Dr Emily Walkom

Dr Emily Walkom

Research Officer/Evaluator

School of Medicine and Public Health (Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Toxicology)

Career Summary

Biography

I completed my PhD in psychology at the University of Newcastle in 2002. My PhD examined the relationship between children's computer game playing and their social behaviour. Since starting with the discipline of Clinical Pharmacology in June 2002, I have been involved in a number of research projects around medicines use, including systematic reviews, surveys of medical practitioners and the general public, and qualitative research. In my current role as a research academic my key focus is providing external evaluations of submissions to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee. My research interests include medicines affordability, quality use of medicines and medicines policy. 



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Health Care Systems
  • Medicines

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
321403 Clinical pharmacy and pharmacy practice 30
420201 Behavioural epidemiology 50
380108 Health economics 20

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Research Officer/Evaluator University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Research Officer/Evaluator University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/1/2014 -  Membership - ISPOR Australia Chapter ISPOR Australia Chapter
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Miller P, Newby D, Walkom E, Schneider J, Li SC, Evans TJ, 'The performance and accuracy of depression screening tools capable of self-administration in primary care: A systematic review and meta-analysis', European Journal of Psychiatry, 35 1-18 (2021)

Background and Objectives: The US Preventative Services Taskforce recommends screening adults for depression in primary care where adequate systems are established to ensure accur... [more]

Background and Objectives: The US Preventative Services Taskforce recommends screening adults for depression in primary care where adequate systems are established to ensure accurate diagnosis, effective treatment and follow-up. However, there is currently no consensus on which screening tool is most suitable for use in primary healthcare. We aim to systematically review the literature for operating characteristics of depression screening tools capable of self-administration in primary healthcare and meta-analyse the psychometric characteristics of these tools to determine their performance and accuracy. Methods: An electronic literature search of EMBASE, Medline and CINAHL Complete was conducted from January 1982 to September 15, 2019 using the keywords: depression, screening, primary healthcare and adult. General and psychometric characteristics were extracted for screening tools studied in primary healthcare only when assessed against a ¿reference-standard¿. Results: Eighty-one studies from 22 countries were included in the review. Forty unique depression screening tools suitable for self-administration were identified in studies yielding 138 psychometric data sets. Based on ease of administration, 18 screening tools were suitable for use in primary healthcare. Of the tools meta-analysed, only the PHQ-9 and WHO-5 displayed superior accuracy and were easily administered. Conclusion: Although numerous depression screening tools are suitable for use in primary care based on ease of administration, the PHQ-9 was the most widely assessed tool and displayed superior DOR, a-ROC, specificity and LR +. Our review supports the use of the PHQ-9 as a brief, easily administered depression screening tool with superior discriminatory performance and robust psychometric characteristics in primary care settings.

DOI 10.1016/j.ejpsy.2020.10.002
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jennifer Schneider, Shuchuen Li, David Newby
2020 Miller P, Newby D, Walkom E, Schneider J, Li SC, 'Depression screening in adults by pharmacists in the community: a systematic review', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 28 428-440 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/ijpp.12661
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors David Newby, Shuchuen Li, Jennifer Schneider
2019 Bevan M, Ng YC, Cooper J, Robertson J, Walkom E, Chiu S, Newby DA, 'The role of evidence in consumer choice of non-prescription medicines', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 27 501-509 (2019) [C1]

Objectives: To identify factors influencing Australian consumer decision-making and attitudes towards non-prescription medicine (NPM) purchases, pharmacy's role in providing ... [more]

Objectives: To identify factors influencing Australian consumer decision-making and attitudes towards non-prescription medicine (NPM) purchases, pharmacy's role in providing these medications and views around sources of evidence for effectiveness of these products. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of a general population sample of 1731 adults using an Australian online consumer panel stratified by gender, age and location (State/Territory). Beliefs about NPM purchases and evidence of their efficacy were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree-strongly agree). Non-parametric measures (Ridit analysis and Mann¿Whitney U-test) were used to explore associations between responses and previous experience with medicines. Key findings: The most important factors when purchasing NPMs were effectiveness and safety. However, personal experience was the most common method of determining effectiveness. Most respondents believed buying NPMs in pharmacies gave access to advice, but were less likely to agree that pharmacies were associated with safe and effective treatments. Around half the respondents agreed that it is wrong to sell treatments lacking scientific evidence; many also agreed that it is up to consumers to decide what they want even without scientific evidence. Individuals experiencing an ineffective NPM were less likely to trust scientific evidence of efficacy as the sole source of effectiveness information; regular prescription medicine users often agreed that scientific evidence is needed to support effectiveness. Conclusions: Consumers have conflicting views regarding the need for scientific evidence and the desire for patient autonomy in NPM purchases. This presents a challenge for pharmacists wishing to maintain professional obligations to provide evidence-based treatments to consumers.

