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Professor Deb Loxton

Deputy Director- ALSWH & RCGHA

Faculty of Health and Medicine (Public Health)

Promoting women’s health across the lifespan

A passionate woman’s health advocate and researcher, Professor Deb Loxton is shining a light on the most pressing health issues facing women today—including the lifetime health implications for women living with a violent partner and the health deficits affecting mums and babies globally.

Deb Loxton

Co-director of the University’s Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Professor Deb Loxton has been at the forefront of women’s health research in Australia for almost two decades.

Deb’s work provides crucial insights into factors affecting women’s long-term health. This includes researching risk factors and health outcomes for women with experience of domestic violence. The dedicated women’s health researcher is also exploring maternal and infant health with the aim of reducing worldwide rates of mortality and morbidity. Across all her work, Deb is committed to seeing research translate into action and answers for women.

Tracking women’s health in Australia

Deb is the Deputy Director of the globally significant Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH). The study started in 1996 and tracks four generations of more than 57,000 women, exploring a range of health outcomes—including the life-long health impacts of domestic violence.

“I am fortunate that as Deputy Director of the ALSWH, I have been able to include comprehensive measures of abuse in this study, making it one of the most comprehensive sources of information about violence against women in the world.”

The study was the first to investigate the health impacts of domestic violence over such a long period of time.

“Violence is a big term, and incorporates emotional abuse, financial abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse and harassment.

“If you think about any four women in your life, the stats suggest at least one of them has lived with a violent partner, or will, at some point in their lifetime.

“And it doesn't just happen to people who live a certain sort of a life, it happens across the board.”

The hidden scars of domestic violence

Drawing on the ALSWH data, Deb now researches how living with a violent partner can affect a women’s health long term, and their recovery from that experience.

Her research reveals that the impact of domestic violence on physical and mental health can last for decades—and potentially for a lifetime.

“My research continues to highlight the long-term impact and costs associated with violence against women in Australia.

“We have data showing women 15 years post-violence with the same deficit in physical and mental health that they had when they were in the relationship.”

Deb explains that violence can lead to an array of complex health problems, including depression, anxiety, and even chronic pain and diseases such as cervical cancer. Deb is particularly interested in the cumulative impact of different experiences of abuse, such as abuse in childhood followed by violence in later life. Her goal is to identify factors that facilitate recovery, so solutions can follow.

“Abuse and adversity in childhood is related to long-term health behaviour issues and a variety of health problems, both physical and psychological.

“The stretch target of my research is to find those factors, life events and supports that will enable women to fully recover from abuse, whenever it is experienced in the lifespan.”

Deb’s research findings are now helping to improve Australia’s response to this national public health issue. For example, they were used to inform the Australian women’s health policy 2010 and strategy 2019. In 2015, Deb was invited to contribute to the Australian Human Right’s Commission expert roundtable, as part of a national consultation to examine the impact of domestic and family violence on children.

“What I like best is seeing where the research goes and what it does for people. For example, from our ongoing research, we know social support can be very helpful. Women with social support, like accessible psychological care or support networks, do better in the long-term.”

Better health for mums and babies worldwide

Alongside domestic violence, Deb is involved in collaborative research into maternal and infant mortality and morbidity.

Despite global progress towards reducing maternal and infant mortality rates, the situation remains dire for millions of mums and babies worldwide.

The 2015 Millennium Development Goals to reduce these rates was not achieved in many low-middle income countries. In Australia, some adverse birth outcomes and maternal mental health remain serious issues.

In her role with the University’s Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, Deb developed and leads the Worldwide Wellness of Mothers and Babies (WWOMB) program, which aims to eliminate preventable maternal and infant mortality and morbidity globally.

“To do this, the program generates new knowledge about health services for maternal and infant wellbeing and investigates health behaviour during pregnancy, such as alcohol use and the use of mental health services.”

Building on what works

Deb’s work is contributing to a growing global body of evidence on what works and why in the field of women’s health. This evidence base can be used by researchers and government to observe emerging trends, inform future policy, quantify public health issues and forward plan.

Evidence is also a hallmark of Deb’s approach to teaching. As a PhD supervisor with the University of Newcastle, Deb is excited to share the evidence and research methods with the next generation of practitioners and researchers—ensuring women’s health research continues to remain a public priority in Australia.

“It’s a pleasure to support PhD candidates who are researching ways to reduce violence against women and improve maternal and infant health in their home countries. This work will make a difference to the health of women in nations where resources are highly limited.”

Deb Loxton

Promoting women’s health across the lifespan

Associate Professor Deb Loxton examines the health and wellbeing of women who have lived with violent partners, and the impact of reproductive health options an

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Career Summary

Biography

Professor Deborah Loxton is Co-director of the Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, a priority research centre of the University of Newcastle, and Deputy Director of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH). Prof Loxton has a background in psychology and was awarded her PhD in health in 2003. She is an experienced quantitative and qualitative researcher in women's health, with particular interests in reproductive health and the impact of stressful life events, including the health impact of abuse, such as domestic violence. Prof Loxton’s research is largely undertaken using data from the ALSWH, a longitudinal cohort survey that collects data from four age cohorts of over 57,000 Australian women. She has extensive experience in developing and conducting survey based research, including participant recruitment and retention in large cohort studies. In 2012-13, Prof Loxton led the ALSWH research team in recruiting the newest cohort of participants, which includes over 17,000 women born 1989-95.

In her role as Deputy Director of ALSWH, Prof Loxton oversees data collection and cohort maintenance, in addition to leading and contributing to publications and reports to government that arise from the study. She has authored over 100 peer reviewed publications and has produced a further 15 government reports (six as lead author). Prof Loxton’s program of work has informed health policy in Australia, New Zealand and the USA in the areas of domestic violence, superannuation, reproductive health and sole motherhood. In addition, her work has been used by the World Health Organization to develop a screening tool for elder abuse. In 2015, ALSWH was awarded the CAPHIA Team Award for excellence and innovation in public health research. The award recognises ALSWH as an exceptional public health resource that provides an evidence base for government and other decision-makers for the development and evaluation of policy and practice in many areas of service delivery that affect women.

Prof Loxton has been awarded over $24M funding and has been involved in over 120 collaborations in Australia and internationally. Her international collaborations include the USA Academy of Violence and Abuse and the Korean Women’s Development Institute. Prof Loxton has initiated formal relationships between the Research Centre for Genderational Health and Ageing and these organisations.

In addition to her duties as ALSWH Deputy Director, Prof Loxton is leading a program of research that investigates the health impact of abuse across the lifecourse. She is also currently facilitating a consortium which includes researchers from University of Newcastle, La Trobe University, Family Planning NSW, Victorian Assisted Reproductive Technology Association, the Jean Hailes Foundation, and the Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service to examine Aboriginal reproductive health. Recently, Prof Loxton has started working in the area of improving maternal mortality in developing nations.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of New England
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of New England
  • Diploma of Management, GE Consultancy Pty Ltd (RTO)

Keywords

  • Psychology - assessment
  • Psychology - research methods
  • Women's health
  • domestic violence
  • health service use
  • maternal health and wellbeing
  • maternal mortality
  • mental health
  • reproductive health
  • social and economic wellbeing and health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2006 -  Deputy Director Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Australia
1/01/2004 - 1/12/2005 Research Manager University of Newcastle
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Australia
1/06/2003 - 31/12/2003 Senior Research Officer

Women's health

University of Newcastle
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Excellence and Innovation in Public Health Team Research Award
Council of Academic Public Health Institutions Australia
2008 Faculty Research Award
University of Newcastle
2001 Keith and Dorothy McKay Travelling Scholarship
University of New England
1999 APA PhD Scholarship
University of New England

Invitations

Contributor

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Mental Health Commission of NSW
Mental health reform working party
2012 Sexual and Reproductive Health Research Roundtable
2009 • Maternity Services Review Roundtables for data collection monitoring and research, and peer support

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2012 Motherhood, health and the impact of psychosocial factors
The challenges of service provision to high risk mothers and infants. Perinatal and Mental Health Unit, St John of God seminar
2011 Maternal health and wellbeing: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Mothering:  Challenges, Change and Hope

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2007 Women's Health Summit, Sydney Town Hall
Organisation: Women's Health NSW Description: This summit was attended by over 500 health workers, academics and stakeholders with an interest in women's health. I was invited to speak about the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and about my research into intimate partner violence and sole motherhood.
2005 Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Organisation: Department of Health and Ageing Description: Invited presentation for the Department of Health and Ageing to present ALSWH findings on the health and wellbeing of women who had experienced intimate partner violence, attended by around 50 representatives from government departments in Canberra, 2005. This presentation was recorded on DVD and will be available for electronic distribution.
2004 Health and economic wellbeing of Australian sole mothers.
Organisation: Office of the Status of Women Description: I was invited to present findings from a year long investigation I conducted into the health and economic wellbeing of sole mothers, at the Office of the Prime Minister and Cabinet by the Office of the Status of Women. Over 50 representatives from various government departments attended.

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2015 Adversity
2015 Australian Human Rights Commission Expert Roundtable on Domestic Violence and Children
2012 Women’s health
Invited address to the Australian Psychological Society Newcastle AGM
2012 What can we find out about sexual and reproductive health?
First national sexual and reproductive health conference
2011 The Australian longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) conference Women’s Event
2009 Intimate partner violence, health and social support: Findings over the long term
Lunchtime seminar series, Women’s Health in the North
2007 Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
The Benevolent Society Breakfast Meeting for Professionals
2007 Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
The Benevolent Society Manager’s Meeting
2007 Women’s health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
International Women’s Day Forum
2007 Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Australian Women’s Health Nurse Association Professional Update
2006 Going through menopause: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Jean Hailes Foundation for Women’s Health Menopause and Midlife, Update for Allied Health Professionals
2006 Going through menopause
Jean Hailes Foundation for Women’s Health Menopause and Beyond: What really matters for women
2005 Presentation for health professionals
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2007 Loxton DJ, Byles J, Dobson A, Brown W, Conducting Longitudinal Research, eContent Management Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia, 134 (2007)
2007 Loxton DJ, Stewart Williams JA, Adamson LR, Barriers to Service Delivery for Young Pregnant Women and Mothers: Report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme (NYARS), National Youth Affairs Research Scheme, Canberra, 147 (2007) [A2]
Co-authors Jenny Stewartwilliams

Journal article (163 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 William J, Chojenta C, Martin MA, Loxton D, 'An actuarial investigation into maternal out-of-hospital cost risk factors', Annals of Actuarial Science, 13 1-35 (2019) [C1]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2018. This paper adopts an actuarial approach to identify the risk factors of government-funded maternal out-of-hospital costs in Australia, w... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2018. This paper adopts an actuarial approach to identify the risk factors of government-funded maternal out-of-hospital costs in Australia, with a focus on women who experience adverse birth outcomes. We use a two-phase modelling methodology incorporating both classification and regression trees and generalised linear models on a data set that links administrative and longitudinal survey data from a large sample of women, to address maternal out-of-hospital costs. We find that adverse births are a statistically significant risk factor of out-of-hospital costs in both the delivery and postnatal periods. Furthermore, other significant cost risk factors are in-vitro fertilisation, specialist use, general practitioner use, area of residence and mental health factors (including anxiety, intense anxiety, postnatal depression and stress about own health) and the results vary by perinatal sub-period and the patient's private health insurance status. We highlight these differences and use the results as an evidence base to inform public policy. Mental health policy is identified as a priority area for further investigation due to the dominance of these factors in many of the fitted models.

DOI 10.1017/S1748499518000015
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, D'Arcy E, Loxton D, 'Spatial distribution and determinant factors of anaemia among women of reproductive age in Ethiopia: A multilevel and spatial analysis', BMJ Open, 9 1-14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027276
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Kiross GT, Chojenta C, Barker D, Tiruye TY, Loxton D, 'The effect of maternal education on infant mortality in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLoS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Kiross et al. Introduction Some studies in developing countries have shown that infant mortality is highly associated with maternal education, implying that maternal educat... [more]

© 2019 Kiross et al. Introduction Some studies in developing countries have shown that infant mortality is highly associated with maternal education, implying that maternal education might play an important role in the reduction of infant mortality. However, other research has shown that lower levels of maternal education does not have any significant contribution to infant survival. In this systematic review, we focus on the effect of different levels of maternal education on infant mortality in Ethiopia. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched between November 15, 2017 and February 20, 2018. All articles published until February 20, 2018 were included in the study. The data extraction was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA 2009) guidelines. An I2 test was used to assess heterogeneity and a funnel plot was used to check publication bias. Findings We retrieved 441 records after removing duplications. During screening, 31 articles were fully accessed for data extraction. Finally, five articles were included for analysis. The overall pooled estimate indicated that attending primary education was associated with a 28% reduction in the odds of infant mortality compared to those infants born to mothers who were illiterate, OR: 0.72 (95% CI = 0.66, 0.78). Another pooled estimate indicated that attending secondary education and above was associated with a 45% reduction in the odds of infant mortality compared to those infants born to mothers who were illiterate, OR: 0.55 (95% CI = 0.47, 0.64).

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0220076
Co-authors Daniel Barker, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Coombe J, Loxton D, Tooth L, Byles J, ' I can be a mum or a professional, but not both : What women say about their experiences of juggling paid employment with motherhood', Australian Journal of Social Issues, 54 305-322 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/ajs4.76
Co-authors Julie Byles
2019 Tekelab T, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'The impact of antenatal care on neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLoS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Tekelab et al. Background Newborns are at greatest risk of dying at and shortly after the time of birth. Newborn mortality remains an urgent concern and is an important ind... [more]

© 2019 Tekelab et al. Background Newborns are at greatest risk of dying at and shortly after the time of birth. Newborn mortality remains an urgent concern and is an important indicator of child health, development and well-being. Studies examining the effectiveness of antenatal care on maternal and newborn health outcomes have provided conflicting results. The aim of this review and meta-analysis was to determine the pooled effect of antenatal care on neonatal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We searched PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and Google Scholar from September to November 2016 and then updated our search on April 13, 2019. Two independent reviewers extracted data from eligible studies. The quality of each included study was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies (RoBANS). The results were reported based on risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a random-effects model. Results Eight hundred and ninety eight studies were initially identified. During screening, 23 studies were found to be relevant for data extraction. Of these, only twelve studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. In five of the twelve studies included in the analysis, antenatal care service utilization had a significant association with neonatal mortality. The pooled risk ratio by the random-effects model was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.43, 0.86) for neonates born to women who received at least one antenatal care visit by a skilled provider as compared to neonates born to women who did not receive antenatal care. Conclusion This review indicates that utilization of at least one antenatal care visit by a skilled provider during pregnancy reduces the risk of neonatal mortality by 39% in sub-Saharan African countries. Thus, in order to accelerate progress towards the reduction of newborn deaths, all pregnant women should receive antenatal care during pregnancy.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0222566
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Roger Smith
2019 William J, Loong B, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'The profiles of public and private patients in maternal healthcare: A longitudinal study to examine adverse selection', Annals of Actuarial Science, (2019)

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2019. In this article, we investigate differences in the profiles of patients within the Australian mixed public-private maternal health syste... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2019. In this article, we investigate differences in the profiles of patients within the Australian mixed public-private maternal health system to examine the extent of adverse selection. There are conflicting influences on adverse selection within the private health sector in Australia due to government regulations that incentivise lower risk segments of the population to purchase community-rated private health insurance. We use a two-phase modelling methodology that incorporates statistical learning and logistic regression on a dataset that links administrative and longitudinal survey data for a large cohort of women. We find that the key predictor of private patient status is having private health insurance, which itself is largely driven by sociodemographic factors rather than health-or pregnancy-related factors. Additionally, transitioning between the public-private systems for a subsequent pregnancy is uncommon; however, it is primarily driven by changes in private health insurance when it occurs. Other significant factors when transitioning to the private system for a second pregnancy are hypertension, increased access to specialists and stress related to previous motherhood experiences. Consequently, there is limited evidence of adverse selection in this market, with targeted financial incentives likely outweighing the impact of community rating even during childbearing years where private health service use increases.

DOI 10.1017/S1748499519000083
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Loxton D, Powers J, Townsend N, Harris ML, Forder P, 'Longitudinal inconsistency in responses to survey items that ask women about intimate partner violence.', BMC Med Res Methodol, 19 201 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12874-019-0835-4
Co-authors Peta Forder, Melissa Harris, Jenny Powers
2019 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Getachew T, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Antenatal care use in Ethiopia: a spatial and multilevel analysis.', BMC Pregnancy Childbirth, 19 399 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12884-019-2550-x
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Roger Smith
2019 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Predisposing, enabling and need factors associated with skilled delivery care utilization among reproductive-aged women in Kersa district, eastern Ethiopia.', Reprod Health, 16 167 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s12978-019-0829-z
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Loxton D, Townsend N, Dolja-Gore X, Forder P, Coles J, 'Adverse Childhood Experiences and Healthcare Costs in Adult Life', Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 28 511-525 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis. The current study aims to present the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and examine the healthcare costs associated with primary, ... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis. The current study aims to present the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and examine the healthcare costs associated with primary, allied, and specialist healthcare services. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health is a general health survey of four nationally representative age cohorts. The current study uses 20¿years of survey and administrative data (1996¿2015) from the cohort born 1973¿1978. Overall, 41% of women indicated at least one category of childhood adversity. The most commonly reported type of childhood adversity was having a household member with a mental illness (16%), with the most commonly reported ACES category being psychological abuse (17%). Women who had experienced adversity in childhood had higher healthcare costs than women who had not experienced adversity. The healthcare costs associated with experiences of adversity in childhood fully justify a comprehensive policy and practice review.

