Dr Kate Bartlem

Dr Kate Bartlem

NHMRC Fellow

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

Dr Kate Bartlem is an NHMRC Early Career Fellow with the School of Psychology. Her research interests are broadly focused on addressing the chronic disease burden among disadvantaged population groups. Specific interests include:

  • understanding and addressing the chronic disease burden among people who have a mental health condition
  • health behaviour change for disadvantaged population groups
  • implementation science, with a focus on developing strategies for large-scale implementation to facilitate the translation of evidence based policies and practices into mental health services
  • developing strategies to increase the appropriateness of existing population level behaviour change services for high risk populations

Memberships

Dr Bartlem is a member of the:

  • Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
  • Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour (Executive member)
  • Hunter Medical Research Institute's Public Health group
  • Australasian Society for Behavioural Health and Medicine (ASBHM; Executive member and Newsletter Editor)

Research Expertise

Implementation science, clinical practice change, mental health services, preventive care, health behaviour change, integrating physical and mental health care



Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Implementation
  • Clinical practice change
  • Integrating mental and physical health care
  • Mental health services
  • Health behaviours

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified 20
160508 Health Policy 20
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
NHMRC Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/09/2014 - 30/09/2014 Consultant World Health Organisation
Comprehensive Information Systems for Tobacco Control

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/07/2011 - 31/07/2015 Project Officer Hunter New England Population Health
Health Promotion
1/01/2010 - 30/06/2011 Research Assistant University of Newcastle
School of Psychology

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/02/2011 -  Casual Academic University of Newcastle
School of Psychology

Awards

Award

Year Award
2012 Reducing Health Risks in the Community Award
Hunter New England Population Health
2010 University Medal in Psychology
University of Newcastle
2010 Chancellor's Award for Research Excellence
University of Newcastle
2010 Vice Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Research Candidates
University of Newcastle

Distinction

Year Award
2014 Three Minute Thesis University Finalist
University of Newcastle

Nomination

Year Award
2016 Beryl Nashar Young Researcher Award Nominee
University of Newcastle

Scholarship

Year Award
2016 Australian Postgraduate Award
Commonwealth Government

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
PSYC6601 Facilitating Best Practice Healthcare
University of Newcastle
Online teaching, marking 1/07/2015 - 31/12/2015
PSYC1010 Introduction to Psychology 1
University of Newcastle
Marking 1/01/2011 - 31/12/2012
PSYC6601 Health and Psychology
University of Newcastle
Course coordinator 24/07/2017 - 31/12/2017
PSYC3500 Advanced Health Psychology
University of Newcastle
Marking, tutoring 1/02/2011 - 30/12/2014
PSYC1020 Introduction to Psychology 2
University of Newcastle
Marking 1/01/2011 - 31/12/2012
PSYC6601 Health and Psychology
University of Newcastle
Online teaching, marking 1/01/2015 - 30/06/2015
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, O'Brien KM, Wyse RJ, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2018)
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub4
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Erica James, Rebecca Hodder, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Rebecca Wyse
2018 Bailey JM, Hansen V, Wye PM, Wiggers JH, Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, 'Supporting change in chronic disease risk behaviours for people with a mental illness: a qualitative study of the experiences of family carers', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5314-z
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2018 Hodder RK, O'Brien KM, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, Clinton-Mcharg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2018 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub5
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Erica James, Rebecca Hodder, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan, Tara Clinton-Mcharg
2018 Fehily C, Bartlem K, Wiggers J, Wolfenden L, Regan T, Dray J, et al., 'Systematic review of interventions to increase the provision of care for chronic disease risk behaviours in mental health settings: Review protocol', Systematic Reviews, 7 (2018)

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: People with a mental illness experience a higher morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases relative to the general population. A higher preva... [more]

