 The Author(s). Background: For every neonate who dies, many others experience a near miss event that could have but did not result in death. Neonatal near miss is three to ... [more]

© 2020 The Author(s). Background: For every neonate who dies, many others experience a near miss event that could have but did not result in death. Neonatal near miss is three to eight times more frequent than neonatal deaths and, therefore, is more useful for assessing the determinants of adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and determinants of neonatal near miss in south Ethiopia. Methods: A facility-based prospective study was conducted among 2704 neonates between 12 July to 26 November 2018. The neonates were followed from the time of admission to hospital discharge or seven postpartum days if the newborn stayed in the hospital. The data were collected by interviewer-administered questionnaire and medical record review. Logistic regression was employed to identify the distant, intermediate and proximal factors associated with neonatal near miss. The independent variables were analysed in three hierarchical blocks. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to determine the strength of the associations. Results: The incidences of neonatal near miss and neonatal death were 45.1 (95% CI = 37.7-53.8) and 17.4 (95% CI = 13.0-23.3) per 1000 live births, respectively. Of those newborns who experienced neonatal near miss, more than half (59.8%) of their mothers were referred from other health facilities. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of neonatal near miss were significantly higher among neonates with a low monthly income (< 79 USD monthly), a birth interval of less than 24 months and where severe maternal complications had occurred. Conclusion: Strategies to improve neonatal survival need a multifaceted approach that includes socio-economic and health-related factors. The findings of this study highlight important implications for policymakers with regard to neonatal near miss. In particular, addressing inequalities by increasing women's income, promoting an optimal birth interval of 24 months or above through postpartum family planning, and preventing maternal complications may improve newborn survival.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-020-03049-w
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2020 Hendryx M, Chojenta C, Byles JE, 'Obesity Risk Among Young Australian Women: A Prospective Latent Class Analysis', Obesity, 28 154-160 (2020) [C1]

© 2019 The Obesity Society Objective: Prospective studies on obesity incidence specifically among young adults have not been reported. This study examined risks of obesity inciden... [more]

© 2019 The Obesity Society Objective: Prospective studies on obesity incidence specifically among young adults have not been reported. This study examined risks of obesity incidence over 19 years among young women without obesity at baseline. Methods: Women aged 18 to 23 years at baseline (N = 8,177) were followed up every 2 to 3 years to ages 37 to 42 using the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. A latent class analysis identified obesity-risk classes based on time-dependent measures of income, education, physical activity, sleep quality, dietary behavior, depression, stressful events, and social functioning. Cox proportional hazards regression models examined associations between incident obesity and latent classes, controlling for covariates. Results: Four latent classes were identified, including a lower-risk referent class and classes characterized by poor exercise and diet, stress and low income, and multiple intermediate-level risks. Compared with the referent, all three risk classes had significantly higher obesity risk, with the highest risk in the stress and low-income group (hazard ratio = 2.22; 95% CI: 1.92-2.56). Individual risks associated with obesity included lower education, stressful life events, and lower vigorous physical activity. Conclusions: Young women without baseline obesity were at risk of developing obesity when they experienced co-occurring behavioral, socioeconomic, and psychosocial risks. Both latent classes and individual risk indicators offer insights into prevention strategies.

DOI 10.1002/oby.22646
Co-authors Julie Byles
2020 Tiruye TY, Harris ML, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'Intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia and its association with unintended pregnancy: a national cross-sectional survey', International Journal of Public Health, (2020)

© 2020, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+). Objectives: To investigate the association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and unintended pregnancy among women in Ethiopia.... [more]

© 2020, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+). Objectives: To investigate the association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and unintended pregnancy among women in Ethiopia. Methods: A retrospective analysis of nationally representative data was conducted among 2969 married women of reproductive age (15¿49¿years). Logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of IPV with the outcome variable. Results: Unintended pregnancy was reported by 26.5% of women. About¿36% of participants reported having ever experienced IPV (a composite measure of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse) and 56% had experienced at least one act of partner controlling behaviour. After controlling for potential confounders, a significant association was observed between IPV and unintended pregnancy (AOR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05, 1.85) and between multiple acts of partner controlling behaviours and unintended pregnancy (AOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.16, 2.14). Conclusions: In Ethiopia, which has a high fertility rate (4.6 children per woman) and low use of contraception (36%), IPV including partner controlling behaviour further contributes to the problem of unintended pregnancy. Reproductive health programs should be sensitive to the relational aspects of fertility control and incorporate IPV interventions into reproductive health services.

DOI 10.1007/s00038-020-01510-3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, Liz Holliday
2020 Tiruye TY, Harris ML, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'Determinants of intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia: A multi-level analysis', PLOS ONE, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0232217
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton
2020 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Taddele T, Loxton D, 'Perceptions of midwives on the quality of emergency obstetric care at hospitals in Ethiopia: A qualitative explanatory study', Midwifery, 90 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102814
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Beyene AS, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, 'Gender-based violence perpetration by male high school students in Eastern Ethiopia', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 1-14 (2020) [C1]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Gender-based violence (GBV) perpetration is a global public health problem due to its detrimental effect on health and ed... [more]

© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Gender-based violence (GBV) perpetration is a global public health problem due to its detrimental effect on health and education. This study aims to determine the prevalence of gender-based violence perpetration by male students in eastern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in eastern Ethiopia in December 2018. A total of 1064 male students were involved in the study. Data were collected using an adaptation of the WHO Multi-Country Study self-administered questionnaire on the Women Health and Life Event. Descriptive statistics were calculated using STATA version 14. The prevalence of gender-based violence committed by a male in the last 12 months was 55.83% (95% CI: 52.84¿58.82%). The prevalence of emotional abuse against an intimate or non-partner was 45.86% (95% CI: 42.87¿48.86%), physical abuse was 45.77% (95% CI: 42.77¿ 48.77%), and sexual abuse was 31.11% (95% CI: 28.32¿33.90%). The perpetration of multiple types of gender-based violence (emotional, physical, and sexual) was 47.15% (95% CI: 43.15¿51.25%), with 17.72% (95% CI: 14.75¿21.03%) reporting emotionally and physically violent acts, 14.21% (95% CI: 11.51¿17.27%) reporting emotionally violent acts only, and 12.88% (95% CI: 10.29¿15.82%) reporting physically violent acts only. There were statistically significant differences between the age of participants who committed acts of all forms of GBV in the ¿ever¿ timeframe and the past 12 months (p < 0.001). Effective prevention and intervention strategies should be developed at the school level to reduce gender-based violence perpetration.