DOI 10.1080/10538712.2018.1523814
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Peta Forder, Xenia Doljagore
2019 Melka AS, Chojenta CL, Holliday EG, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of E-cigarette Use Among Young Australian Women', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 56 293-299 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: E-cigarette use is controversial worldwide. The majority of previous studies on e-cigarette use were not gender specific. This study aimed to ide... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Introduction: E-cigarette use is controversial worldwide. The majority of previous studies on e-cigarette use were not gender specific. This study aimed to identify the predictors of e-cigarette use among young Australian women. Methods: This study used cross-sectional data from the 1989¿1995 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. In 2015, study participants (N=8,915) aged 19¿26 years completed an online survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of e-cigarette use. Data were analyzed in 2018. Results: The prevalence of ever and past-year e-cigarette use among young Australian women was 11.1% and 6.4%, respectively. More than a quarter of past-year and ever e-cigarette users were never cigarette smokers. Use of e-cigarettes in the past year was associated with younger age (AOR per year increase=0.87, 95% CI=0.82, 0.93); financial difficulty (AOR=0.68, 95% CI=0.54, 0.87); being an ex-smoker (AOR=5.05, 95% CI=3.64, 7.01) or current cigarette smoker (AOR=10.01, 95% CI=7.77, 12.89); drinking at a level of lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury (AOR=1.23, 95% CI=1.01, 1.53). Ever e-cigarette use showed similar associations and was also associated with rural residence (AOR=0.74, 95% CI=0.60, 0.91) and intimate partner violence (AOR=1.44, 95% CI=1.17, 1.76). Conclusions: The high prevalence of e-cigarette use among never cigarette smokers has significant public health implications. Interventions to curb the use of e-cigarettes among young Australian women should focus on risk factors, such as early age, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and intimate partner violence.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2018.09.019
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Melka AS, Loxton D, 'Unintended Pregnancy in Women Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', AIDS and Behavior, 23 1431-1451 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries.... [more]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries. To pool magnitude and factors associated with unintended pregnancy in women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, a systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken in November 2016. Pooling the magnitude of unintended pregnancy reported by 14 studies yielded a crude summary prevalence of 55.9%. The magnitude of unwanted pregnancy and mistimed pregnancy in six studies ranged from 14 to 59 and 9 to 47.2%, respectively. Contraceptive failure was an important factor for many unintended pregnancies. The magnitude of unintended pregnancy was significantly higher in HIV-positive women than for HIV-negative women in three out of six studies. The available evidence suggests that there is a high magnitude of unintended pregnancy in this population. Improving effective contraceptive utilization is thus a priority to address unintended pregnancies and to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV. PROSPERO Number: CRD42016051310.

DOI 10.1007/s10461-018-2346-4
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2019 Tay CT, Teede HJ, Hill B, Loxton D, Joham AE, 'Increased prevalence of eating disorders, low self-esteem, and psychological distress in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a community-based cohort study', Fertility and Sterility, 112 353-361 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of eating disorders in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women without PCOS and examine the relationship betwe... [more]

© 2019 Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of eating disorders in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with women without PCOS and examine the relationship between PCOS, body mass index, self-esteem, and psychological distress scores. Design: Cross-sectional, community-based study. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s): A total of 8,467 participants born between 1989 and 1995 in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health with self-reported PCOS status (PCOS n = 875 vs. non-PCOS n = 7,592). Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measures(s): Self-reported eating disorders, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Kessler psychological distress scale. Result(s): Compared with women not reporting PCOS, women reporting PCOS had higher prevalence of eating disorders (11.0% vs. 7.6%), low self-esteem (31.7% vs. 24.2%), and psychological distress (severe psychological distress: 21.0% vs. 13.5%). After adjusting for confounders, women reporting PCOS were more likely to report eating disorders (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2¿2.0). Low self-esteem and psychological distress were highly correlated and further increased the odds of eating disorders in women reporting PCOS. Polycystic ovary syndrome was significantly associated with low self-esteem and psychological distress but not after adjusting for confounders. Obesity was associated with low self-esteem (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2¿1.8) and psychological distress (adjusted OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0¿1.4) but not eating disorders. Underweight women had increased odds for eating disorders (adjusted OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.8¿3.4). Conclusion(s): Women with PCOS are more likely to report low self-esteem, psychological distress, and eating disorders. Low self-esteem and psychological distress are highly correlated and further increased the risk for eating disorders.

DOI 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2019.03.027
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2019 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Delaying factors for maternal health service utilization in eastern Ethiopia: A qualitative exploratory study', Women and Birth, (2019)

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: In Ethiopia, maternal health service utilization is still unacceptably low. The societal and cultural factors that constrain wome... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Background: In Ethiopia, maternal health service utilization is still unacceptably low. The societal and cultural factors that constrain women from attending these services have not yet been sufficiently explored. Using qualitative methods, we aimed to explore the factors that delay maternal health service utilization in eastern Ethiopia. Method: A total of 13 audio-recorded focus group discussions were conducted comprising 88 participants. We conducted separate group discussions with reproductive aged women, mothers-in-law, traditional birth attendants, husbands, and Health Extension Workers to capture their knowledge, practices, feelings, thoughts and attitudes towards maternal health service utilization. The recorded sessions were transcribed into the local language and then translated into English for analysis. Result: The study identified a number of factors that may delay maternal health service utilization. Factors were grouped using the Three Delays model as a framework. Low level of awareness regarding need, poor involvement of husband, perceived absence of health problems, social power, community misperceptions and cultural restrictions, negative attitudes towards male midwives, acceptance of traditional birth attendants and poor social networking were Delay One factors. Lack of physical accessibility and high transportation costs were categorised as Delay Two factors for skilled birth care attendance. Perceived or experienced poor quality of care were categorised as Delay Three factors for both skilled birth and postnatal care utilization. Conclusion: Despite the ongoing government measures to improve maternal health service utilization in Ethiopia, numerous factors continue to contribute to delays in service use, which in turn contribute to high maternal mortality.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.04.006
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Tekelab T, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Factors affecting utilization of antenatal care in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis', PLOS ONE, 14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0214848
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Chojenta C, William J, Martin MA, Byles J, Loxton D, 'The impact of a history of poor mental health on health care costs in the perinatal period', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 22 467-473 (2019) [C1]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. The perinatal period is a critical time for mental health and is also associated with high health care expenditure. ... [more]

© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. The perinatal period is a critical time for mental health and is also associated with high health care expenditure. Our previous work has identified a history of poor mental health as the strongest predictor of poor perinatal mental health. This study aims to examine the impact of a history of poor mental health on health care costs during the perinatal period. Data from the 1973¿1978 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health (ALSWH) were linked with a number of administrative datasets including the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection and Perinatal Data Collection, the Medicare Benefits Scheme and the Pharmaceuticals Benefits Scheme between 2002 and 2011. Even when taking birth type and private health insurance status into account, a history of poor mental health resulted in an average increase of over 11% per birth across the perinatal period. These findings indicate that an investment in prevention and early treatment of poor mental health prior to child bearing may result in a cost saving in the perinatal period and a reduction of the incidence of women experiencing poor perinatal mental health.

DOI 10.1007/s00737-018-0912-4
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Byles JE, Rahman MM, Princehorn EM, Holliday EG, Leigh L, Loxton D, et al., 'Successful ageing from old to very old: a longitudinal study of 12,432 women from Australia.', Age Ageing, 48 803-810 (2019)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/afz116
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Paul Kowal, Julie Byles
2019 Musa A, Chojenta C, Geleto A, Loxton D, 'The associations between intimate partner violence and maternal health care service utilization: A systematic review and meta-analysis', BMC Women's Health, 19 1-14 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-019-0735-0
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Magnitude and correlates of postnatal care utilization among reproductive aged women in a rural district in eastern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study', Midwifery, 70 22-30 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Postnatal care is critical to detect and manage postpartum complications in the early stages as well as to prevent potentially life-threatening hea... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd Background: Postnatal care is critical to detect and manage postpartum complications in the early stages as well as to prevent potentially life-threatening health conditions that lead to maternal death. However, postnatal care utilization is persistently low in Ethiopia. The aim of this study is to assess the magnitude and correlates of postnatal care utilization among reproductiveaged women in Kersa district, in eastern Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in ten randomly selected sub-districts in Kersa district. Respondents were recruited using systematic random sampling techniques. Data were collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire using iPads. A total of 1206 respondents¿ data were considered in the analysis. Frequency and percentage distributions of the variables were performed. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to identify the predisposing, enabling and need factors associated with postnatal care utilization. An Odds Ratio with 95% confidence interval was used to ascertain the direction and strength of the association. Results: Less than one in thirteen women attended postnatal care after their last delivery in the study community. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that postnatal care utilization is associated with receiving education on maternal health, best friend's use of maternal care, head of the household, and experience of postpartum complications. Receiving education on maternal health (AOR, 2.32; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.89) and best friend's use of maternal care (AOR, 2.41; 95% CI: 1.39, 4.19) were significant predisposing factors that independently predicted postnatal care utilization. Furthermore, head of the household was a significantly associated enabling factor for postnatal care utilization (AOR, 0.24; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.81). The experience of postpartum complications (AOR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.20) was the only need factor that was associated with postnatal care utilization. Conclusion: Postnatal care utilization is extremely low in the study district. Strengthening health education and promotion activities on maternal health, peer education programs within the women's social networks, strengthening women empowerment programs, and women's mobilization to seek postnatal care before the occurrence of complications are essential actions that can improve postnatal care utilization.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2018.12.002
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Getachew T, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Service environment link and false discovery rate correction: Methodological considerations in population and health facility surveys.', PLoS One, 14 e0219860 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0219860
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Kibret KT, Chojenta C, Gresham E, Tegegne TK, Loxton D, 'Maternal dietary patterns and risk of adverse pregnancy (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes mellitus) and birth (preterm birth and low birth weight) outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Public Health Nutrition, 22 506-520 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective Epidemiological studies have indicated that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes such as hypert... [more]

© 2018 The Authors. Objective Epidemiological studies have indicated that dietary patterns during pregnancy are associated with adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW). However, the results of these studies are varied and inconsistent. The present study aimed to assess the association between dietary patterns and the risk of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Seven databases were searched for articles. Two reviewers performed the study selection and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to estimate pooled effect sizes of eligible studies.Setting Studies conducted all over the world were incorporated.Subjects The review focused on pregnant women.Results A total of twenty-one studies were identified. Adherence to a healthy dietary pattern (intake of vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains) was significantly associated with lower odds (OR; 95 % CI) of pre-eclampsia (0·78; 0·70, 0·86; I 2=39·0 %, P=0·178), GDM (0·78; 0·56, 0·99; I 2=68·6 %, P=0·013) and PTB (0·75; 0·57, 0·93; I 2=89·6 %, P=0·0001).Conclusions Our review suggests that dietary patterns with a higher intake of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fish are associated with a decreased likelihood of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. Further research should be conducted in low-income countries to understand the impact of limited resources on dietary intake and adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes.

DOI 10.1017/S1368980018002616
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Musa A, Loxton D, 'WOMEN's Knowledge of Obstetric Danger signs in Ethiopia (WOMEN's KODE):a systematic review and meta-analysis', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-019-0979-7
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2019 Damone AL, Joham AE, Loxton D, Earnest A, Teede HJ, Moran LJ, 'Depression, anxiety and perceived stress in women with and without PCOS: a community-based study', Psychological medicine, 49 1510-1520 (2019) [C1]

BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with increased psychological distress in clinical populations. We aimed to assess depression, anxiety and perceived stre... [more]

BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with increased psychological distress in clinical populations. We aimed to assess depression, anxiety and perceived stress in women with and without PCOS in a large community-based sample and investigate the role of stress in contributing to and mediating the relationship between PCOS, depression and anxiety. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALWSH) comparing women with (n = 478) or without (n = 8134) a self-reported diagnosis of PCOS. Main outcome measures were depression, anxiety and perceived stress measured using validated scales. The ¿2 and t tests were used to assess differences between groups. Univariable and multivariable regression were performed to determine factors contributing to each outcome. RESULTS: Women reporting PCOS, compared with women not reporting PCOS, reported higher prevalence of depression (27.3% v. 18.8%), anxiety symptoms (50% v. 39.2%) and greater score for perceived stress (1.01 ± 0.03 v. 0.88 ± 0.01). After adjusting for body mass index, infertility and socio-demographic factors, women with PCOS were still more likely to be depressed, anxious and to have a higher level of perceived stress. There was a high-level mediation effect of stress between PCOS and both depression and anxiety. CONCLUSION: Compared with women not reporting PCOS, women reporting PCOS have increased depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Stress may play a role in the association between PCOS, depression and anxiety. Further studies should consider assessment and management of stress in PCOS as it may be relevant for understanding the aetiology and treatment of psychological distress.

DOI 10.1017/S0033291718002076
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2019 Loxton D, Harris ML, Forder P, Powers J, Townsend N, Bytes J, Mishra G, 'Factors Influencing Web-Based Survey Response for a Longitudinal Cohort of Young Women Born Between 1989 and 1995', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 21 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/11286
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peta Forder, Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Jenny Powers
2019 Beyene AS, Chojenta C, Roba HS, Melka AS, Loxton D, 'Gender-based violence among female youths in educational institutions of Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 8 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-019-0969-9
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Addisushunu Beyene Uon
2019 Reilly N, Kingston D, Loxton D, Talcevska K, Austin M-P, 'A narrative review of studies addressing the clinical effectiveness of perinatal depression screening programs.', Women Birth, (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.03.004
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Nicole Reilly
2019 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Examining long-acting reversible contraception non-use among Australian women in their 20s: findings from a qualitative study', CULTURE HEALTH & SEXUALITY, 21 822-836 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13691058.2018.1519119
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2019 Khan MN, Harris ML, Shifti DM, Laar AS, Loxton D, 'Effects of unintended pregnancy on maternal healthcare services utilization in low- and lower-middle-income countries: systematic review and meta-analysis', International Journal of Public Health, 64 743-754 (2019) [C1]

© 2019, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+). Objectives: To examine the association between unintended pregnancy and maternal healthcare services utilization in low- and lower-m... [more]

© 2019, Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+). Objectives: To examine the association between unintended pregnancy and maternal healthcare services utilization in low- and lower-middle-income countries. Methods: A systematic literature search of Medline, Cinahl, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Popline, Maternity and Infant Care, and Scopus databases published since the beginning of the Millennium Development Goals (i.e. January 2000) to June 2018 was performed. We estimated the pooled odds ratios using random effect models and performed subgroup analysis by participants and study characteristics. Results: A total of 38 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Our study found the occurrence of unintended pregnancy was associated with a 25¿39% reduction in the use of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal healthcare services. Stratified analysis found the differences of healthcare services utilization across types of pregnancy unintendedness (e.g. mistimed, unwanted). Conclusions: Integrating family planning and maternal healthcare services should be considered to encourage women with unintended pregnancies to access maternal healthcare services.

DOI 10.1007/s00038-019-01238-9
Co-authors Mdnuruzzaman Khan Uon, Melissa Harris
2019 Melka A, Chojenta C, Holliday E, Loxton D, 'Adverse childhood experiences and electronic cigarette use among young Australian women.', Preventive medicine, 126 105759-105759 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105759
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Liz Holliday
2019 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Motivators of contraceptive method change and implications for long-acting reversible contraception (non-)use: A qualitative free-text analysis', Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, 19 71-77 (2019) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To develop a greater understanding of the motivators of contraceptive method change over time for young Australian women, with a particular interes... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To develop a greater understanding of the motivators of contraceptive method change over time for young Australian women, with a particular interest in long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use. Method: Free-text comments from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) Study were used to explore the reasons for contraceptive method change among women who reported one or more contraceptive changes across the three CUPID surveys. Results: 512 women reported making at least one contraceptive method change, with 740 comments explaining these changes between them. Participants reported a multitude of reasons motivating their contraceptive change. Five key themes were developed to explain these motivators: the natural, sexual and fertile body, specific contraceptive characteristics and other important people. Findings suggest that women's decisions to switch or discontinue a contraceptive depended largely on her ability (and desire) to juggle its impact on her sexual, fertile and natural body. Importantly, the transient and fluid nature of contraceptive practices were demonstrated, as the women adjusted their method to suit their needs at the time. Conclusion: Regarding LARC use, these findings suggest that rather than being appealing, the ¿temporarily permanent¿ nature of these methods may be unappealing and incongruent with the needs of some women.

DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2018.12.004
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2019 Moss KM, Loxton D, Dobson AJ, Slaughter V, Mishra GD, 'Testing competing mediators of the association between pre-conception maternal depression and child health-related quality of life: the MatCH study', Archives of Women's Mental Health, (2019)

© 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. Maternal depression is a potent risk factor for poor child development across a number of domains but the mechanisms... [more]

© 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature. Maternal depression is a potent risk factor for poor child development across a number of domains but the mechanisms of transmission are poorly understood. This study aimed to test competing mediators of the association between pre-conception maternal depression and child psychosocial functioning. In 2016, mothers in the 1973¿1978 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health were asked to be part of the Mothers and their Children¿s Health study and to complete surveys on the health of their three youngest children under 13¿years. The current study includes children aged 0¿12¿years (N = 5532, M = 6.99¿years, SD = 3.22¿years) and their mothers (N = 2917). We used the CESD-10 to measure depression and the PedsQL to measure psychosocial functioning, and used multilevel structural equation modeling to test hypotheses. Pre-conception maternal depression was associated with poorer maternal mental health and parenting after birth. The effect of pre-conception maternal depression was mediated by post-birth maternal depression in children aged 0¿4¿years (unstandardized regression coefficient (B) = - 0.26, 95%CI - 0.38, - 0.13) and children aged 5¿12¿years (B = - 0.25, 95%CI - 0.34, - 0.16), and by post-birth maternal stress (B = - 0.04, 95%CI - 0.08, - 0.01), and parenting (B = - 0.03, 95%CI - 0.04, - 0.02) in children aged 5¿12¿years. Post-birth maternal depression was the strongest mediator. Pre-conception is the optimal time for depression intervention. Post-birth interventions should include a focus on reducing depression and improving negative parenting aspects such as hostility and discipline.

DOI 10.1007/s00737-019-0941-7
2019 Forder PM, Rich J, Harris S, Chojenta C, Reilly N, Austin MP, Loxton D, 'Honesty and comfort levels in mothers when screened for perinatal depression and anxiety', Women and Birth, (2019)

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Purpose: To evaluate the degree of honesty and level of comfort reported by women when questioned about their emotional wellbeing during the ... [more]

© 2019 Australian College of Midwives Purpose: To evaluate the degree of honesty and level of comfort reported by women when questioned about their emotional wellbeing during the perinatal period; to investigate if honesty and comfort are associated with perinatal depression or perinatal anxiety; and to examine the reasons why women may not always respond honestly. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data from 1597 women from the cross-sectional perinatal mental health substudy (part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health)were analysed using a mixed methods approach. Results: When questioned by their health practitioner about their emotional wellbeing in the perinatal period, 20.7% of women indicated they had not always responded honestly. Reasons for not being honest reflected four main themes: normalizing of symptoms/coping; negative perceptions (self-and others); fear of adverse repercussions; and fear of involvement of health services (trust and confidentiality). The 38.9% of women who did not feel comfortable when questioned by their health practitioner about their emotional wellbeing were four times more likely to report perinatal depression (odds ratio = 4.09; 95% confidence interval = 2.55, 6.57)and nearly twice as likely to report perinatal anxiety (odds ratio = 1.90; 95% confidence interval = 1.24, 2.94)than other women. Conclusions: Women who are most likely to need mental health care during the perinatal period are also those least likely to be honest about their mental health. A non-judgemental, open and reassuring approach by clinicians may help to reduce the stigma and fears contributing to lack of honest responses, and improve early diagnosis and treatment of mental health problems.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2019.04.001
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jane Rich, Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly, Catherine Chojenta
2018 Mishra GD, Chung H-F, Gelaw YA, Loxton D, 'The role of smoking in the relationship between intimate partner violence and age at natural menopause: a mediation analysis', Women's Midlife Health, 4 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40695-017-0031-9
2018 Tesfaye G, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Assefa N, Smith R, 'Magnitude, trends and causes of maternal mortality among reproductive aged women in Kersa health and demographic surveillance system, eastern Ethiopia', BMC WOMENS HEALTH, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0690-1
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2018 Melka AS, Chojenta CL, Holliday EG, Loxton DJ, 'Effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation: protocol for umbrella review and quality assessment of systematic reviews', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 7 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0878-3
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Liz Holliday
2018 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Accidentally-on-purpose: Findings from a qualitative study exploring pregnancy intention and long-acting reversible contraceptive use', BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health, 44 207-213 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Article author(s). Background Although it is known that pregnancy intention impacts contraceptive use, there has been little exploration into the relationship between pregn... [more]

© 2018 Article author(s). Background Although it is known that pregnancy intention impacts contraceptive use, there has been little exploration into the relationship between pregnancy intention and long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) non-use in the Australian context. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews with a sample of participants from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) Study were conducted in 2016. Results Of the 59 women contacted, 15 participated in an interview. One theme arising from these interviews is reported here. Results from the analysis suggest that women with ambivalent or unclear plans toward pregnancy were less likely to perceive LARC as a suitable method for them. Conversely, women who clearly intended to avoid pregnancy and who had clear plans for future pregnancy valued these methods, and often framed their future plans for pregnancy within the context of their chosen LARC. Conclusions Findings presented demonstrated the complex relationship between pregnancy intention and contraceptive use. In particular, this study provided insight into the complex notion of pregnancy ambivalence. Dichotomous definitions of pregnancy as intended or unintended were found to be inadequate in encapsulating actual reproductive experiences.

DOI 10.1136/bmjsrh-2018-200112
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2018 Loxton D, Tooth L, Harris ML, Forder PM, Dobson A, Powers J, et al., 'Cohort Profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) 1989-95 cohort.', International journal of epidemiology, 47 391-392e (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyx133
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers, Melissa Harris, Peta Forder
2018 William J, Martin MA, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'An actuarial investigation into maternal hospital cost risk factors for public patients', Annals of Actuarial Science, 12 106-129 (2018) [C1]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2017. We investigate an actuarial approach to identifying the factors impacting government-funded maternal hospital costs in Australia, with a... [more]

© Institute and Faculty of Actuaries 2017. We investigate an actuarial approach to identifying the factors impacting government-funded maternal hospital costs in Australia, with a focus on women who experience adverse birth outcomes. We propose a two-phase modelling methodology that adopts actuarial methods from typical insurance claim cost modelling and extends to other statistical techniques to account for the large volume of covariates available for modelling. Specifically, Classification and Regression Trees and generalised linear mixed models are employed to analyse a data set that links longitudinal survey and administrative data from a large sample of women. The results show that adverse births are a statistically significant risk factor affecting maternal hospital costs in the antenatal and delivery periods. Other significant cost risk factors in the delivery period include mode of delivery, private health insurance status, diabetes, smoking status, area of residence and onset of labour. We demonstrate the efficacy of using actuarial techniques in non-traditional areas and highlight how the results can be used to inform public policy.

DOI 10.1017/S174849951700015X
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2018 Byles J, Curryer C, Vo K, Forder P, Loxton D, McLaughlin D, 'Changes in housing among older women: Latent class analysis of housing patterns in older Australian women', Urban Studies, 55 917-934 (2018) [C1]

© 2016, © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2016. Scant research exists on the patterns of changes in older women¿s housing, and whether and when women transition into residential age... [more]

© 2016, © Urban Studies Journal Limited 2016. Scant research exists on the patterns of changes in older women¿s housing, and whether and when women transition into residential aged care (RAC). This study aimed to identify groups of women with different housing patterns (latent classes) over time, with a secondary aim to describe socio-demographic and health characteristics of women in each class. We analysed linked data for 9575 women born 1921¿1926 from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women¿s Health (ALSWH), Australian National Death Index, and Residential Aged Care (RAC) administrative records for the years 1999 through to 2011. Seven distinct housing patterns (classes) were identified over time. Four classes showed a stable pattern: living in a house for most surveys (47.0%), living in a house but with earlier death (13.7%), living in an apartment (12.8%), living in a retirement village (5.8%). One class showed a pattern of downsizing: moving from a house to retirement village (6.6%). Two patterns showed transition: from an apartment or retirement village, to RAC and death (7.8%), and from house to RAC (6.4%). This study provides new evidence about socio-demographic and health influences on housing patterns and entry into residential care in later life. These findings can inform policy and aged care planning for women in later life, by identifying patterns of transition into residential aged care, or alternatively, remaining in the community.

DOI 10.1177/0042098016661309
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Peta Forder, Julie Byles
2018 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Who takes responsibility for contraception, according to young Australian women?', SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE, 15 2-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2017.11.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2018 Tegegne TK, Chojenta C, Loxton D, Smith R, Kibret KT, 'The impact of geographic access on institutional delivery care use in low and middle-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis.', PloS one, 13 e0203130 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0203130
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Roger Smith
2018 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Mussa A, Loxton D, 'Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa - a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 7 (2018)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0720-y
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2018 Tesfaye G, Chojenta C, Smith R, Loxton D, 'Application of the Andersen-Newman model of health care utilization to understand antenatal care use in Kersa District, Eastern Ethiopia', PLOS ONE, 13 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0208729
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2018 Geleto A, Chojenta C, Musa A, Loxton D, 'Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of literature.', Systematic reviews, 7 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0842-2
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2018 Morgan K, Chojenta C, Tavener M, Smith A, Loxton D, 'Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: A systematic review of the literature', Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, 215 106-118 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Purpose: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is most commonly seen in women of child bearing age, however little is known about its effects in pregnancy. Method: A systematic review was conducted in March 2015 and updated in February 2018. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINHAL, and the Cochrane Library were searched from database inception. The ClinicalTrials.gov site and bibliographies were searched. MeSH and Emtree headings and keywords included; Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, and were combined with pregnancy and pregnancy related subject headings and keywords. Searches were limited to English. Eligible articles contained key words within the title and or abstract. Articles were excluded if Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome was not pre-existing. Results: Eleven articles were identified as eligible for inclusion. Studies were appraised using the PRISMA 2009 guidelines. The overall quality of evidence was poor using the NHMRC Evidence Grading Matrix, which was attributed to small sample sizes and mostly observational studies, emphasizing the need for future high quality research. Findings in this review must be used with caution due to the poor quality of the literature available. Conclusions: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome should not be a contraindication to pregnancy. Symptom course is variable during pregnancy and the post-partum period. Continuing pre-conception medication may help symptoms, with no significant risks reported. Obstetric complications, not Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, should dictate mode of delivery. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome did not appear to affect the rate of adverse events. These results are important in determining appropriate management and care in this population.

DOI 10.1016/j.autneu.2018.05.003
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Meredith Tavener
2018 Sharma BB, Loxton DJ, Murray H, Angeli GL, Oldmeadow C, Chiu S, Smith R, 'A first step to improving maternal mortality in a low-literacy setting; the successful use of singing to improve knowledge regarding antenatal care', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 219 615.e1-615.e11 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Background: Preventable maternal mortality is related to delays in recognizing the problem, transport to a facility, and receiving appropriate care on arrival. Reducing mat... [more]

© 2018 Background: Preventable maternal mortality is related to delays in recognizing the problem, transport to a facility, and receiving appropriate care on arrival. Reducing maternal mortality in low-literacy settings is particularly challenging. In the rural villages of Nepal, the maternal mortality rate is among the highest in the world; the reasons include illiteracy and lack of knowledge of the needs of pregnant women. Culturally, singing and dancing are part of Nepalese daily life and present an opportunity to transmit knowledge of antenatal care and care at birth with a view to reducing the first 2 delays. Objective: We hypothesized that health messages regarding the importance of antenatal care and skilled birth assistance would be effectively transmitted by songs in the limited literacy environment of rural Nepal. Study Design: We randomly grouped 4 rural village development committees comprising 36 villages into 2 (intervention and control) clusters. In the intervention group, local groups were invited to write song lyrics incorporating key health messages regarding antenatal care to accompany popular melodies. The groups presented their songs and dances in a festival organized and judged by the community. The winning songs were performed by the local people in a song and dance progression through the villages, houses, and fields. A wall chart with the key health messages was also provided to each household. Knowledge of household decision makers (senior men and women) was assessed before and after the intervention and at 12 months using a structured questionnaire in all households that also assessed behavior change. Results: Structured interviews were conducted at baseline, immediately postintervention in the control and intervention areas (intervention n = 735 interviews, control n = 775), and at 12 months in the intervention area only (n = 867). Knowledge scores were recorded as the number of correct items out of 36 questions at baseline and postintervention, and of 21 questions at follow-up. Postintervention, test score doubled in the intervention group from a mean of 11.60/36¿22.33/36 (P <.001), with no practically significant change in the control population (17.48/36¿18.26/36). Improvement was greatest among the most illiterate members of the community (6.8/36¿19.8/36, P <.001). At 12 months follow-up, a majority of the participants (63.9%) indicated that they provided information learned from the songs to their neighbors and friends, and 41.3% reported still singing the songs from the intervention. Conclusion: The use of songs bypassed the limitations of literacy in communicating health messages that are key to improving maternal care in this low-literacy rural setting within a developing country. The improvements were maintained without further intervention for 12 months. With appropriate sociocultural adaptation to local contexts, this low-cost method of community education may be applicable to improving maternal health knowledge and behavior change in other low-resource and limited literacy settings that may lead to reductions in maternal mortality.

DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2018.09.038
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Giavanna Angeli, Roger Smith
2018 Rich JL, Wright SL, Loxton D, 'Older rural women living with drought', Local Environment, 23 1141-1155 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/13549839.2018.1532986
Co-authors Sarah Wright, Jane Rich
2018 Mishra GD, Moss K, Loos C, Dobson AJ, Davies PSW, Loxton D, et al., 'MatCH (Mothers and their Children's Health) Profile: Offspring of the 1973-78 Cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', LONGITUDINAL AND LIFE COURSE STUDIES, 9 351-375 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.14301/llcs.v9i3.491
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2018 Sharma BB, Jones L, Loxton DJ, Booth D, Smith R, 'Systematic review of community participation interventions to improve maternal health outcomes in rural South Asia.', BMC pregnancy and childbirth, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1964-1
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Roger Smith
2018 Forder P, Byles J, Vo K, Curryer C, Loxton D, 'Cumulative incidence of admission to permanent residential aged care for Australian women A competing risk analysis', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 166-171 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: To provide a direct estimate of the risk of admission to permanent residential aged care among older women while accounting for death, according to h... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: To provide a direct estimate of the risk of admission to permanent residential aged care among older women while accounting for death, according to housing type and other variables. Methods: A competing risk analysis from 8,867 Australian women born 1921¿26, using linked data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), Residential Aged Care (RAC), and the Australian National Death Index. Results: After accounting for deaths, around 35% of women will be admitted to RAC between ages 73 and 90. The conditional cumulative incidence of admission to RAC was 26.9% if living in a house, compared to 36.0% from an apartment, 43.6% within a retirement village, and 37.1% if living in a mobile home. Each one-year increase in age was associated with a relative 17% increased risk of RAC. Conclusions: Around one-third of women will enter RAC between age 73 and 90. Living in a house had the lowest risk of entering residential aged care over time. Implications for public health: These findings have important implications for planning for aged care services, including the role of housing in delaying admission to residential aged care, and the need for residential care by a high proportion of women towards the end of life.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12713
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2018 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D Este C, Blyth F, Byles J, 'Differences in Use of Government Subsidised Mental Health Services by Men and Women with Psychological Distress: A Study of 229,628 Australians Aged 45 Years and Over', Community Mental Health Journal, 54 1008-1018 (2018) [C1]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. This study examined factors associated with use of government subsidised mental health services by 229,628 m... [more]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. This study examined factors associated with use of government subsidised mental health services by 229,628 men and women from the Sax Institute¿s 45 and Up Study. Logistical regression models assessed use of mental health services by gender and according to level of psychological distress. Approximately equal proportion of men and women had high psychological distress scores (approximately 7%) but only 7% of these men and 11% of these women used services. Use was associated with predisposing (younger age and higher education), enabling (private health insurance) and need factors (higher psychological distress scores). Associations were similar for men and women except urban area of residence, separated/divorced marital status, and smoking were associated with service use for women but not men. Results suggest some inequity in the use of services by those with higher levels of need and further efforts may be required to reach people with higher need but lower service use.

