Dr Melissa Harris

Dr Melissa Harris

Research Fellow

Faculty of Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Research overview and current appointment: Dr Harris is an ARC DECRA Postdoctoral Research at the Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing. She has a background in psychology and is developing a significant track record in understanding the complex health and social outcomes for women, particularly those with chronic disease. Dr Harris has a particular interest in chronic disease management, including the impact of psychosocial factors on physical health and healthcare outcomes as well as the contraceptive practices for women with chronic disease. Her current program of work draws together Dr Harris’ research strengths in chronic disease and contraceptive use and access and research methods (e.g. longitudinal modelling, data linkage, cohort recruitment) by examining the contraceptive decision-making practices of Australian women of reproductive age with chronic disease to provide much needed information regarding reasons for unintended pregnancy in this population.

Research highlights: Dr Harris is developing an international reputation for research excellence, particularly in the use of innovative research methods and statistical approaches. Her expertise in understanding the impact of chronic disease began with her PhD where she was able to demonstrate the most convincing evidence to date regarding the identification of perceived stress as a modifiable risk factor for arthritis. In a commentary commissioned by the journal it was suggested that this piece of research “the potential for enlightening the field of rheumatology and the care of patients who may be at risk for arthritis-related illnesses” and established the groundwork on which all future research examining mechanisms that explain the relationship between perceived stress and arthritis onset would be based. This paper has informed national government policy regarding the role of mental health in chronic disease. Dr Harris’ international reputation in this area is further evidenced by the invitation to contribute a sole author book chapter on the contribution of psychological factors to the burden and onset of arthritis, contribution to government reports as well as participation in panel discussions and with senior clinicians, researchers, practitioners and advocates of women’s health.

Dr Harris has also developed a reputation in the use of innovative cohort recruitment methods through the employment of 21st century recruitment techniques as part of her role as Project Coordinator for CUPID. The dataset produced as a result of this work is an ongoing rich resource (the only dataset specifically focused on access to contraception in young Australian women). As a result of this work, Dr Harris has delivered workshops and currently consults with other researchers on recruiting cohorts using 21st century technology as well being invited to present on creating successful collaborations with industry.

Publications and grants: In her short academic career, Dr Harris has made a substantial contribution to the field of public health. She has attracted over $750,000 in funding from grants. She has published over 30 journal articles or abstracts (>80% of which are first/second author) in high ranking public health journals, with 2 lead author (published in top 10 journals for epidemiology and psychology) receiving invited commentaries in which the quality, innovation and substantial impact to the field was commended. In addition, Dr Harris has 1 invited sole author book chapter, co-authored 5 government reports, contributed to 30 national/international conference presentations (including the Global Conference on Contraception, Reproductive and Sexual Health, Qualitative Health Research Conference, IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics and the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studie) and 1 clinical manual (The “Parenting with Feeling” program which has been implemented throughout Australia and New Zealand).

Peer review and professional activities: Dr Harris is the contraceptive use and family planning stream lead for the Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing’s World Wide Wellness of Mothers and Babies (WWOMB) program. Dr Harris is currently supervising  9 PhD students and has supervised 2 PhD students (one receiving the School of Medicine and Public Health’s Best Confirmation) and 7 Honours students to completion (with one receiving the University of Newcastle Psychology Society prize for Best Honours presentation).She has taught into a number of psychology and public health subjects including experimental methodology, and understanding sensitive issues such as abuse and mental health disorders. She has also contributed to her field through conference organisation, providing external grant peer-review (e.g. NHMRC and the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development) and acting as a regular reviewer for high impact international journals in public health, including a number ranked within the top 10% of their respective disciplines (e.g. The BMJ, American Journal of Epidemiology).



Qualifications

  • PhD (Gender and Health), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) Honours, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • ageing
  • chronic disease
  • chronic disease management
  • cohort studies
  • comorbidity
  • contraceptive use
  • diabetes
  • disease onset
  • health services research
  • health trajectories
  • hopsitalisation
  • linked data
  • longitudinal data
  • mental health
  • morbidity
  • mortality
  • multimorbidity
  • psychological medicine
  • psychosocial factors
  • psychosomatics
  • qualitative methods
  • quality of life
  • stress and health
  • women's health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111716 Preventive Medicine 30
111706 Epidemiology 40
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2015 - 13/08/2015 Research Academic Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing
Australia
20/08/2012 - 31/12/2014 Research Academic Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing
Australia
2/04/2012 - 30/11/2012 Research Assistant Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health
Australia
5/10/2009 - 8/02/2011 Research Associate Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing
Australia
8/10/2007 - 5/10/2009 Research Associate Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2018 Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
ARC (Australian Research Council)

Scholarship

Year Award
2011 University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship
The University of Newcastle

Invitations

Keynote Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2015 Chronic disease onset and women: does stress hold the key?

