Dr Tazeen Majeed

Dr Tazeen Majeed

Research Academic

Faculty of Health and Medicine

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Tazeen Majeed MBBS MPH PhD is a post-doctoral research fellow with the Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing - a Priority Research Centre at the University of Newcastle. She has a background in medicine and was a practicing medical doctor in 'Internal Medicine'. As a public health researcher, Dr Majeed has strong interests in population health and in particular in life course studies, cardiovascular diseases and its treatment pathways, gender differences in chronic diseases, impacts and associations of workforce participation among men and women. As an emerging gerontologist, Dr Majeed's interest in ageing are health issues affecting older people, housing and residential aged care, use of health services among older people and  workforce participation among ageing population and in particular among women. 

As an early career researcher, Dr Majeed has already made vast contributions to the field of generational health and ageing, using developed expertise in various research methods and epidemiological approaches including use of longitudinal and linked data. She has been involved with research using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH), which is Australia's largest longitudinal study on women's health focused on their health and well-being. In 1996, this study recruited more than 40,000 women from three different cohorts (born 1921-1926, 1946-1951 and 1973-1978) and in 2013, ALSWH recruited over 15,000 women into a new cohort (born 1989-1995). Dr Majeed is conducting research relating to all the original ALSWH cohorts (1921-1926, 1946-1951 and 1973-1978) with topic relating to asthma; diabetes; depression; arthritis; workforce participation; health services use; housing and care). She is also conducting research using the 45 & Up Study data; the Social, Economic and Environmental Factors (SEEF) sub-study and the Life Histories and Health (LHH) sub-study. She has expertise in using complex, linked data sets including Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) data; Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) data; Aged Care Program data and Administrative hospital service use data. 

In her short research career Dr Majeed has already successfully attracted over $100,000 of funding from scholarships, awards and grants. Her substantial contributions to the field of public health include peer-reviewed published papers in reputed journals; reports; research collaborations within University of Newcastle, with Department of Education and Training and some prospective international collaborations; grant proposals; active participation in inquiries by Australian Human Rights Commission etc. The acknowledgement of Dr Majeed’s emerging expertise in the field of public health is also evidenced in her recent role and participation in preparation of various national and  international reports such as 'Korean Women Development Institute (KWDI) report, report for the United Nations titled “Directory of Research on Ageing in Africa” , as well as a major report for  the International Longevity Centre  (ILC- Australia)and reports for the Australian Government Department of Health .  Dr Majeed has also represented University of Newcastle and Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing in several international and national conferences related to public health, longitudinal studies and gerontology. She has also been invited as a guest speaker at the World Congress of Geriatrics and Gerontology and has actively represented her institution on various national research and translation platforms. 

Dr Majeed is an associate editor for The International Journal of Ageing and Society, as well as a regular manuscript reviewer for a number of high quality journals, including the BMJ, International Journal of Public Health, Journal of Vocational Behaviour.  She is also a participating member of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies (SLLS), Australia Association of Gerontology (AAG), NSW Cardiovascular Research Network (CVRN), the Pakistan Medical Association and was the New South Wales representative for the Emerging Researchers in Ageing (ERA).

Teaching Expertise 

Dr Majeed is actively associated and involved in postgraduate teaching and course material updates since 2014. Since 2017 onwards she is the Course-Coordinator for 'PUBH5301 Chronic Diseases and Injury'; 'PUBH6302 Social and Ecosystem Health'; 'PUBH6304 Global health'; and 'PUBH6305 Global Health Systems and Policy' which are associated with Masters of Public Health.  In addition she gives regular lectures for other courses for MPH. 



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Public Health, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Chronic Diseases
  • Cohort Studies
  • Epidemilogy
  • Gender
  • Health Services Research
  • Housing and Health Services
  • Life-Course Epidemiology
  • Linked Data
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Motherhood and Work
  • Population Health
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Women' Health
  • Workforce Participation

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
  • Urdu (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
010402 Biostatistics 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2014 Travel Bursaries
ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)

Scholarship

Year Award
2015 Grants –In- Aid
University of Newcastle
2014 Supplementary Scholarship - ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)
The University of New South Wales
2011 Postgraduate Research Scholarship - UNRS CENTRAL 50:50
Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Invitations

Participant

Year Title / Rationale
2015 Women, Work, and Illness: A Longitudinal Analysis of Workforce Participation Patterns for Women Beyond Middle Age
2014 A Gendered Approach to Workforce Participation Patterns across the Life Course
2014 Employment Status and Chronic Diseases: Cross-sectional Study among Men and Women Aged 60 – 64 Years
2013 Workforce Participation Patterns in Young and Older Women – The Impact of Chronic Diseases and Competing Activities
2012 Impact of Chronic Diseases on Workforce participation among the participants of NSW 45 and Up Study

