Dr Catherine Chojenta

Dr Catherine Chojenta

Post Doctoral Research Fellow

Faculty of Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Catherine Chojenta BA Psych (Hons) PhD is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle. She is a public health researcher with a particular focus on women's health and well-being across the life course. She has expertise in a range of research methodologies including mixed methods, quantitative, qualitative and data linkage, and has applied these to produce high quality evidence for those factors that increase women's risk of poor health and those which are protective of well-being. She is an emerging expert in the field of perinatal mental health and has applied a range of methods to determine risk factors for poor perinatal mental health and determinants of long and short term mental health outcomes for women and infants.

As an early career researcher, Dr Chojenta has already made an impact on the understanding and promotion of women’s health in Australia. As a postdoctoral research fellow in Public Health, she is developing a program of work that focuses on frequent users of health services, in particular older people and women of reproductive age. She has employed a number of complex statistical techniques to interrogate survey data linked to administrative hospital service use data in order to explore drivers of health services in Australia.

Dr Chojenta worked for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health 2001-2013, and in this role she has contributed to numerous reports, promotional material and peer-reviewed journal articles that have been used as an evidence base for policy. For example, she contributed to a 2009 report on Reproductive Health to the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing on reproductive health that was cited numerous times in the new National Women’s Health Policy 2010.

Dr Chojenta has been awarded several grants over her short academic career totalling over $775,000. She has been awarded two University of Newcastle grants ($34,993) to support her PhD studies, and this opportunity has offered her the experience of being a chief investigator on a project. She has also been awarded several other grants as part of a research team. She was a Chief Investigator on a NHMRC Project Grant examining the long term impact and outcomes of the 75+ Health Assessments. She was part of a team who were awarded $248,000 from the BUPA Foundation to examine the efficacy of psychosocial screening for perinatal mood disorders. She was also awarded $74,957 by the Department of Veterans Affairs along with Prof Julie Byles to produce a cook book and health-related material for elderly residents in the community. Both of these projects utilize a person-centred focus on a public health issue. Two recent follow-ups to this project were awarded in 2012 for $79,412 and 2015 for $33,872 to extend on this work and re-develop and extend the Cooking for One or Two program.

Dr Chojenta has already published over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles and has several other manuscripts in production. She has conducted reviews for the British Medical Journal, Medical Journal of Australia, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, BMC Women’s Health and PLoS One.

Dr Chojenta has had extensive experience in project management throughout her role with the ALSWH since 2001. She has managed several research projects, and has had specific experience in conducting both semi-structured and open-ended interviews with younger women in relation to a range of topics such as postnatal depression and experiences of motherhood, tobacco use in relation to life stages, and alcohol consumption during pregnancy. She has also trained a number of other researchers in research techniques.

She has co-supervised one PhD candidate to completion as well as four honours project. She is currently supervising 20 PhD candidates on a number of project related to maternal and infant health (12 as primary supervisor).

Dr Chojenta has mentored several general staff members at RCGHA. In this role she has trained staff in administrative tasks and research techniques, as well as provided guidance on goal setting and problem-solving when necessary.

In 2018 she was invited to present her research findings at the TMU-UoN Joint Symposium on Women’s Health in Taipei, Taiwan. In 2016 she was invited to chair a session of the Marce Society International Conference in Melbourne on the latest treatment and research news. She has presented research findings at several national and international conferences, such as the Marce Society International Conferences in Melbourne (2016), Paris (2012), Pittsburgh (2010) and Sydney (2008), the International Qualitative Health Conference in Canada (2010), the Mixed Methods Conference in Leeds (2009), the Australian Women’s Health Conferences in Hobart (2010) and Sydney (2013) and the International Women’s Mental Health Conference in Melbourne (2008). Additionally, she has conducted media interviews on the prevalence and risk factors for postnatal depression for print, live radio and live television.

Dr Chojenta is a member of the Australian Branch of the Marce Society, the Australian Association of Gerontology, the International Association of Mixed Methods and the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth, and participates in conferences and online discussions for each of these associations.