© 2018 The Author(s). Background: People with a mental illness experience a higher morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases relative to the general population. A higher prevalence of risk behaviours, including tobacco smoking, poor nutrition, harmful alcohol consumption and physical inactivity, is a substantial contributor to this health inequity. Clinical practice guidelines recommend that mental health services routinely provide care to their clients to address these risk behaviours. Such care may include the following elements: ask, assess, advise, assist and arrange (the '5As'), which has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing risk behaviours. Despite this potential, the provision of such care is reported to be low internationally and in Australia, and there is a need to identify effective strategies to increase care provision. The proposed review will examine the effectiveness of interventions which aimed to increase care provision (i.e. increase the proportion of clients receiving or clinicians providing the 5As) for the chronic disease risk behaviours of clients within the context of mental health service delivery. Methods: Eligible studies will be any quantitative study designs with a comparison group and which report on the effectiveness of an intervention strategy (including delivery arrangements, financial arrangements, governance arrangements and implementation strategies) to increase care provision specifically for chronic disease risk behaviours (tobacco smoking, poor nutrition, harmful alcohol consumption and physical inactivity). Screening for studies will be conducted across seven electronic databases: PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). Two authors will independently screen studies for eligibility and extract data from included studies. Where studies are sufficiently homogenous, meta-analysis will be performed. Where considerable heterogeneity exists (I2=75), narrative synthesis will be used. Discussion: This review will be the first to synthesise evidence for the effectiveness of intervention approaches to facilitate care provision for chronic disease risk behaviours in the context of mental health service delivery. The results have the potential to inform the development of evidenced-based approaches to address the health inequities experienced by this population group. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42017074360.

DOI 10.1186/s13643-018-0735-4
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Julia Dray Uon, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2018 Stockings E, Bartlem K, Hall A, Hodder R, Gilligan C, Wiggers J, et al., 'Whole-of-community interventions to reduce population-level harms arising from alcohol and other drug use: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Addiction, (2018)
DOI 10.1111/add.14277
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Conor Gilligan, Rebecca Hodder
2017 Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services', Drug and Alcohol Review, 36 369-377 (2017) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introducti... [more]

© 2016 The Authors Drug and Alcohol Review published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Introduction and Aims: Health risk behaviours, such as smoking, nutrition and physical inactivity, are significant contributors to chronic disease for people with substance use disorders. This study reports the prevalence of these behaviours amongst substance use treatment clients, their attitudes towards modifying such behaviours and the acceptability of receiving support to do so. Client characteristics associated with risk status and interest in modifying behaviours were examined. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with clients of 15 community substance use treatment services within in New South Wales, Australia. Data for the study were collected via computer assisted telephone interviews. Results: Of those contactable and eligible, 386 (71%) clients completed the survey. Clients reported a high prevalence of smoking (80%), insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption (89%) and insufficient physical activity (31%). Overall, 51¿69% of clients reported considering modifying their health risk behaviours and 88¿97% thought it was acceptable to be provided preventive care to address such behaviours. Younger clients were more likely to smoke (18¿34 years (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 11.3]); 35¿54 years (OR = 2.6 [95% CI = 1.2, 5.7])) and be interested in increasing vegetable consumption (18¿34 years (OR = 4.4 [95% CI = 1.3, 14.8]); 35¿54 years (OR = 8.0 [95% CI = 2.5, 25.4])) than older clients (=55 years). Discussion and Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of health risk behaviours amongst clients of community substance use treatment services. However, contrary to commonly cited barriers to care provision, clients are interested in modifying their risk behaviours and report that receiving preventive care to address these behaviours is acceptable. [Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, Gillham K, Bartlem K, McElwaine K, Gow B, Wiggers J. Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:369¿377.].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12439
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, A Dunlop, John Wiggers
2017 Bailey JM, Wye PM, Stockings EA, Bartlem KM, Metse AP, Wiggers JH, Bowman JA, 'Smoking Cessation Care for People with a Mental Illness: Family Carer Expectations of Health and Community Services', Journal of Smoking Cessation, 12 221-230 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2016.23
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2017 Wiggers J, McElwaine K, Freund M, Campbell L, Bowman J, Wye P, et al., 'Increasing the provision of preventive care by community healthcare services: a stepped wedge implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0636-2
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Daniel Barker, John Wiggers, Megan Freund
2017 Hodder RK, Stacey FG, Wyse RJ, O'Brien KM, Clinton-McHarg T, Tzelepis F, et al., 'Interventions for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children aged five years and under', COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD008552.pub3
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Flora Tzelepis, Rebecca Wyse, Erica James, Rebecca Hodder, Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Bartlem K, Bailey J, Metse A, Asara A, Wye P, Clancy R, et al., 'Do mental health consumers want to improve their long-term disease risk behaviours? A survey of over 2000 psychiatric inpatients', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 27 1032-1043 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/inm.12411
Co-authors John Wiggers, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman
2017 Bailey JM, Wye PM, Wiggers JH, Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, 'Family carers: A role in addressing chronic disease risk behaviours for people with a mental illness?', Preventive Medicine Reports, 7 140-146 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 The Authors People with a mental illness experience greater chronic disease morbidity and mortality compared to those without mental illness. Family carers have the potenti... [more]