Prestigious works

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious Work Role
2015 2015 International Longevity Centre Australia (ILC-Australia), Work, Retirement and Health: A brief directory of Australian research Report Contributor
2015 2016 United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2015). Directory of Research on Ageing in Africa: 2004-2015 (ST/ESA/SER.A/391) http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/ageing/Dir_Research_Ageing_Africa_%202004-2015.pdf Analyst

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PUBH6304 Global Health
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

This course focuses on health issues that transcend national boundaries and on regions disproportionately affected by poverty and ill-health. It brings together participants to share experiences, and to further their understanding of the relationships between poverty, development, social and other determinants of health, and of global health emergencies. A series of case studies are used to explore and illustrate these issues. Students apply their learning to a global health priority area and develop a plan for a local intervention that contributes to improving global health.


"https://www.newcastle.edu.au/course/PUBH6304#mGmcqdERk8CLuHxr.99"

Course Co-ordinator 1/01/0001 - 1/01/0001
PUBH6305 Global Health Systems and Policy
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

This course covers health systems and policy to equip students with a conceptual understanding and a set of tools to address major public health challenges from a health systems and health policy perspective.

The units provide an understanding of health systems including specific topics such as health workforce, financing, service delivery, information systems and health policy, and how these impact health interventions and health status in countries. A case study approach  then provides students with concrete examples of health systems and policy challenges.

Course Co-ordinator 1/01/0001 - 1/01/0001
PUBH6300 Introduction to Public health
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Public Health is the discipline that seeks to understand patterns and causes of disease within populations and brings evidence-based interventions to address those diseases of significance within populations. It requires an understanding of the current Burden of Disease in Australia, the Region and Globally. In order to effectively respond to the challenge of this Burden of Disease students will need to understand the biological, social and environmental courses of these patterns of disease; as well as an understanding of economic and political processes in determining a response to the burden of disease.

An understanding of how health systems and organisations are structured and function to respond to this Burden of Disease in Australia, the Region and Globally is central to understanding how Population Health Responses are mounted.

Lecturer 1/01/0001 - 1/01/0001
PUBH6302 Social and Ecosystem Health
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Understanding the social and ecosystem causes of human disease is essential for developing and implementing effective public health policies. This course draws together two important emerging areas of public health: social determinants of health inequality and the ecosystem health perspective (Ecohealth). ‘Sustainable’ human health depends upon healthy ecosystems. Yet ecosystems around the world are deteriorating under increasing pressure from human activity and patterns of consumption. Analysing the links between public health, ecosystems and social/cultural contexts offers guidance for addressing the dual threat to environmental and human health.

Lecturer 19/07/2013 - 31/12/2020
PUBH 6301 Chronic Disease and Injury Control
The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
This course provides students with a more detailed understanding of contemporary population health risks and challenges posed by chronic or non-communicable disease of public health significance in Australia, the Region and Globally.
Course Co-ordinator 1/07/2017 - 31/12/2018
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Majeed T, Forder PM, Mishra G, Kendig H, Byles JE, 'Exploring Workforce Participation Patterns and Chronic Diseases among Middle-Aged Australian Men and Women over the Life Course', Journal of Aging and Health, 29 343-361 (2017)

© SAGE Publications. Objective: This study identified associations between chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma, depression, and arthritis) and workforce participation patterns wit... [more]

© SAGE Publications. Objective: This study identified associations between chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma, depression, and arthritis) and workforce participation patterns with a gendered perspective. Method: We used data from 1,261 middle-aged participants of the Australian Life Histories and Health (LHH) Survey, aged 60 to 64 years in 2011. Latent class analysis identified dominant workforce patterns and associations between chronic diseases and these patterns were explored by multinomial regression models. Results: Diabetes, asthma, depression, and arthritis were less prevalent in men and women in class "mostly full-time work," compared with other workforce patterns. The odds of "mostly full-time work" were lower for men reporting depression or arthritis, whereas among women, depression was associated with "increasing part-time work" after adjusting early and adult life factors. Discussion: The results strengthen the importance of gender focused policies aimed to promote and preserve health of young and middle-aged workers, and creating supportive environment for those with chronic health issues over the life course.