Organiser

Year Title / Rationale
2010 9th National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing "Getting the right skill mix"

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2013 Make love not war: the CUPID collaboration

Grant Reviews

Year Grant Amount
2015 NHMRC Project Grant
Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS, Aust Competitive - Commonwealth - 1CS
$617,536

Prestigious works

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious Work Role
2015 2015 Recruiting online: lessons from a longitudinal survey of contraception and pregnancy intentions of young Australian women American Journal of Epidemiology Author
2014 2014 Health and wellbeing of women aged 18 to 23 in 2013 and 1996: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health Report prepared for the Australian Government Department of Health Author
2013 2013 Mental Health: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health Report prepared for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing Author
2013 2013 The influence of perceived stress on the onset of arthritis in women: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health Annals of Behavioral Medicine Author
2009 2009 The Parenting with Feeling Program Clinical manual Author

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
INFO1010 Introduction to Information Systems
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Tutor 2/03/2009 - 5/06/2009
INFO1010 Introduction to Information Systems
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Coordinated and lectured into the understanding data and spreadsheets module for 220 students.
Lecturer/Tutor 27/07/2009 - 18/12/2009
PUBH2300 Personal Development and Health Issues in the Primary School
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Tutor 17/07/2006 - 24/11/2006
PUBH2020 Foundation Studs in Early Childhood Health and Policy
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Tutor 20/02/2006 - 30/06/2006
PUBH1080 Studies in Population Health and Health Promotion
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Exam marking 17/07/2006 - 24/11/2006
PSYC2500 Introduction to Abnormal Behaviour
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Tutor 14/07/2003 - 28/11/2003
PSYC2070 Experimental Methodology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle
Tutor 24/02/2003 - 30/06/2003
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (35 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Harris BM, Harris ML, Rae K, Chojenta C, 'Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women: An integrative review', Midwifery, 73 49-61 (2019) [C1]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To synthesise primary research regarding the facilitators and barriers to smoking cessation amongst Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women d... [more]

© 2019 Elsevier Ltd Objective: To synthesise primary research regarding the facilitators and barriers to smoking cessation amongst Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women during pregnancy. Design: An integrative review. Review methods: A systematic search of peer-reviewed literature from five databases published from January 2008 to April 2018. Articles were reviewed using the approach outlined by Whittemore and Knafl, with the identified themes collated and synthesised according to study characteristics and barriers and facilitators of smoking cessation. Findings: Of the 310 papers retrieved, nine studies were included within the review (five quantitative and four qualitative). The quality of the studies were ascertained via Joanna Briggs Institute checklists for cross sectional analysis, randomized controlled trials, and qualitative research. The overall quality of the research was deemed acceptable. Two facilitators to smoking cessation within the studied population were identified: ¿support to quit¿ and ¿information and advice¿ while four barriers to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women were identified: ¿smoking prevalence¿ ¿high daily stress¿ ¿ambivalence regarding adverse effects of smoking¿ and ¿attitudes, knowledge and training of the healthcare professional¿. Conclusions: Social and familial influences and daily stress have a strong impact on whether a woman feels she can quit smoking during pregnancy. However, in this study, information and advice regarding potential adverse effects of smoking on the foetus, or lack thereof, from health professionals either facilitated cessation of smoking in pregnancy or was a barrier to quitting. Likewise, a lack of awareness from midwives and doctors on smoking cessation strategies, such as nicotine replacement therapy, was a barrier for women. Implications for practice: The findings indicate that education regarding the adverse effects of smoking in pregnancy, as well as strategies on smoking cessation from midwives, doctors, and Aboriginal Health Workers within the antenatal period may have a positive effect on current smoking rates among pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women. Involving the partner/support person and family of the woman in this education may have a greater impact on smoking cessation rates through the woman gaining social and familial support in her decision to quit. Thus, healthcare workers require additional professional development to provide information and knowledge within a culturally competent manner. Successful smoking cessation programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women during pregnancy could have measurable impacts on mortality rates for Indigenous infants and significantly contribute to ¿Closing the Gap¿.

DOI 10.1016/j.midw.2019.03.003
Co-authors Kym Rae, Catherine Chojenta
2019 Dolja-Gore X, Harris ML, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'Factors associated with length of stay in hospital for men and women aged 85 and over: A quantile regression approach', European Journal of Internal Medicine, 63 46-55 (2019)

© 2019 Objectives: Explore characteristics of hospital use for adults aged 85 and over in their last year of life and examine factors associated with cumulative overnight length o... [more]

© 2019 Objectives: Explore characteristics of hospital use for adults aged 85 and over in their last year of life and examine factors associated with cumulative overnight length of stay (LOS). Data source/study setting: NSW 45 and Up Study linked with hospital data. Study design: Longitudinal cohort study. Methods: Quantile regression models were performed for men and women (N = 3145)to examine heterogeneity in predictors of overnight hospital admissions. Coefficients were estimated at the 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles of the LOS distribution. Principal findings: 86% had at least one hospitalisation in their last year of life, with 60% dying in hospital. For men, first admission for organ failure was associated with a 26 day increase at the 90th LOS percentile, and a 0.22 day increase at the 10th percentile compared to men with cancer. Women admitted with influenza had decreased LOS of 20.5 days at the 75th percentile and 6 to 8 fewer days at the lower percentiles compared to those women with cancer. Conclusions: Poor health behaviours were a major driver of highest LOS among older men, pointing to opportunities to achieve health care savings through prevention. For older women, influenza was associated with shorter LOS, which could be an indicator of the high and rapid mortality rates at older ages, and may be easily prevented. Other factors associated with LOS among women, included where they lived before they were admitted, and discharge destination.

