Dr Natalie Johnson

Dr Natalie Johnson

Senior Lecturer

School of Medicine and Public Health (Health Behaviour Sciences)

Career Summary

Biography

I qualified from the University of Newcastle with a Bachelor of Education in 1989, postgraduate qualifications in Health Promotion in 1991, and a PhD in 1996. I held an NHMRC Postdoctoral Fellowship from 1996-2000, and was employed as a part-time lecturer in Quality Improvement in Health Care from 2001-2005 before returning to full-time employment as a lecturer in Health Behaviour Sciences in 2006. I was awarded an Equity Research Fellowship in 2007, promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2012, and was awarded a Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship in 2016. 

Research Expertise
I am a researcher in the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre in Health Behaviour, and the University of Newcastle's Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition. Recent research experience includes the conduct of an NHMRC funded randomised trial testing the efficacy of an electronic screening and brief intervention program on alcohol consumption among hospital outpatients with hazardous or harmful drinking. I was also a chief investigator on a randomised trial testing the efficacy of counselling by an exercise physiologist on the physical activity levels of referred insufficiently active primary care patients. A comprehensive program of research into the mental health and wellbeing of University students, which will complement my teaching experience, is in the early stages of development following the award of the Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship.

Teaching Expertise
I coordinated and taught postgraduate distance education courses in Quality Improvement in Health Care between 1998 and 2005. From 2006 onwards, I have coordinated and taught courses in health, public health and health promotion to students in the School of Education. I also teach communication skills to students enrolled in the Joint Medical Program. 

Administrative Expertise
I coordinate undergraduate courses with large numbers of students in both semesters and sit on the associated education and examination committees. In addition to this, I am the Human Research Ethics Peer Review Representative in the School of Medicine and Public Health.

Collaborations
I have established collaborations with a number of national and international experts on a range of innovative projects. This includes: (a) Prof Kyp Kypri (UoN), Prof John B. Saunders (Sydney University), Prof Richard Saitz (Boston University), Prof John Attia (UoN & JHH), A/Prof Adrian Dunlop (Director Drug & Alcohol Services, HNE LHD), Prof Christopher Doran (UoN), Prof Jim McCambridge (York University), Prof Patrick McElduff (previously UoN) and A/Prof Luke Wolfenden (HNE HLD) on a randomised trial designed to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of e-SBI for outpatients who screen positive for hazardous drinking and (b) A/Prof Erica James, Prof Ron Plotnikoff, Dr Ben Ewald and Prof Wendy Brown (UQ) on a trial testing the efficacy of two physical activity counselling strategies on physical activity behaviour over a 12-month period among insufficiently active adults attending general practices in the Newcastle and Lake Macquarie areas of NSW. 


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Education, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Social Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Health behaviour
  • Health promotion
  • Physical activity
  • Public health

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/03/2006 - 31/12/2012 Lecturer

Health Behaviour Sciences

The University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
1/01/2001 - 1/02/2006 Lecturer

Quality Improvement

University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2016 Gladys M Brawn Career Development Fellowship (Teaching Assist Scheme)
Gladys M Brawn Memorial Fellowship Scheme
2007 Equity Research Fellowship
The University of Newcastle
1996 Postdoctoral Fellowship
NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, Dunlop A, Brown A, Saitz R, et al., 'Effect of electronic brief intervention on uptake of specialty treatment in hospital outpatients with likely alcohol dependence: Pilot randomized trial and qualitative interviews.', Drug and alcohol dependence, 183 253-260 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.11.016
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Joanna Latter, Kypros Kypri, A Dunlop
2018 Ewald B, Stacey F, Johnson N, Plotnikoff RC, Holliday E, Brown W, James EL, 'Physical activity coaching by Australian Exercise Physiologists is cost effective for patients referred from general practice', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 12-15 (2018) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: Interventions to promote physical activity for sedentary patients seen in general practice may be a way to reduce the burden of chronic disease. Coac... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Objective: Interventions to promote physical activity for sedentary patients seen in general practice may be a way to reduce the burden of chronic disease. Coaching by an exercise physiologist is publicly funded in Australia, but cost effectiveness has not been documented. Methods: In a three-arm randomised controlled trial, face-to-face coaching and telephone coaching over 12 weeks were compared with a control group using the outcome of step count for one week at baseline, three months and twelve months. Program costs and time-based costs were considered. Quality of life was measured as a secondary outcome. Results: At 12 months, the intervention groups were more active than controls by 1,002 steps per day (95%CI 244, 1,759). This was achieved at a cost of AUD$245 per person. There was no change in reported quality of life or utility values. Conclusion: Coaching achieved a modest increase in activity equivalent to 10 minutes walking per day, at a cost of AUD$245 per person. Face-to-face and telephone counselling were both effective. Implication for public health: Persistence of increases nine months after the end of coaching suggests it creates long-term change and is a good value health intervention.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12733
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Erica James, Ron Plotnikoff, Ben Ewald
2018 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Latter J, et al., 'Effect of electronic screening and brief intervention on hazardous or harmful drinking among adults in the hospital outpatient setting: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 191 78-85 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Most trials of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) have been conducted in young people. The aim of this study was to evalu... [more]