DOI 10.3390/ijerph17155536
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon, Deborah Loxton
2020 Meazaw MW, Chojenta C, Muluneh MD, Loxton D, 'Factors associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic and meta-analysis.', PloS one, 15 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0237476
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2020 Forder PM, Rich J, Harris S, Chojenta C, Reilly N, Austin MP, Loxton D, 'Honesty and comfort levels in mothers when screened for perinatal depression and anxiety', Women and Birth, 33 e142-e150 (2020)

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Purpose: To evaluate the degree of honesty and level of comfort reported by women when questioned about their emotional wellbeing during the ... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Purpose: To evaluate the degree of honesty and level of comfort reported by women when questioned about their emotional wellbeing during the perinatal period; to investigate if honesty and comfort are associated with perinatal depression or perinatal anxiety; and to examine the reasons why women may not always respond honestly. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data from 1597 women from the cross-sectional perinatal mental health substudy (part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health) were analysed using a mixed methods approach. Results: When questioned by their health practitioner about their emotional wellbeing in the perinatal period, 20.7% of women indicated they had not always responded honestly. Reasons for not being honest reflected four main themes: normalizing of symptoms/coping; negative perceptions (self-and others); fear of adverse repercussions; and fear of involvement of health services (trust and confidentiality). The 38.9% of women who did not feel comfortable when questioned by their health practitioner about their emotional wellbeing were four times more likely to report perinatal depression (odds ratio = 4.09; 95% confidence interval = 2.55, 6.57) and nearly twice as likely to report perinatal anxiety (odds ratio = 1.90; 95% confidence interval = 1.24, 2.94) than other women. Conclusions: Women who are most likely to need mental health care during the perinatal period are also those least likely to be honest about their mental health. A non-judgemental, open and reassuring approach by clinicians may help to reduce the stigma and fears contributing to lack of honest responses, and improve early diagnosis and treatment of mental health problems.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.04.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jane Rich, Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly
2019 William J, Chojenta C, Martin MA, Loxton D, 'An actuarial investigation into maternal out-of-hospital cost risk factors', Annals of Actuarial Science, 13 1-35 (2019) [C1]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2018. This paper adopts an actuarial approach to identify the risk factors of government-funded maternal out-of-hospital costs in Australia, w... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2018. This paper adopts an actuarial approach to identify the risk factors of government-funded maternal out-of-hospital costs in Australia, with a focus on women who experience adverse birth outcomes. We use a two-phase modelling methodology incorporating both classification and regression trees and generalised linear models on a data set that links administrative and longitudinal survey data from a large sample of women, to address maternal out-of-hospital costs. We find that adverse births are a statistically significant risk factor of out-of-hospital costs in both the delivery and postnatal periods. Furthermore, other significant cost risk factors are in-vitro fertilisation, specialist use, general practitioner use, area of residence and mental health factors (including anxiety, intense anxiety, postnatal depression and stress about own health) and the results vary by perinatal sub-period and the patient's private health insurance status. We highlight these differences and use the results as an evidence base to inform public policy. Mental health policy is identified as a priority area for further investigation due to the dominance of these factors in many of the fitted models.

DOI 10.1017/S1748499518000015
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, D'Arcy E, Loxton D, 'Spatial distribution and determinant factors of anaemia among women of reproductive age in Ethiopia: A multilevel and spatial analysis', BMJ Open, 9 1-14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027276
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Kiross GT, Chojenta C, Barker D, Tiruye TY, Loxton D, 'The effect of maternal education on infant mortality in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLoS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Kiross et al. Introduction Some studies in developing countries have shown that infant mortality is highly associated with maternal education, implying that maternal educat... [more]

© 2019 Kiross et al. Introduction Some studies in developing countries have shown that infant mortality is highly associated with maternal education, implying that maternal education might play an important role in the reduction of infant mortality. However, other research has shown that lower levels of maternal education does not have any significant contribution to infant survival. In this systematic review, we focus on the effect of different levels of maternal education on infant mortality in Ethiopia. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched between November 15, 2017 and February 20, 2018. All articles published until February 20, 2018 were included in the study. The data extraction was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA 2009) guidelines. An I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity and a funnel plot was used to check publication bias. Findings We retrieved 441 records after removing duplications. During screening, 31 articles were fully accessed for data extraction. Finally, five articles were included for analysis. The overall pooled estimate indicated that attending primary education was associated with a 28% reduction in the odds of infant mortality compared to those infants born to mothers who were illiterate, OR: 0.72 (95% CI = 0.66, 0.78). Another pooled estimate indicated that attending secondary education and above was associated with a 45% reduction in the odds of infant mortality compared to those infants born to mothers who were illiterate, OR: 0.55 (95% CI = 0.47, 0.64).