DOI 10.1016/j.ejim.2019.02.011
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2019 Loxton D, Harris ML, Forder P, Powers J, Townsend N, Bytes J, Mishra G, 'Factors Influencing Web-Based Survey Response for a Longitudinal Cohort of Young Women Born Between 1989 and 1995', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 21 (2019)
DOI 10.2196/11286
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Peta Forder, Jenny Powers
2019 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Examining long-acting reversible contraception non-use among Australian women in their 20s: findings from a qualitative study', Culture, Health and Sexuality, (2019)

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Australian women use less effective, short-term methods of contraception more often than any other meth... [more]

© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Australian women use less effective, short-term methods of contraception more often than any other method, despite the availability of much more effective long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Although research examining the low uptake of LARC among Australian women has increased over the past few years, we still know little about the factors influencing this phenomenon. Using data from semi-structured telephone interviews with 15 Australian women in their 20s, this paper explores contraceptive experience to better understand the non-use of LARC. Findings highlight the ubiquity of the use of the oral contraceptive pill and perceptions of LARC as a more serious contraceptive choice. Among participants, the intrauterine device (IUD) was viewed particularly unfavourably. Furthermore, LARC was shown to be only considered for use after dissatisfaction with shorter-term methods (usually the Pill) if at all. Overall, these findings suggest further education in dispelling myths and discomfort around LARC use, while simultaneously recognising and respecting women¿s decisions to not use LARC methods.

DOI 10.1080/13691058.2018.1519119
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Motivators of contraceptive method change and implications for long-acting reversible contraception (non-)use: A qualitative free-text analysis', Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, 19 71-77 (2019)

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To develop a greater understanding of the motivators of contraceptive method change over time for young Australian women, with a particular interes... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Objective: To develop a greater understanding of the motivators of contraceptive method change over time for young Australian women, with a particular interest in long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use. Method: Free-text comments from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) Study were used to explore the reasons for contraceptive method change among women who reported one or more contraceptive changes across the three CUPID surveys. Results: 512 women reported making at least one contraceptive method change, with 740 comments explaining these changes between them. Participants reported a multitude of reasons motivating their contraceptive change. Five key themes were developed to explain these motivators: the natural, sexual and fertile body, specific contraceptive characteristics and other important people. Findings suggest that women's decisions to switch or discontinue a contraceptive depended largely on her ability (and desire) to juggle its impact on her sexual, fertile and natural body. Importantly, the transient and fluid nature of contraceptive practices were demonstrated, as the women adjusted their method to suit their needs at the time. Conclusion: Regarding LARC use, these findings suggest that rather than being appealing, the ¿temporarily permanent¿ nature of these methods may be unappealing and incongruent with the needs of some women.

DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2018.12.004
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2019 Khan MN, Harris ML, Shifti DM, Laar AS, Loxton D, 'Effects of unintended pregnancy on maternal healthcare services utilization in low- and lower-middle-income countries: systematic review and meta-analysis.', Int J Public Health, (2019)
DOI 10.1007/s00038-019-01238-9
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Mdnuruzzaman Khan Uon
2019 Fradgley EA, Karnon J, Roach D, Harding K, Wilkinson-Meyers L, Chojenta C, et al., 'Taking the pulse of the health services research community: a cross-sectional survey of research impact, barriers and support.', Aust Health Rev, (2019)
DOI 10.1071/AH18213
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Chris Paul, Elizabeth Fradgley
2019 Wubishet BL, Harris ML, Forder PM, Acharya SH, Byles JE, 'Predictors of 15-year survival among Australian women with diabetes from age 76-81.', Diabetes Res Clin Pract, 150 48-56 (2019)
DOI 10.1016/j.diabres.2019.02.016
Co-authors Peta Forder, Julie Byles
2018 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Accidentally-on-purpose: Findings from a qualitative study exploring pregnancy intention and long-acting reversible contraceptive use', BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health, 44 207-213 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Article author(s). Background Although it is known that pregnancy intention impacts contraceptive use, there has been little exploration into the relationship between pregn... [more]

© 2018 Article author(s). Background Although it is known that pregnancy intention impacts contraceptive use, there has been little exploration into the relationship between pregnancy intention and long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) non-use in the Australian context. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews with a sample of participants from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) Study were conducted in 2016. Results Of the 59 women contacted, 15 participated in an interview. One theme arising from these interviews is reported here. Results from the analysis suggest that women with ambivalent or unclear plans toward pregnancy were less likely to perceive LARC as a suitable method for them. Conversely, women who clearly intended to avoid pregnancy and who had clear plans for future pregnancy valued these methods, and often framed their future plans for pregnancy within the context of their chosen LARC. Conclusions Findings presented demonstrated the complex relationship between pregnancy intention and contraceptive use. In particular, this study provided insight into the complex notion of pregnancy ambivalence. Dichotomous definitions of pregnancy as intended or unintended were found to be inadequate in encapsulating actual reproductive experiences.

DOI 10.1136/bmjsrh-2018-200112
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Loxton D, Tooth L, Harris ML, Forder PM, Dobson A, Powers J, et al., 'Cohort Profile: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) 1989-95 cohort.', International journal of epidemiology, 47 391-392e (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ije/dyx133
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Peta Forder, Jenny Powers, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2018 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Who takes responsibility for contraception, according to young Australian women?', SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE, 15 2-9 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2017:11.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Feyissa TR, Harris ML, Melka AS, Loxton D, 'Unintended Pregnancy in Women Living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis', AIDS and Behavior, (2018)

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries.... [more]

© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. In 2014, about 1.5 million pregnancies occurred among HIV-positive women in low and middle-income countries. To pool magnitude and factors associated with unintended pregnancy in women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, a systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken in November 2016. Pooling the magnitude of unintended pregnancy reported by 14 studies yielded a crude summary prevalence of 55.9%. The magnitude of unwanted pregnancy and mistimed pregnancy in six studies ranged from 14 to 59 and 9 to 47.2%, respectively. Contraceptive failure was an important factor for many unintended pregnancies. The magnitude of unintended pregnancy was significantly higher in HIV-positive women than for HIV-negative women in three out of six studies. The available evidence suggests that there is a high magnitude of unintended pregnancy in this population. Improving effective contraceptive utilization is thus a priority to address unintended pregnancies and to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV. PROSPERO Number: CRD42016051310.