DOI 10.1007/s10597-018-0262-8
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles, Catherine Deste
2017 Szalacha LA, Hughes TL, McNair R, Loxton D, 'Mental health, sexual identity, and interpersonal violence: Findings from the Australian longitudinal Women's health study', BMC WOMENS HEALTH, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0452-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2017 Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Anderson AE, Townsend N, 'Intimate partner violence adversely impacts health over 16 years and across generations: A longitudinal cohort study', PLOS ONE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0178138
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Xenia Doljagore
2017 Ferreira P, Loxton D, Tooth LR, 'Intimate personal violence and caregiving: Influences on physical and mental health in middle-aged women', Maturitas, 102 34-40 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.05.001
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2017 Hure A, Powers J, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Rates and Predictors of Caesarean Section for First and Second Births: A Prospective Cohort of Australian Women', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 21 1175-1184 (2017) [C1]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and secon... [more]

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Objective To determine rates of vaginal delivery, emergency caesarean section, and elective caesarean section for first and second births in Australia, and to identify maternal predictors of caesarean section. Methods Data were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health. A total of 5275 women aged 18¿38 years, who had given birth to their first child between 1996 and 2012 were included; 75.0% (n = 3956) had delivered a second child. Mode of delivery for first and second singleton birth(s) was obtained from longitudinal survey data. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, anthropometric and medical history variables were tested as predictors of mode of delivery for first and second births using multinomial logistic regression. Results Caesarean sections accounted for 29.1% (n = 1535) of first births, consisting of 18.2% emergency and 10.9% elective caesareans. Mode of delivery for first and second births was consistent for 85.5% of women (n = 3383) who delivered both children either vaginally or via caesarean section. Higher maternal age and body mass index, short-stature, anxiety and having private health insurance were predictive of caesarean section for first births. Vaginal birth after caesarean section was more common in women who were older, short-statured, or had been overweight or obese for both children, compared to women who had two vaginal deliveries. Conclusions for Practice Rates of caesarean section in Australia are high. Renewed efforts are needed to reduce the number of unnecessary caesarean births, with particular caution applied to first births. Interventions could focus on elective caesareans for women with private health insurance or a history of anxiety.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-016-2216-5
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2017 Htet TD, Teede HJ, de Courten B, Loxton D, Real FG, Moran LJ, Joham AE, 'Asthma in reproductive-aged women with polycystic ovary syndrome and association with obesity', EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 49 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1183/13993003.01334-2016
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2017 Harris ML, Oldmeadow C, Hure A, Luu J, Loxton D, Attia J, 'Stress increases the risk of type 2 diabetes onset in women: A 12-year longitudinal study using causal modelling.', PLoS One, 12 e0172126 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0172126
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
Co-authors John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Melissa Harris, Alexis Hure
2017 Stanford S, Jones MP, Loxton DJ, 'Understanding women who self-harm: Predictors and long-term outcomes in a longitudinal community sample', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51 151-160 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0004867416633298
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2017 Goldhammer DL, Fraser C, Wigginton B, Harris ML, Bateson D, Loxton D, et al., 'What do young Australian women want (when talking to doctors about contraception)?', BMC Family Practice, 18 1-10 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12875-017-0616-2
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2017 Powers JR, Loxton D, Anderson AE, Dobson AJ, Mishra GD, Hockey R, Brown WJ, 'Changes in smoking, drinking, overweight and physical inactivity in young Australian women 1996-2013 (vol 28, pg 255, 2017)', HEALTH PROMOTION JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 28 266-266 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/HE16085_CO
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Amy Anderson
2017 Francis L, Loxton D, James C, 'The culture of pretence: a hidden barrier to recognising, disclosing and ending domestic violence', Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26 2202-2214 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 John Wiley &amp; Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore in detail how women perceived their experience of domestic violence and leaving or ending the abuse. This resear... [more]

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Aims and objectives: To explore in detail how women perceived their experience of domestic violence and leaving or ending the abuse. This research also examined how service providers identified their professional role in assisting women to end such relationships. Background: Domestic violence against women continues to occur internationally. Reliable statistics are difficult to capture because of inconsistent definitions, contradictory methods of acquiring data and unreported incidents. Design: A qualitative study, undertaken in two phases, was conducted in Australia. Methods: Twelve women who had experienced domestic violence and ended those relationships participated in one semistructured interview (Phase 1). Twenty-five professionals from health, social sciences and law, whose work included assisting women experiencing domestic violence, participated in three focus groups (Phase 2). Thematic analysis guided by a narrative inquiry approach forms the framework for information collection and interpretation of data in this project. Findings: The barriers that impede women from disclosing abuse and taking action to end domestic violence are complex and varied between participants. Women did not always acknowledge or realise their relationship was precarious and often denied or minimised the abuse to cope with the domestic violence. Professionals identified that women did not always identify or acknowledge abuse inherent in their relationship although this delayed the provision of appropriate services. Conclusion: Whether women disclose abuse or deny violence in their relationship, acceptance by service providers and the offer of support is crucial to assisting women in violent relationships. Relevance to clinical practice: It is hoped that the findings may assist health practitioners, including nurses, to provide nonjudgemental support to women experiencing domestic violence whether women acknowledge the abusive relationship or not.

DOI 10.1111/jocn.13501
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Colin James
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Who uses long-acting reversible contraception? Profile of LARC users in the CUPID cohort', Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, 11 19-24 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Objective To explore the characteristics of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users in a nationally representative cohort of young Australian women ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Objective To explore the characteristics of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users in a nationally representative cohort of young Australian women aged 18¿23. Methods Data from 3155 women who responded to a question about their contraceptive use in the previous six months at the baseline Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) survey were included. Results 726 (19.1%) women reported LARC use, with the Implanon being the most popular method (n¿=¿478; 65.8%). A history of pregnancy was strongly associated with increased odds of LARC use in the multivariate model (OR¿=¿2.67, 95% CI¿=¿2.11, 3.34, p¿=¿0.001). Comparatively, using contraception for reasons other than pregnancy prevention was associated with decreased odds of LARC use in the multivariate model (period management: OR¿=¿0.74, 95% CI¿=¿0.60, 0.91, p¿=¿0.004, body management: OR¿=¿0.53, 95% CI¿=¿0.37, 0.77, p¿=¿0.001, medical condition: OR¿=¿0.25, 95% CI¿=¿0.09, 0.66, p¿=¿0.005). Highest education and Medicare card status also contributed to the final multivariate model, and were associated with decreased odds of LARC use. Conclusion Reproductive history and reasons for contraceptive use are strong indications of method choice. Promoting LARC as highly effective may not be a sufficient incentive for young women to take up the method when pregnancy prevention may be equal or secondary to their desired non-contraceptive effects.

DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2016.09.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2017 Tesfaye G, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Semahegn A, Smith R, 'Delayed initiation of antenatal care and associated factors in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Reproductive health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0412-4
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Roger Smith, Catherine Chojenta
2017 Townsend N, Powers J, Loxton D, 'Bullying among 18 to 23-year-old women in 2013', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41 394-398 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: To identify the prevalence of bullying among women aged 18¿23 in 2013, and to describe the demographic characteristics, health and risk factors of th... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: To identify the prevalence of bullying among women aged 18¿23 in 2013, and to describe the demographic characteristics, health and risk factors of those who experienced bullying. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 1989¿95 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a nationally representative cohort (n=16,801). Results: More than one-quarter of women (28.4%) indicated they had never been bullied, 53.4% reported experiencing bullying in the past and 18.2% indicated that they were recently bullied. Women who had experienced bullying were more likely to have lower levels of education, less likely to be studying or employed, and had more difficulty managing on their income. Women who experienced bullying were more likely to use tobacco or illicit drugs, be overweight or obese and to be sedentary. Even after adjusting for these factors, women who had experienced bullying were at risk of poor physical health, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts and self-harm. Conclusions: This is the first nationally representative study to demonstrate the strong association between being a victim of bullying and health outcomes in a post-school-age population. Implications for public health: The findings highlight the need for interventions for women who have already experienced bullying and are past school age.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12671
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2016 Coombe J, Harris ML, Wigginton B, Lucke J, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive use at the time of unintended pregnancy: Findings from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions study.', Aust Fam Physician, 45 842-848 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2016 Tavener MA, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Generating qualitative data by design: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health qualitative data collection.', Public Health Research & Practice, 26 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.17061/phrp2631631
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Meredith Tavener
2016 Joham AE, Nanayakkara N, Ranasinha S, Zoungas S, Boyle J, Harrison CL, et al., 'Obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome and breastfeeding: An observational study', Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 95 458-466 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. Introduction. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 9-21% of ... [more]

© 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. Introduction. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 9-21% of reproductive- age women. The relations between PCOS, body mass index (BMI) and breastfeeding are unclear. Our aim was to examine breastfeeding in women with and without PCOS and the relation with BMI. Material and methods. This is a cross-sectional study set in the general community. Participants are women, aged 31-36 years, from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), a large community-based study. Data was analyzed from the first child of respondents to Survey five (2009) reporting at least one live born child. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with breastfeeding. The main outcome measures studied were breastfeeding initiation and duration and the main explanatory variables included selfreported PCOS and BMI. Results. Of the 4898 women, 6.5% reported PCOS (95% confidence interval 5.8-7.2%). Median duration of breastfeeding was lower in women reporting PCOS (6 months, range 2-10 months) than in women not reporting PCOS (7 months, range 3-12 months) (p = 0.001). On multivariable regression analysis, there was no association between PCOS and breastfeeding outcomes. However, being overweight or obese was associated with not initiating breastfeeding and with breastfeeding for less than 6 months, after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions. High BMI is negatively associated with breastfeeding, whereas PCOS status per se does not appear to be related to breastfeeding initiation and duration, after adjusting for BMI.

DOI 10.1111/aogs.12850
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Peta Forder
2016 Coles J, Anderson A, Loxton D, 'Breastfeeding Duration after Childhood Sexual Abuse: An Australian Cohort Study.', Journal of human lactation : official journal of International Lactation Consultant Association, 32 NP28-NP35 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0890334415590782
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Amy Anderson
2016 Dillon G, Hussain R, Kibele E, Rahman S, Loxton D, 'Influence of Intimate Partner Violence on Domestic Relocation in Metropolitan and Non-Metropolitan Young Australian Women', Violence Against Women, 22 1597-1620 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Data from a national, population-based longitudinal study of Australian women (26-34 years) were analyzed to investigate the association between dome... [more]

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Data from a national, population-based longitudinal study of Australian women (26-34 years) were analyzed to investigate the association between domestic relocation and multiple explanatory factors, namely intimate partner violence (IPV), metropolitan versus non-metropolitan residence, education, income, housing tenure, number of children, and changes in relationship status. Experience of IPV in the past 12 months was significantly associated with increased odds of domestic relocation. This association remained significant after controlling for age, social support, area of residence, income, number of children, education, and housing situation. Change in relationship status attenuated the association between recent IPV and domestic relocation. Metropolitan versus non-metropolitan residence had no major influence on these results.

DOI 10.1177/1077801216628689
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2016 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke JC, 'A qualitative analysis of women's explanations for changing contraception: the importance of non-contraceptive effects.', The journal of family planning and reproductive health care, 42 256-262 (2016) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2016 Harris ML, Byles JE, Townsend N, Loxton D, 'Perceptions of coping with non-disease-related life stress for women with osteoarthritis: a qualitative analysis.', BMJ Open, 6 e010630 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010630
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2016 Wigginton B, Moran C, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Young Australian women explain their contraceptive choices', Culture, Health and Sexuality, 18 727-741 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men¿s options for reversible contraception h... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men¿s options for reversible contraception have not advanced beyond the condom. There has been little discursive exploration of how neoliberal and postfeminist discourses shape women¿s accounts of choosing whether or not to use contraception. Our thematic discourse analysis of 760 free-text responses to a question about contraceptive choice considers the social and political climate that promotes the self-governed woman who freely chooses contraception. We examine the ways in which women formulated and defended their accounts of choice, focusing on the theme of free contraceptive choice that constructed women¿s choices as unconstrained by material, social and political forces. We identify two discursive strategies that underpinned this theme: a woman¿s body, a woman¿s choice and planning parenthood, and explore the ways in which choice was understood as a gendered entitlement and how contraceptive choices were shaped (and constrained) by women¿s plans for parenthood. We discuss the implications of these discursive strategies, and neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, in terms of the disallowance of any contextual, social and structural factors, including the absence of men in the ¿contraceptive economy¿.

DOI 10.1080/13691058.2015.1117138
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2016 Powers J, Duffy L, Burns L, Loxton D, 'Binge drinking and subsequent depressive symptoms in young women in Australia', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 161 86-94 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Background: The long-term impact of binge drinking on subsequent depressive symptoms is unclear. The aims were to identify longitudinal patterns of bi... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Background: The long-term impact of binge drinking on subsequent depressive symptoms is unclear. The aims were to identify longitudinal patterns of binge drinking and whether binge drinking preceded depressive symptoms in the short-term (1-6 years) and long-term (10-15 years). Methods: Longitudinal data from 1996, 2000 and 2009 mailed surveys of 8,197 women in the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Latent class analysis was used to identify binge drinking patterns and logistic regression to estimate associations with subsequent depressive symptoms. Results: Five binge drinking trajectories were identified with predicted proportions of women who were very infrequent (24%), fluctuating infrequent (17%), frequent (17%), very frequent (26%) or extremely frequent binge drinkers (16%) between 16 and 21 years. At 22-27 years, depressive symptoms were significantly higher for extremely frequent binge drinkers (31% versus 21% in the short-term; 22% versus 16%-18% in the long-term) than for less frequent bingers. Unadjusted odds of depressive symptoms were 1.70 (95%CI:1.38;2.08) times for extremely frequent binge drinkers than very infrequent bingers and were 1.30 (95%CI:1.04;1.63) after adjusting for demographics, relationships and experience of violence. At 31-36 years, the odds of depressive symptoms were 1.34 (95%CI:1.09-1.64) times for extremely frequent than very infrequent binge drinkers, but were not significant after adjusting for relationships and violence. Conclusions: Extremely frequent binge drinking (more than weekly) in late adolescence appears to elevate the risk of subsequent depressive symptoms in young women in their early twenties and thirties, emphasising the need for preventive strategies to curb binge drinking.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.019
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2016 Tavener M, Mooney R, Thomson C, Loxton D, 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health: Using Focus Groups to Inform Recruitment.', JMIR Res Protoc, 5 e31 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.5020
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Meredith Tavener
2016 Otterbach S, Tavener M, Forder P, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'The effect of motherhood and work on women's time pressure: A cohort analysis using the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF WORK ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH, 42 500-509 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.5271/sjweh.3590
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2016 Dillon G, Hussain R, Loxton D, Khan A, 'Rurality and Self-Reported Health in Women with a History of Intimate Partner Violence.', PLoS One, 11 e0162380 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0162380
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
2016 Chojenta CL, Lucke JC, Forder PM, Loxton DJ, 'Maternal Health Factors as Risks for Postnatal Depression: A Prospective Longitudinal Study', PLoS ONE, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of r... [more]

© 2016 Chojenta et al. Purpose While previous studies have identified a range of potential risk factors for postnatal depression (PND), none have examined a comprehensive set of risk factors at a population-level using data collected prospectively. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between a range of factors and PND and to construct a model of the predictors of PND. Methods Data came from 5219 women who completed Survey 5 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2009 and reported giving birth to a child. Results Over 15% of women reported experiencing PND with at least one of their children. The strongest positive associations were for postnatal anxiety (OR = 13.79,95%CI = 10.48,18.13) and antenatal depression (OR = 9.23,95%CI = 6.10,13.97). Positive associations were also found for history of depression and PND, low SF-36 Mental Health Index, emotional distress during labour, and breastfeeding for less than six months. Conclusions Results indicate that understanding a woman's mental health history plays an important role in the detection of those who are most vulnerable to PND. Treatment and management of depression and anxiety earlier in life and during pregnancy may have a positive impact on the incidence of PND.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147246
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Peta Forder, Catherine Chojenta
2016 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'What qualities of long-acting reversible contraception do women perceive as desirable or undesirable? A systematic review', Sexual Health, 13 404-419 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 CSIRO. Little research examining qualities of contraception that make them attractive or unattractive to users, particularly young women, exists. The aim of this study is t... [more]

© 2016 CSIRO. Little research examining qualities of contraception that make them attractive or unattractive to users, particularly young women, exists. The aim of this study is to systemically review the evidence regarding desirable and undesirable qualities of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), including intrauterine devices, the implant and the injection, as perceived by women. Five electronic databases were searched in May 2015 using terms related to LARC and method preference or decision-making. Studies were included if they concerned women aged 18-23 years from developed countries and reported on perceived positive or negative qualities of LARC. Thirty articles were deemed relevant. Five key themes emerged under which qualities were categorised; including: (1) impact on bleeding; (2) impact on the body; (3) device-specific characteristics; (4) general characteristics; and (5) perceptions and misbeliefs. Fit and forget, high efficacy and long-term protection were considered the top desirable qualities of LARC. Undesirable qualities varied among the LARC methods; however, irregular bleeding, painful insertion and removal procedure, weight gain and location in the body were among those most commonly reported. The contraceptive benefits of LARC, including their high efficacy and longevity, are generally considered to be positive qualities by women, while the potential impact of side-effects on the body are considered as negative qualities. This information is crucial in the clinical setting as it provides practitioners with a greater understanding of the qualities women do and do not like about LARC methods. Discussion about these qualities, positive and negative, during consultations about contraception may increase rates of uptake.

DOI 10.1071/SH15189
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Coles J, Lee A, Taft A, Mazza D, Loxton D, 'Childhood sexual abuse and its association with adult physical and mental health: results from a national cohort of young Australian women.', J Interpers Violence, 30 1929-1944 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0886260514555270
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
2015 May-Ling JL, Loxton D, McLaughlin D, 'Trauma exposure and the subsequent risk of coronary heart disease among mid-aged women', JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 38 57-65 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10865-014-9577-2
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2015 Coles J, Lee A, Taft A, Mazza D, Loxton D, 'General practice service use and satisfaction among female survivors of childhood sexual abuse', Australian Family Physician, 44 71-76 (2015) [C1]

Background: Because childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adult violence are associated with poorer physical and mental health of women, our aim was to investigate the associations bet... [more]

Background: Because childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adult violence are associated with poorer physical and mental health of women, our aim was to investigate the associations between CSA, adult violence experiences and general practice service use and satisfaction in a community sample of Australian women aged 28-33 years. Methods: Data of 9058 women from the 1973-78 cohort who completed Survey 4 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were analysed. Results: Logistic regressions conducted indicated that after controlling for demographic variables, women with experiences of lifetime violence were more likely to have higher general practice service use compared to those without violence experiences. CSA was not associated with an increase in service use but was significantly associated with a decrease in service satisfaction. This finding remained significant even when they visited the general practice more frequently. Discussion: Implementing trauma-informed care is suggested as a way to improve the satisfaction of this patient group with complex needs.

Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2015 Powers J, Tavener M, Graves A, Loxton D, 'Loss to follow-up was used to estimate bias in a longitudinal study: A new approach', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2015) [C1]

Objectives: To examine bias arising from loss to follow-up due to lack of contact. Study Design and Setting: The 1973-1978 cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women&apos;s ... [more]

Objectives: To examine bias arising from loss to follow-up due to lack of contact. Study Design and Setting: The 1973-1978 cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was first surveyed in 1996 and followed up in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. At the 2000 survey, 9,688 women responded (responders), 2,972 could not be contacted, of whom 1,515 responded subsequently (temporary no contact) and 1,457 did not (permanent no contact). Characteristics were compared for these groups at baseline and follow-up in 2003, 2006, or 2009. Relative risk ratios were used to estimate bias. Results: No-contacts were younger, more likely to live in cities, to be less educated and stressed about money than responders. No-contacts were more likely to be in de facto relationships, separated, divorced, or widowed, to have experienced partner violence and be smokers. Compared with temporary no contact, permanent no contact were less educated, less likely to be studying or employed. Despite differences in prevalence estimates, relative odds ratios were close to one and had confidence intervals that included one, indicating little effect of bias. Conclusion: Although various characteristics were related to loss to follow-up, the relative risks estimates did not indicate serious bias due to loss to follow-up in this cohort of young women.

DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.01.010
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Jenny Powers
2015 Hure AJ, Chojenta CL, Powers JR, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets', JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 25 30-37 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2188/jea.JE20140032
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2015 Powers JR, Anderson AE, Byles JE, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, 'Do women grow out of risky drinking? A prospective study of three cohorts of Australian women', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2015) [C1]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women&apos;s drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data cam... [more]

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data came from three prospective cohorts of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health aged 18-23 (n=14247), 45-50 (n=13715) and 70-75 years (n=12432) when first surveyed in 1996. The same women were re-surveyed at roughly 3-year intervals until 2012. At each survey, four drinking behaviours were based on two guidelines: long-term drinking (no more than two standard drinks per day) and episodic drinking (no more than four standard drinks on an occasion): (i) no risk (within both guidelines); (ii) low episodic risk (less than once a month); high episodic risk (at least once a month); long-term risk (more than two drinks per day regardless of episodic drinking). Results: No risk drinking increased with age, low episodic risk drinking remained almost constant between ages 18 and 39, and high episodic risk drinking declined rapidly. Few women drank at long-term risk. Factors associated with risky drinking varied with age; however, being a past or current smoker consistently increased the risk, and risks for smokers increased with age. Risky drinking was less likely to be practised by women providing care and needing help with daily tasks, or by pregnant women and those living with children. Discussion and Conclusions: Risky drinking behaviour should be addressed in younger women and in those who smoke. Interventions to reduce risky drinking, possibly in combination with reducing smoking, could be offered through general practice centres.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12246
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2015 Rowlands IJ, Loxton D, Dobson A, Mishra GD, 'Seeking health information online: Association with young australian women's physical, mental, and reproductive health', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Relatively little is known about the extent to which young adults use the Internet as a health information resource and whether there are factors that distinguish between those wh... [more]

Relatively little is known about the extent to which young adults use the Internet as a health information resource and whether there are factors that distinguish between those who do and do not go online for health information. Objective: The aim was to identify the sociodemographic, physical, mental, and reproductive health factors associated with young women's use of the Internet for health information. Methods: We used data from 17,069 young women aged 18-23 years who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between sociodemographic, physical, mental, and reproductive health factors associated with searching the Internet for health information. Results: Overall, 43.54% (7433/17,069) of women used the Internet for health information. Women who used the Internet had higher odds of regular urinary or bowel symptoms (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.36-1.54), psychological distress (very high distress: OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13-1.37), self-reported mental health diagnoses (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.23), and menstrual symptoms (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.15-1.36) than women who did not use the Internet for health information. Internet users were less likely to have had blood pressure checks (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.93) and skin cancer checks (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.97) and to have had a live birth (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.64-0.86) or pregnancy loss (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.98) than non-Internet users. Conclusions: Women experiencing "stigmatized" conditions or symptoms were more likely to search the Internet for health information. The Internet may be an acceptable resource that offers "anonymized" information or support to young women and this has important implications for health service providers and public health policy.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.4048
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 22
2015 Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Harris et al. respond to "social media recruitment"', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 750-751 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwv008
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting online: Lessons from a longitudinal survey of contraception and pregnancy intentions of young Australian women', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 737-746 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author. Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recr... [more]

© 2015 The Author. Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recruitment methods. We report on the implementation and feasibility of an innovative and flexible approach used to recruit participants for a longitudinal cohort study about contraceptive use and pregnancy (the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention, and Decisions (CUPID) Study). Australian women aged 18-23 years were recruited using a range of online, networking, and offline methods, including social media (primarily Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California; http://www.facebook.com)), face-to-face events, distribution of promotional material, and media releases. Over the course of the 1-year recruitment period (beginning in September 2012), a total of 3,795 eligible women were recruited to complete the online survey, at a cost of approximately A$11 per participant. This sample was found to be broadly representative of the Australian population of women aged 18-23 years in terms of demographic characteristics, with the exception of an overrepresentation of tertiary-educated women (88.7% compared with 72.6%). This study demonstrated that although current recruitment strategies are required to be innovative and flexible in order to engage young people in epidemiologic research, representative samples can be achieved online at reasonable cost.

DOI 10.1093/aje/kwv006
Citations Scopus - 42Web of Science - 37
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Herbert D, Lucke J, 'The feminisation of contraceptive use: Australian women's accounts of accessing contraception', FEMINISM & PSYCHOLOGY, 25 178-198 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0959353514562802
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Dillon G, Hussain R, Loxton D, 'Intimate partner violence in the young cohort of the Australian longitudinal study on women's health: urban/rural comparison and demographic associations', Advances in Mental Health, 13 18-29 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/18374905.2015.1039752
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4
2015 Gresham E, Forder P, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hure AJ, 'Agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes and administrative data in New South Wales, Australia', BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate th... [more]

© 2015 Gresham et al. Background: Many epidemiological studies that focus on pregnancy rely on maternal self-report of perinatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between self-reported perinatal outcomes (gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria, gestational diabetes, premature birth and low birth weight) in a longitudinal study and linked to administrative data (medical records). Methods: Self-reported survey data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was linked with the New South Wales Perinatal Data Collection. Agreement between the two sources was evaluated using percentage agreement and kappa statistics. Analyses were conducted at two levels by: i) the mother and ii) each individual child. Results: Women reliably self-report their perinatal outcomes (=87 % agreement). Gestational hypertension with or without proteinuria had the lowest level of agreement. Mothers' reports of perinatal outcomes were more reliable when evaluated by child. Restricting the analysis to complete and consistent reporting further strengthened the reliability of the child-specific data, increasing the agreement from >92 to >95 % for all outcomes. Conclusions: The present study offers a high degree of confidence in the use of maternal self-reports of the perinatal outcomes gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm birth and low birth weight in epidemiological research, particularly when reported on a per child basis. Furthermore self-report offers a cost-effective and convenient method for gathering detailed maternal perinatal histories.

DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0597-x
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Julie Byles, Catherine Chojenta
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 36
Co-authors Julie Byles, Amy Anderson, Melissa Harris, Jenny Powers
2015 Powers JR, Dobson AJ, Berry HL, Graves AM, Hanigan IC, Loxton D, 'Lack of association between drought and mental health in a cohort of 45-61 year old rural Australian women.', Aust N Z J Public Health, 39 518-523 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12369
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2015 Harris ML, Byles JE, Sibbritt D, Loxton D, '"Just get on with it": Qualitative insights of coming to terms with a deteriorating body for older women with osteoarthritis', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Harris et al. Objective: To qualify the psychosocial burden of osteoarthritis for older women and identify factors perceived to assist with psychological adjustment to the ... [more]

© 2015 Harris et al. Objective: To qualify the psychosocial burden of osteoarthritis for older women and identify factors perceived to assist with psychological adjustment to the disease. Methods: Women who indicated being diagnosed/treated for osteoarthritis in the previous three years in the fifth survey of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health provided the sampling frame. Participants were randomly sampled until saturation was reached using a systematic process. Thematic content analysis was applied to the 19 semi-structured telephone interviews using a realist framework. Results: The findings indicate that the emotional burden of osteoarthritis is considerable, and the process of psychological adjustment complex. Older women with osteoarthritis have psychological difficulties associated with increasing pain and functional impairment. Psychological adjustment over time was attributed primarily to cognitive and attitudinal factors (e.g. stoicism, making downward comparisons and possessing specific notions about the cause of arthritis). This was a dynamic 'day to day' process involving a constant struggle between grieving physical losses and increasing dependence amidst symptom management. Conclusion: The findings of this study add to the current understanding of the complex processes involved in psychological adjustment over time. Targeted interventions focused on assisting women with arthritis redefine self-concepts outside the confines of caring responsibilities, coupled with public health education programs around understanding the destructive nature of arthritis are required. Understanding the destructive and (potentially) preventable nature of arthritis may facilitate early detection and increased uptake of appropriate treatment options for osteoarthritis that have the ability to modify disease trajectories.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0120507
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2015 Dobson AJ, Hockey R, Brown WJ, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, McLaughlin D, et al., 'Cohort Profile Update: Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.', Int J Epidemiol, 44 1547-1547f (2015) [C2]
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyv110
Citations Scopus - 75Web of Science - 68
Co-authors Julie Byles
2014 Chojenta C, Harris S, Reilly N, Forder P, Austin MP, Loxton D, 'History of pregnancy loss increases the risk of mental health problems in subsequent pregnancies but not in the postpartum', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during su... [more]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during subsequent pregnancies and births. This paper examined the impact of any type of pregnancy loss on mental health in a subsequent pregnancy and postpartum. Data were obtained from a sub-sample (N = 584) of the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a prospective cohort study that has been collecting data since 1996. Pregnancy loss was defined as miscarriage, termination due to medical reasons, ectopic pregnancy and stillbirth. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, stress or distress, sadness or low mood, excessive worry, lack of enjoyment, and feelings of guilt. Demographic factors and mental health history were controlled for in the analysis. Women with a previous pregnancy loss were more likely to experience sadness or low mood (AOR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.11 to 2.76, p = 0.0162), and excessive worry (AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.24 to 3.24, p = 0.0043) during a subsequent pregnancy, but not during the postpartum phase following a subsequent birth. These results indicate that while women who have experienced a pregnancy loss are a more vulnerable population during a subsequent pregnancy, these deficits are not evident in the postpartum. © 2014 Chojenta et al.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0095038
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly, Catherine Chojenta
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder PM, Powers J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Risky drinking patterns are being continued into pregnancy: a prospective cohort study.', PLoS One, 9 e86171 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0086171
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Jenny Powers, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Peta Forder
2014 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Women's perceptions of information about alcohol use during pregnancy: a qualitative study.', BMC Public Health, 14 1048 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1048
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Frances Kaylambkin, Amy Anderson
2014 Mishra GD, Hockey R, Powers J, Loxton D, Tooth L, Rowlands I, et al., 'Recruitment via the internet and social networking sites: The 1989-1995 cohort of the Australian longitudinal study on women's health', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (2014) [C1]

Background: Faced with the challenge of recruiting young adults for health studies, researchers have increasingly turned to the Internet and social networking sites, such as Faceb... [more]

Background: Faced with the challenge of recruiting young adults for health studies, researchers have increasingly turned to the Internet and social networking sites, such as Facebook, as part of their recruitment strategy. As yet, few large-scale studies are available that report on the characteristics and representativeness of the sample obtained from such recruitment methods.Objective: The intent of the study was to describe the sociodemographic and health characteristics of a national sample of young Australian women recruited mainly through the Internet and social networking sites and to discuss the representativeness of their sociodemographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics relative to the population.Methods: A cohort of 17,069 women (born between 1989 and 1995) was recruited in 2012-13 for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Sociodemographic characteristics (percentages, means, and 95% confidence intervals) from the online survey data were compared with women aged 18-23 years from the 2011 Australian Census. Sample data were compared by age and education level with data from the 2011-13 Australian Health Survey (AHS).Results: Compared to the Australian Census data, study participants were broadly representative in terms of geographical distribution across Australia, marital status (95.62%, 16,321/17,069) were never married), and age distribution. A higher percentage had attained university (22.52%, 3844/17,069) and trade/certificate/diploma qualifications (25.94%, 4428/17,069) compared with this age group of women in the national population (9.4% and 21.7% respectively). Among study participants, 22.05% (3721/16,877) were not in paid employment with 35.18% (5931/16,857) studying 16 or more hours a week. A higher percentage of study participants rated their health in the online survey as fair or poor (rather than good, very good, or excellent) compared with those participating in face-to-face interviews in the AHS (18.77%, 3203/17,069 vs 10.1%). A higher percentage of study participants were current smokers (21.78%, 3718/17,069 vs 16.4%) and physically active (59.30%, 10,089/17,014 were classified as sufficiently active vs 48.3%) but alcohol consumption was lower (59.58%, 9865/16,558 reported drinking alcohol at least once per month vs 65.9% in the AHS). Using self-reported height and weight to determine body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), 34.80% (5901/16,956) of the cohort were classified as overweight or obese (BMI of 25 or more), compared with 33.6% respectively using measured height and weight in the AHS.Conclusions: Findings indicated that using the Internet and social networking sites for an online survey represent a feasible recruitment strategy for a national cohort of young women and result in a broadly representative sample of the Australian population.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3788
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2014 Dixon SC, Herbert DL, Loxton D, Lucke JC, ''As many options as there are, there are just not enough for me': Contraceptive use and barriers to access among Australian women', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 19 340-351 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 The European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health. Objective A comprehensive life course perspective of women&apos;s experiences in obtaining and using contrace... [more]

© 2014 The European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health. Objective A comprehensive life course perspective of women's experiences in obtaining and using contraception in Australia is lacking. This paper explores free-text comments about contraception provided by women born between 1973 and 1978 who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Methods The ALSWH is a national population-based cohort study involving over 40,000 women from three age groups, who are surveyed every three years. An initial search identified 1600 comments from 690 women across five surveys from 1996 (when they were aged 18-23 years) to 2009 (31-36 years). The analysis included 305 comments from 289 participants. Factors relating to experiences of barriers to access and optimal contraceptive use were identified and explored using thematic analysis. Results Five themes recurred across the five surveys as women aged: (i) side effects affecting physical and mental health; (ii) lack of information about contraception; (iii) negative experiences with health services; (iv) contraceptive failure; and (v) difficulty with accessing contraception. Conclusion Side effects of hormonal contraception and concerns about contraceptive failure influence women's mental and physical health. Many barriers to effective contraception persist throughout women's reproductive lives. Further research is needed into reducing barriers and minimising negative experiences, to ensure optimal contraceptive access for Australian women.

DOI 10.3109/13625187.2014.919380
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 14
2014 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton DJ, D'Este CA, Byles JE, 'Mental health service use: Is there a difference between rural and non-rural women in service uptake?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 22 92-100 (2014) [C1]

This study examines differences in uptake of the Medicare items rolled out in 2006 under the &apos;Better Access Scheme&apos; (BAS) between rural and non-rural Australian women. I... [more]

This study examines differences in uptake of the Medicare items rolled out in 2006 under the 'Better Access Scheme' (BAS) between rural and non-rural Australian women. It compares differences in women's uptake of the BAS services by area of residence (ARIA+) across time using the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH) survey data linked to Medicare data. Women aged 28-33 years at the time the BAS was introduced that responded to the self-reported question on depression/anxiety and consented to linkage of their survey data with Medicare data (n=4316). Participants were grouped by ARIA+according to BAS use, diagnoses of anxiety/depression but no BAS use and other eligible women. Across all areas, women born 1973-1978 with a self-reported diagnosis of depression/anxiety or having treatment under the BAS had a significantly lower mean mental health score compared to other women. Significantly more women living in non-rural areas had used at least one service provided under the BAS initiative compared to women in outer regional, inner regional or remotes areas (21% versus 18% versus 13% versus 7%, respectively), and across all areas, 12% of women reported having a diagnosis of depression/anxiety but not been treated under the BAS. While there is a gradual uptake of the new BAS services, a large percentage of women who have a diagnosis of depression/anxiety have not been treated under the BAS. The data suggest that women in urban areas have been better able to take up the services compared to non-urban women. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

DOI 10.1111/ajr.12109
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Adherence to recommended health checks by women in mid-life: data from a prospective study of women across Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 38 39-43 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12180
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles
2014 Harris ML, Herbert D, Loxton D, Dobson A, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting young women for health surveys: Traditional random sampling methods are not cost-effective', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 495 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12281
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2014 Tavener M, Byles J, Loxton D, 'Expert perceptions of the popular baby boomer image', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 33 E31-E35 (2014) [C1]

© 2013 ACOTA. Aim: This paper explored how gerontology experts described baby boomers, whether they challenged the popular image, and if they provided alternatives to the popularl... [more]

© 2013 ACOTA. Aim: This paper explored how gerontology experts described baby boomers, whether they challenged the popular image, and if they provided alternatives to the popularly reported baby boomer behaviours and characteristics. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with ten experts from different areas across Australia. The interviews were semi-structured and guided by a 'sense-making' approach to explore the baby boomer construct and identify expert narratives that differed from the popularly tendered image. Results: The majority of experts were identified as baby boomers and made use of phrases associated with the popular baby boomer image, such as 'cashed up', 'reinventing retirement' and 'sea change'. Lifestyle and wealth were recognised as staple features of the popular image. To a lesser degree, the experts also recognised alternative characteristics and behaviours, including people with disabilities and those who struggle financially. Conclusions: Experts appeared to identify with the popular baby boomer label, but not necessarily the accompanying stereotypes.

