Dr Megan Freund

Dr Megan Freund

NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Megan Freund is a mid-career researcher who has worked in health behaviour research for over 18 years. She completed her PhD in 2008 at the University of Newcastle. She held the HMRI and Newcastle Institute of Public Health Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships between 2007 and 2013, working closely with the Hunter New England Health District's Population Health Unit. In 2016, Dr Freund commenced working with the Health Behaviour Research Collaborative at the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Newcastle. Dr Freund currently holds an NHMRC Translation Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowship.

Research expertise

Dr Freund's research focus is on translational research regarding the adoption of efficacious health behaviour interventions into routine practice by service delivery organisations. During her TRIP Fellowship, Dr Freund will conduct a research trial that examines the effectiveness of systems-based intervention in increasing health assessments for Aboriginal people attending Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Dr Freund's other current research includes:

  • Improving timely diagnosis and provision of best care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia
  • Examining the relative impact of individual client, treatment and system level factors on successful outcomes for people seeking assistance with alcohol misuse
  • Understanding the prevalence, type and burden of adolescent gambling
  • Examing the health and wellbeing needs of people residing in social housing
  • Understanding the health and wellbeing needs of older people living in manufactured home villages

Dr Freund has published 58 papers in peer reviewed journals.  She has been successful in applications to nationally competitive grants with a funding value of over $7M. This includes funding from NHMRC Project, NHMRC Partnership, NHMRC Boosting and ARC Linkage grants schemes. Dr Freund currently supervises 3 PhD students. She has supervised 3 PhD, 2 masters and 4 honours students to completion. Dr Freund has reviewed grant applications for the NHMRC Project round, the NHMRC TRIP Fellowship round, the ARC Fellowship scheme, the US National Institutes of Health (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) grants scheme, and the UK Medical Research Council’s Fellowship scheme. Dr Freund has reviewed manuscripts at the request of journal editors including those from the American Journal of Public Health, the Drug and Alcohol Review, BMJ Open, Nicotine and Tobacco Research and Addiction.

Collaborations

Dr Freund has collaborated with the Hunter New England Health Service (HNE), in particular,

working toward building the capacity of HNE clinical services to provide preventive care to all

patients in a systematic and evidence-based fashion. Dr Freund has collaborated with a number of

Translational Cancer Research Centres regarding a project that aimed to develop and pilot test an approach for implementing smoking cessation care for cancer patients. Currently Dr Freund is collaborating with leading drug and alcohol clinical care experts in the delivery of a nationwide research project investigating the relative impact of individual client, treatment and clinical system factors on outcomes for people seeking assistance with alcohol misuse.



Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle
  • Graduate Diploma in Health Promotion, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Aboriginal health
  • Dementia
  • Health assessment
  • Health service delivery
  • Preventive care

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 30
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 40
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow Priority Research Centre (PRC) for Healthy Lungs | The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health
Australia
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (65 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Dunlop A, et al., 'Providing routine chronic disease preventive care in community substance use services: A pilot study of a multistrategic clinical practice change intervention', BMJ Open, 8 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020042
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, A Dunlop, John Wiggers
2018 Hodder RK, Homer S, Freund M, Bowman JA, Lecathelinais C, Coly-Vas K, et al., 'The association between adolescent condom use and individual and environmental resilience protective factors', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42 230-233 (2018) [C1]

© 2018 The University of Newcastle. Objective: Individual and environmental resilience protective factors are suggested to be associated with adolescent condom use; however, previ... [more]

© 2018 The University of Newcastle. Objective: Individual and environmental resilience protective factors are suggested to be associated with adolescent condom use; however, previous studies have not comprehensively examined such associations. This study aimed to determine the associations between condom use, and numerous individual and environmental resilience protective factors in sexually active Australian adolescents. Methods: Participants were Grade 10 students attending 28 Australian government high schools (n=1,688). An online survey (2011) collected data regarding: sexual intercourse (past year), condom use and 14 individual and environmental resilience protective factors. Multivariable backward stepwise logistic regression models examined associations between student condom use and protective factors (total, subscale). Results: Only total environmental protective factors remained in the final total score model; students with higher total environmental protective factors scores were 2.59 times more likely to always use a condom(95%CI:1.80-3.74). Only three of 14 protective factor subscales were associated with a higher likelihood of always using a condom in the final subscale model (individual: goals/aspirations; environmental: community participation, pro-social peers). Conclusions: Total environmental and three protective factor subscales demonstrated prominent associations with consistent use of condoms in sexually active adolescents. Implications for public health: Consideration of particular resilience protective factors in adolescent sexual risk behaviour prevention, such as condom use, is warranted.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12744
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Kim Colyvas, Julia Dray Uon
2018 Peek K, Bryant J, Carey M, Dodd N, Freund M, Lawson S, Meyer C, 'Reducing falls among people living with dementia: A systematic review.', Dementia (London), 1471301218803201 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/1471301218803201
Co-authors Natalie Dodd, Jamie Bryant, Mariko Carey
2018 Freund M, Zucca A, Sanson-Fisher R, Milat A, Mackenzie L, Turon H, 'Barriers to the evaluation of evidence-based public health policy', Journal of Public Health Policy, (2018)

© 2018, Springer Nature Limited. Public health policy has the potential to produce great benefits for individuals and communities. There is growing demand that such efforts be rig... [more]

© 2018, Springer Nature Limited. Public health policy has the potential to produce great benefits for individuals and communities. There is growing demand that such efforts be rigorously evaluated to ensure that the expected benefits are, in fact, realised. Commonly, public health policy is evaluated by consumer acceptability, reach, or changes in knowledge and attitudes. Non-robust research designs are often used. But these approaches to evaluation do not answer three critical questions: Has a change in the desired outcome occurred? Was it a consequence of the policy and not some extraneous factor? Was the size of the change considered significant and cost-effective? We, a team of government and academic scholars working in research and evaluation, have examined some of the more common impediments to robust evaluation: political impediments, a lack of investment in evaluation capacity within bureaucracy, and the failure of academic researchers to understand the need for the evaluation of public health policy.

DOI 10.1057/s41271-018-0145-9
Co-authors Rob Sanson-Fisher, Lisa Mackenzie, Alison Zucca
2018 Freund M, Hobden B, Deeming S, Noble N, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW, 'Reducing alcohol-related harm in Australia: a simple data-based tool to assist prioritization of research and health care delivery in primary care.', Fam Pract, (2018)
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmy103
Co-authors Bree Hobden, Natasha Noble, Rob Sanson-Fisher
2018 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'Differential intervention effectiveness of a universal school-based resilience intervention in reducing adolescent substance use within student subgroups: Exploratory assessment within a cluster-randomised controlled trial', BMJ Open, 8 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021047
Co-authors John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Christopher Oldmeadow, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Bryant J, Turon H, Waller A, Freund M, Mansfield E, Sanson-Fisher R, 'Effectiveness of interventions to increase participation in advance care planning for people with a diagnosis of dementia: A systematic review.', Palliat Med, 269216318801750 (2018)
DOI 10.1177/0269216318801750
Co-authors Elise Mansfield, Jamie Bryant, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Amy Waller
2017 Tzelepis F, Daly J, Dowe S, Bourke A, Gillham K, Freund M, 'Supporting aboriginal women to quit smoking: Antenatal and postnatal care providers' confidence, attitudes, and practices', Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 19 642-646 (2017) [C1]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies hav... [more]