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: Most trials of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) have been conducted in young people. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of e-SBI in adults with hazardous or harmful drinking. Methods: This individually randomized, parallel, two-group, double-blind controlled trial was conducted in the outpatient department of a large public hospital in Australia. Consenting adults who scored 5¿9 on the AUDIT-C (837/3225; 26%) were randomized in a 1:1 ratio by computer to screening alone (442/837; 53%) or to 10 min of assessment and personalized feedback on their alcohol consumption (comparisons with medical guidelines and age and sex-specific norms), peak blood alcohol concentration, expenditure on alcohol, and risk of alcohol dependence (395/837; 47%). The two primary outcomes, assessed six months after randomization, were the number of standard drinks (10 g ethanol) consumed by participants in the last seven days and their AUDIT score. Results: 693/837 (83%) and 635/837 (76%) participants were followed-up at 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in the median number of standard drinks consumed in the last seven days (intervention: 12; control: 10.5; rate ratio, 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 0.96¿1.31]; P =.17) or in their median AUDIT score (intervention: 7; control: 7; mean difference, 0.28 [-0.42 to 0.98]; P =.44). Conclusion: These results do not support the implementation of an e-SBI program comprising personalized feedback and normative feedback for adults with hazardous or harmful drinking in the hospital outpatient setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.06.030
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Joanna Latter, A Dunlop, John Attia, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Penrose L, Roe Y, Johnson NA, James EL, 'Process redesign of a surgical pathway improves access to cataract surgery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in South East Queensland', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 24 135-140 (2018) [C1]

© La Trobe University. The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) aimed to improve access to cataract surgery in urban South East Queensland (SEQ) for Indigenous Australians... [more]

© La Trobe University. The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) aimed to improve access to cataract surgery in urban South East Queensland (SEQ) for Indigenous Australians, without compromising clinical visual outcomes. The Penchansky and Levesque concept of access as the 'fit' between the patient's needs and the ability of the system to meet those needs was used to inform the redesign of the mainstream cataract surgical pathway. The IUIH staff and community stakeholders mapped the traditional external cataract surgical pathway and then innovatively redesigned it to reduce the number of patients being removed by the system at key transition points. The integration of eye health within the primary health care (PHC) clinic has improved the continuity and coordination of care along the surgical pathway, and ensured the sustainability of collaborative partnerships with key external organisations. Audit data demonstrated a significant increase in utilisation of cataract surgical services after the process redesign. Previous studies have found that PHC models involving integration, coordination and continuity of care enhance patient health outcomes however, the IUIH surgical model extends this to tertiary care. There is scope to apply this model to other surgical pathways and communities who experience access inequity.

DOI 10.1071/PY17039
Co-authors Erica James
2017 Mogre V, Johnson NA, Tzelepis F, Shaw J, Paul C, 'Adherence to self-care behaviours and associated barriers in type 2 diabetes patients of low-and middle-income countries: A systematic review protocol', Systematic Reviews, 6 (2017)

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Diabetes has become a global health emergency affecting high-, middle- and low-income countries. Previous systematic reviews have either focused ... [more]