DOI 10.1111/ijpp.12546
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors David Newby, Joyce Cooper
2017 Fabbri A, Grundy Q, Mintzes B, Swandari S, Moynihan R, Walkom E, Bero LA, 'A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia', BMJ Open, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016701
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17
2016 Athuraliya N, Walkom EJ, Dharmaratne S, Robertson J, 'Assessing medication packaging and labelling appropriateness in Sri Lanka.', J Pharm Policy Pract, 9 38 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s40545-016-0091-5
Citations Scopus - 5
2016 Robertson J, Newby DA, Walkom EJ, 'Health Care Spending: Changes in the Perceptions of the Australian Public.', PloS one, 11 e0157312 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0157312
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors David Newby
2015 Ren S, Newby D, Li SC, Walkom E, Miller P, Hure A, Attia J, 'Effect of the adult pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Open Heart, 2 1-9 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/openhrt-2015-000247
Citations Web of Science - 39
Co-authors John Attia, Shuchuen Li, David Newby, Alexis Hure
2013 Loxton D, Robertson J, Walkom EJ, 'Costs of medicines and health care: a concern for Australian women across the ages.', BMC Health Services Research, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-484
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, Bevan MD, Newby DA, 'Medicines and the media: news reports of medicines recommended for government reimbursement in Australia', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-489
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors David Newby
2011 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, Henry DA, 'Health systems and sustainability: Doctors and consumers differ on threats and solutions', PLoS ONE, 6 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0019222
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
2010 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, Pearson S-A, Hains I, Williamson M, Newby DA, 'The impact of pharmacy computerised clinical decision support on prescribing, clinical and patient outcomes: A systematic review of the literature', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 18 69-87 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1211/ijpp/18.02.0002
Citations Scopus - 48
Co-authors David Newby
2010 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, Moynihan R, Bero L, Henry DA, 'Pharmaceutical industry funding of educational events for pharmacists in Australia: An analysis of data from the first 6 months of a mandatory disclosure programme', International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 18 88-92 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1211/ijpp/18.02.0003
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Mddah01
2009 Robertson J, Moynihan R, Walkom EJ, Bero L, Henry DA, 'Mandatory disclosure of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals', PLoS Medicine, 6 e1000128 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000128
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 21
Co-authors Mddah01
2009 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, Henry DA, 'Transparency in pricing arrangements for medicines listed on the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme', Australian Health Review, 33 192-199 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/AH090192
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 13
2008 Harris AH, Hill SR, Chin G, Jing Jing L, Walkom EJ, 'The role of value for money in public insurance coverage decisions for drugs in australia: A retrospective analysis 1994-2004', Medical Decision Making, 28 713-722 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0272989x08315247
Citations Scopus - 150Web of Science - 136
2006 Walkom EJ, Robertson J, Newby DA, Pillay T, 'The role of pharmacoeconomics in formulary decision-making - Considerations for hospital and managed care pharmacy and therapeutics committees', Formulary, 41 374-385 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jsps.2010.10.005
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 10
Co-authors David Newby
2005 Robertson J, Walkom EJ, McGettigan P, 'Response rates and representativeness: a lottery incentive improves physician survey return rates', Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 14 571-577 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/pds.1126
Citations Scopus - 49Web of Science - 49
2005 Smith A, Hill S, Walkom E, Thambiran M, 'An evaluation of the World Health Organization problem-based pharmacotherapy teaching courses (based on the "Guide to Good Prescribing"), 1994-2001', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, 61 785-786 (2005)
DOI 10.1007/s00228-005-0990-x
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Anthony Smith
2001 Carr SC, Rugimbana RO, Walkom E, Bolitho FH, 'Selecting expatriates in developing areas: "country-of-origin" effects in Tanzania?', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTERCULTURAL RELATIONS, 25 441-457 (2001)
DOI 10.1016/S0147-1767(01)00015-3
Citations Scopus - 29Web of Science - 27
2000 Rugimbana RO, Carr S, Bolitho F, Walkom E, 'The Impact of "Consumer Cringe" on Developing Regional Trade Blocks:A Tanzanian Case Study', Journal of African Business, 1,2 91-106 (2000) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
Show 17 more journal articles

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2010 Robertson J, Bevan MD, Walkom EJ, Newby DA, 'News Reports of Medicines in Relation to Decisions of the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee', PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY AND DRUG SAFETY (2010)
Co-authors David Newby
2010 Robertson J, Bevan M, Walkom EJ, Newby DA, 'News reports of medicines in relation to decisions of the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC)', National Medicines Symposium 2010. Abstracts, Melbourne, Vic (2010) [E3]
Co-authors David Newby

Thesis / Dissertation (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2002 Walkom EJ, Relationships between computer game play and children's social behaviour., University of Newcastle (2002)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 2
Total funding $8,383,281

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20201 grants / $178,382

Health Technology Assessment, Research Support and Other Services Panel$178,382

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Ms Danielle Lang, Mr Rob Bell, Mr Marc Bevan, Doctor Emily Walkom, Mr Jarrod Bell, Ms Lynn Goon, Doctor Madeleine Hinwood
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G2000297
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y

20161 grants / $8,204,899

Provision of external evaluation of Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) and health technology related submissions$8,204,899

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Ms Danielle Lang, Mr Jarrod Bell, Mr Rob Bell, Mr Marc Bevan, Ms Lynn Goon, Doctor Madeleine Hinwood, Doctor Emily Walkom, Miss Chiara Berardi
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1601071
Type Of Funding C2100 - Aust Commonwealth – Own Purpose
Category 2100
UON Y
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Dr Emily Walkom

Position

Research Officer/Evaluator
Newcastle Evaluation Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Focus area

Clinical Pharmacology and Clinical Toxicology

Contact Details

Email emily.walkom@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4014 3009
Fax (02) 4960 2088

Office

Room NM2-545
Building Mater Hospital Level 5 - New Med 2
Location Mater Hospital

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