DOI 10.1007/s10461-018-2346-4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2017 Harris ML, Oldmeadow C, Hure A, Luu J, Loxton D, Attia J, 'Stress increases the risk of type 2 diabetes onset in women: A 12-year longitudinal study using causal modelling.', PLoS One, 12 e0172126 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0172126
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, Deborah Loxton, John Attia, Alexis Hure
2017 Goldhammer DL, Fraser C, Wigginton B, Harris ML, Bateson D, Loxton D, et al., 'What do young Australian women want (when talking to doctors about contraception)?', BMC Family Practice, 18 1-10 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12875-017-0616-2
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2017 Dolja-Gore X, Harris ML, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'Patterns of hospitalization risk for women surviving into very old age', Medical Care, 55 352-361 (2017) [C1]

Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Background: By 2050, adults aged 80 years and over will represent around 20% of the global population. Little is ... [more]

Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. Background: By 2050, adults aged 80 years and over will represent around 20% of the global population. Little is known about how adults surviving into very old age use hospital services over time. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine patterns of hospital usage over a 10-year period for women who were aged 84 to 89 in 2010 and examine factors associated with increased use. Methods: Survey data from 1936 women from the 1921 to 1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were matched with the state-based Admitted Patients Data Collection. Hospital use profiles were determined using repeated measures latent class analysis. Results: Four latent class trajectories were identified. One-quarter of the sample were at low risk of hospitalization, while 20.6% demonstrated increased risk of hospitalization and a further 38.1% had moderate hospitalization risk over time. Only 16.8% of the sample was classified as having high hospitalization risk. Correlates of hospital use for very old women differed according to hospital use class and were contingent on the timing of exposure (ie, short-term or long-term). Conclusions: Despite the perception that older adults place a significant burden on health care systems, the majority of women demonstrated relatively low hospital use over an extended period, even in the presence of chronic health conditions. High hospitalization risk was found to be concentrated among a small minority of these long-term survivors. The findings suggest the importance of service planning and treatment regimes that take account of the diverse trajectories of hospital use into and through advanced old age.

DOI 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000636
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Who uses long-acting reversible contraception? Profile of LARC users in the CUPID cohort', Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, 11 19-24 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Objective To explore the characteristics of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users in a nationally representative cohort of young Australian women ... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Objective To explore the characteristics of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users in a nationally representative cohort of young Australian women aged 18¿23. Methods Data from 3155 women who responded to a question about their contraceptive use in the previous six months at the baseline Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions (CUPID) survey were included. Results 726 (19.1%) women reported LARC use, with the Implanon being the most popular method (n¿=¿478; 65.8%). A history of pregnancy was strongly associated with increased odds of LARC use in the multivariate model (OR¿=¿2.67, 95% CI¿=¿2.11, 3.34, p¿=¿0.001). Comparatively, using contraception for reasons other than pregnancy prevention was associated with decreased odds of LARC use in the multivariate model (period management: OR¿=¿0.74, 95% CI¿=¿0.60, 0.91, p¿=¿0.004, body management: OR¿=¿0.53, 95% CI¿=¿0.37, 0.77, p¿=¿0.001, medical condition: OR¿=¿0.25, 95% CI¿=¿0.09, 0.66, p¿=¿0.005). Highest education and Medicare card status also contributed to the final multivariate model, and were associated with decreased odds of LARC use. Conclusion Reproductive history and reasons for contraceptive use are strong indications of method choice. Promoting LARC as highly effective may not be a sufficient incentive for young women to take up the method when pregnancy prevention may be equal or secondary to their desired non-contraceptive effects.

DOI 10.1016/j.srhc.2016.09.003
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Coombe J, Harris ML, Wigginton B, Lucke J, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive use at the time of unintended pregnancy: Findings from the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention and Decisions study.', Aust Fam Physician, 45 842-848 (2016) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Harris ML, Dolja-Gore X, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'First incident hospitalisation for Australian women aged 70 and beyond: A 10 year examination using competing risks', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 64 29-37 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. There are increasing concerns regarding high hospital use among older adults and the capacity to manage the economic impact of the ageing population t... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. There are increasing concerns regarding high hospital use among older adults and the capacity to manage the economic impact of the ageing population trend on healthcare systems. First hospitalisation in old age may act as a catalyst for ongoing intensification of health problems and acute care use. This study examined factors associated with first incident hospitalisation in women aged over 70, accounting for the health inequalities associated with geographic location. Survey data from 3780 women from the 1921 to 1926 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were matched with the Admitted Patients Data Collection and National Death Index. Days to first event (hospitalisation or death) were modelled using competing risks methods. A total of 3065 (80.3%) women had at least one hospital admission. More than half of the top 15 reasons for first hospitalisation were related to cardiovascular disease, with atrial fibrillation the most common. Proportional subdistribution hazards models showed that first hospital admission was driven by enabling and need factors including asthma/bronchitis diagnosis (HR = 1.16; p = 0.047), private health insurance (HR = 1.16; p = 0.004) more than two prescribed medications in previous month (HR = 1.31; p = 0.001), more than four general practitioner visits in previous year (HR = 1.50; p = 0.034), lower physical functioning (HR = 0.99; p < 0.001) and living in an inner regional area (HR = 1.17; p = 0.003). First overnight hospitalisation was primarily related with potentially preventable and treatable chronic diseases. Primary and secondary strategies aimed at chronic disease generally, and better chronic disease management particularly for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, may play a vital role in disease prevention or delay in readmissions among this population.

