Dr Sam McCrabb

Dr Sam McCrabb

Methods Editor

School of Medicine and Public Health

Career Summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Psychology, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Health Promotion
  • Implementation
  • Public Health
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Systematic Reviews
  • Tobacco Control

Languages

  • English (Fluent)
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (33 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2021 Hall A, O'Brien K, McCrabb S, Kypri K, Brown S, Wilczynska M, et al., 'Learnings from efforts to synthesise evidence on the COVID-19 incubation period.', Public Health, 198 e12-e13 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/j.puhe.2021.05.002
Co-authors Rebecca Wyse, Luke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri, John Wiggers, Scott Brown, Alix Hall
2021 Yoong SL, Lum M, Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Jones J, et al., 'Healthy eating interventions delivered in early childhood education and care settings for improving the diet of children aged six years and below', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2021 (2021)

Objectives: This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (intervention). The objectives are as follows:. To assess the effectiveness of¿healthy eating interventions delivered in ECEC¿... [more]

Objectives: This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (intervention). The objectives are as follows:. To assess the effectiveness of¿healthy eating interventions delivered in ECEC¿settings for improving child dietary intake in children aged six years or under, relative to usual care or no intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the impact of ECEC- based healthy eating interventions on physical (child weight), language/cognitive skills, social/emotional (mental health) and quality of life. The¿review will also report on cost¿of the intervention and adverse effects of ECEC-based healthy eating interventions, where this exists.

DOI 10.1002/14651858.CD013862
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Courtney Barnes, Alice Grady, Alix Hall, Luke Wolfenden
2021 Wolfenden L, Movsisyan A, McCrabb S, Stratil JM, Yoong SL, 'Selecting Review Outcomes for Systematic Reviews of Public Health Interventions.', Am J Public Health, 111 465-470 (2021)
DOI 10.2105/AJPH.2020.306061
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Serene Yoong
2021 Lane C, McCrabb S, Nathan N, Naylor PJ, Bauman A, Milat A, et al., 'How effective are physical activity interventions when they are scaled-up: a systematic review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021)

Background: The ¿scale-up¿ of effective physical activity interventions is required if they are to yield improvements in population health. The purpose of this study was to system... [more]

Background: The ¿scale-up¿ of effective physical activity interventions is required if they are to yield improvements in population health. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effectiveness of community-based physical activity interventions that have been scaled-up. We also sought to explore differences in the effect size of these interventions compared with prior evaluations of their efficacy in more controlled contexts, and describe adaptations that were made to interventions as part of the scale-up process. Methods: We performed a search of empirical research using six electronic databases, hand searched reference lists and contacted field experts. An intervention was considered ¿scaled-up¿ if it had been intentionally delivered on a larger scale (to a greater number of participants, new populations, and/or by means of different delivery systems) than a preceding randomised control trial (¿pre-scale¿) in which a significant intervention effect (p < 0.05) was reported on any measure of physical activity. Effect size differences between pre-scale and scaled up interventions were quantified ([the effect size reported in the scaled-up study / the effect size reported in the pre-scale-up efficacy trial] × 100) to explore any scale-up ¿penalties¿ in intervention effects. Results: We identified 10 eligible studies. Six scaled-up interventions appeared to achieve significant improvement on at least one measure of physical activity. Six studies included measures of physical activity that were common between pre-scale and scaled-up trials enabling the calculation of an effect size difference (and potential scale-up penalty). Differences in effect size ranged from 132 to 25% (median = 58.8%), suggesting that most scaled-up interventions typically achieve less than 60% of their pre-scale effect size. A variety of adaptations were made for scale-up ¿ the most common being mode of delivery. Conclusion: The majority of interventions remained effective when delivered at-scale however their effects were markedly lower than reported in pre-scale trials. Adaptations of interventions were common and may have impacted on the effectiveness of interventions delivered at scale. These outcomes provide valuable insight for researchers and public health practitioners interested in the design and scale-up of physical activity interventions, and contribute to the growing evidence base for delivering health promotion interventions at-scale. Trial registration: PROSPERO CRD42020144842.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-021-01080-4
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Luke Wolfenden, Nicole Nathan
2021 Wolfenden L, Barnes C, Lane C, McCrabb S, Brown HM, Gerritsen S, et al., 'Consolidating evidence on the effectiveness of interventions promoting fruit and vegetable consumption: an umbrella review', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 18 (2021) [C1]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidenc... [more]