© 2017 The Authors People with a mental illness experience greater chronic disease morbidity and mortality compared to those without mental illness. Family carers have the potential to promote the health behaviours of those they care for however factors which may influence the extent to which they do so have not been reported. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate carers': 1) promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, quitting smoking, and reducing alcohol consumption; 2) perceptions of their role and ability to promote such behaviours; 3) and the association between carer perceptions and the promotion of such behaviours. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with mental health carers (N¿=¿144, 37.6% response rate) in New South Wales, Australia in 2013. Associations between current promotion of health behaviours and carer perceptions were explored through multivariate regression analysis in 2016. A majority of respondents promoted fruit and vegetable consumption (63.8%), physical activity (60.3%), quitting smoking (56.3%), and reducing alcohol consumption (56.2%) to the person they cared for. A perception that it was ¿very important¿ to have a positive influence on these behaviours was positively related with promotion of each of the four behaviours, with those holding such a view being more likely to promote such behaviours, than those who did not (odds ratio: 9.47¿24.13, p¿<¿0.001). The majority (56.2%¿63.8%) of carers reported promoting the health behaviours of those they cared for, demonstrating a need and opportunity to build the capacity of carers to contribute to reducing the health risk behaviours among people with a mental illness.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.05.014
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2017 Stacey FG, Finch M, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Jessop K, Wedesweiler T, et al., 'Evidence of the Potential Effectiveness of Centre-Based Childcare Policies and Practices on Child Diet and Physical Activity: Consolidating Evidence from Systematic Reviews of Intervention Trials and Observational Studies', Current Nutrition Reports, 6 228-246 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s13668-017-0212-z
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden
2017 Fehily C, Bartlem K, Wiggers J, Wyne P, Clancy R, Castle D, et al., 'Evaluating the effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle clinician in addressing the chronic disease risk behaviours of community mental health clients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial', TRIALS, 18 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-2017-1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Richard Clancy
2017 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder RK, et al., 'Systematic Review of Universal Resilience-Focused Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting', Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 56 813-824 (2017) [C1]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems i... [more]

© 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Objective To examine the effect of universal, school-based, resilience-focused interventions on mental health problems in children and adolescents. Method Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of universal, school-based interventions that included strategies to strengthen a minimum of 3 internal resilience protective factors, and included an outcome measure of mental health problems in children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years. Six databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Results were pooled in meta-analyses by mental health outcome (anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, hyperactivity, conduct problems, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress), for all trials (5-18 years). Subgroup analyses were conducted by age (child: 5-10 years; adolescent: 11-18 years), length of follow-up (short: post-=12 months; long: >12 months), and gender (narrative). Results A total of 57 included trials were identified from 5,984 records, with 49 contributing to meta-analyses. For all trials, resilience-focused interventions were effective relative to a control in reducing 4 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and general psychological distress. For child trials (meta-analyses for 6 outcomes), interventions were effective for anxiety symptoms and general psychological distress. For adolescent trials (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. For short-term follow-up, interventions were effective for 2 of 7 outcomes: depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. For long-term follow-up (meta-analyses for 5 outcomes), interventions were effective for internalizing problems. Conclusion The findings may suggest most promise for using universal resilience-focused interventions at least for short-term reductions in depressive and anxiety symptoms for children and adolescents, particularly if a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based approach is used. The limited number of trials providing data amenable for meta-analysis for some outcomes and subgroups, the variability of interventions, study quality, and bias mean that it is not possible to draw more specific conclusions. Identifying what intervention qualities (such as number and type of protective factor) achieve the greatest positive effect per mental health problem outcome remains an important area for future research. Systematic review protocol and registration Systematic Review of Universal Resilience Interventions Targeting Child and Adolescent Mental Health in the School Setting; http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-015-0172-6; PROSPERO CRD42015025908.