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0220076
Citations Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Daniel Barker
2019 Harris BM, Harris ML, Rae K, Chojenta C, 'Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women: An integrative review', Midwifery, 73 49-61 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To synthesise primary research regarding the facilitators and barriers to smoking cessation amongst Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women d... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To synthesise primary research regarding the facilitators and barriers to smoking cessation amongst Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women during pregnancy. Design: An integrative review. Review methods: A systematic search of peer-reviewed literature from five databases published from January 2008 to April 2018. Articles were reviewed using the approach outlined by Whittemore and Knafl, with the identified themes collated and synthesised according to study characteristics and barriers and facilitators of smoking cessation. Findings: Of the 310 papers retrieved, nine studies were included within the review (five quantitative and four qualitative). The quality of the studies were ascertained via Joanna Briggs Institute checklists for cross sectional analysis, randomized controlled trials, and qualitative research. The overall quality of the research was deemed acceptable. Two facilitators to smoking cessation within the studied population were identified: ¿support to quit¿ and ¿information and advice¿ while four barriers to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women were identified: ¿smoking prevalence¿ ¿high daily stress¿ ¿ambivalence regarding adverse effects of smoking¿ and ¿attitudes, knowledge and training of the healthcare professional¿. Conclusions: Social and familial influences and daily stress have a strong impact on whether a woman feels she can quit smoking during pregnancy. However, in this study, information and advice regarding potential adverse effects of smoking on the foetus, or lack thereof, from health professionals either facilitated cessation of smoking in pregnancy or was a barrier to quitting. Likewise, a lack of awareness from midwives and doctors on smoking cessation strategies, such as nicotine replacement therapy, was a barrier for women. Implications for practice: The findings indicate that education regarding the adverse effects of smoking in pregnancy, as well as strategies on smoking cessation from midwives, doctors, and Aboriginal Health Workers within the antenatal period may have a positive effect on current smoking rates among pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women. Involving the partner/support person and family of the woman in this education may have a greater impact on smoking cessation rates through the woman gaining social and familial support in her decision to quit. Thus, healthcare workers require additional professional development to provide information and knowledge within a culturally competent manner. Successful smoking cessation programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women during pregnancy could have measurable impacts on mortality rates for Indigenous infants and significantly contribute to ¿Closing the Gap¿.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2019.03.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Kym Rae
2019 Tekelab T, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'The impact of antenatal care on neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLoS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Tekelab et al. Background Newborns are at greatest risk of dying at and shortly after the time of birth. Newborn mortality remains an urgent concern and is an important ind... [more]

© 2019 Tekelab et al. Background Newborns are at greatest risk of dying at and shortly after the time of birth. Newborn mortality remains an urgent concern and is an important indicator of child health, development and well-being. Studies examining the effectiveness of antenatal care on maternal and newborn health outcomes have provided conflicting results. The aim of this review and meta-analysis was to determine the pooled effect of antenatal care on neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We searched PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and Google Scholar from September to November 2016 and then updated our search on April 13, 2019. Two independent reviewers extracted data from eligible studies. The quality of each included study was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies (RoBANS). The results were reported based on risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a random-effects model. Results Eight hundred and ninety eight studies were initially identified. During screening, 23 studies were found to be relevant for data extraction. Of these, only twelve studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. In five of the twelve studies included in the analysis, antenatal care service utilization had a significant association with neonatal mortality. The pooled risk ratio by the random-effects model was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.86) for neonates born to women who received at least one antenatal care visit by a skilled provider as compared to neonates born to women who did not receive antenatal care. Conclusion This review indicates that utilization of at least one antenatal care visit by a skilled provider during pregnancy reduces the risk of neonatal mortality by 39% in sub-Saharan African countries. Thus, in order to accelerate progress towards the reduction of newborn deaths, all pregnant women should receive antenatal care during pregnancy.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0222566
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2019 Hendryx M, Luo J, Chojenta C, Byles JE, 'Exposure to heavy metals from point pollution sources and risk of incident type 2 diabetes among women: a prospective cohort analysis', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH, (2019)
DOI 10.1080/09603123.2019.1668545
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles
2019 Melka AS, Chojenta CL, Holliday EG, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of E-cigarette Use Among Young Australian Women', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 56 293-299 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: E-cigarette use is controversial worldwide. The majority of previous studies on e-cigarette use were not gender specific. This study aimed to ide... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: E-cigarette use is controversial worldwide. The majority of previous studies on e-cigarette use were not gender specific. This study aimed to identify the predictors of e-cigarette use among young Australian women. Methods: This study used cross-sectional data from the 1989¿1995 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. In 2015, study participants (N=8,915) aged 19¿26 years completed an online survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of e-cigarette use. Data were analyzed in 2018. Results: The prevalence of ever and past-year e-cigarette use among young Australian women was 11.1% and 6.4%, respectively. More than a quarter of past-year and ever e-cigarette users were never cigarette smokers. Use of e-cigarettes in the past year was associated with younger age (AOR per year increase=0.87, 95% CI=0.82, 0.93); financial difficulty (AOR=0.68, 95% CI=0.54, 0.87); being an ex-smoker (AOR=5.05, 95% CI=3.64, 7.01) or current cigarette smoker (AOR=10.01, 95% CI=7.77, 12.89); drinking at a level of lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury (AOR=1.23, 95% CI=1.01, 1.53). Ever e-cigarette use showed similar associations and was also associated with rural residence (AOR=0.74, 95% CI=0.60, 0.91) and intimate partner violence (AOR=1.44, 95% CI=1.17, 1.76). Conclusions: The high prevalence of e-cigarette use among never cigarette smokers has significant public health implications. Interventions to curb the use of e-cigarettes among young Australian women should focus on risk factors, such as early age, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and intimate partner violence.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.019
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Liz Holliday
2019 Bagade T, Chojenta C, Harris ML, Nepal S, Loxton D, 'Does gender equality and availability of contraception influence maternal and child mortality? A systematic review', BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health, (2019)

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Background: Current global maternal and child health policies rarely value gender equality or women&apos;s rights and are restricted to po... [more]

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Background: Current global maternal and child health policies rarely value gender equality or women's rights and are restricted to policies addressing clinical interventions and family planning. Gender equality influences the knowledge, autonomy and utilisation of contraception and healthcare, thereby affecting maternal and child health. This systematic review aims to analyse the concurrent effect of gender equality and contraception on maternal and under-5 child mortality. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to investigate the current evidence. Studies were eligible if three themes - namely, indicators of gender equality (such as female education, labour force participation, gender-based violence), contraception, and maternal or child mortality - were present together in a single article analysing the same sample at the same time. Results: Even though extensive literature on this topic exists, only three studies managed to fit the selection criteria. Findings of two studies indicated an association between intimate partner violence (IPV) and infant mortality, and also reported that women's contraceptive use increased the risk of IPV. The third study found that the mother's secondary education attainment significantly reduced child mortality, while the mother's working status increased the odds of child mortality. The researchers of all included studies specified that contraceptive use significantly reduced the risk of child mortality. Conclusion: Improvement in gender equality and contraception concurrently affect the reduction in child mortality. These findings provide strong support to address the research gaps and to include a gender equality approach towards maternal and child health policies.