Background: The overarching objective was to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. To do this, systematic review evidence regarding the effects of intervention strategies was synthesized; organized, where appropriate, by the setting in which the strategies were implemented. Additionally, we sought to describe gaps in the review of evidence; that is, where evidence regarding the effectiveness of recommended policy actions had not been systematically synthesised. Methods: We undertook a systematic search of electronic databases and the grey literature to identify systematic reviews describing the effects of any intervention strategy targeting fruit and/or vegetable intake in children or adults of any age. Results: The effects of 32 intervention strategies were synthesised from the 19 included reviews. The strategies were mapped across all three broad domains of the NOURISHING framework (i.e. food environment, food system and behaviour change communication), but covered just 14 of the framework¿s 65 sub-policy areas. There was evidence supporting the effectiveness of 19 of the 32 intervention strategies. The findings of the umbrella review suggest that intervention strategies implemented within schools, childcare services, homes, workplaces and primary care can be effective, as can eHealth strategies, mass media campaigns, household food production strategies and fiscal interventions. Conclusions: A range of effective strategy options are available for policy makers and practitioners interested in improving fruit and/or vegetable intake. However, the effects of many strategies ¿ particularly those targeting agricultural production practices, the supply chain and the broader food system ¿ have not been reported in systematic reviews. Primary studies assessing the effects of these strategies, and the inclusion of such studies in systematic reviews, are needed to better inform national and international efforts to improve public health nutrition. Trial registration: The review protocol was deposited in a publicly available Open Science framework prior to execution of the search strategy. https://osf.io/unj7x/.

DOI 10.1186/s12966-020-01046-y
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Hannah Brown, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Courtney Barnes
2021 Barnes C, McCrabb S, Stacey F, Nathan N, Yoong SL, Grady A, et al., 'Improving implementation of school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies, practices, and programs: a systematic review.', Transl Behav Med, 11 1365-1410 (2021)
DOI 10.1093/tbm/ibab037
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, Rebecca Hodder, Courtney Barnes, Serene Yoong
2021 McCrabb S, Mooney K, Wolfenden L, Gonzalez S, Ditton E, Yoong S, Kypri K, '"He who pays the piper calls the tune": Researcher experiences of funder suppression of health behaviour intervention trial findings.', PLoS One, 16 e0255704 (2021)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0255704
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Kypros Kypri
2021 Shoesmith A, Hall A, Wolfenden L, Shelton RC, Powell BJ, Brown H, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators influencing the sustainment of health behaviour interventions in schools and childcare services: a systematic review', IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE, 16 (2021) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13012-021-01134-y
Co-authors Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Serene Yoong, Luke Wolfenden, Hannah Brown, Alix Hall
2021 Yoong SL, Hall A, Leonard A, McCrabb S, Wiggers J, Tursan d'Espaignet E, et al., 'Prevalence of electronic nicotine delivery systems and electronic non-nicotine delivery systems in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.', Lancet Public Health, 6 e661-e673 (2021)
DOI 10.1016/S2468-2667(21)00106-7
Co-authors Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Christopher Oldmeadow, Chris Paul, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden
2020 McCrabb S, Mooney K, Elton B, Grady A, Yoong SL, Wolfenden L, 'How to optimise public health interventions: a scoping review of guidance from optimisation process frameworks', BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 20 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12889-020-09950-5
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Yoong SL, Lum M, Jones J, Kerr E, Falkiner M, Delaney T, et al., 'A systematic review of interventions to improve the dietary intake, physical activity and weight status of children attending family day care services', Public Health Nutrition, 23 2211-2220 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1017/S1368980019005275
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Serene Yoong, Alice Grady
2020 Yoong SL, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, Wyse R, Sutherland R, Hodder RK, et al., 'Adaptation of public health initiatives: expert views on current guidance and opportunities to advance their application and benefit', Health education research, 35 243-257 (2020) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/her/cyaa014
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse, Rachel Sutherland, John Attia, Nicole Nathan, John Wiggers, Rebecca Hodder, Alice Grady, Luke Wolfenden
2020 Jackson J, Wolfenden L, Grady A, Lum M, Leonard A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Early childhood education and care-based healthy eating interventions for improving child diet: a systematic review protocol', SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, 9 (2020)
DOI 10.1186/s13643-020-01440-4
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Courtney Barnes, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong
2020 Murray EG, Isbister GK, McCrabb S, Halpin SA, Bonevski B, 'An examination of factors associated with tobacco smoking amongst patients presenting with deliberate self-poisoning', Journal of Affective Disorders, 260 544-549 (2020) [C1]