DOI 10.1177/0898264316635586
Co-authors Peta Forder, Julie Byles
2017 Dolja-Gore X, Tavener M, Majeed T, Nair BR, Byles JE, 'Uptake, prevalence and predictors of first-time use for the 75+ Health Assessment Scheme.', Aust J Prim Health, (2017)
DOI 10.1071/PY16108
Co-authors Meredith Tavener
2017 Majeed T, Forder PM, Tavener M, Vo K, Byles J, 'Work after age 65: A prospective study of Australian men and women.', Australas J Ageing, 36 158-164 (2017)
DOI 10.1111/ajag.12382
Co-authors Peta Forder, Meredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2017 Khan AA, Ashraf A, Baker D, Al-Omary MS, Savage L, Ekmejian A, et al., 'Clozapine and incidence of myocarditis and sudden death ¿ Long term Australian experience', International Journal of Cardiology, 238 136-139 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Background Clozapine is the cornerstone of therapy for refractory schizophrenia; however, the potential for cardiotoxicity is an important limitation in its use. In the cu... [more]

© 2017 Background Clozapine is the cornerstone of therapy for refractory schizophrenia; however, the potential for cardiotoxicity is an important limitation in its use. In the current analysis we sought to evaluate the long term cardiac outcomes of clozapine therapy. Methods All-cause mortality, incidence of sudden death and time to myocarditis were assessed in a cohort of patients maintained on clozapine between January 2009 and December 2015. All patients had regular electrocardiograms, complete blood count, clozapine levels and echocardiography as part of a formal protocol. Results A total of 503 patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia were maintained on clozapine during the study period of which 93 patients (18%) discontinued therapy with 29 (6%) deaths. The incidence of sudden death and myocarditis were 2% (n¿=¿10) and 3% (n¿=¿14) respectively. Amongst patients with sudden death, 7 out of 10 (70%) were documented to have used illicit drugs prior to death, with a tendency to weight gain also noted. The mean time to myocarditis post clozapine commencement was 15¿±¿7¿days. The reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction in those with myocarditis was 11¿±¿2%. Conclusion Myocarditis and sudden cardiac death are uncommon but clinically important complications in a cohort of patients followed while maintained on clozapine undergoing regular cardiac assessment. Further studies are required to document the role of preventive measures for left ventricular dysfunction and sudden cardiac death in this population.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.03.013
2016 Eftekhari P, Forder PM, Majeed T, Byles JE, 'Impact of asthma on mortality in older women: An Australian cohort study of 10,413 women', Respiratory Medicine, 119 102-108 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Comorbid conditions frequently coexist with asthma in older adults and can alter the natural history of asthma, complicating management and affecti... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Background Comorbid conditions frequently coexist with asthma in older adults and can alter the natural history of asthma, complicating management and affecting overall prognosis and survival. Objectives This study investigates the impact of asthma on mortality among older women, with a specific interest in influence of comorbidities and social factors on survival of older women with asthma. Design Participants were from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and were born between 1921 and 1926. Cox proportional hazards were used to evaluate mortality rates for women with and without asthma, after adjustment for comorbidities and other factors. Results Of 10,413 women aged 73¿78, 829 (8%) reported having been diagnosed by a doctor for asthma. Women with asthma had a higher likelihood of heart disease, hypertension, thrombosis, bronchitis/emphysema, osteoporosis and major illnesses (p¿ < ¿0.0001). Asthma was associated with increased risk of death (HR¿=¿1.31, 95%CI 1.18¿1.45, p¿ < ¿0.0001). After adjusting for age, demographic factors, comorbidities, risk factors, residential area and social support, women with asthma retained a 17% increased risk of death compared to women without asthma (HR¿=¿1.17, 95%CI 1.03¿1.32, p¿=¿0.016). Conclusion Older women with asthma have a higher rate of mortality compared with other women of the same age. This increased risk of death remains after age, demographic factors, comorbidities, risk factors, residential area and social support have been taken into account.

DOI 10.1016/j.rmed.2016.08.026
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2015 Majeed T, Forder P, Mishra G, Byles J, 'Women, Work, and Illness: A Longitudinal Analysis of Workforce Participation Patterns for Women Beyond Middle Age.', J Womens Health (Larchmt), 24 455-465 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1089/jwh.2014.5009
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2015 Majeed T, Forder P, Mishra G, Kendig H, Byles J, 'A gendered approach to workforce participation patterns over the life course for an Australian baby boom cohort', Journal of Vocational Behavior, 87 108-122 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Population ageing and its future implications for governments and individuals have been central to much policy debate and research targeted to retain older p... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Inc. Population ageing and its future implications for governments and individuals have been central to much policy debate and research targeted to retain older people in the workforce. This study identified workforce participation patterns across the adult life course for women and men entering later life, and explored the influences of various early and adult life socio-demographic circum stances. Data were collected from 1261 men and women aged 60 to 64. years in the Life History and Health (LHH) Survey (a sub-study of the Sax Institute's 45 and Up Study, Australia) in 2010-11. LHH provides detailed information on personal histories of paid work, socio-economic resources from childhood (number of books and father's occupation) and adult life factors such as educational attainment, marital histories, childcare and informal caring. Latent class analysis (LCA) was undertaken to identify patterns of workforce participation for participants across their adult life. Significant gender differences were confirmed. Further analysis (LCA with covariates) showed that women who reported having books during childhood, and those who had post-school qualification, were more likely to have mostly been in paid work and less likely to have not been in paid work; while ever partnered women had significantly higher odds of increasing part time work over time. Men who had reported ever having had informal caring activities were likely to have had decreasing participation in paid work over time, and were highly likely to be not in paid work after 55. years. Ever partnered status was protective for being in paid work for men. These findings indicate the need for gender-specific policies and strategies to enable continued workforce participation throughout adult life and into later working years, particularly for people who had fewer social or economic opportunities earlier in life.