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: Diabetes has become a global health emergency affecting high-, middle- and low-income countries. Previous systematic reviews have either focused on patients' adherence to diabetes self-care behaviours only or barriers to diabetes care (including self-care) only in the published literature and have not also analysed data separately for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Thus, none have focused on adherence with, and barriers to, self-care behaviours from the perspectives of both patient and providers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This systematic review will evaluate the published literature on adherence to five diabetes self-care behaviours (i.e., diet, exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose, medication taking and foot care) and associated barriers in type 2 diabetes patients in LMICs. Healthcare providers' barriers to the provision of diabetes self-care support will also be reviewed. Methods: This narrative review will be reported in accordance with the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P). The electronic databases, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and the British Nursing Index will be searched. Qualitative and quantitative studies reporting on type 2 diabetes patients' adherence to self-care behaviours and associated barriers in LMICs will be included. Studies also reporting on barriers encountered by providers in LMICs providing diabetes care and supporting patients to adhere to self-care behaviours will also be included. Cross-sectional studies, observational cohort studies, baseline data of randomised controlled trials and qualitative studies will be eligible. Two independent reviewers will screen articles for inclusion, undertake quality assessment of included studies and execute data extraction using standardised forms. Discrepancies will be discussed to reach consensus, and another reviewer will adjudicate if the need arises. The Guidance of Narrative Synthesis in Systematic Reviews will be employed to explore relationships within and between included studies. Discussion: This review will provide evidence on adherence to self-care behaviours by type 2 diabetes patients in LMICs. Barriers experienced by patients in LMICs to adhere to recommended self-care behaviours will also be identified. Barriers experienced by healthcare providers in LMICs in providing self-care support patients will also be determined. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42016035406

DOI 10.1186/s13643-017-0436-4
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Mogre V, Abanga ZO, Tzelepis F, Johnson NA, Paul C, 'Adherence to and factors associated with self-care behaviours in type 2 diabetes patients in Ghana', BMC ENDOCRINE DISORDERS, 17 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12902-017-0169-3
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Chris Paul, Flora Tzelepis
2017 James EL, Ewald BD, Johnson NA, Stacey FG, Brown WJ, Holliday EG, et al., 'Referral for Expert Physical Activity Counseling: A Pragmatic RCT', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 53 490-499 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Introduction Primary care physicians are well placed to offer physical activity counseling, but insufficient time is a barrier. Refe... [more]

© 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Introduction Primary care physicians are well placed to offer physical activity counseling, but insufficient time is a barrier. Referral to an exercise specialist is an alternative. In Australia, exercise specialists are publicly funded to provide face-to-face counseling to patients who have an existing chronic illness. This trial aimed to (1) determine the efficacy of primary care physicians¿ referral of insufficiently active patients for counseling to increase physical activity, compared with usual care, and (2) compare the efficacy of face-to-face counseling with counseling predominantly via telephone. Study design Three-arm pragmatic RCT. Setting/participants Two hundred three insufficiently active (<7,000 steps/day) primary care practice patients (mean age 57 years; 70% female) recruited in New South Wales, Australia, in 2011¿2014. Intervention (1) Five face-to-face counseling sessions by an exercise specialist, (2) one face-to-face counseling session followed by four telephone calls by an exercise specialist, or (3) a generic mailed physical activity brochure (usual care). The counseling sessions operationalized social cognitive theory via a behavior change counseling framework. Main outcome measures Change in average daily step counts between baseline and 12 months. Data were analyzed in 2016. Results Forty (20%) participants formally withdrew; completion rates at 3 and 6 months were 64% and 58%, respectively. Intervention attendance was high (75% received five sessions). The estimated mean difference between usual care and the combined intervention groups at 12 months was 1,002 steps/day (95% CI=244, 1,759, p=0.01). When comparing face-to-face with predominantly telephone counseling, the telephone group had a non-significant higher mean daily step count (by 619 steps) at 12 months. Conclusions Provision of expert physical activity counseling to insufficiently active primary care patients resulted in a significant increase in physical activity (approximately 70 minutes of walking per week) at 12 months. Face-to-face only and counseling conducted predominantly via telephone were both effective. This trial provides evidence to expand public funding for expert physical activity counseling and for delivery via telephone in addition to face-to-face consultations. Trial registration This trial is registered at www.anzctr.org.au/ ACTRN12611000884909.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.06.016
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Ron Plotnikoff, Erica James, Liz Holliday
2016 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, Attia J, McEvoy M, Dunlop A, Scott R, 'Genetic feedback to reduce alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking: Feasibility and acceptability', Public Health Research and Practice, 26 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Johnson et al. Objective: There have been no trials in healthcare settings of genetic susceptibility feedback in relation to alcohol consumption. The purpose of this study ... [more]