Background: Understand factors related to related to tobacco smoking amongst individuals who present with deliberate self-harm is important. This article explores the relationship... [more]

Background: Understand factors related to related to tobacco smoking amongst individuals who present with deliberate self-harm is important. This article explores the relationship between tobacco use with mental health diagnoses and substance use in a cohort of overdose admissions. Methods: Secondary analysis of an existing health service database with 7133 patients admitted for deliberate self-poisonings from 1997 to 2013 was conducted. A data collection form was used on admission to capture information on patient demographics, drugs ingested, use of drugs of misuse, regular medications and management and complications of poisoning. The data was analysed using a multiple logistic regression model. Results: Within a deliberate self-poisoning population, those diagnosed with: an amphetamine substance use disorder (OR = 1.84, p <.001), alcohol use disorder (OR = 1.68, p <.001), other substance use disorder (OR = 1.77, p <.001), psychotic diagnoses (OR = 1.17, p =.032), or had a history of self-harm (OR = 1.15, p =.011) were more likely to be a current tobacco smoker. Those who were older (OR = 0.99, p <.001) or diagnosed with a mood disorder (OR = 0.87, p =.018) were less likely to smoke tobacco. Limitations: The study was unable to differentiate between suicide attempts and self-harm self-poisonings. Conclusions: Among a deliberate self-poisoning population those who were younger, diagnosed with a variety of substance use disorders, or had a history of previous self-poisoning were more likely to use tobacco. Those with a mood disorder were less likely to smoke tobacco.

DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2019.09.057
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister, Sean Halpin, Billie Bonevski
2019 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Skelton E, Twyman L, Palazzi K, et al., 'Internet-based programs incorporating behavior change techniques are associated with increased smoking cessation in the general population: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 53 180-195 (2019) [C1]

Background and aims This study aims to (i) examine the effectiveness of internet-based smoking cessation programs; (ii) describe the number and type of behavior change techniques ... [more]

Background and aims This study aims to (i) examine the effectiveness of internet-based smoking cessation programs; (ii) describe the number and type of behavior change techniques (BCTs) employed; and (iii) explore whether BCTs included in internet-based smoking cessation programs are related to program effectiveness. Methods MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials were included if they described the study of a smoking cessation program delivered via the internet; included current adult tobacco smokers from the general population; and were written in English. Random effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions were used to examine program effectiveness (pooled odds ratios, by outcome measure, i.e., 7 day point prevalence abstinence [PPA], 30 day PPA, other abstinence measure) in short- and long-term outcomes, and examine the associations between BCT number and type (individual BCTs and BCT domain) and program effectiveness. Results Results from 45 studies were included (n = 65,736). Intervention effectiveness was found in the short term for all outcome measures (OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.12, 1.50, p = .001), for "prolonged abstinence" (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.09, 1.87, p = .009), and "30 day PPA" (OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.13, 2.72, p = .013). Internet-based programs were effective in the long term for all outcome measures (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.06, 1.35, p = .004) and for "prolonged abstinence" (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19, 1.63, p < .001). On average, interventions used more BCTs than comparison groups (6.6 vs. 3.1, p = .0002). The impact of specific individual BCTs and BCT domains on effectiveness was examined and is reported. Conclusions Internet-based smoking cessation interventions increased the odds of cessation by 29 per cent in the short term and by 19 per cent in the long term. Internet-based smoking cessation intervention development should incorporate BCTs to increase effectiveness. Registration CRD42015014676.