DOI 10.1016/j.jvb.2014.12.004
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
2014 Majeed T, Forder PM, Byles J, 'Employment Status and Chronic Diseases: A Cross-sectional Study among 60¿64 Year-old Men and Women', The International Journal of Aging and Society, 3 33-43 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Julie Byles, Peta Forder
Show 5 more journal articles
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $245,725

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20172 grants / $144,725

Health service use at the end of life by older Australian women with chronic conditions$130,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Project Team Professor Gita Mishra, Professor Annette Dobson, Doctor Michael Waller, Mr Richard Hockey, Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Xenia Dolja-Gore, Doctor Tazeen Majeed, Doctor Melissa Harris
Scheme Consultancy/Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1701041
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Understanding health care use, costs, and quality of life for older people with common cardiac dysrhythmia$14,725

Funding body: CEPAR (ARC Centre of Excellence in Population and Aging Health)

Funding body CEPAR (ARC Centre of Excellence in Population and Aging Health)
Project Team Professor Julie Byles, Doctor Tazeen Majeed, Professor Robert Cumming
Scheme Associate Investigator grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700570
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

20152 grants / $5,000

Workforce Participation Patterns Over The Life-course And The Association With Chronic Diseases - A Gendered Approach$3,500

Funding body: Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle
Scheme Grants-in-aid
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

Women, Work and Illness$1,500

Funding body: The University of New South Wales

Funding body The University of New South Wales
Scheme Travel Grant - ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20141 grants / $5,000

Supplementary Scholarship - ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)$5,000

Funding body: ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)

Funding body ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR)
Scheme Supplementary Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON N

20111 grants / $91,000

University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship (UNRS CENTRAL 50:50)$91,000

Funding body: The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Scheme University of Newcastle Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current5

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.75

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD HIV Epidemic on Female Garments Factory Workers in Dhaka City of Bangladesh PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Factors Associated with Hospital-Based Adverse Events in Older Patients - A Retrospective Study of Australian Women PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Impact of Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) among adults handling waste products in Bangladesh Health, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Using Epidemiological Evidence to Aid Tailored Joint Decision Making in Areas of Clinical Uncertainty in the Management of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) in Later Life PhD (Gender & Health), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Mental Health and Bone Quality PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Research Projects

Using latent class analysis to identify how mid‐aged women manage on income over time 2015 - 2017


Workforce participation patterns in middle age women with breast cancer. 2016 - 2018


Factors affecting survival among older women with asthma 2011 - 2015


Profiling women's workforce participation and child care usage- Department of Education and Training, Australian Government 2016 - 2017


Social, Economic and Environmental Factors (SEEF) Sub-study 2015 - 2017


Change in health status and health care use for women who have and have not had health assessments 2015 - 2017


The Life History and Health project 2012 - 2015

Publications

Majeed T, Forder P, Mishra G, Kendig H, Byles J, 'A gendered approach to workforce participation patterns over the life course for an Australian baby boom cohort', Journal of Vocational Behavior, 87 108-122 (2015) [C1]


Chronic disease and workforce participation patterns in young and middle aged women 2012 - 2016

Publications

Majeed T, Forder P, Mishra G, Byles J, 'Women, Work, and Illness: A Longitudinal Analysis of Workforce Participation Patterns for Women Beyond Middle Age.', J Womens Health (Larchmt), 24 455-465 (2015) [C1]


House and Home: Pathways and alternatives to residential aged care for older Australian women 2015 - 2016


Language and ageing in Australian women: An exploration of the effects of ageing on language 2016 - 2017


Narratives of health: Comparing ‘early’ and ‘late’ adopters of the 75+ Health Assessments 2017


Thinking ahead: How healthy do baby boomer women think they will be? 2016 - 2017


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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 6
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Dr Tazeen Majeed

Positions

Research Academic
School of Medicine & Public Health; Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Lecturer
School of Medicine & Public Health; Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email tazeen.majeed@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420618
Fax (02)40420044

Office

Room Level 4, West Wing
Building Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Buidling
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