Qualifications

  • PhD (Gender and Health), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Mixed Methods
  • Women's Health
  • Longitudinal Research
  • Perinatal Mental Health
  • Healthy ageing
  • Maternal health
  • Infant health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 75
170105 Gender Psychology 25

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Post Doctoral Research Fellow University of Newcastle
Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 31/12/2017 HMRI Post-Doctoral Research Fellow Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.
Australia
1/01/2013 - 31/12/2013 Research Fellow

As a Research Fellow, I drafted manuscripts and reports for publication, wrote grant applications, presented research findings at conferences and seminars. I reviewed manuscripts for journals, and have also mentored postgraduate students. I designed new research projects, and conducted both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods. I was also responsible for project management for two projects. I managed professional staff, coordinated production of grant deliverables and reports, managed the ethics applications and approvals, and managed the day to day timeline of the projects to ensure goals were met.

Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australia
1/06/2008 - 31/12/2012 Research Academic The University of Newcastle
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/06/2005 - 31/05/2008 Research and Communications Officer The University of Newcastle
Australia
1/02/2004 - 31/05/2005 Research Assistant Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, NSW
Australia
1/07/2001 - 31/01/2004 Project Assistant Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, The University of Newcastle, NSW
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2012 HMRI Postnatal Depression Travel Award
Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI)

Prestigious works

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious Work Role
2009 2009 Reproductive Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health Report to Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Contributor
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (30 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Chojenta C, Mingay E, Gresham E, Byles J, 'Cooking for One or Two: Applying Participatory Action Research to improve community-dwelling older adults' health and well-being', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 29 105-107 (2018)
DOI 10.1002/hpja.35
Co-authors Julie Byles
2018 Morgan K, Chojenta C, Tavener M, Smith A, Loxton D, 'Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: A systematic review of the literature', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, (2018)

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy. Method: A systematic review was conducted in March 2015 and updated in February 2018. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINHAL, and the Cochrane Library were searched from database inception. The ClinicalTrials.gov site and bibliographies were searched. MeSH and Emtree headings and keywords included; Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, and were combined with pregnancy and pregnancy related subject headings and keywords. Searches were limited to English. Eligible articles contained key words within the title and or abstract. Articles were excluded if Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome was not pre-existing. Results: Eleven articles were identified as eligible for inclusion. Studies were appraised using the PRISMA 2009 guidelines. The overall quality of evidence was poor using the NHMRC Evidence Grading Matrix, which was attributed to small sample sizes and mostly observational studies, emphasizing the need for future high quality research. Findings in this review must be used with caution due to the poor quality of the literature available. Conclusions: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome should not be a contraindication to pregnancy. Symptom course is variable during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Continuing pre-conception medication may help symptoms, with no significant risks reported. Obstetric complications, not Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, should dictate mode of delivery. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome did not appear to affect the rate of adverse events. These results are important in determining appropriate management and care in this population.

DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2018.05.003
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Meredith Tavener
2018 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Mussa A, Loxton D, 'Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa-a systematic review protocol', Systematic Reviews, 7 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Nearly 15% of all pregnancies end in fatal perinatal obstetric complications including bleeding, infections, hypertension, obstructed labor, and ... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: Nearly 15% of all pregnancies end in fatal perinatal obstetric complications including bleeding, infections, hypertension, obstructed labor, and complications of abortion. Between 1990 and 2015, an estimated 10.7 million women died due to obstetric complications. Almost all of these deaths (99%) happened in developing countries, and 66% of maternal deaths were attributed to sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases of maternal mortalities can be prevented through provision of evidence-based potentially life-saving signal functions of emergency obstetric care. However, different factors can hinder women's ability to access and use emergency obstetric services in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, the aim of this review is to synthesize current evidence on barriers to accessing and utilizing emergency obstetric care in sub-Saharan African. Decision-makers and policy formulators will use evidence generated from this review in improving maternal healthcare particularly the emergency obstetric care. Methods: Electronic databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and Maternity and Infant Care will be searched for studies using predefined search terms. Articles published in English language between 2010 and 2017 with quantitative and qualitative design will be included. The identified papers will be assessed for meeting eligibility criteria. First, the articles will be screened by examining their titles and abstracts. Then, two reviewers will review the full text of the selected articles independently. Two reviewers using a standard data extraction format will undertake data extraction from the retained studies. The quality of the included papers will be assessed using the mixed methods appraisal tool. Results from the eligible studies will be qualitatively synthesized using the narrative synthesis approach and reported using the three delays model. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist will be employed to present the findings. Discussion: This systematic review will present a detailed synthesis of the evidence for barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 7 years. This systematic review is expected to provide clear information that can help in designing maternal health policy and interventions particularly in emergency obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa where maternal mortality remains high. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017074102.

DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0720-y
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Chojenta C, Byles J, Nair BK, 'Rehabilitation and convalescent hospital stay in New South Wales: An analysis of 3,979 women aged 75+', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 195-199 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12731
Co-authors Kichu Nair, Julie Byles
2017 Hure A, Powers J, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Rates and Predictors of Caesarean Section for First and Second Births: A Prospective Cohort of Australian Women', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 21 1175-1184 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and secon... [more]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and second births in Australia, and to identify maternal predictors of caesarean section. Methods Data were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. A total of 5275 women aged 18¿38 years, who had given birth to their first child between 1996 and 2012 were included; 75.0% (n = 3956) had delivered a second child. Mode of delivery for first and second singleton birth(s) was obtained from longitudinal survey data. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric and medical history variables were tested as predictors of mode of delivery for first and second births using multinomial logistic regression. Results Caesarean sections accounted for 29.1% (n = 1535) of first births, consisting of 18.2% emergency and 10.9% elective caesareans. Mode of delivery for first and second births was consistent for 85.5% of women (n = 3383) who delivered both children either vaginally or via caesarean section. Higher maternal age and body mass index, short-stature, anxiety and having private health insurance were predictive of caesarean section for first births. Vaginal birth after caesarean section was more common in women who were older, short-statured, or had been overweight or obese for both children, compared to women who had two vaginal deliveries. Conclusions for Practice Rates of caesarean section in Australia are high. Renewed efforts are needed to reduce the number of unnecessary caesarean births, with particular caution applied to first births. Interventions could focus on elective caesareans for women with private health insurance or a history of anxiety.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-016-2216-5
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2017 Tesfaye G, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Semahegn A, Smith R, 'Delayed initiation of antenatal care and associated factors in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Reproductive health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0412-4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Roger Smith
2016 Tavener MA, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Generating qualitative data by design: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health qualitative data collection.', Public Health Research & Practice, 26 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.17061/phrp2631631
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Deborah Loxton
2016 Leigh L, Byles JE, Chojenta C, Pachana NA, 'Late life changes in mental health: a longitudinal study of 9683 women', Aging and Mental Health, 20 1044-1054 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Objectives: To identify latent subgroups of women in late life who are alike in terms of their mental health trajectories. Method: Longitudinal data... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. Objectives: To identify latent subgroups of women in late life who are alike in terms of their mental health trajectories. Method: Longitudinal data are for 9683 participants in the 1921¿1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, who completed at least two surveys between 1999 (aged 73¿78 years) and 2008 (aged 82¿87 years). Mental health was measured using the five-item mental health inventory (MHI-5). Latent profile analysis uncovered patterns of change in MHI-5 scores. Results: Three patterns of change were identified for women who were still alive in 2008 (n = 7061), and three similar patterns for deceased women (n = 2622): (1) ¿poor mental health¿ representing women with low MHI-5 scores, (2) ¿good mental health¿ and (3) ¿excellent¿ mental health, where scores remained very high. Deceased women had lower mental health scores for each class. Remote areas of residence, higher education, single marital status, higher Body Mass Index (BMI) and falls were the covariates associated with mental health in the survivor group. For the deceased group, education, BMI and falls were significant. Arthritis, stroke, heart disease, bronchitis/emphysema, diabetes and osteoporosis were associated with worse mental health for both groups, while asthma increased these odds significantly for the survivor group only. Hypertension and cancer were not significant predictors of poor mental health. Conclusion: The results show associations between chronic disease and level of mental health in older age, but no evidence of a large decline in mental health in the period prior to death.