DOI 10.1016/j.jaac.2017.07.780
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Julia Dray Uon, Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Christopher Oldmeadow
2016 Bartlem KM, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye PM, Barker D, McElwaine KM, et al., 'Effectiveness of an intervention in increasing the provision of preventive care by community mental health services: a non-randomized, multiple baseline implementation trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 11 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0408-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Daniel Barker, Jenny Bowman, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Patrick Mcelduff
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Ross K, Freund M, Wye P, McElwaine K, et al., 'Mental health clinician attitudes to the provision of preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours and association with care provision', BMC Psychiatry, 16 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Bartlem et al. Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association betw... [more]

© 2016 Bartlem et al. Background: Preventive care for chronic disease risk behaviours by mental health clinicians is sub-optimal. Little research has examined the association between clinician attitudes and such care delivery. This study aimed to explore: i) the attitudes of a multi-disciplinary group of community mental health clinicians regarding their perceived role, perception of client interest, and perceived self-efficacy in the provision of preventive care, ii) whether such attitudes differ by professional discipline, and iii) the association between these attitudes and clinician provision of such care. Method: A telephone survey was conducted with 151 Australian community mental health clinicians regarding their attitudes towards provision of assessment, advice and referral addressing smoking, nutrition, alcohol, and physical activity, and their reported provision of such care. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between attitudes and care delivery, and attitudinal differences by professional discipline. Results: Most clinicians reported that: their manager supported provision of preventive care; such care was part of their role; it would not jeopardise their practitioner-client relationships, clients found preventive care acceptable, and that they had the confidence, knowledge and skills to modify client health behaviours. Half reported that clients were not interested in changing their health behaviours, and one third indicated that the provision of preventive care negatively impacted on time available for delivery of acute care. The following attitudes were positively associated with the provision of preventive care: role congruence, client interest in change, and addressing health risk behaviours will not jeopardise the client-clinician relationship. Conclusions: Strategies are required to translate positive attitudes to improved client care and address attitudes which may hinder the provision of preventive care in community mental health.

DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0763-3
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Megan Freund
2016 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Bartlem KM, Wye PM, Wiggers JH, 'Systematic review of interventions to increase the delivery of preventive care by primary care nurses and allied health clinicians', Implementation Science, 11 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 McElwaine et al. Background: Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summ... [more]

© 2016 McElwaine et al. Background: Primary care nurses and allied health clinicians are potential providers of opportunistic preventive care. This systematic review aimed to summarise evidence for the effectiveness of practice change interventions in increasing nurse or allied health professional provision of any of five preventive care elements (ask, assess, advise, assist, and/or arrange) for any of four behavioural risks (smoking, inadequate nutrition, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) within a primary care setting. Methods: A search of Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, and CINAHL databases was undertaken to locate controlled intervention trials published between 1992 and May 2014 that provided practice change interventions to primary care nurses and/or allied health professionals to increase preventive care. The effect of interventions aimed at increasing the provision of any of the five care elements for any of the four behavioural risks was examined. A narrative synthesis was utilised. Results: From 8109 articles, seven trials met the inclusion criteria. All trials bar one, assessed multi-strategic practice change interventions (three to five strategies) focused on care by nurses (six trials) or mixed nursing/allied health clinicians. One trial examined care provision for all four risks, five trials examined care for smoking only, and one trial examined care for alcohol consumption only. For the six trials reporting significance testing (excludes one smoking care trial), significant effects favouring the intervention group were reported in at least one trial for smoking risk assessment (2/4 trials reported an effect for at least one analysis of an assessment outcome), brief advice (2/3), assistance (2/2), and arranging referral (2/3); alcohol risk assessment (1/2) and brief advice (1/2); inadequate nutrition risk assessment (1/1); and physical inactivity risk assessment and brief advice (1/1). When the number of analyses undertaken within trials focusing on smoking care was considered, the results were less promising (e.g. of the 15 analyses conducted on brief advice variables across three trials, four showed a positive effect). Conclusions: Evidence for the effect of practice change interventions on preventive care by primary care nurses or allied health providers is inconclusive given the small number of trials and inconsistency of results between and within trials. Systematic review registration number: None.