DOI 10.1111/ajag.12087
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2014 Duffy L, Adams J, Sibbritt D, Loxton D, 'Complementary and alternative medicine for victims of intimate partner abuse: A systematic review of use and efficacy', Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2014 (2014) [C1]

Objectives. To examine: (i) the extent to which victims of intimate partner abuse (IPA) use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and (ii) the effects of CAM on their menta... [more]

Objectives. To examine: (i) the extent to which victims of intimate partner abuse (IPA) use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and (ii) the effects of CAM on their mental health. Methods. Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for studies measuring the extent of CAM use amongst victims of IPA and trials assessing the impact of CAM on mental health amongst this population. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane collaboration tool. Results. No studies measuring the level of CAM use amongst IPA victims, and only three studies assessing the effect of CAM on the mental health of this population were identified. Two studies looked at yogic breathing, while one assessed the effect of music therapy. All three studies showed some beneficial effects; however, each had a small sample, brief intervention period, and no follow-up measurement and were considered to be at high risk of bias. Conclusions. The review found little evidence for the benefits of CAM for IPA victims. Findings suggest positive effects of music therapy and yogic breathing; however, methodological limitations mean that these results should be interpreted with caution. It is important that more research into the use and effects of CAM amongst this population are undertaken. © 2014 Luke Duffy et al.

DOI 10.1155/2014/963967
2014 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Austin MP, 'The impact of routine assessment of past or current mental health on help-seeking in the perinatal period', Women and Birth, (2014) [C1]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value o... [more]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value of this line of enquiry in increasing engagement with support services, as required, remains controversial. Aim: The current study aimed to examine whether assessment of past or current mental health, received with or without referral for additional support, is associated with help-seeking during pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods: A subsample of women drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (young cohort) who reported experiencing significant emotional distress during pregnancy (N = 398) or in the 12 months following birth (N = 380) participated in the study. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that women who were not asked about their emotional health were less likely to seek any formal help during both pregnancy (adjOR = 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04-0.24) and the postpartum (adjOR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.02-0.13), as were women who were asked about these issues but who were not referred for additional support (antenatal: adjOR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.15-0.45; postnatal: adjOR = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.07-0.27). However, considerable levels of consultation with general practitioners, midwives and child health nurses, even in the absence of referral, were evident. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that enquiry by a health professional about women's past or current mental health is associated with help-seeking throughout the perinatal period. The clinical and resource implications of these findings for the primary health care sector should be considered prior to the implementation of future routine perinatal depression screening or psychosocial assessment programmes. © 2014 Australian College of Midwives.

DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.07.003
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Peta Forder, Catherine Chojenta, Nicole Reilly
2013 Loxton D, Powers J, Fitzgerald D, Forder P, Anderson A, Taft A, Hegarty K, 'The Community Composite Abuse Scale: Reliability and Validity of a Measure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Community Survey from the ALSWH', Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care, 2 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.4172/2325-9795.1000115
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Peta Forder, Amy Anderson
2013 Vashum KP, McEvoy M, Shi Z, Milton AH, Islam MR, Sibbritt D, et al., 'Is dietary zinc protective for type 2 diabetes? Results from the Australian longitudinal study on women's health', BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6823-13-40
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Julie Byles, Mark Mcevoy, John Attia, Amanda Patterson
2013 Loxton D, Robertson J, Walkom EJ, 'Costs of medicines and health care: a concern for Australian women across the ages.', BMC Health Services Research, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-484
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Emily Walkom
2013 Rich JL, Byrne JM, Curryer C, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Prevalence and correlates of depression among Australian women: A systematic literature review, January 1999- January 2010', BMC Research Notes, 6 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-6-424
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors Jane Rich, Julie Byles
2013 Baker AT, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, McLaughlin D, Graves A, Dobson A, 'Utility and acceptability of the modified telephone interview for cognitive status in a longitudinal study of Australian women aged 85 to 90', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 1217-1220 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jgs.12333
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Julie Byles
2013 Lucke JC, Herbert DL, Watson M, Loxton D, 'Predictors of Sexually Transmitted Infection in Australian Women: Evidence from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, 42 237-246 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10508-012-0020-x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2013 Nanyakkara N, Joham A, Eszter V, Zoungas S, Loxton DJ, Teede H, 'Breastfeeding in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Women s Health Study', Medicus, 53 (2013)
2013 Adams J, Sibbritt D, Broom A, Loxton D, Wardle J, Pirotta M, Lui C, 'Complementary and Alternative Medicine Consultations in Urban and Nonurban Areas: A National Survey of 1427 Australian Women', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 36 12-19 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2012.12.010
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17
2013 Austin M-P, Loxton D, Chojenta CL, Reilly N, 'Maternal mental health in the perinatal period: Outcomes from Australian epidemiological and longitudinal based studies', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S42 (2013)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2013 Herbert D, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among 18-23 year old women in Australia: the first findings of the CUPID study', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 18 S78-S78 (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2013 Chojenta CL, Loxton D, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, 16 (suppl 1) S111 (2013)
Co-authors Peta Forder, Catherine Chojenta
2013 Harris ML, Loxton D, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The Influence of Perceived Stress on the Onset of Arthritis in Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 46 9-18 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-013-9478-6
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2013 Powers JR, McDermott LJ, Loxton DJ, Chojenta CL, 'A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Predictors of Concurrent Alcohol and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 17 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10995-012-0949-3
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2013 Herbert DL, Loxton D, Bateson D, Weisberg E, Lucke JC, 'Challenges for Researchers Investigating Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Intentions of Young Women Living in Urban and Rural Areas of Australia: Face-to-Face Discussions to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Survey', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 15 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.2266
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of antenatal alcohol use among Australian women: A prospective cohort study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 1366-1374 (2013) [C1]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study o... [more]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Population or Sample A total of 1969 women sampled from the ALSWH 1973-78 cohort. Methods Women were included if they were pregnant in 2000, 2003, 2006 or 2009. The relationship between antenatal alcohol consumption and sociodemographics, reproductive health, mental health, physical health, health behaviours, alcohol guidelines and healthcare factors was investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Main outcome measures Alcohol use during pregnancy. Results Most (82.0%) women continued to drink alcohol during pregnancy. Women were more likely to drink alcohol during pregnancy if they had consumed alcohol on a weekly basis before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-1.90), binge drank before pregnancy (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.76-2.94), or if they were pregnant while alcohol guidelines recommended low alcohol versus abstinence (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03). Drinking during pregnancy was less likely if women had a Health Care Card (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45-0.88) or if they had ever had fertility problems (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.86). Conclusions Most Australian women who drank alcohol continued to do so during pregnancy. Prepregnancy alcohol consumption was one of the main predictors of antenatal alcohol use. Alcohol guidelines, fertility problems and Health Care Card status also impacted antenatal alcohol consumption. © 2013 RCOG.

DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.12356
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Frances Kaylambkin, Amy Anderson, Peta Forder, Jenny Powers
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Disparities in reported psychosocial assessment across public and private maternity settings: a national survey of women in Australia', BMC Public Health, 13 632 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-632
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Referral for Management of Emotional Health Issues During the Perinatal Period: Does Mental Health Assessment Make a Difference?', Birth, 40 297-306 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/birt.12067
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Peta Forder, Nicole Reilly
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jmwh.12014
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers, Amy Anderson
2013 Schofield MJ, Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Mortality and Disability Outcomes of Self-Reported Elder Abuse: A 12-Year Prospective Investigation', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 679-685 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/jgs.12212
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 40
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2013 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Lyn Ebert, Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers
2013 Teede HJ, Joham AE, Paul E, Moran LJ, Loxton D, Jolley D, Lombard C, 'Longitudinal weight gain in women identified With polycystic ovary syndrome: Results of an observational study in young women', Obesity, 21 1526-1532 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/oby.20213
Citations Scopus - 107Web of Science - 105
2013 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Poor Adherence to National and International Breastfeeding Duration Targets in an Australian Longitudinal Cohort', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0054409
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers
2013 Rich JL, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Quality, Rigour and Usefulness of Free-Text Comments Collected by a Large Population Based Longitudinal Study - ALSWH', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0068832
Citations Scopus - 28Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Jane Rich
2012 Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The relative importance of psychosocial factors in arthritis: Findings from 10,509 Australian women', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 73 251-256 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris
2012 Dillon G, Hussain R, Loxton DJ, Rahman S, 'Mental and physical health and intimate partner violence against women: A review of the literature', International Journal of Family Medicine, (2012)
2012 Rich JL, Wright SL, Loxton DJ, ''Patience, hormone replacement therapy and rain!' Women, ageing and drought in Australia: Narratives from the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 324-328 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jane Rich, Sarah Wright
2012 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Baker J, Rich JL, Dobson AJ, 'Empirical evidence suggests adverse climate events have not affected Australian women's health and well-being', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 452-457 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jane Rich, Jenny Powers
2012 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Determinants of pregnant women's compliance with alcohol guidelines: A prospective cohort study', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Frances Kaylambkin, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Jenny Powers
2012 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'How do previous mental health, social support, and stressful life events contribute to postnatal depression in a representative sample of Australian women?', Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health, 57 145-150 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1542-2011.2011.00140.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2012 Hure AJ, Powers JR, Mishra GD, Herbert DL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, 'Miscarriage, preterm delivery, and stillbirth: Large variations in rates within a cohort of Australian women', PLOS One, 7 1-8 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles, Alexis Hure
2011 Adams J, Sibbritt DW, Broom A, Loxton DJ, Pirotta M, Humphreys J, Lui C-W, 'A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: A national survey of 1,427 women', BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11 85 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 41Web of Science - 40
2011 Stavrou E, Vajdic CM, Loxton DJ, Pearson S-A, 'The validity of self-reported cancer diagnoses and factors associated with accurate reporting in a cohort of older Australian women', Cancer Epidemiology, 35 e75-e80 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 24
2011 Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Loxton DJ, Parkinson L, Stewart Williams JA, 'Women's uptake of medicare benefits schedule mental health items for general practitioners, psychologists and other allied mental health professionals', Medical Journal of Australia, 194 175-179 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
Co-authors L Parkinson, Jenny Stewartwilliams, Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2011 Mackerras D, Powers JR, Boorman J, Loxton DJ, Giles GG, 'Estimating the impact of mandatory fortification of bread with iodine on pregnant and post-partum women', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 65 1118-1122 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2011 Burns L, Black E, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Elliott E, Shakeshaft A, Dunlop AJ, 'Geographic and maternal characteristics associated with alcohol use in pregnancy', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35 1230-1237 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01457.x
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Jenny Powers, A Dunlop
2011 Lucke J, Herbert D, Loxton DJ, Weisberg E, 'Unintended pregnancies: Reducing rates by improving access to contraception', Australian Family Physician, 40 849 (2011) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
2011 Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Forced sex: A critical factor in the sleep difficulties of young Australian women', Violence and Victims, 26 53-72 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011 Dolja-Gore X, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hockey RL, Dobson AJ, 'Increased bulk-billing for general practice consultations in regional and remote areas, 2002-2008', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 203-204 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2010 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Burns LA, Shakeshaft A, Elliott EJ, Dunlop AJ, 'Assessing pregnant women's compliance with different alcohol guidelines: An 11-year prospective study', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 690-693 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Jenny Powers, A Dunlop
2010 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'The impact of attrition in an 11-Year prospective longitudinal study of younger women', Annals of Epidemiology, 20 318-321 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.01.002
Citations Scopus - 76Web of Science - 73
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2010 Lucke JC, Brown W, Tooth L, Loxton DJ, Byles JE, Spallek M, et al., 'Health across generations: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Biological Research for Nursing, 12 162-170 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1099800410373804
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2009 Loxton DJ, Powers JR, Schofield M, Hussain R, Hosking SJ, 'Inadequate cervical cancer screening among mid-aged Australian women who have experienced partner violence', Preventive Medicine, 48 184-188 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.019
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2007 Loxton DJ, Byles JE, Dobson A, Brown WJ, 'Conducting longitudinal research: Practical lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 (2007) [C2]
Co-authors Julie Byles
2007 Loxton DJ, 'Editorial', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 78-79 (2007) [C3]
2007 Warner-Smith PA, Loxton DJ, Brown WJ, 'Human Resources for Longitudinal Studies: Matching people to skills and tasks', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 92-103 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.5172/mra.455.1.2.92
Citations Scopus - 8
2007 Loxton DJ, Young AF, 'Longitudinal survey development and design', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 114-125 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
2007 Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, 'Communication and dissemination of longitudinal study findings', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 199-209 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Chojenta
2007 Helman J, Loxton DJ, Adamson LR, Graves AM, Powers JR, 'Conducting substudies in a longitudinal research project', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 187-198 (2007) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2006 Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, Young AF, 'The psychological health of sole mothers in Australia', Medical Journal of Australia, 184 265-268 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24
2006 Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'Psychological health in midlife among women who have ever lived with a violent partner or spouse', Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 21 1092-1107 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0886260506290290
Citations Scopus - 43Web of Science - 34
2006 Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, Mishra G, 'History of domestic violence and physical health in midlife', Violence against Women, 12 715-731 (2006) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 32
2005 Loxton DJ, 'What future? The long term implications of sole motherhood for economic wellbeing', Just Policy, 39-44 (2005) [C1]
2005 Loxton DJ, 'What future? The long-term implications of sole motherhood for economic wellbeing', Just Policy, 35 39-44 (2005)
2004 Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'History of domestic violence and health service use among mid-aged Australian women', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 28 383-388 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00448.x
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
2004 Minichiello V, Plummer D, Loxton DJ, 'Factors predicting sexual relationships in older people: an Australian study', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 23 125-130 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2004.00018.x
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 26
2001 Hussain R, Schofield MJ, Loxton D, 'Cosmetic surgery history is related to higher health service use in mid-life: Womens Health Australia', The Medical Journal of Australia, 176 576-579 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2001 Schofield MJ, Hussain R, Loxton D, Miller Z, 'Psychosocial and health behavioural covariates of cosmetic surgery: Women''s Health Australia study', Journal of Health Psychology, 7 445-457 (2001) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19
2000 Minichiello V, Plummer D, Loxton D, 'Knowledge and Beliefs of Older Australians about Sexuality and Health (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7
Show 160 more journal articles