DOI 10.1016/j.archger.2015.12.006
Co-authors Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2016 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke JC, 'A qualitative analysis of women's explanations for changing contraception: the importance of non-contraceptive effects.', The journal of family planning and reproductive health care, 42 256-262 (2016) [C1]
Citations Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Harris ML, Byles JE, Townsend N, Loxton D, 'Perceptions of coping with non-disease-related life stress for women with osteoarthritis: a qualitative analysis.', BMJ Open, 6 e010630 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010630
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2016 Wigginton B, Moran C, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Young Australian women explain their contraceptive choices', Culture, Health and Sexuality, 18 727-741 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Taylor &amp; Francis. New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men¿s options for reversible contraception h... [more]

© 2015 Taylor & Francis. New developments in female contraceptives allow women increased options for preventing pregnancy, while men¿s options for reversible contraception have not advanced beyond the condom. There has been little discursive exploration of how neoliberal and postfeminist discourses shape women¿s accounts of choosing whether or not to use contraception. Our thematic discourse analysis of 760 free-text responses to a question about contraceptive choice considers the social and political climate that promotes the self-governed woman who freely chooses contraception. We examine the ways in which women formulated and defended their accounts of choice, focusing on the theme of free contraceptive choice that constructed women¿s choices as unconstrained by material, social and political forces. We identify two discursive strategies that underpinned this theme: a woman¿s body, a woman¿s choice and planning parenthood, and explore the ways in which choice was understood as a gendered entitlement and how contraceptive choices were shaped (and constrained) by women¿s plans for parenthood. We discuss the implications of these discursive strategies, and neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, in terms of the disallowance of any contextual, social and structural factors, including the absence of men in the ¿contraceptive economy¿.

DOI 10.1080/13691058.2015.1117138
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'What qualities of long-acting reversible contraception do women perceive as desirable or undesirable? A systematic review', Sexual Health, 13 404-419 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 CSIRO. Little research examining qualities of contraception that make them attractive or unattractive to users, particularly young women, exists. The aim of this study is t... [more]

© 2016 CSIRO. Little research examining qualities of contraception that make them attractive or unattractive to users, particularly young women, exists. The aim of this study is to systemically review the evidence regarding desirable and undesirable qualities of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), including intrauterine devices, the implant and the injection, as perceived by women. Five electronic databases were searched in May 2015 using terms related to LARC and method preference or decision-making. Studies were included if they concerned women aged 18-23 years from developed countries and reported on perceived positive or negative qualities of LARC. Thirty articles were deemed relevant. Five key themes emerged under which qualities were categorised; including: (1) impact on bleeding; (2) impact on the body; (3) device-specific characteristics; (4) general characteristics; and (5) perceptions and misbeliefs. Fit and forget, high efficacy and long-term protection were considered the top desirable qualities of LARC. Undesirable qualities varied among the LARC methods; however, irregular bleeding, painful insertion and removal procedure, weight gain and location in the body were among those most commonly reported. The contraceptive benefits of LARC, including their high efficacy and longevity, are generally considered to be positive qualities by women, while the potential impact of side-effects on the body are considered as negative qualities. This information is crucial in the clinical setting as it provides practitioners with a greater understanding of the qualities women do and do not like about LARC methods. Discussion about these qualities, positive and negative, during consultations about contraception may increase rates of uptake.

DOI 10.1071/SH15189
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Harris ML, Dolja-Gore X, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'End of life hospitalisations differ for older Australian women according to death trajectory: A longitudinal data linkage study', BMC Health Services Research, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1729-3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles, Xenia Doljagore
2015 Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Harris et al. respond to "social media recruitment"', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 750-751 (2015) [C3]
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwv008
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2015 Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting online: Lessons from a longitudinal survey of contraception and pregnancy intentions of young Australian women', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 737-746 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Author. Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recr... [more]

© 2015 The Author. Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recruitment methods. We report on the implementation and feasibility of an innovative and flexible approach used to recruit participants for a longitudinal cohort study about contraceptive use and pregnancy (the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention, and Decisions (CUPID) Study). Australian women aged 18-23 years were recruited using a range of online, networking, and offline methods, including social media (primarily Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California; http://www.facebook.com)), face-to-face events, distribution of promotional material, and media releases. Over the course of the 1-year recruitment period (beginning in September 2012), a total of 3,795 eligible women were recruited to complete the online survey, at a cost of approximately A$11 per participant. This sample was found to be broadly representative of the Australian population of women aged 18-23 years in terms of demographic characteristics, with the exception of an overrepresentation of tertiary-educated women (88.7% compared with 72.6%). This study demonstrated that although current recruitment strategies are required to be innovative and flexible in order to engage young people in epidemiologic research, representative samples can be achieved online at reasonable cost.