© The Author 2017. Introduction: Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies have investigated the amount or type of smoking cessation care that stafffrom Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal services provide to clients who smoke or staffconfidence to do so. This study examined Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal staffconfidence, perceived role and delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women and characteristics associated with provision of such care. Methods: Stafffrom 11 Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Services and eight Aboriginal Child and Family Health services in the Hunter New England Local Health District in Australia completed a cross-sectional self-reported survey (n = 67, response rate = 97.1%). Results: Most staffreported they assessed clients' smoking status most or all of the time (92.2%). However, only a minority reported they offered a quitline referral (42.2%), provided follow-up support (28.6%) or provided nicotine replacement therapy (4.7%) to most or all clients who smoked. Few stafffelt confident in motivating clients to quit smoking (19.7%) and advising clients about using nicotine replacement therapy (15.6%). Staffconfident with talking to clients about how smoking affected their health had significantly higher odds of offering a quitline referral [OR = 4.9 (1.7-14.5)] and quitting assistance [OR = 3.9 (1.3-11.6)] to clients who smoke. Conclusions: Antenatal and postnatal staffdelivery of smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal women or mothers with young Aboriginal children could be improved. Programs that support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal providers to deliver smoking cessation care to clients are needed. Implications: Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staffhave multiple opportunities to assist Aboriginal women to quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum. However, staffconfidence and practices of offering various forms of smoking cessation support to pregnant Aboriginal women is unexplored. This is the first study to examine the amount and type of smoking cessation support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staffprovide to Aboriginal women, staffconfidence and their perceived role in delivering smoking cessation care. This information is valuable for developing strategies that assist antenatal and postnatal staffto improve their delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women.

DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntw286
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis
2017 Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services', Drug and Alcohol Review, 36 369-377 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introducti... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: Health risk behaviours, such as smoking, nutrition and physical inactivity, are significant contributors to chronic disease for people with substance use disorders. This study reports the prevalence of these behaviours amongst substance use treatment clients, their attitudes towards modifying such behaviours and the acceptability of receiving support to do so. Client characteristics associated with risk status and interest in modifying behaviours were examined. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with clients of 15 community substance use treatment services within in New South Wales, Australia. Data for the study were collected via computer assisted telephone interviews. Results: Of those contactable and eligible, 386 (71%) clients completed the survey. Clients reported a high prevalence of smoking (80%), insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption (89%) and insufficient physical activity (31%). Overall, 51¿69% of clients reported considering modifying their health risk behaviours and 88¿97% thought it was acceptable to be provided preventive care to address such behaviours. Younger clients were more likely to smoke (18¿34 years (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 11.3]); 35¿54 years (OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.2, 5.7])) and be interested in increasing vegetable consumption (18¿34 years (OR = 4.4 [95% CI = 1.3, 14.8]); 35¿54 years (OR = 8.0 [95% CI = 2.5, 25.4])) than older clients (=55 years). Discussion and Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of health risk behaviours amongst clients of community substance use treatment services. However, contrary to commonly cited barriers to care provision, clients are interested in modifying their risk behaviours and report that receiving preventive care to address these behaviours is acceptable. [Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, Gillham K, Bartlem K, McElwaine K, Gow B, Wiggers J. Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:369¿377.].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12439
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem
2017 Wiggers J, McElwaine K, Freund M, Campbell L, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Increasing the provision of preventive care by community healthcare services: a stepped wedge implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0636-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Daniel Barker
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal intervention targeting student resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents', Journal of Adolescence, 57 74-89 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach... [more]

© 2017 The Authors Worldwide, 10¿20% of adolescents experience mental health problems. Strategies aimed at strengthening resilience protective factors provide a potential approach for reducing mental health problems in adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a universal, school-based intervention targeting resilience protective factors in reducing mental health problems in adolescents. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in 20 intervention and 12 control secondary schools located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas of NSW, Australia. Data were collected from 3115 students at baseline (Grade 7, 2011), of whom 2149 provided data at follow up (Grade 10, 2014; enrolments in Grades 7 to 10 typically aged 12¿16 years; 50% male; 69.0% retention). There were no significant differences between groups at follow-up for three mental health outcomes: total SDQ, internalising problems, and prosocial behaviour. A small statistically significant difference in favour of the control group was found for externalising problems. Findings highlight the continued difficulties in developing effective, school-based prevention programs for mental health problems in adolescents. Trial registration ANZCTR (Ref no: ACTRN12611000606987).

DOI 10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.03.009
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2017 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Freund M, Clancy R, et al., 'Efficacy of a universal smoking cessation intervention initiated in inpatient psychiatry and continued post-discharge: A randomised controlled trial', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51 366-381 (2017) [C1]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Interventions are required to redress the disproportionate tobacco-related health burden experienced by... [more]

© The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Interventions are required to redress the disproportionate tobacco-related health burden experienced by persons with a mental illness. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a universal smoking cessation intervention initiated within an acute psychiatric inpatient setting and continued post-discharge in reducing smoking prevalence and increasing quitting behaviours. Method: A randomised controlled trial was undertaken across four psychiatric inpatient facilities in Australia. Participants (N = 754) were randomised to receive either usual care (n = 375) or an intervention comprising a brief motivational interview and self-help material while in hospital, followed by a 4-month pharmacological and psychosocial intervention (n = 379) upon discharge. Primary outcomes assessed at 6 and 12 months post-discharge were 7-day point prevalence and 1-month prolonged smoking abstinence. A number of secondary smoking-related outcomes were also assessed. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on psychiatric diagnosis, baseline readiness to quit and nicotine dependence. Results: Seven-day point prevalence abstinence was higher for intervention participants (15.8%) than controls (9.3%) at 6 months post-discharge (odds ratio = 1.07, p = 0.04), but not at 12 months (13.4% and 10.0%, respectively; odds ratio = 1.03, p = 0.25). Significant intervention effects were not found on measures of prolonged abstinence at either 6 or 12 months post-discharge. Differential intervention effects for the primary outcomes were not detected for any subgroups. At both 6 and 12 months post-discharge, intervention group participants were significantly more likely to smoke fewer cigarettes per day, have reduced cigarette consumption by 3/450% and to have made at least one quit attempt, relative to controls. Conclusions: Universal smoking cessation treatment initiated in inpatient psychiatry and continued post-discharge was efficacious in increasing 7-day point prevalence smoking cessation rates and related quitting behaviours at 6 months post-discharge, with sustained effects on quitting behaviour at 12 months. Further research is required to identify strategies for achieving longer term smoking cessation.