DOI 10.1186/s13012-016-0409-3
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Megan Freund, John Wiggers
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Provision of Chronic Disease Preventive Care in Community Substance Use Services: Client and Clinician Report', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 68 24-30 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors. Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care m... [more]

© 2016 The Authors. Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care may be effective in reducing such health behaviors. This study aimed to examine clinician provision of preventive care to clients of community substance use treatment services. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 386 clients and 54 clinicians of community substance use treatment services in one health district in New South Wales, Australia. Client- and clinician-reported provision of three elements of care (assessment, brief advice and referral) for three health risk behaviors (tobacco smoking, insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption and insufficient physical activity) was assessed, with associations with client characteristics examined. Results: Provision was highest for tobacco smoking assessment (90% client reported, 87% clinician reported) and brief advice (79% client reported, 80% clinician reported) and lowest for fruit and vegetable consumption (assessment 23%, brief advice 25%). Few clients reported being offered a referral (<. 10%). Assessment of physical activity and brief advice for all behaviors was higher for clients residing in rural/remote areas. Conclusion: Assessment and brief advice were provided to the majority of clients for smoking, but sub-optimally for the other behaviors. Further investigation of barriers to the provision of preventive care within substance use treatment settings is required, particularly for referral to ongoing support.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2016.05.006
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman, Megan Freund, A Dunlop
2016 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Slattery C, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Clinician assessment, advice and referral for multiple health risk behaviours: Prevalence and predictors of delivery by primary health care nurses and allied health professionals (vol 94, pg 193, 2014)', PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, 99 1749-1749 (2016)
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2016.06.026
Co-authors Megan Freund, John Wiggers
2015 Stockings EAL, Bowman JA, Bartlem KM, Mcelwaine KM, Baker AL, Terry M, et al., 'Implementation of a smoke-free policy in an inpatient psychiatric facility: Patient-reported adherence, support, and receipt of nicotine-dependence treatment', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 24 342-349 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The implementation of smoke-free policies in inpatient psychiatric facilities, including patient adherence, mental health nu... [more]

© 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc. The implementation of smoke-free policies in inpatient psychiatric facilities, including patient adherence, mental health nursing staff support, and provision of nicotine-dependence treatment to patients, has been reported to be poor. The extent to which the quality of smoke-free policy implementation is associated with patient views of a policy is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 181 patients (53.6%, n = 97 smokers; and 46.4%, n = 84 non-smokers) in an Australian inpatient psychiatric facility with a total smoke-free policy. Smokers' adherence to the policy was poor (83.5% smoked). Only half (53.6%) perceived staff to be supportive of the policy. Most smokers used nicotine-replacement therapy (75.3%); although few received optimal nicotine-dependence treatment (19.6%). Overall, 45.9% of patients viewed the smoke-free policy in the unit as positive (29.9% smokers; 64.3% non-smokers). For smokers, adhering to the ban, perceiving staff to be supportive, and reporting that the nicotine-replacement therapy reduced cravings to smoke were associated with a more positive view towards the smoke-free policy. These findings support the importance of patient adherence, mental health nursing staff support, and adequate provision of nicotine-dependence treatment in strengthening smoke-free policy implementation in inpatient psychiatric settings.

DOI 10.1111/inm.12128
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Richard Clancy, Kim Colyvas, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker
2015 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Lecathelinais C, McElwaine K, et al., 'Acceptability and receipt of preventive care for chronic-disease health risk behaviors reported by clients of community mental health services', Psychiatric Services, 66 857-864 (2015) [C1]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health... [more]