DOI 10.1080/13607863.2015.1060943
Co-authors Julie Byles
2016 Chojenta CL, Lucke JC, Forder PM, Loxton DJ, 'Maternal Health Factors as Risks for Postnatal Depression: A Prospective Longitudinal Study', PLoS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of r... [more]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of risk factors at a population-level using data collected prospectively. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between a range of factors and PND and to construct a model of the predictors of PND. Methods Data came from 5219 women who completed Survey 5 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2009 and reported giving birth to a child. Results Over 15% of women reported experiencing PND with at least one of their children. The strongest positive associations were for postnatal anxiety (OR = 13.79,95%CI = 10.48,18.13) and antenatal depression (OR = 9.23,95%CI = 6.10,13.97). Positive associations were also found for history of depression and PND, low SF-36 Mental Health Index, emotional distress during labour, and breastfeeding for less than six months. Conclusions Results indicate that understanding a woman's mental health history plays an important role in the detection of those who are most vulnerable to PND. Treatment and management of depression and anxiety earlier in life and during pregnancy may have a positive impact on the incidence of PND.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147246
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2015 Hure AJ, Chojenta CL, Powers JR, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets', JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 25 30-37 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2188/jea.JE20140032
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Alexis Hure
2015 Byles JE, Francis JL, Chojenta CL, Hubbard IJ, 'Long-term survival of older australian women with a history of stroke', Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 24 53-60 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 National Stroke Association. Background Although many people survive an initial stroke, little is known about long-term impacts of stroke on survival. Methods Data from the... [more]

© 2015 National Stroke Association. Background Although many people survive an initial stroke, little is known about long-term impacts of stroke on survival. Methods Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to compare 12-year survival rates in older women with prevalent stroke, incident stroke, and no stroke. Cox regression models were fitted to assess the effect of lifestyle and demographic characteristics on the relationship between stroke and all-cause mortality. The "no stroke" group was used as the reference category in all statistical models. Results At baseline, 4% of the women reported a previous stroke (prevalent stroke). At survey 2 in 1999, a further 3% reported having a stroke between 1996 and 1999 (incident stroke). Stroke was significantly associated with reduced long-term survival. Age-Adjusted hazards ratios (HRs) were: 1.64 (1.43-1.89) for the "prevalent stroke" group and 2.29 (1.97-2.66) for the "incident stroke" group. Adjusting for comorbidities reduced the HRs, but the risk of death was still significantly higher in the 2 stroke groups. Adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors did not make any further difference to the relationship between stroke and survival. However, obesity and past smoking were also risk factors for mortality. Conclusions This study highlights the long-term impacts of stroke on life expectancy and the importance of comorbidities and other lifestyle factors in affecting poststroke survival.