DOI 10.1136/bmjsrh-2018-200184
Co-authors Tanmay Bagade, Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris
2019 Tekelab T, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Factors affecting utilization of antenatal care in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0214848
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2019 Chojenta C, William J, Martin MA, Byles J, Loxton D, 'The impact of a history of poor mental health on health care costs in the perinatal period', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 22 467-473 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. The perinatal period is a critical time for mental health and is also associated with high health care expenditure. ... [more]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. The perinatal period is a critical time for mental health and is also associated with high health care expenditure. Our previous work has identified a history of poor mental health as the strongest predictor of poor perinatal mental health. This study aims to examine the impact of a history of poor mental health on health care costs during the perinatal period. Data from the 1973¿1978 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health (ALSWH) were linked with a number of administrative datasets including the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection and Perinatal Data Collection, the Medicare Benefits Scheme and the Pharmaceuticals Benefits Scheme between 2002 and 2011. Even when taking birth type and private health insurance status into account, a history of poor mental health resulted in an average increase of over 11% per birth across the perinatal period. These findings indicate that an investment in prevention and early treatment of poor mental health prior to child bearing may result in a cost saving in the perinatal period and a reduction of the incidence of women experiencing poor perinatal mental health.

DOI 10.1007/s00737-018-0912-4
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2019 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Getachew T, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Antenatal care use in Ethiopia: a spatial and multilevel analysis', BMC PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-019-2550-x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2019 Hendryx M, Luo J, Chojenta C, Byles JE, 'Air pollution exposures from multiple point sources and risk of incident chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma', Environmental Research, 179 1-6 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.envres.2019.108783
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julie Byles
2019 Musa A, Chojenta C, Geleto A, Loxton D, 'The associations between intimate partner violence and maternal health care service utilization: A systematic review and meta-analysis', BMC Women's Health, 19 1-14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-019-0735-0
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Magnitude and correlates of postnatal care utilization among reproductive aged women in a rural district in eastern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study', Midwifery, 70 22-30 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Postnatal care is critical to detect and manage postpartum complications in the early stages as well as to prevent potentially life-threatening hea... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Postnatal care is critical to detect and manage postpartum complications in the early stages as well as to prevent potentially life-threatening health conditions that lead to maternal death. However, postnatal care utilization is persistently low in Ethiopia. The aim of this study is to assess the magnitude and correlates of postnatal care utilization among reproductiveaged women in Kersa district, in eastern Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in ten randomly selected sub-districts in Kersa district. Respondents were recruited using systematic random sampling techniques. Data were collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire using iPads. A total of 1206 respondents¿ data were considered in the analysis. Frequency and percentage distributions of the variables were performed. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to identify the predisposing, enabling and need factors associated with postnatal care utilization. An Odds Ratio with 95% confidence interval was used to ascertain the direction and strength of the association. Results: Less than one in thirteen women attended postnatal care after their last delivery in the study community. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that postnatal care utilization is associated with receiving education on maternal health, best friend's use of maternal care, head of the household, and experience of postpartum complications. Receiving education on maternal health (AOR, 2.32; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.89) and best friend's use of maternal care (AOR, 2.41; 95% CI: 1.39, 4.19) were significant predisposing factors that independently predicted postnatal care utilization. Furthermore, head of the household was a significantly associated enabling factor for postnatal care utilization (AOR, 0.24; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.81). The experience of postpartum complications (AOR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.20) was the only need factor that was associated with postnatal care utilization. Conclusion: Postnatal care utilization is extremely low in the study district. Strengthening health education and promotion activities on maternal health, peer education programs within the women's social networks, strengthening women empowerment programs, and women's mobilization to seek postnatal care before the occurrence of complications are essential actions that can improve postnatal care utilization.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2018.12.002
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2019 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Getachew T, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Service environment link and false discovery rate correction: Methodological considerations in population and health facility surveys.', PLoS One, 14 e0219860 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0219860
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2019 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, Gresham E, Tegegne TK, Loxton D, 'Maternal dietary patterns and risk of adverse pregnancy (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus) and birth (preterm birth and low birth weight) outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Public Health Nutrition, 22 506-520 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective Epidemiological studies have indicated that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes such as hypert... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective Epidemiological studies have indicated that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). However, the results of these studies are varied and inconsistent. The present study aimed to assess the association between dietary patterns and the risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Seven databases were searched for articles. Two reviewers performed the study selection and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to estimate pooled effect sizes of eligible studies.Setting Studies conducted all over the world were incorporated.Subjects The review focused on pregnant women.Results A total of twenty-one studies were identified. Adherence to a healthy dietary pattern (intake of vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains) was significantly associated with lower odds (OR; 95 % CI) of pre-eclampsia (0·78; 0·70, 0·86; I 2=39·0 %, P=0·178), GDM (0·78; 0·56, 0·99; I 2=68·6 %, P=0·013) and PTB (0·75; 0·57, 0·93; I 2=89·6 %, P=0·0001).Conclusions Our review suggests that dietary patterns with a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fish are associated with a decreased likelihood of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. Further research should be conducted in low-income countries to understand the impact of limited resources on dietary intake and adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980018002616
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Musa A, Loxton D, 'WOMEN's Knowledge of Obstetric Danger signs in Ethiopia (WOMEN's KODE):a systematic review and meta-analysis', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-019-0979-7
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Predisposing, enabling and need factors associated with skilled delivery care utilization among reproductive-aged women in Kersa district, eastern Ethiopia', REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12978-019-0829-z
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2019 Beyene AS, Chojenta C, Roba HS, Melka AS, Loxton D, 'Gender-based violence among female youths in educational institutions of Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-019-0969-9
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Addisushunu Beyene Uon, Deborah Loxton
2019 Majeed T, Tavener M, Dolja-Gore X, Nair B, Chojenta C, Byles J, 'Patterns of geriatric health assessment use among community dwelling older Australian women over a 14-year period', Journal of Health Services Research and Policy, 24 100-107 (2019) [C1]

© The Author(s) 2019. Objective: To assess which older Australian women had Medicare subsidized health assessments between 1999 and 2013. Methods: This study used prospective, lon... [more]