© 2016 Johnson et al. Objective: There have been no trials in healthcare settings of genetic susceptibility feedback in relation to alcohol consumption. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a full-scale randomised trial estimating the effect of personalised genetic susceptibility feedback on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking. Methods: Outpatients =18 years of age who reported drinking more than 14 standard drinks in the past week or in a typical week were asked to provide a saliva sample for genetic testing. Genetic susceptibility feedback was posted to participants 6 months after recruitment. The co-primary outcomes were the proportion of participants who (i) provided a saliva sample that could be genotyped, and (ii) spoke with a genetic counsellor. Secondary outcomes included changes in patients' weekly alcohol consumption; scores on scales measuring readiness to change, importance of changing and confidence in ability to change drinking habits; knowledge about which cancers are alcohol-attributable; and acceptability of the saliva collection procedure and the genetic-feedback intervention. McNemar's test and paired t-tests were used to test for differences between baseline and follow-up in proportions and means, respectively. Results: Of 100 participants who provided a saliva sample, 93 had adequate DNA for at least one genotyping assay. Three participants spoke to a genetic counsellor. Patients' readiness to change their drinking, their views on the importance of changing and their stated confidence in their ability to change increased between baseline and follow-up. There was no increase in patients' knowledge about alcohol-attributable cancers nor any reduction in how much alcohol they drank 4 months after receiving the feedback. Most participants (80%) were somewhat comfortable or very comfortable with the process used to collect saliva, 84% understood the genetic feedback, 54% found it useful, 10% had sought support to reduce their drinking after receiving the feedback, and 37% reported that the feedback would affect how much they drink in the future. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest it would be feasible to conduct a methodologically robust trial estimating the effect of genetic susceptibility feedback on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking.

DOI 10.17061/phrp2641645
Co-authors A Dunlop, Rodney Scott, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy, Kypros Kypri, Joanna Latter
2016 James E, Freund M, Booth A, Duncan MJ, Johnson N, Short CE, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials', Preventive Medicine, 89 211-223 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effec... [more]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. Methods: MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results: Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. Conclusions: There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.012
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Erica James, Mitch Duncan, Megan Freund, Angela Booth, Luke Wolfenden, Frances Kaylambkin
2015 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Attia J, Saitz R, et al., 'Effect of telephone follow-up on retention and balance in an alcohol intervention trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 746-749 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors. Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate t... [more]

© 2015 The Authors. Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of telephone follow-up on retention, identify participant characteristics predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up, and estimate the effect of including participants who provided follow-up data during or after telephone follow-up on balance between randomly allocated groups in a trial estimating the effect of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with hazardous or harmful drinking. Method: Trial participants were followed up 6. months after randomization (June-December 2013) using e-mails containing a hyperlink to a web-based questionnaire when possible and by post otherwise. Telephone follow-up was attempted after two written reminders and participants were invited to complete the questionnaire by telephone when contact was made. Results: Retention before telephone follow-up was 62.1% (520/837) and 82.8% (693/837) afterward: an increase of 20.7% (173/837). Therefore, 55% (95% CI 49%-60%) of the 317 participants who had not responded after two written reminders responded during or after the follow-up telephone call. Age. <. 55. years, a higher AUDIT-C score and provision of a mobile/cell phone number were predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up. Balance between randomly allocated groups was present before and after inclusion of participants who completed the questionnaire during or after telephone follow-up. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up improved retention in this randomized trial without affecting balance between the randomly allocated groups.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.08.016
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors John Attia, A Dunlop, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri, Joanna Latter
2015 Plotnikoff RC, Costigan SA, Short C, Grunseit A, James E, Johnson N, et al., 'Factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations: Findings from the 45 & up Study', PLoS ONE, 10 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and r... [more]

© 2015 Plotnikoff et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This study examined factors associated with higher sitting time in general, chronic disease, and psychologically-distressed, adult populations (aged =45 years). A series of logistic regression models examined potential socio-demographic and health factors associated with higher sitting (=6hrs/day) in adults from the 45 and Up Study (n = 227,187), including four separate subsamples for analysis comprising those who had ever had heart disease (n = 26,599), cancer (n = 36,381), diabetes (n = 19,550) or psychological distress (n = 48,334). Odds of higher sitting were significantly (p<.01) associated with a number of factors across these groups, with an effect size of ORs=1.5 observed for the high-income =$70,000AUD, employed full-time and severe physical limitations demographics. Identification of key factors associated with higher sitting time in this population-based sample will assist development of broad-based, public health and targeted strategies to reduce sitting-time. In particular, those categorized as being high-income earners, full-time workers, as well as those with severe physical limitations need to be of priority, as higher sitting appears to be substantial across these groups.