DOI 10.1093/aje/kwv006
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2015 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Herbert D, Lucke J, 'The feminisation of contraceptive use: Australian women's accounts of accessing contraception', FEMINISM & PSYCHOLOGY, 25 178-198 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/0959353514562802
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2015 Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/jmir.4261
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 31
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Julie Byles, Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton
2015 Harris ML, Byles JE, Sibbritt D, Loxton D, '"Just get on with it": Qualitative insights of coming to terms with a deteriorating body for older women with osteoarthritis', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Harris et al. Objective: To qualify the psychosocial burden of osteoarthritis for older women and identify factors perceived to assist with psychological adjustment to the ... [more]

© 2015 Harris et al. Objective: To qualify the psychosocial burden of osteoarthritis for older women and identify factors perceived to assist with psychological adjustment to the disease. Methods: Women who indicated being diagnosed/treated for osteoarthritis in the previous three years in the fifth survey of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health provided the sampling frame. Participants were randomly sampled until saturation was reached using a systematic process. Thematic content analysis was applied to the 19 semi-structured telephone interviews using a realist framework. Results: The findings indicate that the emotional burden of osteoarthritis is considerable, and the process of psychological adjustment complex. Older women with osteoarthritis have psychological difficulties associated with increasing pain and functional impairment. Psychological adjustment over time was attributed primarily to cognitive and attitudinal factors (e.g. stoicism, making downward comparisons and possessing specific notions about the cause of arthritis). This was a dynamic 'day to day' process involving a constant struggle between grieving physical losses and increasing dependence amidst symptom management. Conclusion: The findings of this study add to the current understanding of the complex processes involved in psychological adjustment over time. Targeted interventions focused on assisting women with arthritis redefine self-concepts outside the confines of caring responsibilities, coupled with public health education programs around understanding the destructive nature of arthritis are required. Understanding the destructive and (potentially) preventable nature of arthritis may facilitate early detection and increased uptake of appropriate treatment options for osteoarthritis that have the ability to modify disease trajectories.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0120507
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2014 Harris ML, Herbert D, Loxton D, Dobson A, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting young women for health surveys: Traditional random sampling methods are not cost-effective', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 495 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12281
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Herbert D, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among 18-23 year old women in Australia: the first findings of the CUPID study', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 18 S78-S78 (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Harris ML, Loxton D, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The Influence of Perceived Stress on the Onset of Arthritis in Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 46 9-18 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s12160-013-9478-6
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton
2013 Allen J, Inder KJ, Harris ML, Lewin TJ, Attia JR, Kelly BJ, 'Quality of life impact of cardiovascular and affective conditions among older residents from urban and rural communities', HEALTH AND QUALITY OF LIFE OUTCOMES, 11 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-11-140
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Brian Kelly, Kerry Inder, Terry Lewin, John Attia
2012 Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The relative importance of psychosocial factors in arthritis: Findings from 10,509 Australian women', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 73 251-256 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2011 Newman LK, Harris ML, Allen J, 'Neurobiological basis of parenting disturbance', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 45 109-122 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 18
2007 Dundas B, Harris M, Narasimhan M, 'Psychogenic polydipsia review: Etiology, differential, and treatment', Current Psychiatry Reports, 9 236-241 (2007)

Psychogenic polydipsia (PPD), a clinical disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia, is a common occurrence in inpatients with psychiatric disorders. The underlying pathoph... [more]

Psychogenic polydipsia (PPD), a clinical disorder characterized by polyuria and polydipsia, is a common occurrence in inpatients with psychiatric disorders. The underlying pathophysiology of this syndrome is unclear, and multiple factors have been implicated, including a hypothalamic defect and adverse medication effects. Hyponatremia in PPD can progress to water intoxication and is characterized by symptoms of confusion, lethargy, and psychosis, and seizures or death. Evaluation of psychiatric patients with polydipsia warrants a comprehensive evaluation for other medical causes of polydipsia, polyuria, hyponatremia, and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. The management strategy in psychiatric patients should include fluid restriction and behavioral and pharmacologic modalities. Copyright © 2007 by Current Medicine Group LLC.

DOI 10.1007/s11920-007-0025-7
Citations Scopus - 75
Show 32 more journal articles