Conference (129 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Sharma BB, Loxton DJ, Murray H, Angeli GL, Oldmeadow C, Chiu S, Smith R, 'In Nepal a Culturally Appropriate Method of Education Regarding Antenatal and Delivery Care was Highly Effective in Changing Behaviour.', REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES, Paris, FRANCE (2019)
Co-authors Roger Smith, Christopher Oldmeadow, Giavanna Angeli
2019 Feyissa T, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive use among sexually active women living with HIV in western Ethiopia', Newcastle, Australia (2019)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2019 Khan N, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Uptake of modern contraception following a birth that was unintended among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh: analysis of nationwide population-based survey data', Subang Jaya, Malaysia (2019)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2018 Jones M, Loxton D, Harris M, Beath A, Talley N, Koloski N, Ejova A, 'Strong evidence somatisation measures based on symptom checklists are more reflective of psychological rather than physical health: important consequences for gastroenterology research and practice', Vienna, Austria (2018)
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Nicholas Talley
2018 Coombe J, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive method change over time: experiences of Australian women', Göttingen, Germany (2018)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2018 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Exploring Contraceptive Experience to Understand Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (Non)Use Among a Cohort of Young, Australian Women', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2018)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2018 Sharma BB, Loxton D, Murray H, Angeli G, Chiu S, Oldmeadow C, Smith R, 'Use of Songs to Improve Knowledge of Antenatal Care in a Predominantly Illiterate Community.', REPRODUCTIVE SCIENCES, San Diego, CA (2018)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Roger Smith
2018 Rich J, Wright S, Loxton D, 'Narratives of drought and survival: Fifteen women aged over 70 and their experiences of Australian droughts between 1996- 2008.', https://www.newcastle.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/459161/FINAL-Narratives-of-Climate-Change-Symposium-Program.pdf, Newcastle (2018)
Co-authors Sarah Wright
2017 Fleur A, Gibson S, Dixon J, Brilleman S, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Epidemiology of trauma history and pain outcomes: a retrospective cohort study of community based Australian women', Adelaide, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, '"I Thought That It Would Get Better'': How Young Australian Women Make Decisions About Using, or Not Using Contraception', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2017 Kabanoff S, Loxton D, Coles J, Long D, 'How Processes of University Ethics Approval for Research in Domestic Violence Can Mirror Strategies of Abuse That Perpetrators Use to Silence and Control Their Partners', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Debbi Long
2017 Kabanoff S, Loxton D, Coles J, Long D, 'A Two-Way Street for Healing? An Alternative Model of Operations in Domestic Violence Services to Better Align With the Healing Processes of Both Clients and Staff Alike', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Debbi Long
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, '"I Thought That It Would Get Better'': How Young Australian Women Make Decisions About Using, or Not Using Contraception', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2016 Coombe J, Harris M, Loxton D, '"From the Mirena back to the Pill A longitudinal analysis of the motivators of contraceptive method change among young Australian women', Hobart, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2016 Coombe J, Harris M, Wigginton B, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'What do we know about contraceptive use, pregnancy intention and decisions of young Australian women? Findings from the CUPID study', Basel, Switzerland (2016)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'Este C, Byles J, 'How effective are counselling services for women with poor mental health? (An Australian Study).', Chiang Mai, Thailand (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Catherine Deste, Julie Byles
2015 Harris ML, Oldmeadow C, Hure A, Loxton D, Luu J, Attia J, 'Increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women: does perceived stress hold the key?', Dublin, Ireland (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, John Attia, Melissa Harris
2015 Loxton DJ, Powers J, 'Recruiting participants in the 21st century: Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Darwin, NT, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2015 Patrick K, Ezer P, Loxton D, Harris ML, Lucke J, 'Rural-urban differences in use and access to contraception for young Australian women', Bendigo, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2015 Dobson A, Loxton DJ, Mishra G, 'Communicating research: Experiences of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
2014 Harris ML, Wigginton B, Loxton D, Lucke J, ' It s my body : patterns of contraceptive use among young Australian women', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2014 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'What "finding the right contraceptive" means to Young Australian women', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2014 Fraser C, Wigginton B, Harris ML, Bateson D, Stewart M, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive consultations in primary care: who s talking?', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2014 Wigginton B, Moran C, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, ' I love having a choice : young Australian women s discussions about contraceptive choice', Auckland, New Zealand (2014)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2014 Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Pachana N, 'Late life changes in mental health: A longitudinal study of 9973 women aged through their 70 s and 80 s', Lausanne, Switzerland (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Chojenta
2014 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'Este C, Byles J, 'Use of observational data to examine treatment effects of medicare subsidised mental health (BAS) services.', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles, Catherine Deste
2014 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, Byles J, D'Este C, 'Treatment effects on mental health outcomes for Australian women uptaking the Better Access Scheme mental health counselling services: A data linkage study.', Vancouver, Canada (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Deste, Xenia Doljagore
2014 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'The ups and downs of recruiting in the 21st century', Auckland, New Zealand (2014)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2014 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'este C, Byles J, 'HOW EFFECTIVE ARE AUSTRALIAN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELLING SERVICES FOR WOMEN WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH?', VALUE IN HEALTH (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.jval.2014.03.833
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2013 Parsons VLM, O'Brien LM, James CG, Loxton DJ, 'Paramedics under mental health legislation in Australia', Abstracts of the XXXIIIrd International Congress on Law and Mental Health, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Colin James, Louise Obrien
2013 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2013 Herbert D, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among 18-23 year old women in Australia: the first findings of the CUPID study', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, Copenhagen, Denmark (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2013 Loxton DJ, Rich J, Wright S, 'Three generations of Australian women ageing in drought', Canberra, ACT, Australia (2013)
2013 Nanayakkara N, Joham A, Zoungas S, Loxton DJ, Teede H, 'Breastfeeding in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2013)
2013 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Herbert D, Lucke J, 'The medicalisation of reproduction: women s accounts of accessing contraception', Bradford, United Kingdom (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2013 Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of Antenatal Alcohol Consumption in Australia', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Peta Forder, Frances Kaylambkin, Amy Anderson
2013 Forder PM, Harris S, Reilly N, Chojenta C, Loxton D, Austin M-P, 'The issue of honesty during perinatal screening for depression and anxiety', Melbourne (2013)
Co-authors Peta Forder, Catherine Chojenta
2013 Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M-P, 'The impact of mental health assessment on help seeking during the perinatal period: A national survey of women in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2013 Harris ML, Loxton D, Sibbritt D, Byles J, ' The mind is such a powerful thing : the role of perceived stress on the onset of arthritis in women', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2013 Harris ML, Anderson A, Rich J, Loxton D, 'Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: how do women experience information delivery?', Edmonton, Canada (2013)
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Melissa Harris, Jane Rich
2013 Dillon G, Hussain R, Loxton DJ, Rahman S, 'Rurality, domestic relocation and intimate partner violence in young women (poster)', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2013)
2013 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'Este C, Byles J, 'Trends in Mental health Service use for Australian Women.', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Catherine Deste, Xenia Doljagore
2013 Rich J, Loxton DJ, Wright S, 'Ageing in drought A longitudinal thematic analysis of older women s experiences of drought in Australia', Groningen, The Netherlands (2013)
Co-authors Jane Rich
2013 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'Subsequent level of depression in young women who binge drink in late adolescence', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2013 Dixon S, Herbert D, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, ' As many options are there are, there are just not enough for me : A qualitative analysis of contraceptive use and barriers to access among Australian women (poster)', Copenhagen, Denmark (2013)
2013 Hure A, Chojenta CL, Powers J, Loxton D, Byles J, 'Validation of self-reported stillbirths using administrative datasets', Brisbane (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles, Alexis Hure, Catherine Chojenta
2013 Loxton D, Chojenta C, 'Intimate partner abuse and perinatal mental health', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s00737-013-0355-x
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2012 Loxton DJ, 'Survival among women who have experiences abuse in older age', Abstracts. National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence, San Francisco, CA (2012) [E3]
2012 Loxton D, Lucke J, Herbert D, Harris ML, 'What can we find out about sexual and reproductive health?', Melbourne, Australia (2012)
Co-authors Melissa Harris
2012 Dolja-Gore X, loxton D, Blythe F, Byles J, D'Este C, 'Other than psychological distress what factors are associated with using mental health services?', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2012)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Catherine Deste, Julie Byles
2012 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Byles J, 'Aging and vulnerability to abuse: Findings on prevalence, experience and survival outcomes from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Prague, Czech Republic (2012)
2012 Tavener MA, Byles J, O'Mara A, Loxton D, Chalmers K, 'Change in older women's mental health between 2005 and 2008.', Perth, WA (2012)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2012 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'Este C, Byles J, Blythe F, 'Other than psychological distress what factors are associated with using mental health services?', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2012)
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2012 Tavener MA, Loxton D, Byles JE, 'The price of getting old.', University of Newcastle, NSW (2012)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2012 Breen C, Burns L, Conroy E, Powers J, Loxton DJ, Hutchinson D, et al., 'Caring for individuals affected by foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Positives, challenges and suggestions for improvement', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Jenny Powers
2012 Parsons V, O'Brien LM, Loxton DJ, James C, 'Constructing a social narrative on the foundation of shared experiences: A common bond between mental health nurses and paramedics in pre-hospital mental health care', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Darwin (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Louise Obrien
2012 Gresham E, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hure AJ, 'Poorer diet quality predicts hypertension in pregnancy', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Alexis Hure, Julie Byles
2012 Anderson AE, Loxton DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Powers JR, 'Compliance with alcohol guidelines for pregnant women: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Women's Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Amy Anderson, Frances Kaylambkin
2012 Loxton DJ, Rich JL, Chojenta CL, 'Is there anything you would like to add?: Responses to open-ended survey questions as research data', Journal of Womens Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Jane Rich, Catherine Chojenta
2012 Francis LM, Loxton DJ, James CG, 'Navigating the journal to quality care. Nurses and midwives responding to women experiencing domestic violence: How can we advance the provision of assistance to women on this journey?', 2nd Australian Capital Region Nursing & Midwifery Research Conference, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Colin James
2012 Francis LM, Loxton DJ, James CG, 'Something in me had changed: How women leave or end domestic violence', AQR/Discourse, Power Resistance DPR 'Down Under' Conference 2012, Darwin (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Colin James
2011 Joham A, Ranasinha A, Zoungas S, Loxton DJ, Teede H, 'Hypertension in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: New results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2011)
2011 Joham A, Ranasinha A, Zoungas S, Loxton DJ, Teede H, 'Fertility, ovulation induction and in-vitro fertilisation and use in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: New results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2011)
2011 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'An examination of the narratives of women who have experiences postnatal depression in Australia', Leeds, UK (2011)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2011 Joham A, Ranasinha A, Zoungas S, Loxton DJ, Teede H, 'Gestational Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: New results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2011)
2011 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'Differences in birth interventions by area of residence', Perth, WA, Australia (2011)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2011 Tavener MA, Loxton D, Byles JE, 'Something's got to give. Exploring qualitative data for evidence of personal economic arguments in health care decision-making.', Melbourne, Victoria. (2011)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2011 Sibbritt D, Adams J, Broom A, Loxton DJ, Pirotta M, Cohen M, Humphries J, ' Self-integration of health care: A chiropractic and osteopathic case study', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2011)
2011 Loxton DJ, 'A mixed methods approach to measuring abuse in a cohort of older age Australian women', Bloomington, Mn, USA (2011)
2011 Loxton DJ, 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Newcastle, Australia (2011)
2011 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Swings and roundabouts: How women juggle family life and retirement [poster presentation].', Melbourne, Victoria. (2011)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2011 Francis LM, Loxton DJ, ''Something in me had changed'. How women end domestic violence', 17th International Conference of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women Conference Handbook, Auckland, NZ (2011) [E3]
2011 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Does drought affect women s mental health? Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Perth, WA (2011)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2011 Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Dobson A, 'Pap tests and mammograms: Are there urban/rural differences in take-up in women?', Posters - Abstracts. 11th National Rural Health Conference, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Jenny Powers, Julie Byles
2011 Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, ''The perfect mother wouldn't have that': Australian women's experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2010 Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Sexual violence as a predictor of sleep difficulties in a community sample of young women', Sleep & Biological Rhythms, Christchurch, NZ (2010) [E3]
2010 Loxton DJ, 'Abuse in older age: Australian women s experiences of elder abuse', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, McDermott L, Chojenta C, 'Alcohol and tobacco consumption during pregnancy', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2010 Rich J, Wright S, Loxton DJ, 'Stories from Women living with drought in Australia: A longitudinal exploration', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
2010 Loxton DJ, 'Motherhood, drought and elder abuse: Stories from three generations of women who participate in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health (chair)', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
2010 Loxton DJ, 'Symposium (chair): Women s experiences of abuse: Findings from the ALSWH', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
2010 Loxton DJ, 'Experiences of abuse across three generations', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
2010 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Furber K, 'Intimate partner violence, health and social support', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2010 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Identity construction in Australian 'baby boomer' women [poster presentation].', Uxbridge, West London, UK. (2010)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2010 Loxton DJ, Chojenta C, Powers J, 'Alcohol consumption among pregnant women: How do service providers and mothers learn about and react to official guidelines?', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2010 Lucke J, Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2010 Lucke J, Watson M, Herbert D, Loxton DJ, 'Factors associated with STI among young women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health (poster)', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
2010 Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Sexual violence as a predictor of sleep difficulties in a community sample of young women', Lisbon, Portugal (2010)
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'The perfect mother wouldn t have that: Australian women s experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (2010)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2010 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Hobart, Tasmania, Australia (2010)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2010 Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Sexual violence as a predictor of sleep difficulties in a community sample of young women (poster)', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2010)
2010 Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'Psychosocial characteristics of midlife women with arthritis: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', 2010 National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing:, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris
2010 Teede HJ, Deeks AA, Gibson-Helm M, Lombard C, Jolley D, Paul E, et al., 'Body mass index as a predictor of polycystic ovary syndrome risk: Results of a longitudinal cohort study', Endocrine Reviews. ENDO2010 Abstracts, San Diego, CA (2010) [E3]
2010 Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Do adverse climate conditions affect women s self-rated health?', Sydney, NSW (2010)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2010 Stavrou EP, Loxton DJ, 'The validation of self-reported cancer in Australian women: The Australian Longitudinal Study in Women's Health', American Journal of Epidemiology, Anaheim, Solomon Islands (2010) [E3]
2009 Loxton DJ, 'Symposium (chair): Qualitative findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
2009 Loxton DJ, Adamson L, Chojenta C, Rich J, 'Women s experiences of abuse: A longitudinal qualitative perspective', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2009 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Making sense of experts.', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2009 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Furber K, 'Intimate partner violence, health and social support: Findings over the long term', Bloomington MN, USA (2009)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2009 Dobson A, Loxton DJ, 'The health of women in rural areas', Cairns, QLD, Australia (2009)
2009 Teede H, Deeks A, Gibson-Helm M, Lombard C, Jolley D, Paul E, et al., 'Polycystic ovarian syndrome in Australian women: Results of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health study', Adelaide, SA, Australia (2009)
2009 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Contrasting baby boomer identities through narrative.', Vancouver, Canada (2009)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2009 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'Does wave non-response affect the results in longitudinal studies?', Australasian Epidemiologist, Dunedin, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2009 Chojenta CL, Lucke J, Loxton DJ, 'Does social support reduce the likelihood of postnatal depression in Australian mothers?', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2009 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, 'Identity construction in baby boomer women', Australasian Journal on Ageing, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2009.00397.x
Co-authors Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2008 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, Byles J, 'Annual Health Assessments for Older Women', Brisbane, Qld, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2008 Byles J, Robinson I, Loxton DJ, Parkinson L, Gibson R, Young A, 'Treatment for depression among older Australian women', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2008 Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, Robertson J, 'Prescribed Medication use by Women Before, During and After Pregnancy.', Brisbane, Qld, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore
2008 Mackerras D, Powers J, Boorman J, Loxton DJ, Giles G, 'Estimating the impact on pregnant and post-partum women of fortifying bread with iodine', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2008 Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Prevalence and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australia', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2008 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Mooney R, Hosking S, 'Sole motherhood, mental health and the role of social support', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2008 Powers J, Loxton DJ, 'How do pregnant women respond to alcohol guidelines?', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2008)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2008 Lucke J, Watson M, Loxton DJ, Herbert D, 'The sexual health of Australian women in their twenties and thirties', Brisbane, QLD, Australia (2008)
2008 Lucke J, Watson M, Herbert D, Loxton DJ, 'Factors associated with STI among young women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Perth, WA, Australia (2008)
2008 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, Warner Smith P, 'Australian baby boomers. Divergence and convergence of stereotyped characteristics and behaviours.', Fremantle, WA (2008)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2007 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Making the right impression or lost in translation? Representation of baby boomers in Australian news text.', Hobart, Australia (2007)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2007 Loxton DJ, 'The treatment of older women with depression', Sydney, NSW, Australia (2007)
2007 Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Lost in translation: Representation of Australian baby boomers in news text.', Beijing, China (2007)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2006 Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2006)
2005 Loxton DJ, 'The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health: An overview', Newcastle, Australia (2005)
2005 Warner-Smith P, Ford J, Lee C, Loxton DJ, 'Mid-age women consider retirement or do they? Health and labour force transitions in mid-age women: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Melbourne, Victoria, Australia (2005)
2005 Loxton DJ, 'From the smallness of the community, comes the strength of the community: Sole mothering in rural and remote Australia', 8th National Rural Health Conference Program and Papers, Alice Springs, NT (2005) [E2]
2005 Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'Factors that mediate the relationship between partner violence and mental health', Melbourne, Victoria (2005)
2005 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'Gynecological and breast health and partner violence: Preventive healthcare', Newcastle, Australia (2005)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2005 Loxton DJ, 'Intimate partner violence and screening for reproductive health problems', Newcastle, Australia (2005)
2005 Loxton DJ, 'Partner violence and mid-aged women s health', Central Coast, NSW, Australia (2005)
2004 Bryson L, Byles J, Loxton DJ, Warner-Smith P, 'Implications of social diversity for women s health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (2004)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2004 Loxton DJ, 'Intimate partner violence and health services for women', Newcastle, Australia (2004)
2003 Loxton DJ, Hussain R, Schofield M, 'Experiences of domestic abuse in rural and remote Australia', Hobart (2003)
Show 126 more conferences