DOI 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.07.040
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julie Byles, Isobel Hubbard
2015 Gresham E, Forder P, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hure AJ, 'Agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes and administrative data in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate th... [more]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes (gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria, gestational diabetes, premature birth and low birth weight) in a longitudinal study and linked to administrative data (medical records). Methods: Self-reported survey data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was linked with the New South Wales Perinatal Data Collection. Agreement between the two sources was evaluated using percentage agreement and kappa statistics. Analyses were conducted at two levels by: i) the mother and ii) each individual child. Results: Women reliably self-report their perinatal outcomes (=87 % agreement). Gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria had the lowest level of agreement. Mothers' reports of perinatal outcomes were more reliable when evaluated by child. Restricting the analysis to complete and consistent reporting further strengthened the reliability of the child-specific data, increasing the agreement from >92 to >95 % for all outcomes. Conclusions: The present study offers a high degree of confidence in the use of maternal self-reports of the perinatal outcomes gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm birth and low birth weight in epidemiological research, particularly when reported on a per child basis. Furthermore self-report offers a cost-effective and convenient method for gathering detailed maternal perinatal histories.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0597-x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton
2014 Chojenta C, Harris S, Reilly N, Forder P, Austin MP, Loxton D, 'History of pregnancy loss increases the risk of mental health problems in subsequent pregnancies but not in the postpartum', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during su... [more]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during subsequent pregnancies and births. This paper examined the impact of any type of pregnancy loss on mental health in a subsequent pregnancy and postpartum. Data were obtained from a sub-sample (N = 584) of the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a prospective cohort study that has been collecting data since 1996. Pregnancy loss was defined as miscarriage, termination due to medical reasons, ectopic pregnancy and stillbirth. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, stress or distress, sadness or low mood, excessive worry, lack of enjoyment, and feelings of guilt. Demographic factors and mental health history were controlled for in the analysis. Women with a previous pregnancy loss were more likely to experience sadness or low mood (AOR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.11 to 2.76, p = 0.0162), and excessive worry (AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.24 to 3.24, p = 0.0043) during a subsequent pregnancy, but not during the postpartum phase following a subsequent birth. These results indicate that while women who have experienced a pregnancy loss are a more vulnerable population during a subsequent pregnancy, these deficits are not evident in the postpartum. © 2014 Chojenta et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095038
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly, Deborah Loxton
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Adherence to recommended health checks by women in mid-life: data from a prospective study of women across Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 38 39-43 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12180
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2014 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Austin MP, 'The impact of routine assessment of past or current mental health on help-seeking in the perinatal period', Women and Birth, (2014) [C1]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value o... [more]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value of this line of enquiry in increasing engagement with support services, as required, remains controversial. Aim: The current study aimed to examine whether assessment of past or current mental health, received with or without referral for additional support, is associated with help-seeking during pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods: A subsample of women drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (young cohort) who reported experiencing significant emotional distress during pregnancy (N = 398) or in the 12 months following birth (N = 380) participated in the study. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that women who were not asked about their emotional health were less likely to seek any formal help during both pregnancy (adjOR = 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04-0.24) and the postpartum (adjOR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.02-0.13), as were women who were asked about these issues but who were not referred for additional support (antenatal: adjOR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.15-0.45; postnatal: adjOR = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.07-0.27). However, considerable levels of consultation with general practitioners, midwives and child health nurses, even in the absence of referral, were evident. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that enquiry by a health professional about women's past or current mental health is associated with help-seeking throughout the perinatal period. The clinical and resource implications of these findings for the primary health care sector should be considered prior to the implementation of future routine perinatal depression screening or psychosocial assessment programmes. © 2014 Australian College of Midwives.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.07.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Reilly, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2013 Austin M-P, Loxton D, Chojenta CL, Reilly N, 'Maternal mental health in the perinatal period: Outcomes from Australian epidemiological and longitudinal based studies', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S42 (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Chojenta CL, Loxton D, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S111 (2013)
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2013 Powers JR, McDermott LJ, Loxton DJ, Chojenta CL, 'A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Predictors of Concurrent Alcohol and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 17 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10995-012-0949-3
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Disparities in reported psychosocial assessment across public and private maternity settings: a national survey of women in Australia', BMC Public Health, 13 632 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-632
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Referral for Management of Emotional Health Issues During the Perinatal Period: Does Mental Health Assessment Make a Difference?', Birth, 40 297-306 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/birt.12067
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton, Nicole Reilly
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women¿s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jmwh.12014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2013 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2013 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Poor Adherence to National and International Breastfeeding Duration Targets in an Australian Longitudinal Cohort', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0054409
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers, Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton
2013 Rich JL, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Quality, Rigour and Usefulness of Free-Text Comments Collected by a Large Population Based Longitudinal Study - ALSWH', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0068832
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Jane Rich, Deborah Loxton
2012 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'How do previous mental health, social support, and stressful life events contribute to postnatal depression in a representative sample of Australian women?', Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health, 57 145-150 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1542-2011.2011.00140.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2007 Chojenta CL, Mooney RH, Warner-Smith PA, 'Accessing and disseminating longitudinal data: Protocols and policies', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 104-113 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Adamson LR, Chojenta CL, 'Developing relationships and retaining participants in a longitudinal study', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 137-146 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9
2007 Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, 'Communication and dissemination of longitudinal study findings', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 199-209 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2006 Byles JE, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Warner-Smith PA, 'Older women in Australia: ageing in urban, rural and remote environments', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 25 151-157 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2006.00171.x
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2005 Adamson LR, Chojenta CL, Lee C, 'Telephone contact of existing participants in longitudinal surveys (Letter)', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29 188-189 (2005) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00073.x
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Show 27 more journal articles