DOI 10.1093/abm/kay026
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12
Co-authors John Attia, Eliza Skelton, Kristen Mccarter, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
2019 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating Smoking Cessation Care into a Medically Supervised Injecting Facility Using an Organizational Change Intervention: A Qualitative Study of Staff and Client Views', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 16 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph16112050
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2019 McCrabb S, Lane C, Hall A, Milat A, Bauman A, Sutherland R, et al., 'Scaling-up evidence-based obesity interventions: A systematic review assessing intervention adaptations and effectiveness and quantifying the scale-up penalty', OBESITY REVIEWS, 20 964-982 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/obr.12845
Citations Scopus - 63Web of Science - 52
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong
2019 McCrabb S, Twyman L, Palazzi K, Guillaumier A, Paul C, Bonevski B, 'A cross sectional survey of internet use among a highly socially disadvantaged population of tobacco smokers', Addiction Science and Clinical Practice, 14 (2019) [C1]

Background: Tobacco smoking is highest among population groups which are the most socially disadvantaged. Internet-based smoking cessation programs have been found to be effective... [more]

Background: Tobacco smoking is highest among population groups which are the most socially disadvantaged. Internet-based smoking cessation programs have been found to be effective, though rates of internet access are not well known in these groups. This study describes the rates of internet use and types of technology used to access the internet by a population of socially disadvantaged smokers. The study also examined relationships between sociodemographic and smoking behaviours with amount of internet use and type of device used. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 369 clients (response rate 77%) from two non-government community service organisations in metropolitan New South Wales, Australia was conducted using touchscreen computers. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to examine results. Results: Eligible participants ranged from 19 to 88 years old current tobacco users. Over half (58%) of the participants reported weekly or more frequent use of the internet with less than a third (28%) not having any access. The odds of using the internet at least weekly decreased with age and as heaviness of smoking increased (OR = 0.94, p < 0.001; OR = 0.81, p = 0.022, respectively). Odds of internet use were higher as income increased (OR = 2.74, p < 0.001 for individuals earning $201-$400 per week; OR = 2.83, p = 0.006 for individuals earning > $400 per week). Device use differed for age and income. Conclusions: Internet-based interventions appear to reach the majority of socially disadvantaged populations. It is expected that this reach will continue to grow, making internet-based interventions a potential platform for providing care to low socioeconomic individuals who smoke, however inequalities may be exacerbated for those individual without internet access. Implications: Internet use among socially disadvantaged tobacco users is moderate (58%). An internet-based smoking cessation intervention for socially disadvantaged tobacco users may be an effective intervention however, older, heavier tobacco users may not benefit as easily due to limited internet access and therefore acknowledging these limitations when developing an intervention can help to acknowledge limitation of intervention reach.

DOI 10.1186/s13722-019-0168-y
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Chris Paul, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2019 Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Spratt NJ, Pollack M, Baker AL, Magin P, et al., 'An online intervention for improving stroke survivors' health-related quality of life: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial', TRIALS, 20 (2019)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-019-3604-0
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Amanda Baker, Clare Collins, Robin Callister, Alexandra Denham, Billie Bonevski, Andrew Searles, Olivia Wynne, Christopher Oldmeadow, Christopher Levi, Parker Magin, Neil Spratt
2019 Denham AMJ, Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Turner A, Baker AL, Spratt NJ, et al., 'Development of an online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors: Prevent 2nd Stroke', BMJ Innovations, 5 35-42 (2019) [C1]

Background Stroke events often result in long-term negative health outcomes. People who experience a first stroke event are 30%-40% more likely to experience a second stroke event... [more]