Conference (31 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Eftekhari P, Forder PM, Harris ML, Byles JE, 'Health Care Use by Older Australian Women with Asthma', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Dallas, TX (2019)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2018 Thapaliya K, Harris M, Byles J, 'Antipsychotics use status among women with dementia in Australia', Melbourne, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2018 Reeves P, Dolja-Gore X, Thomas S, Harris M, Hodder R, Searles A, Byles J, 'Equity considerations in evaluation of public and preventive health policies', Tamworth, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Andrew Searles
2018 Jones M, Loxton D, Harris M, Beath A, Talley N, Koloski N, Ejova A, 'Strong evidence somatisation measures based on symptom checklists are more reflective of psychological rather than physical health: important consequences for gastroenterology research and practice', Vienna, Austria (2018)
Co-authors Nicholas Talley, Deborah Loxton
2018 Coombe J, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Contraceptive method change over time: experiences of Australian women', Göttingen, Germany (2018)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2018 Wubishet B, Harris M, Lang D, Acharya S, Byles J, 'Rising diabetes prevalence among older Australian women', Melbourne, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Danielle Lang, Julie Byles
2018 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, 'Exploring Contraceptive Experience to Understand Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (Non)Use Among a Cohort of Young, Australian Women', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2018)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2017 Thapaliya K, Harris M, Byles J, 'Pattern of medication use in women with dementia', Perth, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Julie Byles
2017 Wubishet B, Harris M, Abbas S, Lang D, acharya S, Byles J, 'Costs of major complications of Type 2 diabetes: A systematic review', Perth, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Danielle Lang
2017 Fleur A, Gibson S, Dixon J, Brilleman S, Harris M, Loxton D, 'Epidemiology of trauma history and pain outcomes: a retrospective cohort study of community based Australian women', Adelaide, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2017 Wubishet BL, Harris M, Abbas SS, Lang D, Acharya S, Byles J, 'COSTS OF MAJOR COMPLICATIONS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW', VALUE IN HEALTH (2017)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Danielle Lang, Meaghan Katrak
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, '"I Thought That It Would Get Better'': How Young Australian Women Make Decisions About Using, or Not Using Contraception', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2017 Coombe J, Harris ML, Loxton D, '"I Thought That It Would Get Better'': How Young Australian Women Make Decisions About Using, or Not Using Contraception', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF QUALITATIVE METHODS (2017)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Coombe J, Harris M, Loxton D, '"From the Mirena back to the Pill¿¿ A longitudinal analysis of the motivators of contraceptive method change among young Australian women', Hobart, Australia (2016)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2016 Coombe J, Harris M, Wigginton B, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'What do we know about contraceptive use, pregnancy intention and decisions of young Australian women? Findings from the CUPID study', Basel, Switzerland (2016)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2015 Dolja-Gore X, Harris ML, Kendig H, Byles J, 'Determinants of overnight hospital admissions for Australians aged 85+ in their last year of life', Sydney, Australia (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2015 Harris ML, Oldmeadow C, Hure A, Loxton D, Luu J, Attia J, 'Increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women: does perceived stress hold the key?', Dublin, Ireland (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Alexis Hure, John Attia
2015 Patrick K, Ezer P, Loxton D, Harris ML, Lucke J, 'Rural-urban differences in use and access to contraception for young Australian women', Bendigo, Australia (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2015 Rich J, Inder K, Harris ML, Perkins D, Byles J, 'Who cares for whom? Giving and receiving healthcare for women over 70 in remote Australian places', Chiang Mai, Thailand (2015) [O1]
Co-authors Jane Rich, Kerry Inder, David Perkins, Julie Byles
2014 Harris ML, Wigginton B, Loxton D, Lucke J, '¿It¿s my body¿: patterns of contraceptive use among young Australian women', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2014 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'What "finding the ¿right¿ contraceptive" means to Young Australian women', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2014 Fraser C, Wigginton B, Harris ML, Bateson D, Stewart M, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive consultations in primary care: who¿s talking?', Melbourne, Australia (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2014 Wigginton B, Moran C, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, '¿I love having a choice¿: young Australian women¿s discussions about contraceptive choice', Auckland, New Zealand (2014)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Herbert D, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among 18-23 year old women in Australia: the first findings of the CUPID study', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, Copenhagen, Denmark (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Herbert D, Lucke J, 'The medicalisation of reproduction: women¿s accounts of accessing contraception', Bradford, United Kingdom (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2013 Parkinson L, Harris ML, 'Effective population health interventions for the primary prevention of musculoskeletal conditions in older people', Seoul, South Korea (2013)
Co-authors L Parkinson
2013 Harris ML, Loxton D, Sibbritt D, Byles J, '¿The mind is such a powerful thing¿: the role of perceived stress on the onset of arthritis in women', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
2013 Harris ML, Anderson A, Rich J, Loxton D, 'Drinking alcohol during pregnancy: how do women experience information delivery?', Edmonton, Canada (2013)
Co-authors Amy Anderson, Deborah Loxton, Jane Rich
2013 Chojenta C, Anderson A, Gresham E, Harris ML, Rich J, 'Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health: insights from research higher degree students', Sydney, Australia (2013)
Co-authors Jane Rich, Catherine Chojenta, Amy Anderson
2012 Loxton D, Lucke J, Herbert D, Harris ML, 'What can we find out about sexual and reproductive health?', Melbourne, Australia (2012)
Co-authors Deborah Loxton
2010 Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'Psychosocial characteristics of midlife women with arthritis: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', 2010 National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing:, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Julie Byles
Show 28 more conferences

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Byles J, Mishra G, Hockey R, Adane A, Chan H-W, Dolja-Gore X, et al., 'Use, access to, and impact of Medicare services for Australian women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.', Australian Government Department of Health, 210 (2017)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2016 Jae-seon J, Young-taek K, You-kyung M, Leigh L, Forder P, Majeed T, et al., 'An International Harmonization and Comparative study of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health(ALSWH) and the Korean Longitudinal Survey of Women and families(KLoWF)', National Research Council for Economics, Humanities And Social Sciences, Korea, 136 (2016)
Co-authors Peta Forder, Deborah Loxton
2014 Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Anderson A, Hockey R, Powers J, Brown W, et al., 'Health and wellbeing of women aged 18 to 23 in 2013 and 1996: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women¿s Health', Department of Health, 183 (2014)
Co-authors Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, Meredith Tavener, Amy Anderson
2013 Holden L, Dobson A, Byles J, Loxton D, Dolja-Gore X, Hockey R, et al., 'Mental Health: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Department of Health and Ageing (2013)
Co-authors Catherine Chojenta, Deborah Loxton, Xenia Doljagore, Julie Byles
2010 Parkinson L, Harris ML, 'Effective population health interventions for the primary prevention of musculoskeletal conditions: an evidence check rapid review brokered by the Sax Institute (http://www.saxinstitute.org.au) for the Victorian Department of Health', Victorian Department of Health, 101 (2010)
Co-authors L Parkinson
Show 2 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $660,760

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20191 grants / $342,338

Contraceptive choice for women with chronic disease$342,338

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2019
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1800390
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20178 grants / $177,460