© The Author(s) 2019. Objective: To assess which older Australian women had Medicare subsidized health assessments between 1999 and 2013. Methods: This study used prospective, longitudinal survey data from the 1921 to 1926 birth cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health (ALSWH) linked with Medicare Australia data on health services use. Over 11,000 Australian women were included in the study. Latent class analysis was used to identify assessment patterns over time, accounting for death, and based on three categories (¿no assessment¿; ¿assessment; ¿deceased¿) for each year between 1999 and 2013. Further analysis explored the impact of health and sociodemographic characteristics on class membership. Results: Of the women included in the latent class analysis, 37% never had any assessment and the remainder had had at least one assessment. After a steady uptake from 1999 to 2003, there was decline in uptake from 2003 onwards. A six-class model with sufficient homogeneity and reliable estimation was selected to represent assessment patterns and mortality risk, labelled as: ¿high mortality¿ rate with little chance for assessment (12.4%), ¿intermediate mortality, low assessment¿ (14.1%), ¿later mortality/low assessment¿ (13.1%), ¿later mortality, high assessment¿ (7.0%), ¿low mortality, low assessment¿ (31.8%), ¿low mortality, high assessment¿ (21.6%). Older women with certain conditions (such as diabetes, depression, heart disease) were more likely to be in the low assessment groups, and women with difficulty managing on income were more likely to be in low assessment groups. Conclusion: Distinct assessment and mortality patterns were seen, with many women not having assessment, in particular those who had certain health conditions, were taking 3+ medications, had difficulty in managing on income, needed help or were in respite care, and had caring responsibilities. The findings point to a need to promote these assessments among older women, and to reduce financial barriers, even within the context of a heavily subsidized health care system.

DOI 10.1177/1355819618814561
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Tazeen Majeed, Julie Byles, Kichu Nair, Xenia Doljagore
2019 Melka A, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'Adverse childhood experiences and electronic cigarette use among young Australian women.', Preventive medicine, 126 105759-105759 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105759
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Liz Holliday
2018 Tesfaye G, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Assefa N, Smith R, 'Magnitude, trends and causes of maternal mortality among reproductive aged women in Kersa health and demographic surveillance system, eastern Ethiopia', BMC WOMENS HEALTH, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0690-1
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2018 Melka AS, Chojenta CL, Holliday EG, Loxton DJ, 'Effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation: protocol for umbrella review and quality assessment of systematic reviews', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 7 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0878-3
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Deborah Loxton
2018 William J, Martin MA, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'An actuarial investigation into maternal hospital cost risk factors for public patients', Annals of Actuarial Science, 12 106-129 (2018) [C1]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2017. We investigate an actuarial approach to identifying the factors impacting government-funded maternal hospital costs in Australia, with a... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2017. We investigate an actuarial approach to identifying the factors impacting government-funded maternal hospital costs in Australia, with a focus on women who experience adverse birth outcomes. We propose a two-phase modelling methodology that adopts actuarial methods from typical insurance claim cost modelling and extends to other statistical techniques to account for the large volume of covariates available for modelling. Specifically, Classification and Regression Trees and generalised linear mixed models are employed to analyse a data set that links longitudinal survey and administrative data from a large sample of women. The results show that adverse births are a statistically significant risk factor affecting maternal hospital costs in the antenatal and delivery periods. Other significant cost risk factors in the delivery period include mode of delivery, private health insurance status, diabetes, smoking status, area of residence and onset of labour. We demonstrate the efficacy of using actuarial techniques in non-traditional areas and highlight how the results can be used to inform public policy.

DOI 10.1017/S174849951700015X
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Loxton D, Smith R, Kibret KT, 'The impact of geographic access on institutional delivery care use in low and middle-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis.', PloS one, 13 e0203130 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0203130
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2018 Kocanda L, Brown L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta C, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australian longitudinal cohort', Nutrition & Dietetics, 75 50-50 (2018)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Kym Rae, Lucy Kocanda Uon
2018 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Mussa A, Loxton D, 'Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa - a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 7 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0720-y
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Application of the Andersen-Newman model of health care utilization to understand antenatal care use in Kersa District, Eastern Ethiopia', PLOS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0208729
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Roger Smith, Deborah Loxton
2018 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Musa A, Loxton D, 'Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of literature.', Systematic reviews, 7 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0842-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Chojenta C, Mingay E, Gresham E, Byles J, 'Cooking for One or Two: Applying Participatory Action Research to improve community-dwelling older adults' health and well-being', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 29 105-107 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.35
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles
2018 Morgan K, Chojenta C, Tavener M, Smith A, Loxton D, 'Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: A systematic review of the literature', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 215 106-118 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy. Method: A systematic review was conducted in March 2015 and updated in February 2018. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINHAL, and the Cochrane Library were searched from database inception. The ClinicalTrials.gov site and bibliographies were searched. MeSH and Emtree headings and keywords included; Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, and were combined with pregnancy and pregnancy related subject headings and keywords. Searches were limited to English. Eligible articles contained key words within the title and or abstract. Articles were excluded if Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome was not pre-existing. Results: Eleven articles were identified as eligible for inclusion. Studies were appraised using the PRISMA 2009 guidelines. The overall quality of evidence was poor using the NHMRC Evidence Grading Matrix, which was attributed to small sample sizes and mostly observational studies, emphasizing the need for future high quality research. Findings in this review must be used with caution due to the poor quality of the literature available. Conclusions: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome should not be a contraindication to pregnancy. Symptom course is variable during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Continuing pre-conception medication may help symptoms, with no significant risks reported. Obstetric complications, not Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, should dictate mode of delivery. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome did not appear to affect the rate of adverse events. These results are important in determining appropriate management and care in this population.

DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2018.05.003
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Meredith Tavener
2018 Chojenta C, Byles J, Nair BK, 'Rehabilitation and convalescent hospital stay in New South Wales: An analysis of 3,979 women aged 75+', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 195-199 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12731
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Julie Byles
2017 Hure A, Powers J, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Rates and Predictors of Caesarean Section for First and Second Births: A Prospective Cohort of Australian Women', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 21 1175-1184 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and secon... [more]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and second births in Australia, and to identify maternal predictors of caesarean section. Methods Data were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. A total of 5275 women aged 18¿38 years, who had given birth to their first child between 1996 and 2012 were included; 75.0% (n = 3956) had delivered a second child. Mode of delivery for first and second singleton birth(s) was obtained from longitudinal survey data. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric and medical history variables were tested as predictors of mode of delivery for first and second births using multinomial logistic regression. Results Caesarean sections accounted for 29.1% (n = 1535) of first births, consisting of 18.2% emergency and 10.9% elective caesareans. Mode of delivery for first and second births was consistent for 85.5% of women (n = 3383) who delivered both children either vaginally or via caesarean section. Higher maternal age and body mass index, short-stature, anxiety and having private health insurance were predictive of caesarean section for first births. Vaginal birth after caesarean section was more common in women who were older, short-statured, or had been overweight or obese for both children, compared to women who had two vaginal deliveries. Conclusions for Practice Rates of caesarean section in Australia are high. Renewed efforts are needed to reduce the number of unnecessary caesarean births, with particular caution applied to first births. Interventions could focus on elective caesareans for women with private health insurance or a history of anxiety.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-016-2216-5
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers
2017 Tesfaye G, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Semahegn A, Smith R, 'Delayed initiation of antenatal care and associated factors in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Reproductive health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0412-4
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2016 Tavener MA, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Generating qualitative data by design: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health qualitative data collection.', Public Health Research & Practice, 26 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.17061/phrp2631631
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Deborah Loxton
2016 Leigh L, Byles JE, Chojenta C, Pachana NA, 'Late life changes in mental health: a longitudinal study of 9683 women', Aging and Mental Health, 20 1044-1054 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. Objectives: To identify latent subgroups of women in late life who are alike in terms of their mental health trajectories. Method: Longitudinal data... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Objectives: To identify latent subgroups of women in late life who are alike in terms of their mental health trajectories. Method: Longitudinal data are for 9683 participants in the 1921¿1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, who completed at least two surveys between 1999 (aged 73¿78 years) and 2008 (aged 82¿87 years). Mental health was measured using the five-item mental health inventory (MHI-5). Latent profile analysis uncovered patterns of change in MHI-5 scores. Results: Three patterns of change were identified for women who were still alive in 2008 (n = 7061), and three similar patterns for deceased women (n = 2622): (1) ¿poor mental health¿ representing women with low MHI-5 scores, (2) ¿good mental health¿ and (3) ¿excellent¿ mental health, where scores remained very high. Deceased women had lower mental health scores for each class. Remote areas of residence, higher education, single marital status, higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and falls were the covariates associated with mental health in the survivor group. For the deceased group, education, BMI and falls were significant. Arthritis, stroke, heart disease, bronchitis/emphysema, diabetes and osteoporosis were associated with worse mental health for both groups, while asthma increased these odds significantly for the survivor group only. Hypertension and cancer were not significant predictors of poor mental health. Conclusion: The results show associations between chronic disease and level of mental health in older age, but no evidence of a large decline in mental health in the period prior to death.

DOI 10.1080/13607863.2015.1060943
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles
2016 Chojenta CL, Lucke JC, Forder PM, Loxton DJ, 'Maternal Health Factors as Risks for Postnatal Depression: A Prospective Longitudinal Study', PLoS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of r... [more]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of risk factors at a population-level using data collected prospectively. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between a range of factors and PND and to construct a model of the predictors of PND. Methods Data came from 5219 women who completed Survey 5 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2009 and reported giving birth to a child. Results Over 15% of women reported experiencing PND with at least one of their children. The strongest positive associations were for postnatal anxiety (OR = 13.79,95%CI = 10.48,18.13) and antenatal depression (OR = 9.23,95%CI = 6.10,13.97). Positive associations were also found for history of depression and PND, low SF-36 Mental Health Index, emotional distress during labour, and breastfeeding for less than six months. Conclusions Results indicate that understanding a woman's mental health history plays an important role in the detection of those who are most vulnerable to PND. Treatment and management of depression and anxiety earlier in life and during pregnancy may have a positive impact on the incidence of PND.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147246
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2015 Hure AJ, Chojenta CL, Powers JR, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets', JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 25 30-37 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2188/jea.JE20140032
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2015 Byles JE, Francis JL, Chojenta CL, Hubbard IJ, 'Long-term survival of older australian women with a history of stroke', Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 24 53-60 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Stroke Association. Background Although many people survive an initial stroke, little is known about long-term impacts of stroke on survival. Methods Data from the... [more]

© 2015 National Stroke Association. Background Although many people survive an initial stroke, little is known about long-term impacts of stroke on survival. Methods Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to compare 12-year survival rates in older women with prevalent stroke, incident stroke, and no stroke. Cox regression models were fitted to assess the effect of lifestyle and demographic characteristics on the relationship between stroke and all-cause mortality. The "no stroke" group was used as the reference category in all statistical models. Results At baseline, 4% of the women reported a previous stroke (prevalent stroke). At survey 2 in 1999, a further 3% reported having a stroke between 1996 and 1999 (incident stroke). Stroke was significantly associated with reduced long-term survival. Age-Adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) were: 1.64 (1.43-1.89) for the "prevalent stroke" group and 2.29 (1.97-2.66) for the "incident stroke" group. Adjusting for comorbidities reduced the HRs, but the risk of death was still significantly higher in the 2 stroke groups. Adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors did not make any further difference to the relationship between stroke and survival. However, obesity and past smoking were also risk factors for mortality. Conclusions This study highlights the long-term impacts of stroke on life expectancy and the importance of comorbidities and other lifestyle factors in affecting poststroke survival.