Conference (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Brown LJ, Kocanda L, Schumacher T, Rae K, Chojenta CL, 'Breastfeeding duration and reasons for cessation in an Australia longitudinal cohort', Sydney (2018)
Co-authors Leanne Brown, Lucy Kocanda Uon, Kym Rae
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Pachana N, 'Late life changes in mental health: A longitudinal study of 9973 women aged through their 70¿s and 80¿s', Lausanne, Switzerland (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2014 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Forder P, 'Older women's hospital service use: A longitudinal data linkage project', Port Macquarie (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2014 Byles J, Francis JL, Chojenta CL, Hubbard I, 'Long-term survival of older Australian women with a history of stroke', International Journal of Stroke (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Isobel Hubbard
2013 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Forder PM, Harris S, Reilly N, Chojenta C, Loxton D, Austin M-P, 'The issue of honesty during perinatal screening for depression and anxiety', Melbourne (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M-P, 'The impact of mental health assessment on help seeking during the perinatal period: A national survey of women in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder
2013 Chojenta C, Anderson A, Gresham E, Harris ML, Rich J, 'Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health: insights from research higher degree students', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Jane Rich
2013 Hure A, Chojenta CL, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'Validation of self-reported stillbirths using administrative datasets', Brisbane (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, 'Intimate partner abuse and perinatal mental health', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s00737-013-0355-x
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2012 Chojenta CL, 'Adverse reproductive events and mental health and parenting outcomes', Paris (2012)
2012 Loxton DJ, Rich JL, Chojenta CL, 'Is there anything you would like to add?: Responses to open-ended survey questions as research data', Journal of Womens Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jane Rich, Deborah Loxton
2011 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'An examination of the narratives of women who have experiences postnatal depression in Australia', Leeds, UK (2011)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2011 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, ''The perfect mother wouldn't have that': Australian women's experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, McDermott L, Chojenta C, 'Alcohol and tobacco consumption during pregnancy', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2010 Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Powers J, 'Alcohol consumption among pregnant women: How do service providers and mothers learn about and react to official guidelines?', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers
2010 Lucke J, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'The perfect mother wouldn¿t have that: Australian women¿s experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Loxton DJ, Adamson L, Chojenta C, Rich J, 'Women¿s experiences of abuse: A longitudinal qualitative perspective', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2009 Chojenta CL, Lucke J, Loxton DJ, 'Does social support reduce the likelihood of postnatal depression in Australian mothers?', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2008 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
Show 19 more conferences

Report (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Gresham E, Edwards N, 'Extension of the Cooking for 1 or 2 Program', Department of Veterans' Affairs (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2013 Holden L, Dobson A, Byles J, Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Hockey R, et al., 'Mental Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of Health and Ageing (2013)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Xenia Doljagore, Deborah Loxton
2012 Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2012 Byles J, Chojenta CL, Diamond S, Gresham E, 'Recipes for Healthy Ageing: An adjunct to the Cooking for 1 or 2 program', Department of Veterans' Affairs (2012)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2012 Chojenta CL, Byles J, Moxey A, Leigh L, 'Linked Support for Independent Living', UnitingCare Ageing (2012)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2009 Byles J, Perry L, Parkinson L, Bellchambers H, Moxey A, Howie A, et al., 'Enhancing best practice nutrition and hydration in residential aged care', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2009)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2007 Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2007)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2005 Adamson L, Brown W, Byles J, Chojenta C, Dobson A, Fitzgerald D, et al., 'Women¿s weight: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 99 (2005)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
Show 5 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 13
Total funding $609,138

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20181 grants / $8,000

2018 International Visitor from Indiana University, USA$8,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Dr Michael Hendryx
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1700944
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20172 grants / $47,652