DOI 10.1177/0004867417692424
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Richard Clancy, Kim Colyvas, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Nepal S, Dray J, et al., 'Systematic review of universal school-based ¿resilience¿ interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use: A meta-analysis', Preventive Medicine, 100 248-268 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous systema... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier Inc. Universal school-based interventions that address adolescent ¿resilience¿ may represent a means of reducing adolescent substance use, however previous systematic reviews have not examined the effectiveness of such an intervention approach. A systematic review was undertaken to 1) assess whether universal school-based ¿resilience¿ interventions are effective in reducing the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use by adolescents, and 2) describe such effectiveness per intervention characteristic subgroups. Eligible studies were peer-reviewed reports (1994¿2015) of randomised controlled trials including participants aged 5¿18¿years that reported adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit substance use, and implemented a universal school-based ¿resilience¿ intervention (i.e. those addressing both individual (e.g. self-esteem) and environmental (e.g. school connectedness) protective factors of resilience). Trial effects for binary outcomes were synthesised via meta-analyses and effect sizes reported as odds ratios. Subgroup (by intervention type, prevention approach, setting, intervention duration, follow-up length) and sensitivity analyses (excluding studies at high risk of bias) were conducted. Nineteen eligible studies were identified from 16,619 records (tobacco: n¿=¿15, alcohol: n¿=¿17, illicit: n¿=¿11). An overall intervention effect was found for binary measures of illicit substance use (n¿=¿10; OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.6¿0.93, p¿=¿0.007,Tau2¿=¿0.0, I2¿=¿0%), but not tobacco or alcohol use. A similar result was found when studies assessed as high risk of bias were excluded. Overall intervention effects were evident for illicit substance use within multiple intervention characteristic subgroups, but not tobacco and alcohol. Such results support the implementation of universal school-based interventions that address ¿resilience¿ protective factors to reduce adolescent illicit substance use, however suggest alternate approaches are required for tobacco and alcohol use. PROSPERO registration: CRD42014004906.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, Jenny Bowman
2017 Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Dray J, et al., 'Effectiveness of a pragmatic school-based universal resilience intervention in reducing tobacco, alcohol and illicit substance use in a population of adolescents: cluster-randomised controlled trial', BMJ OPEN, 7 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016060
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, et al., 'Systematic Review of Universal Resilience-Focused Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 56 813-824 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems i... [more]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems in children and adolescents. Method Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of universal, school-based interventions that included strategies to strengthen a minimum of 3 internal resilience protective factors, and included an outcome measure of mental health problems in children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years. Six databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Results were pooled in meta-analyses by mental health outcome (anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, hyperactivity, conduct problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress), for all trials (5-18 years). Subgroup analyses were conducted by age (child: 5-10 years; adolescent: 11-18 years), length of follow-up (short: post-=12 months; long: >12 months), and gender (narrative). Results A total of 57 included trials were identified from 5,984 records, with 49 contributing to meta-analyses. For all trials, resilience-focused interventions were effective relative to a control in reducing 4 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. For child trials (meta-analyses for 6 outcomes), interventions were effective for anxiety symptoms and general psychological distress. For adolescent trials (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. For short-term follow-up, interventions were effective for 2 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. For long-term follow-up (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. Conclusion The findings may suggest most promise for using universal resilience-focused interventions at least for short-term reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms for children and adolescents, particularly if a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based approach is used. The limited number of trials providing data amenable for meta-analysis for some outcomes and subgroups, the variability of interventions, study quality, and bias mean that it is not possible to draw more specific conclusions. Identifying what intervention qualities (such as number and type of protective factor) achieve the greatest positive effect per mental health problem outcome remains an important area for future research. Systematic review protocol and registration Systematic Review of Universal Resilience Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting; http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6; PROSPERO CRD42015025908.

DOI 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.780
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Christopher Oldmeadow, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman
2017 Daly JB, Freund M, Burrows S, Considine R, Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, 'A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial of a Brief Child Health Nurse Intervention to Reduce Infant Secondhand Smoke Exposure', Maternal and Child Health Journal, 21 108-117 (2017) [C1]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Background Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is a significant contributor to ill health in children. A study was undertaken to d... [more]

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Background Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is a significant contributor to ill health in children. A study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two brief multi-strategic child health nurse delivered interventions in: decreasing the prevalence of infants exposed to SHS; decreasing the prevalence of smoking amongst parent/carers of infants and increasing the prevalence of household smoking bans. Methods This study was a 3 arm, cluster randomised controlled trial. Clusters were 39 community based well child health clinics in one local area health service. Clinics were stratified according to annual number of client appointments and then randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio, (Intervention 1: Intervention 2: Control), with 13 clinics in each cluster. Parents/carers of infants in the intervention groups received a brief multi-strategic intervention from child health nurses during clinic consultations. Treatment condition¿1 included computer delivered risk assessment and feedback and nurse brief advice. Treatment condition¿2 included all elements of Treatment condition¿1 with the addition of biochemical feedback of infant SHS exposure. Results When compared to the Control group at 12¿months, no significant differences in the prevalence of infant exposure to SHS were detected from baseline to follow-up for Treatment condition¿1 (OR 1.16, 95¿% CI 0.73¿1.85, p¿=¿0.53) or Treatment condition¿2 (OR 1.30, 95¿% CI 0.88¿1.92, p¿=¿0.19) Similarly, no significant differences were detected in the proportion of parent/carers who reported that they were smokers (T1:OR 0.95, 95¿% CI 0.78¿1.15, p¿=¿0.58 and T2:OR 0.97, 95¿% CI 0.80¿1.18, p¿=¿0.77), or in the proportion of households reported to have a complete smoking ban (T1:OR 1.21, 95¿% CI 0.89¿1.64, p¿=¿0.23 and T2:OR 1.06, 95¿% CI 0.79¿1.43, p¿=¿0.68). Conclusions Further research is required to identify effective interventions that can be consistently provided by child health nurses if the potential of such settings to contribute to reductions in child SHS exposure is to be realised.

DOI 10.1007/s10995-016-2099-5
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2017 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Janssen LM, Wiggers J, Reilly K, Delaney T, et al., 'Multi-strategic intervention to enhance implementation of healthy canteen policy: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0537-9
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Christopher Oldmeadow, Serene Yoong, Christopher M Williams, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers
2016 Bartlem KM, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye PM, Barker D, McElwaine KM, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the provision of preventive care by community mental health services: a non-randomized, multiple baseline implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0408-4
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Kate Bartlem, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Daniel Barker, Jenny Bowman
2016 Slattery C, Freund M, Gillham K, Knight J, Wolfenden L, Bisquera A, Wiggers J, 'Increasing smoking cessation care across a network of hospitals: an implementation study', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0390-x
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Ross K, Freund M, Wye P, McElwaine K, et al., 'Mental health clinician attitudes to the provision of preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours and association with care provision', BMC Psychiatry, 16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Bartlem et al. Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association betw... [more]