DOI 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.07.040
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Isobel Hubbard, Julie Byles
2015 Gresham E, Forder P, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hure AJ, 'Agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes and administrative data in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate th... [more]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes (gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria, gestational diabetes, premature birth and low birth weight) in a longitudinal study and linked to administrative data (medical records). Methods: Self-reported survey data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was linked with the New South Wales Perinatal Data Collection. Agreement between the two sources was evaluated using percentage agreement and kappa statistics. Analyses were conducted at two levels by: i) the mother and ii) each individual child. Results: Women reliably self-report their perinatal outcomes (=87 % agreement). Gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria had the lowest level of agreement. Mothers' reports of perinatal outcomes were more reliable when evaluated by child. Restricting the analysis to complete and consistent reporting further strengthened the reliability of the child-specific data, increasing the agreement from >92 to >95 % for all outcomes. Conclusions: The present study offers a high degree of confidence in the use of maternal self-reports of the perinatal outcomes gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm birth and low birth weight in epidemiological research, particularly when reported on a per child basis. Furthermore self-report offers a cost-effective and convenient method for gathering detailed maternal perinatal histories.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0597-x
Citations Scopus - 37Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2014 Chojenta C, Harris S, Reilly N, Forder P, Austin MP, Loxton D, 'History of pregnancy loss increases the risk of mental health problems in subsequent pregnancies but not in the postpartum', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during su... [more]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during subsequent pregnancies and births. This paper examined the impact of any type of pregnancy loss on mental health in a subsequent pregnancy and postpartum. Data were obtained from a sub-sample (N = 584) of the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a prospective cohort study that has been collecting data since 1996. Pregnancy loss was defined as miscarriage, termination due to medical reasons, ectopic pregnancy and stillbirth. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, stress or distress, sadness or low mood, excessive worry, lack of enjoyment, and feelings of guilt. Demographic factors and mental health history were controlled for in the analysis. Women with a previous pregnancy loss were more likely to experience sadness or low mood (AOR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.11 to 2.76, p = 0.0162), and excessive worry (AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.24 to 3.24, p = 0.0043) during a subsequent pregnancy, but not during the postpartum phase following a subsequent birth. These results indicate that while women who have experienced a pregnancy loss are a more vulnerable population during a subsequent pregnancy, these deficits are not evident in the postpartum. © 2014 Chojenta et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095038
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton, Nicole Reilly
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Adherence to recommended health checks by women in mid-life: data from a prospective study of women across Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 38 39-43 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12180
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2014 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Austin MP, 'The impact of routine assessment of past or current mental health on help-seeking in the perinatal period', Women and Birth, (2014) [C1]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value o... [more]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value of this line of enquiry in increasing engagement with support services, as required, remains controversial. Aim: The current study aimed to examine whether assessment of past or current mental health, received with or without referral for additional support, is associated with help-seeking during pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods: A subsample of women drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (young cohort) who reported experiencing significant emotional distress during pregnancy (N = 398) or in the 12 months following birth (N = 380) participated in the study. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that women who were not asked about their emotional health were less likely to seek any formal help during both pregnancy (adjOR = 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04-0.24) and the postpartum (adjOR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.02-0.13), as were women who were asked about these issues but who were not referred for additional support (antenatal: adjOR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.15-0.45; postnatal: adjOR = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.07-0.27). However, considerable levels of consultation with general practitioners, midwives and child health nurses, even in the absence of referral, were evident. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that enquiry by a health professional about women's past or current mental health is associated with help-seeking throughout the perinatal period. The clinical and resource implications of these findings for the primary health care sector should be considered prior to the implementation of future routine perinatal depression screening or psychosocial assessment programmes. © 2014 Australian College of Midwives.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.07.003
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Austin M-P, Loxton D, Chojenta CL, Reilly N, 'Maternal mental health in the perinatal period: Outcomes from Australian epidemiological and longitudinal based studies', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S42 (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Chojenta CL, Loxton D, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S111 (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Powers JR, McDermott LJ, Loxton DJ, Chojenta CL, 'A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Predictors of Concurrent Alcohol and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 17 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10995-012-0949-3
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Disparities in reported psychosocial assessment across public and private maternity settings: a national survey of women in Australia', BMC Public Health, 13 632 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-632
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton, Nicole Reilly
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Referral for Management of Emotional Health Issues During the Perinatal Period: Does Mental Health Assessment Make a Difference?', Birth, 40 297-306 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/birt.12067
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jmwh.12014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2013 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Lyn Ebert
2013 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Poor Adherence to National and International Breastfeeding Duration Targets in an Australian Longitudinal Cohort', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0054409
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2013 Rich JL, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Quality, Rigour and Usefulness of Free-Text Comments Collected by a Large Population Based Longitudinal Study - ALSWH', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0068832
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 27
Co-authors Jane Rich, Deborah Loxton
2012 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'How do previous mental health, social support, and stressful life events contribute to postnatal depression in a representative sample of Australian women?', Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health, 57 145-150 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1542-2011.2011.00140.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2007 Chojenta CL, Mooney RH, Warner-Smith PA, 'Accessing and disseminating longitudinal data: Protocols and policies', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 104-113 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Adamson LR, Chojenta CL, 'Developing relationships and retaining participants in a longitudinal study', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 137-146 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11
2007 Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, 'Communication and dissemination of longitudinal study findings', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 199-209 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2006 Byles JE, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Warner-Smith PA, 'Older women in Australia: ageing in urban, rural and remote environments', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 25 151-157 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2006.00171.x
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2005 Adamson LR, Chojenta CL, Lee C, 'Telephone contact of existing participants in longitudinal surveys (Letter)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29 188-189 (2005) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00073.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Show 83 more journal articles

Conference (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Brown LJ, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta CL, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australia longitudinal cohort', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Kym Rae, Leanne Brown, Lucy Kocanda Uon
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Pachana N, 'Late life changes in mental health: A longitudinal study of 9973 women aged through their 70 s and 80 s', Lausanne, Switzerland (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2014 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Forder P, 'Older women's hospital service use: A longitudinal data linkage project', Port Macquarie (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2014 Byles J, Francis JL, Chojenta CL, Hubbard I, 'Long-term survival of older Australian women with a history of stroke', International Journal of Stroke (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Isobel Hubbard, Julie Byles
2013 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2013 Forder PM, Harris S, Reilly N, Chojenta C, Loxton D, Austin M-P, 'The issue of honesty during perinatal screening for depression and anxiety', Melbourne (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M-P, 'The impact of mental health assessment on help seeking during the perinatal period: A national survey of women in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Chojenta C, Anderson A, Gresham E, Harris ML, Rich J, 'Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health: insights from research higher degree students', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Jane Rich, Melissa Harris, Amy Anderson
2013 Hure A, Chojenta CL, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'Validation of self-reported stillbirths using administrative datasets', Brisbane (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, 'Intimate partner abuse and perinatal mental health', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s00737-013-0355-x
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2012 Chojenta CL, 'Adverse reproductive events and mental health and parenting outcomes', Paris (2012)
2012 Loxton DJ, Rich JL, Chojenta CL, 'Is there anything you would like to add?: Responses to open-ended survey questions as research data', Journal of Womens Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jane Rich
2011 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'An examination of the narratives of women who have experiences postnatal depression in Australia', Leeds, UK (2011)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2011 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, ''The perfect mother wouldn't have that': Australian women's experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, McDermott L, Chojenta C, 'Alcohol and tobacco consumption during pregnancy', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2010 Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Powers J, 'Alcohol consumption among pregnant women: How do service providers and mothers learn about and react to official guidelines?', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2010 Lucke J, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'The perfect mother wouldn t have that: Australian women s experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Loxton DJ, Adamson L, Chojenta C, Rich J, 'Women s experiences of abuse: A longitudinal qualitative perspective', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Chojenta CL, Lucke J, Loxton DJ, 'Does social support reduce the likelihood of postnatal depression in Australian mothers?', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2008 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
Show 19 more conferences