Report (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Byles J, Mishra G, Hockey R, Adane A, Chan H-W, Dolja-Gore X, et al., 'Use, access to, and impact of Medicare services for Australian women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.', Australian Government Department of Health, 210 (2017)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Peta Forder
2016 Jae-seon J, Young-taek K, You-kyung M, Leigh L, Forder P, Majeed T, et al., 'An International Harmonization and Comparative study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health(ALSWH) and the Korean Longitudinal Survey of Women and families(KLoWF)', National Research Council for Economics, Humanities And Social Sciences, Korea, 136 (2016)
Co-authors Peta Forder, Melissa Harris
2015 Byles J, Hockey R, McLaughlin D, Dobson A, Brown W, Loxton DJ, Mishra G, 'Chronic conditions, physical function and health care use: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Department of Health, 170 (2015) [R1]
Co-authors Julie Byles
2014 Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Anderson A, Hockey R, Powers J, Brown W, et al., 'Health and wellbeing of women aged 18 to 23 in 2013 and 1996: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Department of Health, 183 (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Jenny Powers, Meredith Tavener, Amy Anderson
2013 Holden L, Dobson A, Byles J, Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Hockey R, et al., 'Mental Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of Health and Ageing (2013)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles, Melissa Harris, Xenia Doljagore
2012 Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson, Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2011 Dobson A, Byles J, Dolja-Gore X, Fitzgerald D, Hockey R, Loxton DJ, et al., 'Rural, remote and regional differences in women s health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 134 (2011)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Jenny Powers, Jane Rich, Julie Byles
2010 Byles J, Dobson A, Pachana N, Tooth L, Loxton DJ, Berecki J, et al., 'Women, health and ageing: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 268 (2010)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Powers
2010 Loxton DJ, Byrne J, Rich J, Byles J, 'Prevalence and correlates of depression among Australian women: A systematic literature review, January 1999- January 2010', Beyond Blue, 100 (2010)
Co-authors Jane Rich, Julie Byles
2009 Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 153 (2009)
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore
2009 Loxton DJ, Graves A, 'Women s health in Eastern Victoria: Research report', Women s Health East, Victoria, 100 (2009)
2008 Loxton DJ, Hosking S, Stewart Williams J, Brookes J, Byles J, 'A review of selected domestic and family violence prevention programs', The Sax Institute, 1 (2008)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Jenny Stewartwilliams
2008 Dolja-Gore X, Byles J, Loxton D, Berecki J, Gibson R, Hockey R, et al., 'Use and costs of medications and other health care resources: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of health and Ageing (2008)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore, L Parkinson
2007 Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Reproductive health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2007)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta
2007 Byles J, Robinson I, Gibson R, Parkinson L, Loxton DJ, Young A, 'Depression among women in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Hunter Medical Research Institute, 100 (2007)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2005 Loxton DJ, Powers J, Young A, Wood A, 'Report on the provision of data to the Office of Women', Office for Women, Department of Family and Community Services, 726 (2005)
Co-authors Jenny Powers
2005 Loxton DJ, 'Intimate partner violence', Achievement report prepared for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 4 (2005)
2005 Adamson L, Brown W, Byles J, Chojenta C, Dobson A, Fitzgerald D, et al., 'Women s weight: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women s Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 99 (2005)
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles
2004 Loxton DJ, Warner-Smith P, Young A, 'The physical, social and economic health of women with dependent children, following relationship breakdown', Department of Prime minister & Cabinet, Office of the Status of Women, 186 (2004)
2004 Parker G, Loxton DJ, Svensson A, Lee C, Warner-Smith P, Young A, 'Australian women s experiences of abuse and life after abuse', Office of the Status of Women, 47 (2004)
Show 17 more reports

Thesis / Dissertation (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Rich JL, The nature of things: An Interdisciplinary Investigation Into The Experiences and Impacts of Drought For Three Generations Of Australian Women, University of Newcastle (2014)
Co-authors Jane Rich
2010 Tavener MA, Your bloomin' lot: An empirical study of the popular baby boomer stereotype., University of Newcastle (2010)
Co-authors Meredith Tavener
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 55
Total funding $19,248,981

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $237,651

Family, domestic and sexual violence hotspot maps and research summaries$237,651

Funding body: Department of Social Services

Funding body Department of Social Services
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Miss Natalie Townsend, Ms Peta Forder, Miss Isabelle Barnes
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1900436
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

20184 grants / $395,755

Beyond successful ageing: Longevity & healthy ageing among Australian women$245,690

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Lucy Leigh, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Professor John Beard, Doctor Paul Kowal, Professor Carol Jagger
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1700222
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Domestic violence among women who have a disability or women who are culturally and linguistically diverse$69,065

Funding body: Department of Social Services

Funding body Department of Social Services
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Ms Peta Forder, Miss Natalie Townsend, Mr Dominic Cavenagh
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800804
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Worldwide wellness of mothers and babies: reducing maternal mortality in Nepal$57,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1801046
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

Creating positive changes in mental health of Indigenous women through a pilot ArtsHealth program$24,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Associate Professor Kym Rae, Doctor Beth Mah, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1800201
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20179 grants / $3,826,939

Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health 2017-18 to 2019-20 $3,450,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Gita Mishra, Associate Professor Leigh Tooth
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700929
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

M-PreM study: Reproductive factors, from menarche to pre-menopause, and the risk of cardiometabolic and respiratory conditions before menopause $233,111

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Gita Mishra, Professor Shyamali Dharmage, Dr Isabel Ferreira de Sousa, Associate Professor Jenny Visser, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Rachel Huxley, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Grant Montgomery, Professor (Harold) David McIntyre, Professor Jenny Doust
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1700821
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Optimising cervical cancer prevention amongst Aboriginal women in rural and remote New South Wales: A pilot study$50,392

Funding body: Family Planning NSW

Funding body Family Planning NSW
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1701545
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Validation of survey instruments that measure domestic violence$27,667

Funding body: Department of Social Services

Funding body Department of Social Services
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Tender
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700763
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Efficacy of the work-based assessment program for international medical graduates$25,000

Funding body: Australian Medical Council

Funding body Australian Medical Council
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701310
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Liz Fradgley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601330
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Contraceptive use and Fertility in Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Mr Tesfaye Feyissa, Doctor Melissa Harris, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Greaves Family Postgraduate Top Up Scholarship in Medical Research
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701582
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

An International Harmonization and Comparative Study$3,403

Funding body: Korean Women's Development Institute

Funding body Korean Women's Development Institute
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Young taek Kim
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700766
Type Of Funding C3212 - International Not for profit
Category 3212
UON Y

HMRI-SA ‘Future’ Medical Research Travel Grant$2,500

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Miss Jacqueline Coombe, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme HMRI Student Association 'Future' Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700578
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

20165 grants / $1,218,063

Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (Renewal of funding 2017) $1,150,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Gita Mishra, Associate Professor Leigh Tooth
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1600620
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Pathways to improving maternal mortality in rural Nepal$31,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Mr Binod Bindu Sharma, Laureate Professor Roger Smith, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Jennie Thomas Medical Research Travel Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600617
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

Women's constrained choices: How does it affect women?$16,136

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Melissa Johnstone, Professor Christina Lee, Professor Jayne Lucke
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601261
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Research Consultancy$13,009

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600945
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Data book to profile women's workforce participation, child care usage and views on formal and informal child care using data from the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's He$7,918

Funding body: Department of Education and Training

Funding body Department of Education and Training
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Mary Welsh
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1600902
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20154 grants / $135,114

House and Home: Pathways and alternatives to residential aged care for older Australian women$91,024

Funding body: IRT (Illawarra Retirement Trust)

Funding body IRT (Illawarra Retirement Trust)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deirdre McLaughlin, Ms Peta Forder, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Foundation Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1400841
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Indigenous Reproductive Healthcare Pilot$25,000

Funding body: Family Planning NSW

Funding body Family Planning NSW
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jayne Lucke
Scheme Research Project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500628
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Aboriginal Reproductive Health: A Collaborative Approach to Research and Understanding$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501120
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Reaping the Benefits: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health$9,090

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding body NSW Trade & Investment
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme NSW Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP) Conference Sponsorship Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500548
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20144 grants / $283,044

Mothers' and their Children's Health: understanding disparities in health and health service use among young Australian families$240,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Gita Mishra, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Virginia Slaughter, Associate Professor Kylie Hesketh, Associate Professor Leigh Tooth, Professor Ilona Koupil
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1400700
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The role of perceived stress on the onset of type 2 diabetes in women.$21,500

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Melissa Harris, Professor John Attia, Doctor Judy Luu, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301440
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Dietary iron during pregnancy: finding the right balance$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alexis Hure, Doctor Amanda Patterson, Associate Professor Liz Holliday, Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Amina Khambalia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401399
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Australasian Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Conference$1,544

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Miss Amy Anderson, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme AOD Conference Attendance Scholarship Program
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300901
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20133 grants / $1,782,111

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health New Young Cohort and Older Cohort Project $1,755,111

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Gita Mishra
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1301206
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alexis Hure, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

2012 EIA Impact Trial travel grant$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300375
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $2,858,287

Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (Renewal of funding 2012-13 to 2014-15) $2,856,287

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Gita Mishra
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1201195
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Women's Health 2012 Congress, Grand Hyatt in Washing DC, 16 - 18 March 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200503
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20119 grants / $5,178,594

Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health: The new 1989-94 Young Cohort and 1921-26 Cohort follow-up$2,625,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100838
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Women’s Health in the 21st Century$2,190,625

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team

Annette Dobson

Scheme Centre for Research Excellence
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Perinatal mental health assessment: Does it improve maternal health outcomes?$136,760

Funding body: BUPA Health Foundation

Funding body BUPA Health Foundation
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
Scheme Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100152
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

A longitudinal study of patterns of contraception use and access to contraceptive information, advice and services for young Australian women$74,545

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jayne Lucke, Professor Christina Lee, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Ian Fraser, Dr Edith Weisberg
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000904
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Improving Services to Families Affected by Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)$50,057

Funding body: Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation

Funding body Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation
Project Team

L Burns

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Improving Services to Women who are Pregnant and Alcohol Dependent$50,057

Funding body: Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation

Funding body Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation
Project Team

L Burns

Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

The mental health of women who binge drink$34,550

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Ms Jennifer Powers, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000947
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

The Health Effects of Sexual Violence for Young Australian Women.$15,000

Funding body: The Health Effects of Sexual Violence for Young Australian Women.

Funding body The Health Effects of Sexual Violence for Young Australian Women.
Project Team

L Burns

Scheme Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Academy of Violence and Abuse 2011 Scientific Assembly: The Developing Science of Violence and Abuse: Toward a New Undestanding$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100385
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20102 grants / $29,847

Prevalence and correlates of depression among women in Australia: A literature review 1999-2009$27,847

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding body Beyond Blue Ltd
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000166
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Challenging the Boundaries, 16th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites, Vancouver, British Columbia, 3 - 5 October 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000802
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20094 grants / $2,407,985

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (Renewal of funding)$2,368,500

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0189875
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Uptake and impact of new Medicare Benefits Schedule Items - Psychologists and Other Allied Mental Health Professionals$31,990

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding body Australian Rotary Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Mr Richard Gibson, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams, Doctor Paul Kowal
Scheme Mental Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189463
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Research report: Women's health in the east of Victoria$4,995

Funding body: Womens Health East

Funding body Womens Health East
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190059
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Sowing the seeds of academic change: Nuturing new paradigms, Bloomington MInnesota, USA 24-25 April 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189896
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20082 grants / $197,308

CAM use among mid-age women as national mixed-methods study across the urban-rural divide$180,308

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jon Adams, Conjoint Professor David Sibbritt, Dr Marie Pirotta, Professor John Humphries, Professor Marc Cohen, Doctor Alexander Broom
Scheme Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0188978
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Domestic Violence$17,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189568
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20071 grants / $49,854

Alcohol Use in Pregnancy $49,854

Funding body: NSW Department of Health Drug and Alcohol Council

Funding body NSW Department of Health Drug and Alcohol Council
Project Team

L Burns

Scheme Research Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20062 grants / $554,772

PRC - Priority Research Centre for Gender health & Ageing$543,772

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Sandra Capra, Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli, Conjoint Professor David Henry, Professor Tina Koch, Ms Chris Landorf, Conjoint Professor Chris Levi, Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Liz Milward, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Professor Dimity Pond, Conjoint Professor David Sibbritt, Associate Professor Anne Young
Scheme Priority Research Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0186949
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Adequacy and equity of treatment for depression among older Australian women$11,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo G0186177
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

20052 grants / $43,400

Data provision for the Women's Data Warehouse $42,500

Funding body: Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Ms Jennifer Powers, Associate Professor Anne Young
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185597
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

8th National Rural Health Conference, 10-13 March 2005$900

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2005
GNo G0185200
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20041 grants / $50,257

Barriers to service delivery for young pregnant women and mothers.$50,257

Funding body: Department of Family and Community Services

Funding body Department of Family and Community Services
Project Team Doctor Penelope Warner-Smith, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo G0183788
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed18
Current23

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Evaluating the Use of Sexual and Reproductive Health Services for Young Rural Women in Ghana via Mobile Health (mHealth) Technologies PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Birth Interval in Ethiopia: Spatial Variations, Inequalities, Effects on Infants and Child Health Outcomes Based on National Population Data PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy, and Its Relationship with Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Facility-Based Study PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Applying the Neonatal Near Miss Concept as a Clinical Tool in the Australian Context. PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD The Epidemiology, Outcomes, and Management of Preeclampsia and Eclampsia in Ethiopia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Availability and quality of Emergency Obstetric Care among health facilities in Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD The Effect of Dietary Patterns on Maternal Morbidity (Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy and Anemia) in Ethiopia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Gender-based violence among youths in Eastern Ethiopia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Dementia, Capacity and Choice: Identification of Barriers to Providing Best Care to People Living with Dementia, and the Effective Current Strategies and Potential New Strategies to Overcoming Barriers PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Improving Health Outcomes through Challenging Conversations with Aboriginal Women during the Perinatal and Early Childhood Periods. PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Healthy Mother, Sustainable Nation: A Study into the Factors Averting Poor Perinatal Mental Health PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Australia: Prevalence, Recurrence, Pattern of Multiple Outcomes and Risk Factors PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia: Determinants, effects on maternal and child health, and perceptions in the health sector PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD A Community Based Study to Identify Factors That Influence Infant Survival Differentials, in Northern Ethiopia. A Follow Up Study. PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Beyond Maternal and Newborn mortality: Measuring quality of obstetric care in south Ethiopia PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Pregnancy Intention and the Use of Maternal Health Services in Bangladesh PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Contraception and Fertility in Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia PhD (Clinic Epid & MedStats), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Spatial Patterns of Maternal Health Service Utilization and Determinant Factors in Ethiopia PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Contraceptive prevalence and its interaction with Gender development markers - a quantitative and spatial analysis using ArcGIS PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Substance Use and Sexual Behaviors among Young Australian Women PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Under Five Child Health of Nepal PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Living with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome during pregnancy: a qualitative exploration of women's experience PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Creative Survival; What We Can Learn From Women Who Have Experienced Violence, and How We Can Better Listen PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Pathways to Improving Maternal Mortality in Rural Nepal PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2019 PhD Maternal Mortality and Maternal Health Service Utilization in Eastern Ethiopia: the Case of Kersa District PhD (Reproductive Medicine), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Just One Method Among Others: Examining Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (Non-)Use PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Alcohol Use in Pregnancy: Mixed Methods Applied to The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Predictors and Outcomes of the Use of Mental Health Services: An Analysis of Observational Data PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Perinatal Mental Health Assessment: Impact on Service Utilisation and Maternal Health Outcomes Psychiatry, University of New South Wales Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Women of Courage: Comprehensive Court Preparation and Support for Women Survivors of Sexual Assault PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Exploring Social Supports/Support Services and Decisions to Leave or Change with Women Who Have Experienced Domestic Partner Violence PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Intimate Partner Violence in Australia: Impact of Rurality on Vulnerability, Prevalence and Effects Health, University of New England Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Clinical Decision Making and the Role of Paramedics Fulfilling their Legislative Powers Under the Mental Health Act 2007 (NSW). A Qualitative Study PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 PhD The Nature of Things: An Interdisciplinary Investigation Into the Experiences and Impacts of Drought For Three Generations of Australian Women PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD When Life's a Pain: Perceived Stress and Psychosocial Factors in Women with Arthritis Transitioning from Midlife to Older Age PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Prevalence, Antecedents and Perceptions of Efficacy of Treatments of Postnatal Depression in Australia PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2011 Masters The Role of Social Support in the Relationship between Intimate Partner Violence and Health Psychology, Charles Sturt University Co-Supervisor
2010 Professional Doctorate Is Trauma Bad for your Health? The Impact of Trauma and Ongoing Life Events on Negative Health Behaviours in Young Women Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2010 PhD Your Bloomin' Lot: An Empirical Study of the Popular Baby Boomer Stereotype PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2008 Masters Timing of Intimate Partner Violence and the Effects on Mid-aged Australian Women’s Physical and Psychological Health Epidemiology, University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine Co-Supervisor
2008 PhD An Examination of the Structural and Political Barriers Preventing Permanent Resident Overseas-Trained Doctors From Working as General Practitioners in Rural New South Wales PhD (Management), Faculty of Business and Law, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 169
Ethiopia 19
United Kingdom 14
Bangladesh 2
Norway 2
More...
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News

Health impact of domestic violence lasts a lifetime

June 14, 2017

Women who experience intimate partner violence have significant, long-term physical and mental health problems according to UON researchers.

Go to WHoA! – Gen Ys helping to shape health care future

April 29, 2014

More than 17,000 young women bucked the stereotypical ‘Generation Me’ tag last year to complete a survey that will help shape the future of health services.

Alcohol during pregnancy

November 19, 2013

Study shows 80% of expectant mothers consume alcohol during their pregnancy.

Professor Deb Loxton

Position

Deputy Director- ALSWH & RCGHA
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Email deborah.loxton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420690
Mobile 0438841502
Fax 4042 0044
Link UoN Blogs

Office

Room HMRI.4306
Building HMRI Building
Location John Hunter Hospital campus

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