Objective: Compared with the general population, people with a mental illness have a greater prevalence of behaviors that contribute to higher chronic disease rates. Mental health clinical guidelines recommend preventive care to address such behaviors; however, little information is available about whether clients consider preventive care acceptable or about the prevalence of such care in mental health services. This article describes acceptability and receipt of assessment, advice, and referral for smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity, as reported by community mental health service clients. The association between preventive care, diagnosis, and number of clinical appointments was examined. Methods: A cross-sectional telephone interview was conducted with clients (N=558) of community mental health services in Australia. Results: Although preventive care was highly acceptable to clients (86%297%), receipt of preventive care was low. Client receipt of risk assessment ranged from 26% (assessment of fruit or vegetable intake) to 76% (assessment of alcohol consumption). The proportion of clients at risk of and assessed for unhealthy behavior who then received brief advice ranged from 69% (fruit or vegetable intake) to 85% (physical activity), whereas only 38% (alcohol consumption) to 49% (smoking) received any referral. A greater number of mental health appointments were associated with higher prevalence of preventive care, as were diagnoses of diabetes or respiratory conditions and not having a schizophrenia diagnosis. Conclusions: Practice change strategies are required to increase the delivery of routine preventive care within mental health services if clients are to benefit from clinical guidelines.

DOI 10.1176/appi.ps.201400360
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Megan Freund, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
2015 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Bailey JM, Freund M, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Chronic disease health risk behaviours amongst people with a mental illness', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 49 731-741 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Amongst people with a mental illness, modifiable health risk behaviours contribute substantially t... [more]

© 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Objective: Amongst people with a mental illness, modifiable health risk behaviours contribute substantially to increased chronic disease morbidity and mortality. This study examined the prevalence of and interest in changing such behaviours amongst community mental health service clients in Australia. Method: A telephone interview was undertaken with Australian community mental health service clients. Participants reported engagement in four health risk behaviours: tobacco smoking, fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Participants were classified as at risk based upon Australian national guidelines. At-risk participants were asked whether they were considering improving their health risk behaviour within the next month. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and risk, and interest in improving health risk behaviours was examined. Results: Risk prevalence was highest for inadequate vegetable consumption (78.3%), followed by inadequate fruit consumption (60%), smoking (50.7%), physical inactivity (46.8%), short-term alcohol risk (40.3%) and chronic alcohol risk (35.3%). A majority of at-risk participants were considering improving their health risk behaviour for smoking, physical inactivity and inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (65.1%, 71.1%, and 53.3%, respectively). After adjusting for demographic factors, no diagnostic categories were associated with risk for any behaviour. Those with a diagnosis of depression were more likely to be interested in quitting smoking and increasing physical activity. Conclusions: Regardless of diagnosis, a high prevalence of chronic disease health risk behaviours was identified, with many participants expressing an interest in improving these behaviours. Such findings reinforce recommendations that preventive care addressing the chronic disease risks of clients be provided routinely by mental health clinicians. Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12613000693729. URL: www.anzctr.org.au/

DOI 10.1177/0004867415569798
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Slattery C, Wye PM, Lecathelinais C, et al., 'Clinician assessment, advice and referral for multiple health risk behaviors: Prevalence and predictors of delivery by primary health care nurses and allied health professionals', PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, 94 193-201 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2013.10.017
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11
Co-authors John Wiggers, Megan Freund
2014 Bartlem KM, Bowman JA, Freund M, Wye PM, McElwaine KM, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Care provision to prevent chronic disease by community mental health clinicians', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 762-770 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population.... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background People with a mental illness have higher prevalence of behavioral risks for chronic disease than the general population. Despite recommendations regarding the provision of preventive care by mental health services, limited research has examined the extent to which such care is provided.Purpose To examine mental health clinician provision of care for preventable chronic disease risks, and whether such care was associated with the availability of practice support strategies.Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of 151 community mental health clinicians in New South Wales, Australia regarding the provision of three elements of preventive care (i.e., assessment, brief advice, and referral/follow-up) for four health risk behaviors (i.e., tobacco smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, harmful alcohol consumption, and inadequate physical activity). Clinicians reported the availability of 16 strategies to support such care delivery. Data were collected in 2010 and analyzed in 2012-2013.Results Preventive care provision varied by both care element and risk behavior. Optimal care (each care element provided to at least 80% of clients for all health behaviors) was provided by few clinicians: assessment (8.6%), brief advice (24.5%), and referral/follow-up (9.9%). Less than half of clinicians reported more than four support strategies were available (44.4%). The availability of five or more strategies was associated with increased optimal preventive care.Conclusions The provision of preventive care focused on chronic disease prevention in community mental health services is suboptimal. Interventions to increase the routine provision of such care should involve increasing the availability of evidence-based strategies to support care provision.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.003
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 McElwaine KM, Freund M, Campbell EM, Knight J, Bowman JA, Wolfenden L, et al., 'Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians a non-randomized controlled trial', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 47 424-434 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of ... [more]