© 2016 Bartlem et al. Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association between clinician attitudes and such care delivery. This study aimed to explore: i) the attitudes of a multi-disciplinary group of community mental health clinicians regarding their perceived role, perception of client interest, and perceived self-efficacy in the provision of preventive care, ii) whether such attitudes differ by professional discipline, and iii) the association between these attitudes and clinician provision of such care. Method: A telephone survey was conducted with 151 Australian community mental health clinicians regarding their attitudes towards provision of assessment, advice and referral addressing smoking, nutrition, alcohol, and physical activity, and their reported provision of such care. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between attitudes and care delivery, and attitudinal differences by professional discipline. Results: Most clinicians reported that: their manager supported provision of preventive care; such care was part of their role; it would not jeopardise their practitioner-client relationships, clients found preventive care acceptable, and that they had the confidence, knowledge and skills to modify client health behaviours. Half reported that clients were not interested in changing their health behaviours, and one third indicated that the provision of preventive care negatively impacted on time available for delivery of acute care. The following attitudes were positively associated with the provision of preventive care: role congruence, client interest in change, and addressing health risk behaviours will not jeopardise the client-clinician relationship. Conclusions: Strategies are required to translate positive attitudes to improved client care and address attitudes which may hinder the provision of preventive care in community mental health.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0763-3
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Metse AP, Wiggers J, Wye P, Moore L, Clancy R, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Smoking and environmental characteristics of smokers with a mental illness, and associations with quitting behaviour and motivation; a cross sectional study', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2969-1
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy
2016 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Bartlem KM, Wye PM, Wiggers JH, 'Systematic review of interventions to increase the delivery of preventive care by primary care nurses and allied health clinicians', Implementation Science, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 McElwaine et al. Background: Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summ... [more]

© 2016 McElwaine et al. Background: Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summarise evidence for the effectiveness of practice change interventions in increasing nurse or allied health professional provision of any of five preventive care elements (ask, assess, advise, assist, and/or arrange) for any of four behavioural risks (smoking, inadequate nutrition, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) within a primary care setting. Methods: A search of Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, and CINAHL databases was undertaken to locate controlled intervention trials published between 1992 and May 2014 that provided practice change interventions to primary care nurses and/or allied health professionals to increase preventive care. The effect of interventions aimed at increasing the provision of any of the five care elements for any of the four behavioural risks was examined. A narrative synthesis was utilised. Results: From 8109 articles, seven trials met the inclusion criteria. All trials bar one, assessed multi-strategic practice change interventions (three to five strategies) focused on care by nurses (six trials) or mixed nursing/allied health clinicians. One trial examined care provision for all four risks, five trials examined care for smoking only, and one trial examined care for alcohol consumption only. For the six trials reporting significance testing (excludes one smoking care trial), significant effects favouring the intervention group were reported in at least one trial for smoking risk assessment (2/4 trials reported an effect for at least one analysis of an assessment outcome), brief advice (2/3), assistance (2/2), and arranging referral (2/3); alcohol risk assessment (1/2) and brief advice (1/2); inadequate nutrition risk assessment (1/1); and physical inactivity risk assessment and brief advice (1/1). When the number of analyses undertaken within trials focusing on smoking care was considered, the results were less promising (e.g. of the 15 analyses conducted on brief advice variables across three trials, four showed a positive effect). Conclusions: Evidence for the effect of practice change interventions on preventive care by primary care nurses or allied health providers is inconclusive given the small number of trials and inconsistency of results between and within trials. Systematic review registration number: None.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0409-3
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Provision of Chronic Disease Preventive Care in Community Substance Use Services: Client and Clinician Report', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 68 24-30 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors. Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care m... [more]

© 2016 The Authors. Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care may be effective in reducing such health behaviors. This study aimed to examine clinician provision of preventive care to clients of community substance use treatment services. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 386 clients and 54 clinicians of community substance use treatment services in one health district in New South Wales, Australia. Client- and clinician-reported provision of three elements of care (assessment, brief advice and referral) for three health risk behaviors (tobacco smoking, insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption and insufficient physical activity) was assessed, with associations with client characteristics examined. Results: Provision was highest for tobacco smoking assessment (90% client reported, 87% clinician reported) and brief advice (79% client reported, 80% clinician reported) and lowest for fruit and vegetable consumption (assessment 23%, brief advice 25%). Few clients reported being offered a referral (<. 10%). Assessment of physical activity and brief advice for all behaviors was higher for clients residing in rural/remote areas. Conclusion: Assessment and brief advice were provided to the majority of clients for smoking, but sub-optimally for the other behaviors. Further investigation of barriers to the provision of preventive care within substance use treatment settings is required, particularly for referral to ongoing support.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2016.05.006
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, A Dunlop
2016 Daly JB, Mackenzie LJ, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Roseby R, Wiggers JH, 'Interventions by Health care professionals who provide routine child health care to reduce tobacco smoke exposure in children a review and meta-Analysis', JAMA Pediatrics, 170 138-147 (2016) [C1]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health... [more]

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health care professionals in child health settings should address tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in children. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness of interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care in reducing TSE in children. DATA SOURCES A secondary analysis of 57 trials included in a 2014 Cochrane review and a subsequent extended searchwas performed. Controlled trials (published through June 2015) of interventions that focused on reducing child TSE, with no restrictions placed on who delivered the interventions,were identified. Secondary data extractionwas performed in August 2015. STUDY SELECTION Controlled trials of routine child health care delivered by health care professionals (physicians, nurses, medical assistants, health educators, and dieticians) that addressed the outcomes of interest (TSE reduction in children and parental smoking behaviors) were eligible for inclusion in this review and meta-Analysis. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Study details and quality characteristicswere independently extracted by 2 authors. If outcome measures were sufficiently similar, meta-Analysis was performed using the random-effects model by DerSimonian and Laird. Otherwise, the results were described narratively. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome measurewas reduction in child TSE. Secondary outcomes of interest were parental smoking cessation, parental smoking reduction, and maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention. RESULTS Sixteen studiesmet the selection criteria. Narrative analysis of the 6 trials that measured child TSE indicated no intervention effects relative to comparison groups. Similarly, meta-Analysis of 9 trials that measured parental smoking cessation demonstrated no overall intervention effect (n = 6399) (risk ratio 1.05; 95%CI, 0.74-1.50; P = .78). Meta-Analysis of the 3 trials that measured maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention demonstrated a significant overall intervention effect (n = 1293) (risk ratio 1.53; 95%CI, 1.10-2.14; P = .01). High levels of study heterogeneity likely resulted from variability in outcome measures, length of follow up, intervention strategies, and unknown intervention fidelity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care may be effective in preventing maternal smoking relapse. Further research is required to improve the effectiveness of such interventions in reducing child TSE and increasing parental smoking cessation. The findings of this meta-Analysis have policy and practice implications relating to interventions by routine pediatric health care professionals that aim to reduce child exposure to tobacco smoke.

DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.3342
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Lisa Mackenzie
2016 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Slattery C, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Clinician assessment, advice and referral for multiple health risk behaviours: Prevalence and predictors of delivery by primary health care nurses and allied health professionals (vol 94, pg 193, 2014)', PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, 99 1749-1749 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2016.06.026
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem
2016 James E, Freund M, Booth A, Duncan MJ, Johnson N, Short CE, et al., 'Comparative efficacy of simultaneous versus sequential multiple health behavior change interventions among adults: A systematic review of randomised trials', Preventive Medicine, 89 211-223 (2016) [C1]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effec... [more]

© 2016. Background: Growing evidence points to the benefits of addressing multiple health behaviors rather than single behaviors. Purpose: This review evaluates the relative effectiveness of simultaneous and sequentially delivered multiple health behavior change (MHBC) interventions. Secondary aims were to identify: a) the most effective spacing of sequentially delivered components; b) differences in efficacy of MHBC interventions for adoption/cessation behaviors and lifestyle/addictive behaviors, and c) differences in trial retention between simultaneously and sequentially delivered interventions. Methods: MHBC intervention trials published up to October 2015 were identified through a systematic search. Eligible trials were randomised controlled trials that directly compared simultaneous and sequential delivery of a MHBC intervention. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results: Six trials met the inclusion criteria and across these trials the behaviors targeted were smoking, diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption. Three trials reported a difference in intervention effect between a sequential and simultaneous approach in at least one behavioral outcome. Of these, two trials favoured a sequential approach on smoking. One trial favoured a simultaneous approach on fat intake. There was no difference in retention between sequential and simultaneous approaches. Conclusions: There is limited evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of sequential and simultaneous approaches. Given only three of the six trials observed a difference in intervention effectiveness for one health behavior outcome, and the relatively consistent finding that the sequential and simultaneous approaches were more effective than a usual/minimal care control condition, it appears that both approaches should be considered equally efficacious. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015027876.

DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.06.012
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Mitch Duncan, Natalie Johnson, Luke Wolfenden, Erica James, Frances Kaylambkin, Angela Booth
2016 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Hodder R, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, 'Mental health problems in a regional population of Australian adolescents: association with socio-demographic characteristics', Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 10 32-43 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0120-9
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Hodder
2015 Williams CM, Nathan NK, Wyse RJ, Yoong SL, Delaney T, Wiggers J, et al., 'Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2015 (2015)

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the eff... [more]

© 2015 The Cochrane Collaboration. This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The primary aims of the review are to examine the effectiveness of strategies aiming to improve the implementation of school-based policies, programs or practices that aim to promote healthy or reduce unhealthy behaviours relating to child diet, physical activity, obesity, or tobacco or alcohol use. Secondary objectives of the review are to: examine the effectiveness of implementation strategies on health behavioural (e.g. fruit and vegetable consumption) and anthropometric outcomes (e.g. BMI, weight); describe the impact of such strategies on the knowledge, skills or attitudes of stakeholders involved in implementing health promoting policies, programs or practices; describe the cost or cost effectiveness of such strategies; describe any unintended adverse effects of strategies on schools, school staff or children.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD011677
Citations Scopus - 6
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Serene Yoong, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2015 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services: a randomised controlled trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 10 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-015-0340-z
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15
Co-authors John Wiggers, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden, Alison A Fielding, Jenna Hollis, Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong
2015 Dray J, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Campbell E, Freund M, Hodder R, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal resilience interventions targeting child and adolescent mental health in the school setting: Review protocol', Systematic Reviews, (2015) [C3]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience ma... [more]

© 2015 Dray et al. Background: The mental health of children and adolescents is a key area of health concern internationally. Previous empirical studies suggest that resilience may act as a protective mechanism towards the development of mental health problems. Resilience refers to the ability to employ a collection of protective factors to return to or maintain positive mental health following disadvantage or adversity. Schools represent a potential setting within which protective factors of all children and adolescents may be fostered through resilience-focussed interventions. Despite this potential, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. The objective of the present review is to assess the effects of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions, relative to a comparison group, on mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. Methods/design: Eligible studies will be randomised (including cluster-randomised) controlled trials of universal interventions explicitly described as resilience-focussed or comprising strategies to strengthen a minimum of three internal protective factors, targeting children aged 5 to 18 years, implemented within schools, and reporting a mental health outcome. Screening for studies will be conducted across six electronic databases: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Two reviewers will retrieve eligible articles, assess risk of bias, and extract data. Where studies are sufficiently homogenous and reported outcomes are amenable for pooled synthesis, meta-analysis will be performed. Narrative description will be used to synthesise trial outcome data where data cannot be combined or heterogeneity exists. Discussion: This review will aid in building an evidence base for the effectiveness of universal school-based resilience-focussed interventions and in doing so provide an opportunity to better inform the development of interventions to potentially prevent mental health problems in child and adolescent populations. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42015025908

DOI 10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare Service Centers' Preferences and Intentions to Use a Web-Based Program to Implement Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Policies and Practices: A Cross-Sectional Study', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 17 (2015)
DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2015 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Lecathelinais C, McElwaine K, et al., 'Acceptability and receipt of preventive care for chronic-disease health risk behaviors reported by clients of community mental health services', Psychiatric Services, 66 857-864 (2015) [C1]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health... [more]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health clinical guidelines recommend preventive care to address such behaviors; however, little information is available about whether clients consider preventive care acceptable or about the prevalence of such care in mental health services. This article describes acceptability and receipt of assessment, advice, and referral for smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity, as reported by community mental health service clients. The association between preventive care, diagnosis, and number of clinical appointments was examined. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone interview was conducted with clients (N=558) of community mental health services in Australia. Results: Although preventive care was highly acceptable to clients (86%297%), receipt of preventive care was low. Client receipt of risk assessment ranged from 26% (assessment of fruit or vegetable intake) to 76% (assessment of alcohol consumption). The proportion of clients at risk of and assessed for unhealthy behavior who then received brief advice ranged from 69% (fruit or vegetable intake) to 85% (physical activity), whereas only 38% (alcohol consumption) to 49% (smoking) received any referral. A greater number of mental health appointments were associated with higher prevalence of preventive care, as were diagnoses of diabetes or respiratory conditions and not having a schizophrenia diagnosis. Conclusions: Practice change strategies are required to increase the delivery of routine preventive care within mental health services if clients are to benefit from clinical guidelines.

DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.201400360
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2015 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Bailey JM, Freund M, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Chronic disease health risk behaviours amongst people with a mental illness', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 49 731-741 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Amongst people with a mental illness, modifiable health risk behaviours contribute substantially t... [more]

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Amongst people with a mental illness, modifiable health risk behaviours contribute substantially to increased chronic disease morbidity and mortality. This study examined the prevalence of and interest in changing such behaviours amongst community mental health service clients in Australia. Method: A telephone interview was undertaken with Australian community mental health service clients. Participants reported engagement in four health risk behaviours: tobacco smoking, fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Participants were classified as at risk based upon Australian national guidelines. At-risk participants were asked whether they were considering improving their health risk behaviour within the next month. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and risk, and interest in improving health risk behaviours was examined. Results: Risk prevalence was highest for inadequate vegetable consumption (78.3%), followed by inadequate fruit consumption (60%), smoking (50.7%), physical inactivity (46.8%), short-term alcohol risk (40.3%) and chronic alcohol risk (35.3%). A majority of at-risk participants were considering improving their health risk behaviour for smoking, physical inactivity and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (65.1%, 71.1%, and 53.3%, respectively). After adjusting for demographic factors, no diagnostic categories were associated with risk for any behaviour. Those with a diagnosis of depression were more likely to be interested in quitting smoking and increasing physical activity. Conclusions: Regardless of diagnosis, a high prevalence of chronic disease health risk behaviours was identified, with many participants expressing an interest in improving these behaviours. Such findings reinforce recommendations that preventive care addressing the chronic disease risks of clients be provided routinely by mental health clinicians. Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12613000693729. URL: www.anzctr.org.au/