Background Stroke events often result in long-term negative health outcomes. People who experience a first stroke event are 30%-40% more likely to experience a second stroke event within 5 years. An online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors may help stroke survivors improve their health risk behaviours and lower their risk of a second stroke. Objectives This paper describes the development and early iteration testing of the usability and acceptability of an online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors (Prevent 2nd Stroke, P2S). P2S aims to address six modifiable health risk behaviours of stroke: blood pressure, physical activity, nutrition, depression and anxiety, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Methods P2S was developed as an eight-module online secondary prevention programme for stroke survivors. Modelled on the DoTTI (Design and development, Testing early iterations, Testing for effectiveness, Integration and implementation) framework for the development of online programmes, the following stages were followed during programme development: (1) content development and design; and (2) testing early iteration. The programme was pilot-tested with 15 stroke survivors who assessed P2S on usability and acceptability. Results In stage 1, experts provided input for the content development of P2S. In stage 2, 15 stroke survivors were recruited for usability testing of P2S. They reported high ratings of usability and acceptability of P2S. P2S was generally regarded as easy to use' and relevant to stroke survivors'. Participants also largely agreed that it was appropriate to offer lifestyle advice to stroke survivors through the internet. Conclusions The study found that an online secondary prevention programme was acceptable and easily usable by stroke survivors. The next step is to conduct a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of the programme regarding behaviour change and determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention.

DOI 10.1136/bmjinnov-2017-000257
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Robin Callister, Billie Bonevski, Clare Collins, Parker Magin, Neil Spratt, Christopher Oldmeadow, Alexandra Denham, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Olivia Wynne, Mark Wallis
2019 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Comorbid tobacco and other substance use and symptoms of anxiety and depression among hospitalised orthopaedic trauma patients', BMC PSYCHIATRY, 19 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12888-019-2021-y
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden, John Attia, Amanda Baker
2019 Wolfenden L, Bolsewicz K, Grady A, McCrabb S, Kingsland M, Wiggers J, et al., 'Optimisation: Defining and exploring a concept to enhance the impact of public health initiatives', Health Research Policy and Systems, 17 (2019) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s12961-019-0502-6
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Rebecca Hodder, John Wiggers, Luke Wolfenden, Alice Grady, Nicole Nathan, Rachel Sutherland, John Attia, Alix Hall, Serene Yoong, Rebecca Wyse
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, McCrabb S, Bonevski B, 'Integrating smoking cessation care in alcohol and other drug treatment settings using an organizational change intervention: a systematic review', Addiction, 113 2158-2172 (2018) [C1]

Background and Aims: Organizational change interventions involve systems and cultural change within health-care services to make smoking cessation care delivery part of usual trea... [more]

Background and Aims: Organizational change interventions involve systems and cultural change within health-care services to make smoking cessation care delivery part of usual treatment. Six strategies for organizational change have been proposed. This study examined the evidence for organizational change interventions in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting on: (a) smoking cessation care; and (b) smoking cessation and cessation-related outcomes. Methods: A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and Scopus were searched using keywords and MeSH terms from database inception to 1 June 2018. Interventions were assessed against the six organizational change strategies. Results: Of the 5155 papers identified, 14 publications from seven unique studies were included. Most studies employed four or fewer organizational change strategies. The majority (n¿=¿11) were rated weak to moderate in methodological quality. Nine published papers, four unique studies, examined staff reported provision of smoking cessation care; eight reported an increase, one found no change. Three papers, two unique studies, examined client receipt of care; all found significant increases. Three papers, two unique studies, assessed staff smoking prevalence from pre- to post-intervention. Only one study reported a significant reduction in staff smoking prevalence (35.2 versus 21.8%, P¿=¿0.005). Nine papers, six unique studies, assessed client smoking cessation and smoking-related outcomes. Seven papers reported on client smoking prevalence; two found a significant decrease and five found no change to smoking. Four papers reported on number of cigarettes per day, three found a significant decrease and one found no change. Two papers reported on smoking cessation finding a 10% and a 25% seven-day point prevalence abstinence post-discharge from the AOD service. Conclusions: Organizational change interventions within health-care services to make smoking cessation care delivery part of usual treatment offer promise for increasing smoking cessation care and reducing smoking prevalence.