© 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Background: Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. Purpose: To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Design: Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Setting/participants: Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). Intervention: The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Results: Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. Conclusions: The intervention's impact on the provision of preventive care varied by both care element and risk type. Further intervention is required to increase the consistent provision of preventive care, particularly referral/follow-up.

DOI 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.06.018
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden, Megan Freund, Patrick Mcelduff
2013 Bowman J, Fletcher A, Wiggers J, Anderson AE, McElwaine K, Bartlem K, et al., 'Psychologists and Smoking Cessation Intervention: Unrealised Potential', Journal of Smoking Cessation, 8 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/jsc.2013.24
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2013 Stockings E, Bowman J, McElwaine K, Baker A, Terry M, Clancy R, et al., 'Readiness to quit smoking and quit attempts among Australian mental health inpatients.', Nicotine Tob Res, 15 942-949 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/ntr/nts206
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 32
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2013 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, McElwaine K, Knight J, et al., 'Evaluating the effectiveness of a clinical practice change intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care in a network of community-based mental health services: a study protocol of a non-randomized, multiple baseline trial', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 8 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-85
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Jenny Bowman
2012 Bowman JA, Wiggers JH, Colyvas KJ, Wye PM, Walsh RA, Bartlem KM, 'Smoking cessation among Australian methadone clients: Prevalence, characteristics and a need for action', Drug and Alcohol Review, 31 507-513 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00408.x
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Kim Colyvas, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
Show 26 more journal articles

Conference (11 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Stockings E, Wolfenden L, Bartlem K, Gilligan C, Hodder R, Sherker S, Wiggers J, 'PARTNERSHIPS TO REDUCE POPULATION LEVEL HARMS ARISING FROM ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG USE: A REVIEW OF MULTI-SETTING, COMMUNITY-BASED INTERVENTIONS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Tremain D, Wye P, Wiggers J, 'Intervention to increase preventive care in mental health services: reasons for limited effect', EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2016 Dray J, Bowman J, Campbell E, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Hodder R, et al., 'Systematic review of the effect of school-based, resilience-focussed interventions on child and adolescent mental health', The 22nd International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions World Congress, Calgary, Canada (2016)
Co-authors Megan Freund, Julia Dray Uon, Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Bartlem K, Bailey J, Metse A, Wye P, Wiggers J, Clancy R, Bowman J, 'CHRONIC DISEASE RISK BEHAVIORS AMONG PEOPLE WITH A MENTAL ILLNESS: PREVALENCE, INTEREST IN CHANGE AND ACCEPTABILITY OF RISK REDUCTION CARE', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Tremain D, Wye P, Wiggers J, 'A PRACTICE CHANGE INTERVENTION TO INCREASE PREVENTIVE CARE IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES: EXPLORING REASONS FOR LIMITED EFFECT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers
2016 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Barker D, McElwaine K, et al., 'INCREASING THE ROUTINE PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE BY COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH CLINICIANS: A WHOLE SERVICE APPROACH', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors John Wiggers, Megan Freund, Daniel Barker, Jenny Bowman
2014 Bowman J, Bartlem K, Freund M, Knight J, McElwaine K, Wye P, et al., 'COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES AND SMOKING CESSATION CARE: AN UNREALISED POTENTIAL', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Megan Freund, John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Bailey JM, Bowman JA, Wye PM, Bartlem KM, Stockings E, Metse A, Wiggers JH, 'THE PROVISION OF SMOKING CESSATION CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS: EXPECTATIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF 'CARERS'', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors John Wiggers, Jenny Bowman
2014 Stockings EA, Bowman JA, Bartlem KM, McElwaine KM, Baker AL, Terry M, et al., 'QUALITY OF IMPLEMENTATION OF A SMOKE-FREE POLICY IN AN INPATIENT PSYCHIATRIC FACILITY: ASSOCIATION WITH PATIENT ACCEPTABILITY', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, Amanda Baker, Richard Clancy, Kim Colyvas, John Wiggers
2014 Bartlem K, Bowman J, Freund M, Wye P, Knight J, McElwaine K, et al., 'NEED FOR ACTION: PREVENTIVE CARE FOR CHRONIC DISEASE RISK FACTORS WITHIN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES', ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ONCOLOGY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Megan Freund
2008 Bowman JA, 'Psychologists and smoking cessation intervention: Unrealised potential', 2008 UK National Smoking Cessation Conference - Archive, London (2008) [E3]
Co-authors Jenny Bowman
Show 8 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Stockings E, Wolfenden L, Bartlem K, Gilligan C, Hodder R, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, 'Systematic Review and Recommendations. Final Report: The efficacy of multi-setting community based alcohol and other drug (AOD) interventions for reducing population-level harms. Report to the Australian Drug Foundation', Australian Drug Foundation (2016)
Co-authors Conor Gilligan, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $1,231,570