DOI 10.1177/0004867415569798
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers
2015 Colin Bell A, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Fitzgerald M, Morgan PJ, Jones J, et al., 'Child physical activity levels and associations with modifiable characteristics in centre-based childcare', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 232-236 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe children&apos;s physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. M... [more]

© 2015 Public Health Association of Australia. Objective: To describe children's physical activity levels during childcare and associations with modifiable characteristics. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 328 preschool children (43% girls; age 3-5 years) and 145 staff from 20 long day care centres in the Hunter Region of NSW, Australia. Pedometers assessed child physical activity levels. Centre characteristics and staff attitudes and behaviours towards children's physical activity were assessed using surveys, interviews and observational audit. Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Results: Over the measurement period, average step count of children was 15.8 (SD=6.8) steps/minute. Four-year-olds had the highest step counts (16.4, SD=7.1, p=0.03) with no differences by sex. Step counts were significantly higher in centres that had a written physical activity policy (+3.8 steps/minute, p=0.03) and where staff led structured physical activity (+3.7 steps/minute, p<0.001) and joined in active play (+2.9 steps/minute, p=0.06). Conclusions: Written physical activity policy, structured staff-led physical activity and staff joining in active play were associated with higher levels of physical activity. Implications: Childcare physical activity interventions should consider including strategies to encourage written physical activity policies and support structured staff led physical activities.

DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12314
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2015 Yoong SL, Williams CM, Finch M, Wyse R, Jones J, Freund M, et al., 'Childcare service centers' preferences and intentions to use a web-based program to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices:a cross-sectional study', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 17 (2015) [C1]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating ... [more]

Background: Overweight and obesity is a significant public health problem that impacts a large number of children globally. Supporting childcare centers to deliver healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is a recommended strategy for obesity prevention, given that such services provide access to a substantial proportion of children during a key developmental period. Electronic Web-based interventions represent a novel way to support childcare service providers to implement such policies and practices. Objective: This study aimed to assess: (1) childcare centers' current use of technology, (2) factors associated with intention to use electronic Web-based interventions, and (3) Web-based features that managers rated as useful to support staff with implementing healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices. Methods: A computer-Assisted telephone interview (CATI) was conducted with service managers from long day care centers and preschools. The CATI assessed the following: (1) childcare center characteristics, (2) childcare centers' use of electronic devices, (3) intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program-Assessed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with ratings between 1 (strongly disagree) and 7 (strongly agree), and (4) features rated as useful to include in a Web-based program. Results: Overall, 214 service centers out of 277 (77.3%) consented to participate. All service centers except 2 reported using computers (212/214, 99.1%), whereas 40.2% (86/214) used portable tablets. A total of 71.9% (151/210) of childcare service managers reported a score of 6 or more for intention to use a hypothetical electronic Web-based program. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, intention to use the program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.002, odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.2) and perceived usefulness (P<.001, OR 28,95% CI 8.0-95.2). Features reported by service managers as useful or very useful for a Web-based program included decision-support tools to support staff with menu planning (117/129, 90.7%), links to relevant resources (212/212, 100%), updated information on guidelines (208/212, 98.1%), and feedback regarding childcare center performance in relation to other childcare centers (212/212, 100%). Conclusions: Childcare service managers reported high intention to use a Web-based program and identified several useful features to support staff to implement healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices. Further descriptive and intervention research examining the development and use of such a program to support childcare centers with the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity-promoting policies and practices is warranted.