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0127689
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Catherine Deste, Erica James, Sarah Costigan, Ron Plotnikoff
2014 Outram S, Dundas K, Johnson NA, 'The educated citizen: A case study and guide for teaching public health to undergraduates in Australian universities.', Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-disciplinary Journal, 15 32-40 (2014) [C1]
Co-authors Sue Outram, Kate Dundas
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalen... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors A Dunlop, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Kypros Kypri, Joanna Latter, Luke Wolfenden
2014 James EL, Ewald B, Johnson N, Brown W, Stacey FG, Mcelduff P, et al., 'Efficacy of GP referral of insufficiently active patients for expert physical activity counseling: protocol for a pragmatic randomized trial (The NewCOACH trial)', BMC FAMILY PRACTICE, 15 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s12875-014-0218-1
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Ron Plotnikoff, Erica James, Angela Booth, Ben Ewald, Patrick Mcelduff
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Dunlop A, et al., 'The hospital outpatient alcohol project (HOAP): protocol for an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention versus screening alone for unhealthy alcohol use.', Addict Sci Clin Pract, 8 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-8-14
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Attia, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, A Dunlop, Kypros Kypri
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Attia J, 'Development of an electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention program for hospital outpatients with unhealthy alcohol use.', JMIR Res Protoc, 2 e36 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/resprot.2697
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Attia, Kypros Kypri
2012 Gilligan C, Kypri K, Johnson NA, Lynagh MC, Love S, 'Parental supply of alcohol and adolescent risky drinking', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 754-762 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 35
Co-authors Marita Lynagh, Conor Gilligan, Kypros Kypri
2012 Ewald BD, james E, Johnson N, brown W, stacey F, plotnikoff R, 'Efficacy of referral for physical activity counseling: protocol for an rct to compare face to face and telephone counseling.', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15 (2012)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.11.405
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Erica James, Ron Plotnikoff
2010 Johnson NA, Inder KJ, Bowe SJ, 'Trends in referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation in the Hunter Region of Australia, 2002-2007', European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, 17 77-82 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/HJR.0b013e3283304060
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Kerry Inder
2010 Johnson NA, Inder KJ, Ewald BD, James EL, Bowe SJ, 'Association between participation in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation and self-reported receipt of lifestyle advice from a healthcare provider: Results of a population based cross-sectional survey', Rehabilitation Research and Practice, Article 541741 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1155/2010/541741
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Kerry Inder, Erica James
2010 Ewald BD, james E, Johnson N, paras L, 'Efficacy of exercise physiologist counselling in primary care patients. A pilot study to determine feasibility and acceptability. B. Ewald, E James, N. Johnson, L. Paras Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport vol 12, e225-e226', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12 e225-e226 (2010)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.10.473
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Erica James
2010 Johnson NA, Inder KJ, Nagle AL, Wiggers JH, 'Attendance at outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: Is it enhanced by specialist nurse referral?', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 27 31-37 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kerry Inder
2009 Johnson NA, Lim LLY, Bowe SJ, 'Multicenter randomized controlled trial of a home walking intervention after outpatient cardiac rehabilitation on health-related quality of life in women', European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, 16 633-637 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/hjr.0b013e32832e8eba
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
2009 Johnson NA, Inder KJ, Nagle AL, Wiggers JH, 'Secondary prevention among cardiac patients not referred to cardiac rehabilitation', Medical Journal of Australia, 190 161 (2009) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Kerry Inder, John Wiggers
2004 Johnson NA, Fisher JD, Nagle AL, Inder KJ, Wiggers JH, 'Factors Associated With Referral to Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Services', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, 24 165-170 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/00008483-200405000-00005
Citations Scopus - 29
Co-authors Kerry Inder, John Wiggers
2000 Walker RJ, Johnson NA, Heller RF, 'Postgraduate courses in quality improvement: Achievements and future directions', Journal of Quality in Clinical Practice, 20 33-35 (2000) [C3]
1998 Lim L, Johnson NA, O'Connell RL, Heller RF, 'Quality of life and later health outcomes in patients with suspected heart attack', Australian New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 22(5) 540-546 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 31Web of Science - 26
1998 Johnson NA, Heller RF, 'Prediction of Patient Non-Adherence with Home-Based Exercise for Cardiac Rehabilitation: The role of Perceived Barriers and Perceived Benefits', Preventive Medicine, 27 56-64 (1998) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 31
1995 Johnson NA, Boyle CA, Heller RF, 'Leisure-time physical activity and other health behaviours: Are they related?', Australian Journal of Public Health, 19 69-75 (1995) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 22Web of Science - 20
Show 26 more journal articles