Report (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Gresham E, Edwards N, 'Extension of the Cooking for 1 or 2 Program', Department of Veterans' Affairs (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2013 Holden L, Dobson A, Byles J, Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Hockey R, et al., 'Mental Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of Health and Ageing (2013)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Deborah Loxton, Xenia Doljagore
2012 Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2012 Byles J, Chojenta CL, Diamond S, Gresham E, 'Recipes for Healthy Ageing: An adjunct to the Cooking for 1 or 2 program', Department of Veterans' Affairs (2012)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2012 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Moxey A, Leigh L, 'Linked Support for Independent Living', UnitingCare Ageing (2012)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2009 Byles J, Perry L, Parkinson L, Bellchambers H, Moxey A, Howie A, et al., 'Enhancing best practice nutrition and hydration in residential aged care', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2009)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2007 Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2007)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2005 Adamson L, Brown W, Byles J, Chojenta C, Dobson A, Fitzgerald D, et al., 'Women s weight: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 99 (2005)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
Show 5 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $691,328

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $56,318

Live Well Age Well - The health and wellbeing of residents of independent living retirement villages and other communities$50,580

Funding body: Cromwell Property Group Foundation

Funding body Cromwell Property Group Foundation
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800784
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

2018 International Visitor from Indiana University, USA$5,738

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Dr Michael Hendryx
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700944
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20172 grants / $47,652

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Liz Fradgley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601330
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Liveable housing checklist: Future proofing homes for older adults$22,786

Funding body: NSW Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body NSW Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Doctor Meredith Tavener, Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Liveable Communities Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601168
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20152 grants / $238,770

Long term evaluation of uptake, impact and outcomes of the 75+ Health Assessment$204,898

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Xenia Dolja-Gore, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Professor Kichu Nair, Doctor Meredith Tavener
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400038
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Recipes for Life - improving the overall health, and well-being of veterans$33,872

Funding body: Department of Veterans` Affairs

Funding body Department of Veterans` Affairs
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Ellie Gresham
Scheme Veteran and Community Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1401517
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20132 grants / $31,000

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Alexis Hure, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

HMRI Post Natal Depression Travel Award$6,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300229
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20121 grants / $1,000

International Biennial Congress of The Marce Society, Paris, France, 3 - 5 October 2012$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200654
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20113 grants / $302,095

Recipes for healthy ageing - an adjunct to the Cooking for 1 or 2 program$140,335

Funding body: Department of Veterans` Affairs

Funding body Department of Veterans` Affairs
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100372
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Perinatal mental health assessment: Does it improve maternal health outcomes?$136,760

Funding body: BUPA Health Foundation

Funding body BUPA Health Foundation
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100152
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000906
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $2,000

16th Annual Qualitative health Research Conference, Vancouver, Canada, 3 - 5 October 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000767
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20092 grants / $12,493

Predictors and antecendents of postnatal depression in Australia women$9,993

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189971
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

5th International Mixed Methods Conference, Leeds, UK, 8-11 July 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190415
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed3
Current17

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Australia: Prevalence, Recurrence, Pattern of Multiple Outcomes and Risk Factors PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2020 PhD Spatial Patterns of Maternal Health Service Utilization and Determinant Factors in Ethiopia PhD (Clinic Epid & MedStats), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD The Effect of Dietary Patterns on Maternal Morbidity (Anaemia and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy) in Ethiopia PhD (Clinic Epid & MedStats), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2020 PhD Electronic Cigarette Use and Cigarette Smoking among Australian Women PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2019 PhD Nutrition for Health and Wellbeing in Community Dwelling Older Adults PhD (Nutrition & Dietetics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Birth Interval in Ethiopia: Spatial Variations, Inequalities, Effects on Infants and Child Health Outcomes Based on National Population Data PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy, and Its Relationship with Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Facility-Based Study PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Applying the Neonatal Near Miss Concept as a Clinical Tool in the Australian Context. PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD The Epidemiology, Outcomes, and Management of Preeclampsia and Eclampsia in Ethiopia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Availability and quality of Emergency Obstetric Care among health facilities in Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Gender-based Violence Among Youths in Eastern Ethiopia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Healthy Mother, Sustainable Nation: A Study into the Factors Averting Poor Perinatal Mental Health PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia: Determinants, effects on maternal and child health, and perceptions in the health sector PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD A Community Based Study to Identify Factors That Influence Infant Survival Differentials, in Northern Ethiopia. A Follow Up Study. PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Women’s Rights-Based Approach to Gender Equality for Reducing Maternal and Child Mortality PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Under Five Child Health of Nepal PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Living with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: a qualitative exploration of women's experience PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2020 PhD Effect of Antenatal Care and Severe Maternal Complications on Neonatal Near Miss in South Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Maternal Mortality and Maternal Health Service Utilization in Eastern Ethiopia: the Case of Kersa District PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Maternal health system costs of adverse birth outcomes Accounting, Australian National University Co-Supervisor
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News

Creating liveable cities for older Australians

May 8, 2017

A team of researchers from the University of Newcastle (UON) has been awarded a Liveable Communities Grant to identify how to best meet the housing needs

New study identifies risk factors for PND

January 21, 2016

Women with a history of mental health problems are overwhelmingly more likely to suffer PND.

Dr Catherine Chojenta

Positions

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Senior Lecturer
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email catherine.chojenta@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0672
Fax (02) 4042 0044

Office

Room HMRI Public Health Level 4
Building HMRI
Location John Hunter Hospital campus

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