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20182 grants / $921,519

Community managed organisations: a potential role in addressing the chronic disease burden among people with a mental illness$597,507

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Professor John Wiggers, Associate Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Kate Bartlem, Doctor Tara Clinton-Mcharg, Conjoint Associate Professor Andrew Searles, Professor Andrew Wilson
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2020
GNo G1800671
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Population level approaches to addressing chronic disease risk behaviours among people with mental illness$324,012

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Kate Bartlem
Scheme Early Career Fellowships
Role Lead
Funding Start 2018
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G1700207
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20171 grants / $9,271

Process of behavior change outcomes of the NSW Get health Coaching and Information Service among people with mental illness$9,271

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Kate Bartlem, Dr TIMOTHY Regan
Scheme Linkage Pilot Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1700266
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20163 grants / $294,748

Translation of preventive care guidelines into community mental health service delivery$154,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding body The Sax Institute
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Paula Wye, Doctor Kate Bartlem, Conjoint Associate Professor Richard Clancy, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Andrew Wilson, Associate Professor Sonia Wutzke, Professor Chris Rissel, Professor David Castle
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501440
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Translation of preventive care guidelines into community mental health service delivery$134,000

Funding body: Hunter New England Population Health

Funding body Hunter New England Population Health
Project Team Professor Jennifer Bowman, Doctor Paula Wye, Doctor Kate Bartlem, Conjoint Associate Professor Richard Clancy, Professor John Wiggers, Professor Andrew Wilson, Associate Professor Sonia Wutzke, Professor Chris Rissel, Professor David Castle
Scheme Australian Prevention Partnership Centre Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2017
GNo G1501446
Type Of Funding C3112 - Aust Not for profit
Category 3112
UON Y

Faculty Strategic Small Grant$6,748

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle | Australia
Project Team

Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman

Scheme Faculty Small Grant Scheme
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20121 grants / $6,032

Staff Reported Practices and Views Regarding Providing Preventive Care for Drug and Alcohol Clients$6,032

Funding body: Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing

Funding body Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing
Project Team

Megan Freund, Paula Wye, Jenny Bowman, John Wiggers, Adrian Dunlop, Kathleen McElwaine, Kate Bartlem

Scheme Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.9

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2018 PhD A Tailored Multi-Strategic Practice Change Intervention to Improve the Provision of Routine Preventive Care by Community Mental Health Clinicians PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2017 PhD Telephone-Based Supports for Behaviour Change: An Exploration of Effectiveness Amongst People With a Mental Illness PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Translation of Preventive Care Guidelines into Community Mental Health Service Delivery PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Addressing the Chronic Disease Risk Behaviours of People with a Mental Illness PhD (Psychology - Science), Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
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News

UON researchers shine in 2017 NHMRC funding

October 11, 2017

University of Newcastle researchers have secured more than $6 million in the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding

Dr Kate Bartlem

Position

NHMRC Fellow
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science

Contact Details

Email kate.bartlem@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 02 40 33 9608
Links Research Networks
Twitter

Office

Room W251
Building Behavioural Sciences Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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