Conference (6 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Johnson N, Latter J, Kypri K, 'PREVALENCE OF UNHEALTHY ALCOHOL USE AMONG HOSPITAL OUTPATIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors Joanna Latter, Kypros Kypri
2012 Johnson NA, Kypri K, 'The Hospital Outpatients Alcohol Project: Developmental research for a large randomised controlled trial', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kypros Kypri
2012 James EL, Ewald BD, Johnson NA, Brown W, Stacey FG, Plotnikoff RC, 'Efficacy of referral for physical activity counseling: Protocol for an RCT to compare face-to-face and telephone counselling', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Ben Ewald, Ron Plotnikoff, Erica James
2009 Ewald BD, James EL, Johnson NA, Paras LE, 'Efficacy of exercise physiologist counselling in primary care patients: A pilot study to determine feasibility and acceptability', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Brisbane, QLD (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Erica James, Ben Ewald
2005 Johnson NA, Walker RJ, 'Cardiovascular disease in the Hunter: trends 1995 to 2005', Australasian Epidemiologist, Newcastle (2005)
2002 Nagle A, Fisher J, Wiggers J, Johnson N, Inder K, 'Prevalence of being invited, attending, and completing phase II outpatient cardiac rehabilitation', AMERICAN HEART JOURNAL, WASHINGTON, D.C. (2002)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kerry Inder
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 9
Total funding $1,655,571

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20131 grants / $888

APSAD (Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs) Scientific Conference 2013, Brisbane Australia, 24-27 November 2013$888

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1301088
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20121 grants / $370,170

Double blind randomised controlled trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for hospital outpatients$370,170

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Kypros Kypri, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor John Saunders, Professor Richard Saitz, Professor John Attia
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100111
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20111 grants / $752,851

Efficacy of exercise physiologist counselling in primary care patients: a RCT of two pragmatic approaches$752,851

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Erica James, Doctor Benjamin Ewald, Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor Ronald Plotnikoff
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G0190295
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20092 grants / $279,752

Health Behaviour Research Centre (HBRC)$267,361

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Modification and piloting of a web-based electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) to reduce unhealthy drinking among hospital outpatients$12,391

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding body Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson, Professor Kypros Kypri
Scheme Innovative Project Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0190229
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20072 grants / $28,115

Equity Research Fellowship - teaching relief$23,035

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0186940
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

2007 Equity Research Fellowship - Research Grant$5,080

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson
Scheme Equity Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo G0187294
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19981 grants / $2,300

The descriptive epidemiology of cardiac patient participation in post=hospital cardiac rehabilitation in New South Wales$2,300

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 1998
Funding Finish 1998
GNo G0177631
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

19961 grants / $221,495

Benefit of home-based low-to-moderate intensity exercise on quality of life in women with ischaemic heart disease$221,495

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Natalie Johnson
Scheme PHRDC Post Training Fellowship (Defunct)
Role Lead
Funding Start 1996
Funding Finish 2000
GNo G0175561
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Mental Health and Help-Seeking of Australian Postgraduate Students PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Potentials of eHealth and mHealth Services in Health Sector of Bangladesh. PhD (CommunityMed & ClinEpid), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Self-care Behaviours in Ghanaian Adult Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Adherence, Barriers and Health Outcomes. PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Teaching Public Health in Australia PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Natalie Johnson

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Health Behaviour Sciences

Contact Details

Email natalie.johnson@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420552
Fax (02) 40420044

Office

Room W4 - Desk 37
Building HMRI Building
Location New Lambton Heights

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