Health service use at the end of life by older Australian women with chronic conditions$130,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Professor Gita Mishra, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Xenia Dolja-Gore, Professor Annette Dobson, Doctor Michael Waller, Mr Richard Hockey, Doctor Tazeen Majeed
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701041
Type Of Funding C2110 - Aust Commonwealth - Own Purpose
Category 2110
UON Y

Efficacy of the work-based assessment program for international medical graduates$25,000

Funding body: Australian Medical Council

Funding body Australian Medical Council
Project Team Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1701310
Type Of Funding C3111 - Aust For profit
Category 3111
UON Y

Contraceptive use and Fertility in Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia$10,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Mr Tesfaye Feyissa, Doctor Melissa Harris, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Greaves Family Postgraduate Top Up Scholarship in Medical Research
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701582
Type Of Funding C3120 - Aust Philanthropy
Category 3120
UON Y

Does cognitive processing mediate the relationship between domestic violence and long-term health outcomes?$3,960

Funding body: Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program

Funding body Hunter Medical Resarch Institute (HMRI) Public Health Program
Project Team

Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, Frini Karayandis

Scheme Imaging Centre Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Does cognitive processing mediate the relationship between domestic violence and long-term health outcomes?$2,500

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.
Project Team

Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, Frini Karayandis

Scheme Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing Strategic Pilot Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Does cognitive processing mediate the relationship between domestic violence and long-term health outcomes?$2,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Project Team

Deborah Loxton, Melissa Harris, Frini Karayandis

Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Unintended pregnancy and contraceptive decision-making in women with chronic disease: providing an evidence-base$2,000

Funding body: Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.

Funding body Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing (RCGHA), The University of Newcastle, NSW.
Scheme Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing Strategic Pilot Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Unintended pregnancy and contraceptive decision-making in women with chronic disease: providing an evidence-base$1,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant University of Newcastle
Scheme UON Faculty of Health and Medicine Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2018
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20163 grants / $34,296

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team

Christine Paul, John Wiggers, Catherine Chojenta, Melissa Harris, Elizabeth Fradgley

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N

Equipment grant$7,930

Funding body: The University of Newcastle

Funding body The University of Newcastle
Project Team

Harris ML, Chojenta C

Scheme Research Advantage Early Career Researcher Equipment Grant Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

The chronic disease tsunami: the impact of poor mental health on health and health service outcomes for older women with multimorbidity$1,500

Funding body: School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body School of Medicine & Public Health, Faculty of Health & Medicine, University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Harris ML

Scheme Research Infrastructure Block Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20151 grants / $1,500

Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, Dublin, Ireland, 18-21 October 2015$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501124
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20141 grants / $21,500

The role of perceived stress on the onset of type 2 diabetes in women.$21,500

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust

Funding body John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust
Project Team Doctor Melissa Harris, Professor John Attia, Doctor Judy Luu, Professor Deb Loxton
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301440
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20131 grants / $25,000

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$25,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Alexis Hure, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300904
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20121 grants / $5,000

When life's a pain: perceived stress and psychosocial factors in women with arthritis transitioning from midlife to older age$5,000

Funding body: Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Scheme Grants-in-aid
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20101 grants / $14,400

Effective population health interventions for the primary prevention of musculoskeletal conditions$14,400

Funding body: Victorian Department of Health

Funding body Victorian Department of Health
Project Team

Lynne Parkinson, Melissa Harris

Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding C2220 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Other
Category 2220
UON N

2 grants / $39,266

A scoping review of the current state of health services research in Australia$24,866

Funding body: Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand

Funding body Health Services Research Association of Australia and New Zealand
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Doctor Melissa Harris, Doctor Liz Fradgley
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start
Funding Finish
GNo G1601330
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Effective population health interventions for the primary prevention of musculoskeletal conditions$14,400

Funding body: Victorian Department of Health

Funding body Victorian Department of Health
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start
Funding Finish
GNo G1000770
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed8
Current9

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Assessing the Extent of the Implementation of Mobile-Health Technologies (mHealth) to Improve Access and Use of Sexual and Reproductive Health-Related Services for Rural Women in Ghana PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Determinants of Contraception Uptake During Abortion and Post Abortion Care in Cameroon PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2018 PhD Health Care Utilisation and Health Economics of Diabetes Among Australian Women PhD (Health Economics), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Contraception and Fertility in Women Living with HIV in Western Ethiopia PhD (Clinic Epid & MedStats), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2017 PhD Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes in Australia: Prevalence, Recurrence, Pattern of Multiple Outcomes and Risk Factors PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Intimate partner violence against women in Ethiopia: Determinants, effects on maternal and child health, and perceptions in the health sector PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Pregnancy Intention and the Use of Maternal Health Services in Bangladesh PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Contraceptive prevalence and its interaction with Gender development markers - a quantitative and spatial analysis using ArcGIS PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD PATTERN OF MEDICATION USE IN WOMEN WITH DEMENTIA PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Health Care Use by Older Australian Women with Asthma PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Just One Method Among Others: Examining Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (Non-)Use PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 Masters Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women Midwifery, Griffith University Principal Supervisor
2018 Masters Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation within pregnant Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander women Midwifery, Griffith University Principal Supervisor
2015 Honours Contributing factors of self-harm in young Australia women Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Factors associated with suicidal ideation in young Australian women aged 18-23 Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Factors contributing to diagnosed anxiety among Australian females aged between 18-23 Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 Honours Lifestyle variables as a major correlate of depression among young Australian women Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology,The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Melissa Harris

Position

Research Fellow
Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email melissa.harris@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420621
Fax (02) 40420044

Office

Room Level 4 - West Wing 116
Building HMRI
Location John Hunter Hospital campus

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