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Liz Fradgley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601330
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Liveable housing checklist: Future proofing homes for older adults$22,786

Funding body: NSW Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body NSW Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Doctor Meredith Tavener, Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Liveable Communities Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601168
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20151 grants / $204,898

Long term evaluation of uptake, impact and outcomes of the 75+ Health Assessment$204,898

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Xenia Dolja-Gore, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Professor Kichu Nair, Doctor Meredith Tavener
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400038
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20132 grants / $31,000

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alexis Hure, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Ms Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

HMRI Post Natal Depression Travel Award$6,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300229
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20121 grants / $1,000

International Biennial Congress of The Marce Society, Paris, France, 3 - 5 October 2012$1,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200654
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20113 grants / $302,095

Recipes for healthy ageing - an adjunct to the Cooking for 1 or 2 program$140,335

Funding body: Department of Veterans` Affairs

Funding body Department of Veterans` Affairs
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100372
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Perinatal mental health assessment: Does it improve maternal health outcomes?$136,760

Funding body: BUPA Health Foundation

Funding body BUPA Health Foundation
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100152
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women$25,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000906
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20101 grants / $2,000

16th Annual Qualitative health Research Conference, Vancouver, Canada, 3 - 5 October 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000767
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20092 grants / $12,493

Predictors and antecendents of postnatal depression in Australia women$9,993

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Early Career Researcher Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189971
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

5th International Mixed Methods Conference, Leeds, UK, 8-11 July 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190415
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed1
Current20

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD7.98

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Birth Interval in Ethiopia: Spatial Variations, Inequalities, Effects on Infants and Child Health Outcomes Based on National Population Data PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy, and Its Relationship with Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Facility-Based Study PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Applying the Neonatal Near Miss Concept as a Clinical Tool in the Australian Context. PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Availability and quality of Emergency Obstetric Care among health facilities in Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD The Effect of Dietary Patterns on Maternal Morbidity (Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy and Anemia) in Ethiopia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Gender-based violence among youths in Eastern Ethiopia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Discourses and Practices which Surround Mental Health Issues in a Public Hospital Setting. An Exploratory Analysis. PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Healthy Mother, Sustainable Nation: A Study into the Factors Averting Poor Perinatal Mental Health PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Pregnancy Outcome of Mothers Having Chronic Disease and Survival Status of Newborn Up to One Year in North West Ethiopia, 2017-2020: [Cohort Study] PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia: Determinants, effects on maternal and child health, and perceptions in the health sector PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD A Community Based Study to Identify Factors That Influence Infant Survival Differentials, in Northern Ethiopia. A Follow Up Study. PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Beyond Maternal and Newborn mortality: Measuring quality of obstetric care in south Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Spatial Patterns of Maternal Health Service Utilization and Determinant Factors in Ethiopia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD The Determinants of Contraceptive Use among Young Women in South-West Nigeria PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD The Long Term Health and Socioeconomic Consequences of Early Motherhood in Australia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Contraceptive prevalence and its interaction with Gender development markers - a quantitative and spatial analysis using ArcGIS PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Substance Use and Sexual Behaviors among Young Australian Women PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Using a street drama intervention to increase maternal knowledge about household hand washing with soap in rural Nepal PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Living with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: a qualitative exploration of women's experience PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Maternal Mortality and Maternal Health Service Utilization in Eastern Ethiopia: The case of Kersa district PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Maternal health system costs of adverse birth outcomes Accounting, Australian National University Co-Supervisor
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News

Creating liveable cities for older Australians

May 8, 2017

A team of researchers from the University of Newcastle (UON) has been awarded a Liveable Communities Grant to identify how to best meet the housing needs

New study identifies risk factors for PND

January 21, 2016

Women with a history of mental health problems are overwhelmingly more likely to suffer PND.

Dr Catherine Chojenta

Position

Post Doctoral Research Fellow
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email catherine.chojenta@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4042 0672
Fax (02) 4042 0044

Office

Room HMRI Public Health Level 4
Building HMRI
Location John Hunter Hospital campus

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