DOI 10.1111/add.14369
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2018 Wynne O, Guillaumier A, Twyman L, McCrabb S, Denham AMJ, Paul C, et al., 'Signs, fines and compliance officers: A systematic review of strategies for enforcing smoke-free policy', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph15071386
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Olivia Wynne, Alexandra Denham, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul
2018 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating smoking cessation care into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility: An acceptability study', Addictive Behaviors, 84 193-200 (2018) [C1]

Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this population. This study a... [more]

Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) the prevalence of tobacco smoking exceeds 80%; making smoking cessation intervention a priority for this population. This study aims to examine staff and client perspectives from a supervised injecting facility regarding: i) whether an organizational change intervention increased rates of smoking cessation care delivery (pre- to post-intervention); and ii) acceptability of the intervention. Methods: A pre-and-post intervention pilot study in a supervised injecting facility was conducted in Sydney, Australia between July 2014¿December 2015. The intervention employed an organizational change approach and included six components. Cross-sectional samples of staff (pre n = 27, post n = 22) and clients (pre n = 202, post n = 202) completed online surveys pre and post intervention. Results: From pre to post-intervention staff reported smoking cessation practices significantly increased for the provision of verbal advice (30% to 82%; p < 0.001), offer of free or subsidized nicotine replacement therapy (30% to 91%; p < 0.001), referral to a general practitioner (19% to 64%; p = 0.001), and follow-up to check on quit smoking progress (18.5% to 64%; p = 0.001). Significantly more clients reported receiving all smoking cessation strategies post-intervention. Over 85% of staff agreed that it was acceptable to address client smoking as part of usual care and 95% of clients agreed that it was acceptable to be asked by staff about their tobacco smoking. Conclusions: Increasing the provision of smoking cessation care using an organizational change approach is both feasible for staff and acceptable to staff and clients of supervised injecting facilities.

DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.04.001
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Smoking cessation care provision in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services: A cross-sectional survey of staff self-reported practices', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77 101-106 (2017) [C1]

Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client&apos;s smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smokers... [more]

Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client's smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smokers. The aim of this study was to examine Australian AOD program staff report of recommended SCC practices: assessment and recording of smoking status; and the provision of 9 types of SCC. The study also assessed how the decision to provide SCC is made and the AOD program service and AOD staff characteristics associated with the provision of SCC. Methods Between July¿October 2014, treatment staff from 31 Australian AOD services participated in an online cross-sectional survey. In addition, a site contact at each service was interviewed to gather service related data. Results Overall, 362 AOD program staff participated (response rate¿=¿57%) and 62% estimated that client smoking status was recorded for the ¿majority or all¿ of their clients. About a third (33%) reported that they ¿always¿ provide verbal advice to their clients to quit smoking, 18% ¿always¿ offered free or subsidized NRT and 16% ¿always¿ followed-up to check on client quit progress. Thirty percent reported that the decision to provide SCC was made on a client by client basis and 26% offered SCC only when the client requested assistance. Government-managed services, age and gender of AOD program staff were significantly associated with the provision of SCC. Conclusion Most AOD program staff report that smoking status is recorded for the majority of their clients however, the frequency with which SCC practices are delivered is low and the decision to provide care is arbitrary.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.04.003
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2017 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Naylor J, et al., 'Smoke-free recovery from trauma surgery: A pilot trial of an online smoking cessation program for orthopaedic trauma patients', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 1-12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14080847
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden, John Attia
2017 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Who is More Likely to Use the Internet for Health Behavior Change? A Cross-Sectional Survey of Internet Use Among Smokers and Nonsmokers Who Are Orthopedic Trauma Patients.', JMIR Ment Health, 4 e18 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.2196/mental.7435
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh, John Attia, Amanda Baker, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski
2017 McCrabb S, Balogh Z, Baker AL, Harris IA, Attia J, Lott N, et al., 'Development of an online smoking cessation program for use in hospital and following discharge: Smoke-free recovery', BMJ Innovations, 3 115-122 (2017) [C1]