DOI 10.2196/jmir.3639
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Rebecca Wyse, Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Christopher M Williams
2014 Metse AP, Bowman JA, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 266 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-266
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, Wiggers J, 'Improving adolescent mental health and resilience through a resilience-based intervention in schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.', Trials, 15 289 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-15-289
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Wolfenden L, Nathan N, Williams CM, Delaney T, Reilly KL, Freund M, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase the implementation of a healthy canteen policy in Australian primary schools: study protocol.', Implement Sci, 9 147 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0147-3
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Christopher M Williams, John Wiggers
2014 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund M, Jones J, Wiggers J, 'A cluster randomized trial of a multi-level intervention, delivered by service staff, to increase physical activity of children attending center-based childcare', PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 58 9-16 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.10.004
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 19
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Slattery C, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Clinician assessment, advice and referral for multiple health risk behaviors: Prevalence and predictors of delivery by primary health care nurses and allied health professionals', PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, 94 193-201 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2013.10.017
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors John Wiggers, Kate Bartlem
2014 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Freund M, Wye PM, McElwaine KM, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Care provision to prevent chronic disease by community mental health clinicians', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 762-770 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population.... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population. Despite recommendations regarding the provision of preventive care by mental health services, limited research has examined the extent to which such care is provided.Purpose To examine mental health clinician provision of care for preventable chronic disease risks, and whether such care was associated with the availability of practice support strategies.Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of 151 community mental health clinicians in New South Wales, Australia regarding the provision of three elements of preventive care (i.e., assessment, brief advice, and referral/follow-up) for four health risk behaviors (i.e., tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity). Clinicians reported the availability of 16 strategies to support such care delivery. Data were collected in 2010 and analyzed in 2012-2013.Results Preventive care provision varied by both care element and risk behavior. Optimal care (each care element provided to at least 80% of clients for all health behaviors) was provided by few clinicians: assessment (8.6%), brief advice (24.5%), and referral/follow-up (9.9%). Less than half of clinicians reported more than four support strategies were available (44.4%). The availability of five or more strategies was associated with increased optimal preventive care.Conclusions The provision of preventive care focused on chronic disease prevention in community mental health services is suboptimal. Interventions to increase the routine provision of such care should involve increasing the availability of evidence-based strategies to support care provision.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians a non-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 424-434 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of ... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Design: Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Setting/participants: Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). Intervention: The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Results: Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. Conclusions: The intervention's impact on the provision of preventive care varied by both care element and risk type. Further intervention is required to increase the consistent provision of preventive care, particularly referral/follow-up.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.06.018
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2014 Jones J, Wolfenden L, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong SL, Dodds P, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to facilitate the implementation of healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices in childcare services.', BMJ Open, 4 e005312 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005312
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse, Serene Yoong, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2014 Hodder RK, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Systematic review of universal school-based resilience interventions targeting adolescent tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug use: review protocol.', BMJ Open, 4 e004718 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004718
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden
2013 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Doherty EL, et al., 'The delivery of preventive care to clients of community health services', BMC HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-167
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2013 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, McElwaine K, Knight J, et al., 'Evaluating the effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care in a network of community-based mental health services: a study protocol of a non-randomized, multiple baseline trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 8 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-85
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Patrick Mcelduff, Kate Bartlem
2012 Rowe SC, Wiggers JH, Wolfenden L, Francis JL, Freund MA, 'Evaluation of an educational policing strategy to reduce alcohol-related crime associated with licensed premises', Canadian Journal of Public Health, 103 S8-S14 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2012 Wolfenden L, Paul CL, Tzelepis F, Freund MA, Wiggers JH, Gillham K, 'Acceptability of proactive telephone recruitment to a telephone support service to encourage healthy eating, physical activity and weight loss', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 295-296 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2012 Wolfenden L, Wiggers JH, Paul CL, Freund MA, Lecathelinais C, Wye PM, Gillham K, 'Increasing the use of preventative health services to promote healthy eating, physical activity and weight management: The acceptability and potential effectiveness of a proactive telemarketing approach', BMC Public Health, 12 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Chris Paul
2012 Hodder RK, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, Campbell EM, Wye PM, et al., 'A cluster randomised trial of a school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use in secondary school students: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 12 1009 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2011 Heard TR, Daly JB, Bowman JA, Freund MA, Wiggers JH, 'A cross-sectional survey of the prevalence of environmental tobacco smoke preventive care provision by child health services in Australia', BMC Public Health, 11 324 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-324
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2011 Hodder RK, Daly JB, Freund MA, Bowman JA, Hazell T, Wiggers JH, 'A school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and marijuana use in high school students', BMC Public Health, 11 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-11-722
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Hodder
2011 McElwaine KM, Freund MA, Campbell EM, Knight JJ, Slattery C, Doherty E, et al., 'The effectiveness of an intervention in increasing community health clinician provision of preventive care: A study protocol of a non-randomised, multiple-baseline trial', BMC Health Services Research, 11 354 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-11-354
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Patrick Mcelduff, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2011 Wye PM, Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Freund MA, Wolfenden L, Stockings EA, 'Treating nicotine dependence in mental health hospitals', Mental Health and Substance Use: Dual Diagnosis, 4 130-143 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17523281.2011.555077
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2010 Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Wyse R, Wiggers JH, 'A cluster randomised trial to evaluate a physical activity intervention among 3-5 year old children attending long day care services: Study protocol', BMC Public Health, 534 1-10 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-10-534
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Philip Morgan, Luke Wolfenden, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2010 Daly JB, Wiggers JH, Burrows S, Freund MA, 'Household smoking behaviours and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among infants: Are current strategies effectively protecting our young?', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 269-273 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00525.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors John Wiggers
2009 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, Sakrouge R, Lecathelinais LC, Knight JJ, et al., 'Increasing hospital-wide delivery of smoking cessation care for nicotine-dependent in-patients: A multi-strategic intervention trial', Addiction, 104 839-849 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02520.x
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2009 Wolfenden L, Kypri K, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: A guide for researchers', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 270-275 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00387.x
Citations Scopus - 38Web of Science - 38
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, Rebecca Hodder, Luke Wolfenden
2009 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, Sakrouge R, McElduff P, Walsh RA, et al., 'Increasing smoking cessation care provision in hospitals: A meta-analysis of intervention effect', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 11 650-662 (2009) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/ntp056
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 28
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2008 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, Wiggers JH, Knight JJ, Mitchell EN, 'Provision of smoking care in NSW hospitals: Opportunities for further enhancement', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 19 50-55 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/NB07102
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors Chris Paul, John Wiggers
2008 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, McElduff P, Walsh RA, Sakrouge R, et al., 'Smoking care provision in hospitals: A review of prevalence', Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 10 757-774 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14622200802027131
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 49
Co-authors John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff, Chris Paul
2005 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, Sakrouge R, Wiggers JH, 'Smoking care provision in smoke-free hospitals in Australia', Preventive Medicine, 41 151-158 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2004.09.044
Citations Scopus - 32Web of Science - 29
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2004 Wolfenden L, Freund M, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Paul C, Mitchell E, 'Managing nicotine dependence in NSW hospital patients', NSW Public Health Bulletin, 15 98-99 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/NB04023
Citations Scopus - 3
Co-authors Chris Paul, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2004 Wolfenden L, Freund M, Campbell E, Wiggers J, 'Managing nicotine dependence in NSW Hospital patients', NSW Health Bulletin. 2004, 5 98-101 (2004)
DOI 10.1071/NB04023
Hodder RK, Freund M, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Gillham K, Dray J, Wiggers J, 'Association between adolescent tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use and individual and environmental resilience protective factors.', BMJ Open, 6 e012688 [C1]
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012688
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Jenny Bowman
Show 62 more journal articles

Conference (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Exploring the Potential Effectiveness of a School-based Intervention on Mental Health Problems and Resilience in Australian Adolescents', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2017)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Freund M, Campbell E, Hodder R, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Investigating Differences in Prevalence of Risk of Current Mental Health Problems of Australian Adolescents by Socio-demographic Characteristic', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2017)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Sherwood E, Paul C, Freund M, Dadich A, Meiser B, Taylor N, Lynam J, 'Smoking Cessation Care for Patients with Cancer in NSW Hospitals', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2017)
Co-authors Chris Paul
2016 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder R, et al., 'Systematic review of the effect of school-based, resilience-focussed interventions on child and adolescent mental health', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2016)
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon
2016 Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Lecathelinais C, Wiggers J, Marshall J, et al., 'AN INTERVENTION TO FACILITATE THE IMPLEMENTATION OF OBESITY PREVENTION POLICIES AND PRACTICES IN CHILDCARE SERVICES: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenna Hollis, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Barker D, McElwaine K, et al., 'INCREASING THE ROUTINE PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE BY COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIANS: A WHOLE SERVICE APPROACH', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Kate Bartlem, Patrick Mcelduff, Daniel Barker, John Wiggers
2016 Sherwood E, Paul C, Freund M, Dadich A, Meiser B, Taylor N, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION CARE FOR CANCER PATIENTS: PATIENT PERSPECTIVES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2015 Sherwood E, Paul C, Freund M, Dadich A, Meiser B, Taylor N, et al., 'PATHWAYS TO SMOKING CARE IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT: STAGE 2', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2015 Wolfenden L, Jones J, Wyse R, Finch M, Yoong S, Dodds P, et al., 'Improving implementation of evidence-based obesity prevention policies and practices in childcare services: Findings from a series of RCTs conducted by the Hunter New England Population Health Research Group', 4th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation jointly with CIPHER, Sydney, NSW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Rebecca Wyse, John Wiggers
2014 Dray J, Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Mental Health and Resilience in Adolescence: A resilience-based intervention', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203., Groningen, The Netherlands (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Julia Dray Uon, Rebecca Hodder, Jenny Bowman
2014 Freund M, Bowman J, Campbell E, Hodder R, Wiggers J, Gillham K, Gillham K, 'The Mental Health of Adolescents: What Differences Exist?', International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2014; 21(S1): S203., Groningen, The Netherlands (2014) [E3]
DOI 10.1007/s12529-014-9418-2
Co-authors John Wiggers, Julia Dray Uon, Jenny Bowman, Rebecca Hodder
2014 Bowman J, Bartlem K, Freund M, Knight J, McElwaine K, Wye P, et al., 'COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND SMOKING CESSATION CARE: AN UNREALISED POTENTIAL', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2014 Metse A, Bowman J, Wye P, Stockings E, Adams M, Clancy R, et al., 'EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF AN INTEGRATED SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH PATIENTS: STUDY PROTOCOL FOR A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Richard Clancy, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2014 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Knight J, McElwaine K, et al., 'NEED FOR ACTION: PREVENTIVE CARE FOR CHRONIC DISEASE RISK FACTORS WITHIN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2012 Bell C, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Morgan PJ, Freund MA, Jones J, Wiggers JH, 'Predictors of preschool age children's physical activity at long day care', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Sydney, Australia (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Philip Morgan
2009 Slattery C, Wolfenden L, Freund MA, Knight JJ, Gillham K, Wiggers JH, 'To assess the effectiveness of a multi-strategic clinical practice change intervention in increasing the provision of nicotine replacement therpay to nicotine dependent inpatients at a rural hospital', 3rd Rural Health Research Colloquium: Building a Healthier Future Through Research: Program and Abstract Book, Ballina, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2007 Daly J, Freund MA, Wiggers J, Wells VL, Gillham K, 'The One Stop Shop Project - increasing school capacity to support student health and wellbeing, and its impact on student tobacco use (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
2007 Daly J, Tull K, Wiggers J, Freund MA, Price S, 'Smoke free families: Implementation of best practice tobacco screening and support in postnatal care (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
2007 Daly J, Wiggers J, Freund MA, Hodder R, 'Smoke-free families: A multi-component, antenatal clinic-based intervention to decrease tobacco related harm (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
2007 Freund MA, Campbell EM, Paul CL, Sakrouge R, Knight JJ, Wiggers JH, et al., 'Smoking cessation care in hospitals: an intervention trial to increase routine care (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Chris Paul
2007 Knight JJ, Dowling H, Freund MA, Rose B, Falkiner M, Taylor A, et al., 'The Effectiveness Of The Support For Staff Who Smoke Program In Hunter New England Health (Poster)', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland (2007) [E3]
2007 Knight J, Wyse R, Slattery C, Kasch I, Paras LE, Freund MA, 'Facilitating compliance with a clinical practice guideline for managing inpatients who smoke', Oceania Tobacco Control Conference: From Vision to Reality. Programme and Presentations, Auckland, New Zealand (2007) [E3]
Show 19 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 16
Total funding $8,661,277

