Dr Reem Zeki

Dr Reem Zeki

Conjoint Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Reem Zeki is Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Faculty of Health and Medicine at the University of Newcastle, Senior Research Officer within the NSW Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network. She is a public health researcher and epidemiologist, with extensive experience in linked population health data management and analysis. She is currently working on an NHMRC-funded project evaluating outcomes of the Connections program through an analysis of population linked health and justice datasets. This important initiative provides individualised support for post-release NSW prisoners with a history of problem drug use. Reem previously worked on data management and analysis of the National Perinatal Data Collection at the University of NSW, co-authoring three national reports. 


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Technology Sydney
  • Master of Public Health, University of New South Wales

Keywords

  • Diabetes during pregnancy
  • Justice Health
  • Maternal morbidity
  • Perinatal epidemiology
  • Pregnancy
  • Return to custody

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
420299 Epidemiology not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/8/2019 - 31/12/2019 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow University of Technology Sydney
Faculty of Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/8/2014 - 31/7/2019 Research Officer University of Technology Sydney
Faculty of Health
Australia
2/7/2012 - 31/7/2014 Research assistant University of New South Wales
Medicine
Australia
1/11/1999 - 1/12/2006 Dentist Ministry of Health
Iraq
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2019 Zeki R, Li Z, Wang AY, Homer CSE, Oats JJN, Marshall D, Sullivan EA, 'Obstetric anal sphincter injuries among women with gestational diabetes and women without gestational diabetes: A NSW population-based cohort study', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 59 662-669 (2019) [C1]

Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) are associated with maternal morbidity; however, it is uncertain whether gestational diabetes (GDM) is an independent risk fa... [more]

Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) are associated with maternal morbidity; however, it is uncertain whether gestational diabetes (GDM) is an independent risk factor when considering birthweight mode of birth and episiotomy. Aims: To compare rates of OASIs between women with GDM and women without GDM by mode of birth and birthweight. To investigate the association between episiotomy, mode of birth and the risk of OASIs. Methods: A population-based cohort study of women who gave birth vaginally in NSW, from 2007 to 2013. Rates of OASIs were compared between women with and without GDM, stratified by mode of birth, birthweight and a multi-categorical variable of mode of birth and episiotomy. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by multivariable logistic regression. Results: The rate of OASIs was 3.6% (95% CI: 2.6¿2.7) vs 2.6% (95% CI: 3.4¿2.8; P¿<¿0.001) among women with and without GDM, respectively. Women with GDM and a macrosomic baby (birthweight¿=¿4000¿g) had a higher risk of OASIs with forceps (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.08¿2.86, P¿=¿0.02) or vacuum (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.17¿3.04, P¿=¿0.01), compared with those without GDM. For primiparous women with GDM and all women without GDM, an episiotomy with forceps was associated with lower odds of OASIs than forceps only (primiparous GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 2.49, 95% CI: 2.00¿3.11, forceps aOR 5.30, 95% CI: 3.72¿7.54), (primiparous without GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 2.71, 95% CI: 2.55¿2.89, forceps aOR 5.95, 95% CI: 5.41¿6.55) and (multiparous without GDM, forceps-episiotomy aOR 3.75, 95% CI: 3.12¿4.50, forceps aOR 6.20, 95% CI: 4.96¿7.74). Conclusion: Women with GDM and a macrosomic baby should be counselled about the increased risk of OASIs with both vacuum and forceps. With forceps birth, this risk can be partially mitigated by performing a concomitant episiotomy.

DOI 10.1111/ajo.12950
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors E Sullivan, Zhuoyang Li
2019 Sullivan EA, Kendall S, Chang S, Baldry E, Zeki R, Gilles M, et al., 'Aboriginal mothers in prison in Australia: a study of social, emotional and physical wellbeing', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 43 241-247 (2019) [C1]

Objective: To describe the social, emotional and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison. Methods: Cross-sectional survey, including a Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) ... [more]

Objective: To describe the social, emotional and physical wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers in prison. Methods: Cross-sectional survey, including a Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (5-item version) administered to Aboriginal women who self-identified as mothers. Results: Seventy-seven Aboriginal mothers in New South Wales (NSW) and 84 in Western Australia (WA) participated in the study. Eighty-three per cent (n=59) of mothers in NSW were in prison for drug-related offences, 64.8% (n=46) of mothers in WA were in prison for offences committed under the influence of alcohol. Sixty-eight per cent (n=52) of mothers in NSW and 35% (n=28) of mothers in WA reported mental health problems. Physical (PCS) and Mental (MCS) component scores of SF-12 varied for mothers in NSW and WA. Mothers in NSW experienced poorer health and functioning than mothers in WA (NSW: PCS 49.5, MCS 40.6; WA: PCS 54.4, MCS 48.3) and high levels of psychological distress (NSW: 13.1; WA 10.1). Conclusions: Aboriginal mothers in prison have significant health needs associated with physical and mental health, and psychological distress. Implications for public health: Adoption of social and emotional wellbeing as an explanatory framework for culturally secure healthcare in prison is essential to improving health outcomes of Aboriginal mothers in prison in Australia.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12892
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors E Sullivan
2019 Sullivan E, Ward S, Zeki R, Wayland S, Sherwood J, Wang A, et al., 'Recidivism, health and social functioning following release to the community of NSW prisoners with problematic drug use: study protocol of the population-based retrospective cohort study on the evaluation of the Connections Program', BMJ OPEN, 9 (2019)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030546
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors E Sullivan
2018 Zeki R, Oats JJN, Wang AY, Li Z, Homer CSE, Sullivan EA, 'Cesarean section and diabetes during pregnancy: An NSW population study using the Robson classification', JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH, 44 890-898 (2018)
DOI 10.1111/jog.13605
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Zhuoyang Li, E Sullivan
2018 Zeki R, Wang AY, Lui K, Li Z, Oats JJN, Homer CSE, Sullivan EA, 'Neonatal outcomes of live-born term singletons in vertex presentation born to mothers with diabetes during pregnancy by mode of birth: a New South Wales population-based retrospective cohort study', BMJ PAEDIATRICS OPEN, 2 (2018)
DOI 10.1136/bmjpo-2017-000224
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Zhuoyang Li, E Sullivan
Show 2 more journal articles

Report (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Hilder L, Li Z, Zeki R, Sullivan E, 'Stillbirths in Australia 1991-2009', AIHW, 84 (2014)
Co-authors Zhuoyang Li, E Sullivan
2013 Li Z, Zeki R, Hilder L, Sullivan E, 'Australia's mothers and babies 2011', AIHW National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit, 135 (2013)
Co-authors E Sullivan, Zhuoyang Li
2012 Li Z, Zeki R, Hilder L, Sullivan E, 'Australia s mothers and babies 2010', AIHW National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit 2012, 132 (2012)
Co-authors E Sullivan, Zhuoyang Li
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Dr Reem Zeki

Position

Conjoint Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email reem.zeki@newcastle.edu.au
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