Background Tobacco smoking can have negative health outcomes on recovery from surgery. Although it is recommended best practice to provide patients with advice to quit and follow-... [more]

Background Tobacco smoking can have negative health outcomes on recovery from surgery. Although it is recommended best practice to provide patients with advice to quit and follow-up support, provision of postdischarge support is rare. Developing an online smoking cessation program may help address this gap. Objectives This paper describes the development and pretesting of an online smoking cessation program (smoke-free recovery, SFR) tailored to the orthopaedic trauma population for use while in hospital and post-discharge. Methods Drawing on the DoTTI framework for developing an online program, the following steps were followed for program development: (1) design and development; (2) testing early iteration; (3) testing for effectiveness and (4) integration and implementation. This article describes the first two stages of SFR program development. Results SFR is a 10-module online smoking cessation program tailored for patients with orthopaedic trauma. Of the participants who completed testing early iterations, none reported any difficulties orientating themselves to the program or understanding program content. The main themes were that it was ¿helpful¿, provision of ¿help to quit¿ was low and SFR increased thoughts of ¿staying quit post discharge¿. Conclusions This study found that a theory and evidence-based approach as the basis for an online smoking cessation program for patients with orthopaedic trauma was acceptable to users. A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to examine whether the online smoking cessation program is effective in increasing smoking cessation and how it can be integrated and implemented into hospital practice (stages three and four of the DoTTI framework).

DOI 10.1136/bmjinnov-2016-000126
Citations Scopus - 2
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Eliza Skelton, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker, John Attia, Zsolt Balogh, Mark Wallis, Frans Henskens
2017 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Smoking, Quitting, and the Provision of Smoking Cessation Support: A Survey of Orthopaedic Trauma Patients', Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 31 e255-e262 (2017) [C1]

Objective: This study investigates orthopaedic trauma patients smoking cessation history, intentions to quit, receipt of smoking cessation care during hospital admission, and pati... [more]

Objective: This study investigates orthopaedic trauma patients smoking cessation history, intentions to quit, receipt of smoking cessation care during hospital admission, and patient-related factors associated with receipt of smoking cessation care. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey of orthopaedic trauma patients was conducted in 2 public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Prevalence of smoking and associated variables were described. Logistic regressions were used to examine whether patient characteristics were associated with receipt of smoking cessation care. Results: Eight hundred nineteen patients (response rate 73%) participated. More than 1 in 5 patients (21.8%) were current smokers (n = 175). Of the current smokers, more than half (55.3%) indicated making a quit attempt in the last 12 months and the majority (77.6%) were interested in quitting. More than a third of smokers (37.4%) were not advised to quit; 44.3% did not receive any form of nicotine replacement therapy; and 24.1% reported that they did not receive any of these 3 forms of smoking cessation care during their admission. Provision of care was not related to patient characteristics. Conclusions: The prevalence of smoking among the sample was high. Respondents were interested in quitting; however, the provision of care during admission was low. Smoking cessation interventions need to be developed to increase the provision of care and to promote quit attempts in this Australian population.

DOI 10.1097/BOT.0000000000000872
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, John Attia, Amanda Baker, Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski
2017 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, et al., 'Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document', BMC Public Health, 17 (2017) [C1]

Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study... [more]

Background: Comprehensive smoke-free policy in the alcohol and other drug (AOD) setting provides an opportunity to reduce tobacco related harms among clients and staff. This study aimed to examine within AOD services: staff awareness of their service's smoking policy compared to the written policy document and staff and service factors associated with accurate awareness of a total ban and perceived enforcement of a total ban. Methods: An audit of written tobacco smoking policy documents and an online cross-sectional survey of staff from 31 Australian AOD services. In addition, a contact at each service was interviewed to gather service-related data. Results: Overall, 506 staff participated in the survey (response rate: 57%). Nearly half (46%) perceived their service had a total ban with 54% indicating that this policy was always enforced. Over one-third (37%) reported a partial ban with 48% indicating that this policy was always enforced. The audit of written policies revealed that 19 (61%) services had total bans, 11 (36%) had partial bans and 1 (3%) did not have a written smoking policy. Agreement between staff policy awareness and their service's written policy was moderate (Kappa 0.48) for a total ban and fair (Kappa 0.38) for a partial ban. Age (1 year increase) of staff was associated with higher odds of correctly identifying a total ban at their service. Conclusions: Tobacco smoking within Australian AOD services is mostly regulated by a written policy document. Staff policy awareness was modest and perceived policy enforcement was poor.

DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3968-y
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors A Dunlop, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2017 McCrabb S, Baker AL, Attia J, Balogh ZJ, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Hospital smoke-free policy: Compliance, enforcement, and practices. A staff survey in two large public hospitals in Australia', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14111358
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
Co-authors John Attia, Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers', SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT PREVENTION AND POLICY, 12 (2017) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0106-5
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, A Dunlop, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton
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Conference (9 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2018 McCrabb S, Twyman L, Palazzi K, Guillaumier A, Paul C, Bonevski B, 'Internet use in low SES populations and the potential for an e-health intervention', Newcastle, Australia (2018)
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski
2018 McCrabb S, Baker A, Attia J, Balogh Z, Lott N, Palazzi K, et al., 'Smoke-free policy enforcement, compliance and the provision of smoking cessation care in hospitals', Baltimore, Maryland (2018)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Amanda Baker, Eliza Skelton, Zsolt Balogh
2017 McCrabb S, Attia J, Balogh Z, Naylor J, Harris IA, Doran CM, et al., 'Smoke-Free Recovery from Trauma surgery: A pilot of an online smoking cessation program for orthopaedic trauma patients', Melbourne, Australia (2017)
Co-authors Zsolt Balogh, Eliza Skelton, Luke Wolfenden, Billie Bonevski, John Attia
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS TO INTEGRATING SMOKING CESSATION CARE IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey ME, et al., 'INTEGRATING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE TREATMENT INTO ROUTINE SERVICE DELIVERY IN A MEDICALLY SUPERVISED INJECTING FACILITY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2017)
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Billie Bonevski
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, Jauncey M, et al., 'Integrating tobacco dependence treatment into routine service delivery in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Ashleigh Guillaumier, Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2017 Bonevski B, Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Wood W, et al., 'Barriers and facilitators to integrating smoking cessation care in a medically supervised injecting facility', Melbourne, Vic, Australia (2017)
DOI 10.1111/dar.12613
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis, Eliza Skelton, Ashleigh Guillaumier
2015 McCrabb S, Bonevski B, Baker A, Attia J, Harris IA, Doran CM, et al., 'Smoke-free recovery: A tailored online smoking cessation intervention for orthopaedic trauma patients', Dockside Sydney (2015)
Co-authors Amanda Baker, Billie Bonevski, Luke Wolfenden, John Attia
2015 McCrabb S, Bonevski B, Baker AL, Attia J, 'Active ingredients in tailored online smoking cessation interventions: A systematic review', Dockside Sydney (2015)
Co-authors John Attia, Billie Bonevski, Amanda Baker
Show 6 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 1
Total funding $50,300

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


Highlighted grants and funding

Evidence synthesis Ireland: Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease $50,300

Funding body: National University of Ireland

Funding body National University of Ireland
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Sam McCrabb
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2000283
Type Of Funding C3500 – International Not-for profit
Category 3500
UON Y

20201 grants / $50,300

Evidence synthesis Ireland: Strategies for enhancing the implementation of school-based policies or practices targeting risk factors for chronic disease $50,300

Funding body: National University of Ireland

Funding body National University of Ireland
Project Team Professor Luke Wolfenden, Doctor Sam McCrabb
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2020
Funding Finish 2021
GNo G2000283
Type Of Funding C3500 – International Not-for profit
Category 3500
UON Y
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 36
United Kingdom 6
Canada 3
United States 3
Switzerland 1
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Dr Sam McCrabb

Positions

Methods Editor
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Senior Research Assistant
School of Medicine and Public Health
College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing

Contact Details

Email sam.mccrabb@newcastle.edu.au
Phone 4924 6564
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