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $3,136,826

Addressing health and care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with dementia and their communities: A cluster RCT$3,046,293

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor Gail Garvey, Mr Steve Blunden, Assoicate Professor Alan Clough, Professor Michael Lowe, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Jamie Bryant, Dr Megan Passey, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow, Associate Professor Nola Ries
Scheme Targeted Call for Research - Dementia in Indigenous Australians
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2022
GNo G1700852
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of systems-based intervention in increasing health assessments in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services$90,533

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Translating Research into Practice (TRIP) Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2018
GNo G1600759
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20161 grants / $174,967

The susceptibility, prevalence, type and burden of adolescent gambling: an opportunity for an ongoing monitoring tool$174,967

Funding body: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

Funding body Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation
Project Team Laureate Professor Robert Sanson-Fisher, Professor David Hill, Dr Vicki White, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Christopher Oldmeadow
Scheme Tender
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1601000
Type Of Funding C2210 - Aust StateTerritoryLocal - Own Purpose
Category 2210
UON Y

20151 grants / $45,100

Community interventions to address smoking$45,100

Funding body: Cancer Institute NSW

Funding body Cancer Institute NSW
Project Team Professor Christine Paul, Doctor Megan Freund, Professor Billie Bonevski, Professor John Wiggers
Scheme Research Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1501180
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20133 grants / $673,689

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$416,263

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan, Campbell, Elizabeth, Gillham, Karen, Sutherland, Rachel
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1201168
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Tremain - Salary and Top-Up$129,428

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Doctor Megan Freund, Professor John Wiggers, Miss Danika Tremain
Scheme Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1300706
Type Of Funding C2120 - Aust Commonwealth - Other
Category 2120
UON Y

Moving from policy to practice: A randomised trial of an implementation intervention to facilitate the adoption of a statewide healthy canteen policy$127,998

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Bell, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Libby Campbell, Doctor Rachel Sutherland, Ms Nicole Nathan, Campbell, Elizabeth, Campbell, Elizabeth, Gillham, Karen, Gillham, Karen, Sutherland, Rachel, Sutherland, Rachel
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300710
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20122 grants / $2,148,397

Evaluating the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation intervention for mental health patients: a randomised controlled trial$1,485,619

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Paula Wye, Associate Professor Judith Prochaska, Doctor Megan Freund, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Libby Campbell
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1100130
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Creating childcare environments supportive of child obesity prevention: The effectiveness of an intensive population based dissemination intervention$662,778

Funding body: ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)

Funding body ANPHA (Australian National Preventive Health Agency)
Project Team Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye, Ms Meghan Finch, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Rebecca Wyse, Dr Sze Yoong, Ms Jannah Jones
Scheme Preventive Health Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1101031
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20112 grants / $711,950

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$591,239

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Partnership Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1000537
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

The effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing, on a health service wide basis, community health clinician adherence to preventive care guidelines$120,711

Funding body: Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern

Funding body Health Reform Transitional Organisation - Northern
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Libby Campbell, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund, Doctor Paula Wye
Scheme Partnership Projects Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1100784
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20103 grants / $1,478,597

Effectiveness of a resilience intervention in reducing smoking and alcohol consumption among secondary school students$1,432,750

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Libby Campbell, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G0190175
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

A randomised controlled trial of an intervention to increase child physical activity during attendance at childcare$24,547

Funding body: Hunter Children`s Research Foundation

Funding body Hunter Children`s Research Foundation
Project Team Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Philip Morgan, Doctor Megan Freund
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900142
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y

Pilot of an intervention to increase the provision of nicotine dependence treatment in mental health inpatient settings$21,300

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Doctor Paula Wye, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Jennifer Bowman, Professor Amanda Baker, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Jenny Knight, Ms Margaret Terry, Conjoint Associate Professor Richard Clancy
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900190
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20092 grants / $291,751

Health Behaviour Research Centre (HBRC)$267,361

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Effectiveness of an intervention designed to reduce alcohol-related harm associated with licensed premises in Newcastle$24,390

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Professor John Wiggers, Doctor Patrick McElduff, Doctor Megan Freund, Ms Karen Gillham, Doctor Edouard Tursan D'Espaignet
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0189796
Type Of Funding Contract - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFC
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2019 PhD Why Don’t Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Feel the Need to Actively Engage In and Monitor Their Health and Wellbeing, Given the Disproportionate Levels of Premature Deaths Experienced by Their Family and Community Members? PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Understanding the Health and Well-being of Older People Living in Residential Parks PhD (Public Health & BehavSci), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Increasing The Provision Of Preventive Care By Clinicians Within Substance Use Treatment Settings PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD Preventing Mental Health Problems in Children and Adolescents: Strengthening Resilience as a Potential Approach PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2018 PhD Effectiveness of Universal School-Based Resilience Interventions in Reducing Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Substance Use in Adolescents PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Child Health Care Provider Interventions to Prevent Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Children PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2016 PhD Increasing Preventive Care Delivery by Primary Care Nurses and Allied Health Clinicians PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Changing Practice: Preventive Care for Chronic Disease Health Risk Behaviours in Community Mental Health Services PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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Dr Megan Freund

Positions

NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow
Health Behaviour Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellow
Health Behaviour Research Group
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email megan.freund@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 40420834
Fax (02) 4042 0044

Office

Building W4, HMRI Building University Drive Callaghan, NSW 2308
Location Lot 1 Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305

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